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Front of UPI Headquarters, Washington, D.C.
Front of UPI Headquarters, Washington, D.C.

United Press International (UPI) is a global news agency headquartered in the United States filing news in English, Spanish and Arabic. Once one of the three biggest news agencies in the world, with the Associated Press and Reuters, it has dwindled in size and continues to redefine itself. Today, it is owned by News World Communications, which is in turn wholly owned by the Unification Church. Image File history File links External of United Press International building in Washington D.C. File links The following pages link to this file: UPI ... Image File history File links External of United Press International building in Washington D.C. File links The following pages link to this file: UPI ... A news agency is an organization journalists established to supply news reports to organizations in the news trade: newspapers, magazines, and radio and television broadcasters. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Arabic (العربية) is a Semitic language, closely related to Hebrew and Aramaic. ... Associated Press logo This article concerns the news service. ... Reuters (pronounced IPA: ) is a company supplying global financial markets and news media with a range of information products and transactional solutions, including real-time and historical market data, research and analytics, financial trading platforms, investment data and analytics plus news in text, video, graphics and photographs. ... The Unification movement was founded in 1954 by Sun Myung Moon, a Korean minister who fled from North Korea during the Korean War. ...

Contents


Early history

Newspaper publisher E.W. Scripps combined three regional news services (the Publisher's Press Association, Scripps McRae Press Association, and the Scripps News Association) into the United Press Associations, which began service on June 21, 1907. Scripps founded United Press on the principle that there should be no restrictions on who could buy news from a news service. This formula made UP a direct threat to the monopolistic and exclusionary alliances of the major U.S. and European wire services at the time.


UP's announcement on July 15 said: "It is announced that the United Press will not be run on narrow or monopolistic lines, but will seek to give fair and impartial service to all legitimate newspaper publishers in the field." Scripps later said: "I regard my life's greatest service to the people of this country to be the creation of the United Press," because the competition provided by UP prevented the Associated Press from having a monopoly in determining what news was provided to the public.


On May 24, 1958, United Press merged with International News Service, which had been formed in 1909 by newspaper publisher William Randolph Hearst, to become United Press International. UPI, in later 1958, launches the UPI Audio Network, the first wire service radio network. 1958 was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... International News Service was a news agency founded by William Randolph Hearst in 1909. ... 1909 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... William Randolph Hearst William Randolph Hearst (April 29, 1863 – August 14, 1951) was an American newspaper magnate, born in San Francisco, California. ...


Recent history

"In UPI's heyday, 6,000 employees and dozens of bureaus fed hundreds of bulletins per day to 5,000 subscribing news organizations and competed with The Associated Press for front-page space in the world's great dailies. But the beleaguered news agency has lost nearly all of its clients and cachet and hasn't turned a profit since 1961." (Quoted: Brill's Content, April 2001)


UPI was hurt by changes in the modern news business, including the closing of many of America's afternoon newspapers, and was unprofitable for years. It went through seven owners between 1992 and 2000, when it was acquired by News World Communications, owner of the Washington Times. UPI's White House correspondent and most famous reporter, Helen Thomas, resigned in protest of News World Communications' links to the Unification Church. The Washington Times is a daily newspaper published in Washington, D.C.. It was founded in 1982 as a conservative alternative to the Washington Post by members of the controversial Unification Church. ... Helen Thomas (born August 4, 1920) is a news service reporter and dean of the White House press corps. ...


Current UPI Editor of English edition, Martin Walker, a winner of Britain's 'Reporter of the Year' award when he worked for the Guardian, says he has experienced "no editorial pressure from the owners - which very few British newspaper editors can claim in the era of Rupert Murdoch and Conrad Black." Rupert Murdoch Keith Rupert Murdoch (born March 11, 1931), Australian-born American media proprietor, is the major shareholder and managing director of News Corporation, one of the worlds largest and most influential media corporations. ... Conrad Moffat Black, Baron Black of Crossharbour, OC, PC (born August 25, 1944 in Montreal, Quebec), is a Canadian-born British biographer, financier and newspaper magnate. ...


With new investment from News World in its Arabic and Spanish-language services, UPI has been making a comeback. In 2004, UPI won the Clapper Award from the Senate Press Gallery and the Fourth Estate Award for its investigative reporting on the dilapidated 'hospitals' awaiting wounded U.S. soldiers returning from Iraq.


People of UPI

News people who work for UPI are nicknamed "Unipressers." Famous Unipressers from UPI's include journalists Walter Cronkite, David Brinkley, Howard K. Smith, Eric Sevareid, Vernon Scott, Pye Chamberlayne, Frank Bartholomew, Hugh Baillie, Brit Hume and William L. Shirer, who is best remembered today for writing Rise and Fall of the Third Reich and The New York Times' Thomas Friedman. Helen Thomas, who retired after 57 years as UPI's Chief White House Correspondent, was known as the "Dean of the White House Press Corps". Merriman Smith reported first-hand the deaths of two presidents, being in Warm Springs, Georgia when Franklin D. Roosevelt suffered his fatal stroke, and in Dallas, Texas with John F. Kennedy's motorcade when he was shot. His coverage of the assassination won him the Pulitzer Prize. Walter Leland Cronkite Jr. ... David McClure Brinkley (July 10, 1920—June 11, 2003) was an American television newscaster for NBC and later ABC. From 1956 through 1970 he co-anchored the Huntley-Brinkley Report news show with Chet Huntley. ... He also appeared in a number of films, often as himself. ... Arnold Eric Sevareid (November 26, 1912-July 9, 1992) was a CBS journalist from 1939 to 1977. ... Brit Hume (born June 22, 1943) is the managing editor of the Fox News Channel. ... William Lawrence Shirer (February 23, 1904 - December 28, 1993) was an American historian and journalist. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... Thomas L. Friedman (born July 20, 1953) is an American journalist and columnist, presently working as an Op-Ed writer for the New York Times whose column concentrates on foreign affairs. ... Helen Thomas (born August 4, 1920) is a news service reporter and dean of the White House press corps. ... Warm Springs is a city located in Meriwether County, Georgia. ... Order: 32nd President Vice President: John N. Garner Henry A. Wallace Harry S. Truman Term of office: March 4, 1933 – April 12, 1945 Preceded by: Herbert Hoover Succeeded by: Harry S. Truman Date of birth: January 30, 1882 Place of birth: Hyde Park, New York Date of death: April 12... Dallas is one of the ten largest cities in the United States and the heart of the largest metropolitan area in Texas. ... John F. Kennedy The assassination of John F. Kennedy, the thirty-fifth President of the United States, took place on Friday, November 22, 1963, in Dallas, Texas, USA at 12:30 PM Central Standard Time (18:30 UTC). ... Listen to this article · (info) This audio file was created from the revision dated 2005-04-13, and does not reflect subsequent edits to the article. ...


Arnaud de Borchgrave, Newsweek's chief foreign correspondent for 25 years, covering more than 90 countries and 17 wars, is currently UPI Editor-at-Large and began his journalistic career at UPI in 1946. Arnaud de Borchgrave is editor at large of The Washington Times and of United Press International. ... Newsweek Logo Newsweek is a weekly news magazine published in New York City and distributed throughout the United States and Canada. ...


"From its inception, UPI was the underdog, offering young journalists little pay but a lot of opportunity. Time and again, the upstart, pocket-poor wire managed to beat its competition. According to Lucien Carr -- whose pal Jack Kerouac wrote On the Road using a roll of Teletype paper swiped from UPI's office -- "UPI's great virtue was that we were the little guy [that] could screw the AP." Richard Harnett, who spent more than 30 years at UPI, recalls what is often considered its greatest achievement: Merriman Smith's Pulitzer Prize-winning coverage of John F. Kennedy's assassination. "Smith was in the press car....When he heard shots, he called in to the Dallas office and sent a flash bulletin," Harnett says. "The AP reporter started pounding on his shoulder to get to the phone, but Merriman kept it from him." (Quoted - Brill's Content, April 2001) This article needs to be wikified. ... Jack Kerouac (March 12, 1922 – October 21, 1969) was an American novelist, writer, poet, artist, and one of the most prominent members of the Beat Generation. ... On the Road is a novel by Jack Kerouac, published by Viking Press in 1957. ... A teleprinter (teletypewriter, teletype or TTY) is a now largely obsolete electro-mechanical typewriter which can be used to communicate typed messages from point to point through a simple electrical communications channel, often just a pair of wires. ... Associated Press logo This article concerns the news service. ... Listen to this article · (info) This audio file was created from the revision dated 2005-04-13, and does not reflect subsequent edits to the article. ... Order: 35th President Vice President: Lyndon B. Johnson Term of office: January 20, 1961 – November 22, 1963 Preceded by: Dwight D. Eisenhower Succeeded by: Lyndon B. Johnson Date of birth: May 29, 1917 Place of birth: Brookline, Massachusetts Date of death: November 22, 1963 Place of death: Dallas, Texas First...


Milestones

In 1908 UP pioneered the transmission of feature stories and use of reporter bylines. In 1914 Edward Kleinschmidt invented the teletype, which replaced Morse code clickers in delivering news to newspapers. Press critic Oswald Garrison Villard credits United Press with first use of the teletype. 1908 is a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... A byline is the line at the beginning or end of an article in a newspaper, etc, giving the writers name. ... 1914 is a common year starting on Thursday. ... A teleprinter (teletypewriter, teletype or TTY) is a now largely obsolete electro-mechanical typewriter which can be used to communicate typed messages from point to point through a simple electrical communications channel, often just a pair of wires. ... Morse code is a system of representing letters, numbers and punctuation marks by means of a code signal sent intermittently. ...


In the 1920's and 1930's The United Press pioneered its financial wire service and organized the United Feature Syndicate. 1920 is a leap year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar) // Events January January 7 - Forces of Russian White admiral Kolchak surrender in Krasnoyarsk. ... 1930 is a common year starting on Wednesday. ...


Also founded in the 1930's was "Ocean Press" a news service for ocean liners comprised of copy from United Press and later United Press International. This ship-board publication was published by a separate corporate subsidiary of Scripps, but essentially under one roof with UP/UPI at the Daily News Building in New York. The subheadline under the "Ocean Press" logo was: "WORLDWIDE NEWS of UNITED PRESS . . . TRANSMITTED by RADIOMARINE CORPORATION OF AMERICA" ... which appears to have been a subsidiary of RCA. Some mastheads were labeled "UNITED PRESS - RCA NEWS SERVICE." 1930 is a common year starting on Wednesday. ... RCA, formerly an initialism for the Radio Corporation of America, is now a trademark used by two companies for products descended from that common ancestor: Thomson Consumer Electronics, which manufactures RCA-branded televisions, DVD players, video cassette recorders, direct broadcast satellite decoders, camcorders, audio equipment, telephones, and related accessories; and...


In 1935 UP was the first major news service to offer news to broadcasters. 1945 saw it launch the first all-sports wire. 1935 was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1945 was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ...


In 1948 UP Movietone, a newsfilm syndication service, was started with 20th Century-Fox. 1948 is a leap year starting on Thursday (link will take you to calendar). ... Red Fox The foxes comprise 23 species of omnivorous canids, found worldwide. ...


In 1951 United Press offered the first teletypesetter (TTS) service, enabling newspapers to automatically set and justify type from wire transmissions. 1951 was a common year starting on Monday; see its calendar. ...


In 1952 United Press launched the first international television news film service. 1952 was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ...


The 'UPI March' as written and performed by the Cities Services Band of America under the direction of Paul LaValle debuted at the Belasco Theater in New York on Dec. 9, 1952. The UPI March was also played at the coronation of Queen Elizabeth II.


UPI, in 1958, launches the UPI Audio Network, the first wire service radio network. 1958 was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


On April 19, 1979, UPI announced an agreement with Telecomputing Corp. of America to make the UPI world news report available to owners of home computers. Later UPI was the first news service to provide news to dial-up services such as Prodigy, CompuServe and world-wide web search pioneers Yahoo! and Excite April 19 is the 109th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (110th in leap years). ... 1979 is a common year starting on Monday. ... Prodigy Communications Corporation operated a dialup service (a sort of mega-BBS) for home computers in the United States before the advent of the Internet. ... CompuServe, or CIS for short, was the first major commercial online service in the US, dominating the field during the 1980s and remaining a major player through the mid-1990s when it was sidelined by the rise of GUI-based services such as America Online. ... ... Excite Excite is an Internet portal with an included search engine. ...


In 1982 UPI pioneered an eight-level Custom Coding system that allows clients to choose stories based on topic, subtopic and location. Developing one of the first news taxonomies, UPI use of metadata helped define how information was categorized and customized to the user. 1982 is a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Metadata (Greek: meta-+data information), literally data about data, is information that describes another set of data. ...


External links

  • United Press International website
  • Origins and Early History of UPI
  • Downhold Wire
  • Dead Microphone Club - UPI Radio Network
  • UPI's Trail of Tears
  • Rory O'Connor, AlterNet, May 24, 2005, "Toward a 'Faith-Based' Fourth Estate"

  Results from FactBites:
 
University Physicians, Inc. (2517 words)
UPI is a 501(c)(3) corporation established by the Regents of the University of Colorado in 1981 pursuant to Colorado Revised Statutes 23-20-114(2)(a).
UPI is responsible for the billing and collection of fees for the professional services of all SOM faculty physicians and other medical professionals who are members of UPI.
UPI and the SOM are committed to complying with all applicable Federal and State laws and regulations and third-party payer rules governing the billing and collection of fees for professional clinical services.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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