FACTOID # 14: North Carolina has a larger Native American population than North Dakota, South Dakota and Montana combined.
 
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Encyclopedia > UNC Chapel Hill

The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, located in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, is the eleventh-oldest institution of higher education and the oldest public university in the United States. It is known to many as Carolina or simply UNC. It is consistently ranked among the top tier of American Universities in academics and is considered a Public Ivy. Carolina has developed an excellent reputation in many academic fields, and also has a successful and very popular basketball program, which most recently won the 2005 NCAA Tournament. City nickname: The Southern Part of Heaven County Orange County Mayor Kevin C. Foy Area  - Total  - Water 51. ... Nine institutions of higher education, sometimes called Colonial colleges, were founded and chartered in the American Colonies prior to the American Revolution (1775-1783). ... Higher education is education provided by universities and other institutions that award academic degrees, such as university colleges, and liberal arts colleges. ... The term public school has different meanings: In England and Wales, one of a small number of prestigious historic schools open to the public which normally charge fees and are financed by bodies other than the state, commonly as private charitable trusts; here the word public is used much as... A university is an institution of higher education and of research, which grants academic degrees. ... Public Ivy is a term meant to identify a distinct class of public universities offering educational opportunities similar to those found at schools like Columbia, Harvard, Brown, and Dartmouth, but at a much lower cost. ... Basketball Basketball is a ball sport in which two teams of five players each try to score points by throwing a ball through a hoop. ...

University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Image:UNC_SEAL.jpg
© University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill Seal of UNC-CH; I belive this to fit under fair use. ...

Motto: Lux Libertas (Light Liberty)
Chancellor James Moeser
School type Public
Religious affiliation None
Founded 1789
Location Chapel Hill, North Carolina
Enrollment 15,961 undergraduate 10,011 graduate and professional
Faculty 2,601
Endowment Approximately 1 Billion U.S. Dollars.
Campus surroundings Suburban
Campus size 729 acres (3 km²)
Sports teams Tar Heels
Mascot Ramses
Contents

4.1 Student demographics
A motto is a phrase or collection of words intended to describe the motivation or intention of a sociological grouping or organization. ... James Moeser is the current chancellor of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. ... 1789 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... City nickname: The Southern Part of Heaven County Orange County Mayor Kevin C. Foy Area  - Total  - Water 51. ... State nickname: Tar Heel State Other U.S. States Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Governor Michael Easley Official languages English Area 139,509 km² (28th)  - Land 126,256 km²  - Water 13,227 km² (9. ...

History

The University of North Carolina was chartered by the North Carolina General Assembly in 1789. The year of its foundation coincides with the beginning of the French Revolution. Accordingly, Franklin Street in downtown Chapel Hill, which serves as the northern border of the University's campus, is named after the famous eighteenth-century Enlightenment figure Benjamin Franklin. The North Carolina General Assembly is the state legislature of the U.S. state of North Carolina. ... 1789 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... The period of the French Revolution in the history of France covers the years between 1789 and 1799, in which democrats and republicans overthrew the absolute monarchy and the Roman Catholic Church was forced to undergo radical restructuring. ... City nickname: The Southern Part of Heaven County Orange County Mayor Kevin C. Foy Area  - Total  - Water 51. ... Benjamin Franklin by Jean-Baptiste Greuze 1777 For the former mayor of Nepean, see Ben Franklin (politician) Dr. Benjamin Franklin (January 17, 1706 – April 17, 1790) was an American printer, journalist, publisher, author, philanthropist, abolitionist, public servant, scientist, librarian, diplomat, and inventor. ...


The university opened in a single building, which came to be called Old East, and which is still in use as a residence hall. Its cornerstone was laid October 12, 1793, near an Anglican chapel in what therefore became "Chapel Hill, North Carolina." Today, the University celebrates University Day each year on October 12. The first student, Hinton James, arrived on foot from Wilmington, February 12, 1795. He was the only student for two weeks. A halls of residence, British English (almost always halls and not hall) or a residence hall (North American English) is a type of residential accommodation for large numbers of students. ... October 12 is the 285th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (286th in leap years). ... 1793 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... The term Anglican (from the Angles or English) describes those people and churches following the religious traditions developed by the established Church of England. ... For other places called Wilmington, see Wilmington Wilmington is a city located in New Hanover County, North Carolina. ... February 12 is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 1795 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ...


UNC operated as a state university before any other in America. The University of Georgia was chartered in 1785, but did not open its doors until 1801. The College of Charleston opened in 1770, and was chartered in 1785, but was a private school until 1836, when it became a municipal college; it did not join the South Carolina state university system until 1970. The College of William and Mary was founded in 1693, but was a private institution until 1906. Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, was chartered in 1766 and opened in 1771, but did not become the state university until 1956. Which of those schools should be called the oldest state university is a subject of debate; however, UNC is the only public university in the United States that awarded degrees as a public institution in the eighteenth century. The Arch, the gateway to UGAs historic North Campus. ... 1785 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... 1801 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... College of Charleston - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... 1770 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1785 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... 1836 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... State nickname: Palmetto State Other U.S. States Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Governor Mark Sanford Official languages English Area 82,965 km² (40th)  - Land 78,051 km²  - Water 4,915 km² (6%) Population (2000)  - Population {{{2000Pop}}} (26th)  - Density 51. ... 1970 was a common year starting on Thursday. ... College of William and Mary The College of William and Mary in Virginia is a public, liberal-arts university located in Williamsburg, Virginia. ... Events January 11 - Eruption of Mt. ... 1906 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Rutgers University Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey, is located in New Brunswick, Piscataway, Camden and Newark, New Jersey. ... 1766 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1771 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... 1956 was a leap year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In 1932 UNC became one of the three original campuses of the Consolidated University of North Carolina (since 1972 called the University of North Carolina System). In 1963 the Consolidated University was made fully coeducational. As a result, the Woman's College of the University of North Carolina was renamed the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, and the University of North Carolina itself became the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 1932 is a leap year starting on a Friday. ... 1972 was a leap year that started on a Saturday. ... The University of North Carolina, often called the University of North Carolina System to avoid confusion, is a federation of all sixteen public universities in North Carolina. ... 1963 was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... University Seal The University of North Carolina at Greensboro is a public university in Greensboro, North Carolina. ...


Campus

Enlarge
The Old Well, UNC-CH's most recognized landmark.

UNC’s sprawling and well-forested campus is dominated by its two central quads – large yards where it is easy to find a pick up game of frisbee golf. Students mill about in a lowered brick area known as the Pit, often entertained by the Pit Preacher. The Morehead-Patterson Bell Tower, located in the heart of campus, tolls the hour. The Old Well and McCorkle Place at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. ... The Old Well and McCorkle Place at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. ... In architecture a quadrangle, or more colloquially, quad, is a space on a college or university campus usually but not always enclosed on four sides by buildings. ... Disc Golf is a game based on the rules of golf (referred to by disc golfers as ball golf). It uses flying discs which are similar to the Frisbee™, but usually smaller and heavier. ... Gary Birdsong - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ...


The most enduring symbol of the university is the Old Well, a small neoclassical rotunda at the spot of the original well that provided water for the school. It stands at the south end of McCorkle Place, one of two major grassy quads at the north end of campus, between the campus's oldest dorms, Old East and Old West. There is a symbolic drinking fountain (providing city water) at the center of the rotunda so that one can "drink from the old well" as a token of good luck. It is tradition for entering freshman to drink from the well, and the superstition is that if one does this, one will make straight A's for all four years. However, some UNC seniors urinate on the well, and so do some North Carolina State students, so the tradition is widely considered to be a reason to laugh at freshmen. In architecture a quadrangle, or more colloquially, quad, is a space on a college or university campus usually but not always enclosed on four sides by buildings. ... North Carolina State University Seal North Carolina State University is an institution of higher learning located in Raleigh, North Carolina. ...


Organization

UNC is the flagship school in the University of North Carolina system of schools. It has 15 sister institutions. The University of North Carolina, often called the University of North Carolina System to avoid confusion, is a federation of all sixteen public universities in North Carolina. ...


Students

UNC is considered one of the strongest state universities, consistently ranking in the top five among state institutions in national surveys.


Among graduate programs, the School of Information and Library Science, the School of Public Health, the School of Journalism and Mass Communication, the Analytical Chemistry program, and the Kenan Flagler Business School are especially highly regarded.


For undergraduates, the university offers one of the nation's most acclaimed Honors Programs in a public institution.


The university has for decades offered an undergraduate merit scholarship known as the Morehead Scholarship, modeled after the Rhodes Scholarship at Oxford. The scholarship offers tuition, room, and board for four years. The Morehead Scholarship What is the Morehead? The Morehead is a four year full scholarship to the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill by definition, but in reality, it is much more. ... Rhodes House in Oxford The Rhodes Scholarships were created by Englishman Cecil John Rhodes. ... Oxford is a city and local government district in Oxfordshire, England, with a population of 134,248 (2001 census). ...


Also offered is the Robertson Scholarship, an innovative scholarship granting recipients the opportunity to attend both UNC-Chapel Hill and neighboring Duke University. Offered both at UNC and Duke, UNC recipients receive full tuition, room, and living stipends. The Robertson Scholarship is an undergraduate scholarship program created by Julian and Josie Robertson. ... Duke University is a private university located in Durham, North Carolina in the United States. ...


Student demographics

  • Student-faculty ratio: 18:1
  • Classes with fewer than 30 students: 69%
  • Average SAT: 1311
  • Average ACT: 29
  • Campus Size: 729 acres (3 km²)
  • Male-Female ratio: 2:3
  • African American: 9%
  • Asian American: 7%
  • Caucasian: 80%
  • Hispanic: 2%
  • Native American: 0.6%

Sports, clubs, and traditions

As one of the oldest institutions of higher learning in the United States, UNC has developed a long series of traditions associated with its athletics and student organizations. Image:153. ...


Athletics

The school's sports teams are called the Tar Heels and the mascot is the ram. They participate in the NCAA's Division I-A and in the Atlantic Coast Conference. The women's soccer team has won eighteen national championships since 1981, and the men's basketball team has won national championships in 1924, 1957, 1982, 1993, and 2005. From 1961 to 1997 the men's basketball team was coached by Dean Smith, who holds the record (as of 2004) for the most victories by an NCAA Division I men's basketball coach with 879 wins. Roy Williams coached the championship team in 2005, reinforcing his position as one of the all-time notable coaches. Legend has it that the Tar Heel nickname applied to the state and inhabitants of North Carolina--as well as the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s athletic teams--dates back to the Civil War. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often said NC-Double-A) is a voluntary association of about 1200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletics programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... The Atlantic Coast Conference (ACC) is an American college athletic conference, affiliated with the NCAAs Division I, that was founded on May 8, 1953. ... This article lists NCAA Womens soccer championships. ... Dean Edwards Smith (born February 28, 1931 in Emporia, Kansas) was the head coach of the UNC Tar Heels mens basketball team from 1961 to 1997. ... 2004 is a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Roy Williams (born August 1, 1950 in Biltmore, North Carolina) is head coach of the mens basketball at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. ...


In 1994, the University's athletic programs won the Sears Directors Cup 'all-sports national championship' which is awarded for cumulative performance in NCAA competition. Sears Directors Cup - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ...


Notable graduates from the athletic programs include Mia Hamm, Davis Love III, Eddie Pope, Roy Williams, Marion Jones, and many others. Notable athletes from the athletic programs include Michael Jordan, Julius Peppers, Phil Ford, and Rasheed Wallace. Mia Hamm (born Mariel Margret Hamm on March 17, 1972 in Selma, Alabama) is an American soccer player. ... Davis Love III is an American professional golfer who was born in Charlotte, North Carolina on April 13, 1964. ... Eddie Pope (born December 24, 1973, in Greensboro, North Carolina) is a soccer defender, who currently plays for the Real Salt Lake of Major League Soccer and is an important part of the United States national team. ... Roy Williams (born August 1, 1950 in Biltmore, North Carolina) is head coach of the mens basketball at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. ... Marion Jones (born October 12, 1975 in Los Angeles, California) is an American athlete, winner of five medals at the 2000 Summer Olympics. ... Michael Jordan Michael Jeffrey Jordan (born February 17, 1963, in Brooklyn, New York) is a former National Basketball Association player, considered by many to be the greatest basketball player of all time. ... Julius Peppers. ... Rasheed Abdul Wallace (born September 17, 1974 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) is a professional basketball player in the National Basketball Association. ...


Student organizations

Enlarge
"The Pit," a center of student activity at UNC-Chapel Hill. On a typical day, a dozen student organizations will set up tables by or in the Pit. Behind it are the Frank Porter Graham Student Union (left) and the Student Stores. (right).

The Dialectic and Philanthropic Societies[1] (http://www.unc.edu/di_phi), Black Student Movement[2] (http://www.unc.edu/student/orgs/bsm/), and the Campus YMCA[3] (http://campus-y.unc.edu), as well as over 400 other recognized clubs and 48 Greek organizations contribute to a diverse and vibrant student life. A "secret society" known as The Order of Gimghoul exists at the university, which selects or "taps" ten men from the junior class each year and secretly meets at Gimghoul Castle in west Chapel Hill. This castle was constructed from 1924-1926 and is the only bona-fide castle in the state of North Carolina. Many honor societies, such as the Order of the Golden Fleece, the Order of the Grail-Valkyries, and the Order of the Old Well, round out the student body. This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ...


Founded in 1977, WXYC 89.3 FM is UNC's award winning student radio station, broadcasting 24 hours a day, 365 days a year. Though programming is left up the student DJs, WXYC typically plays little heard music from a wide range of genres and eras. On November 7th, 1994 it became the first radio station in the world to broadcast its signal over the internet. WXYC is the student radio station of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. ...


Traditions

Every Halloween is marked by celebration on the UNC-Chapel Hill campus. In recent years, an estimated 70,000 costumed students and onlookers have packed into the mile-long length of Franklin Street abutting campus. Halloween is a holiday celebrated on the night of October 31, usually by children dressing in costumes and going door-to-door collecting candy. ...


The rivalry between UNC and its first opponent, the University of Virginia, has cooled somewhat in recent years. UVA is still referred to by some as "Mr. Jefferson's university to the north," but this rivalry has been largley replaced by rivalries with North Carolina State University, a state institution of similar size with a greater focus on technical sciences; Duke University, whose basketball program has taken off in recent years; and Wake Forest University, a private university in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. It is traditional to exchange pranks with North Carolina State, and to refer to Duke University as "Dook." Duke is now one of North Carolina's greatest rivals; their rivalry in men's basketball is especially intense, with each school being a frequent contender for the national championship. The University of Virginia (also referred to as UVa and often called simply Virginia for short) is a research university in Charlottesville, Virginia. ... North Carolina State University Seal North Carolina State University is an institution of higher learning located in Raleigh, North Carolina. ... Duke University is a private university located in Durham, North Carolina in the United States. ... Wake Forest University is a private university that is located in Winston-Salem, North Carolina and is known for its programs in the liberal arts. ... County Forsyth County, NC Mayor Allen Joines Website Official Website Population 185,776 (2000) Winston-Salem is a city located in Forsyth County, North Carolina. ...


An honor code exists to prosecute students accused of academic and nonacademic offenses against the university community. An honor code is a set of rules or principles governing a community based on a set of rules or ideals that define what constitutes honorable behavior within that comunity. ...


Alumni of note

Jim Beatty (b. ... Lewis Black Lewis Black (born August 30, 1948) is an American stand-up comedian, author, and playwright. ... Erskine Bowles Erskine B. Bowles (born 8 August 1945) is an American businessman and political figure from the U.S. state of North Carolina. ... The White House Chief of Staff is the highest-ranking member of the Executive Office of the President of the United States. ... William Gaston Caperton III (born February 21, 1940) was the governor of West Virginia from 1989 until 1997 and is currently (as of 2003) the president of the College Board, which admisters the nationally-recognized SAT tests. ... Vincent Lamar Carter (born January 26, 1977 in Daytona Beach, Florida) is a professional basketball player for the New Jersey Nets of the National Basketball Association. ... Basketball Basketball is a ball sport in which two teams of five players each try to score points by throwing a ball through a hoop. ... Rick Dees is a radio disc jockey who currently lives in the San Fernando Valley area, near Los Angeles, California, USA. Dees is best known for his syndicated radio show Rick Dees Weekly Top 40 and for the song Disco Duck. Dees was born Rigdon Osmond Dees on March 14... A novelty song is a song, usually in a recorded form, that defies the usual categorisation of music, or may not even be music. ... Categories: People stubs | 1949 births ... Office: U.S. Senator, North Carolina Political party: Democratic Term of office: January 1999 – January 2005 Preceded by: Lauch Faircloth Succeeded by: Richard Burr Date of birth: June 10, 1953 Place of birth: Seneca, South Carolina Marriage: Elizabeth Edwards Johnny Reid John Edwards (born June 10, 1953) is a former... Office: U.S. Senator, North Carolina Political party: Democratic Term of office: January 1999 – January 2005 Preceded by: Lauch Faircloth Succeeded by: Richard Burr Date of birth: June 10, 1953 Place of birth: Seneca, South Carolina Marriage: Elizabeth Edwards Johnny Reid John Edwards (born June 10, 1953) is a former... Seal of the Senate The Senate is one of the two houses of the Congress of the United States, the other being the House of Representatives. ... State nickname: Tar Heel State Other U.S. States Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Governor Michael Easley Official languages English Area 139,509 km² (28th)  - Land 126,256 km²  - Water 13,227 km² (9. ... Samuel James Ervin Jr. ... Seal of the Senate The Senate is one of the two houses of the Congress of the United States, the other being the House of Representatives. ... State nickname: Tar Heel State Other U.S. States Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Governor Michael Easley Official languages English Area 139,509 km² (28th)  - Land 126,256 km²  - Water 13,227 km² (9. ... Louise Fletcher (born July 22, 1934) is an American actress. ... The Academy Award for Best Actress is one of the awards given to people working in the motion picture industry by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences; nominations are made by Academy members who are actors and actresses. ... Peter Gammons (born April 9, 1945) is a sportswriter and media personality. ... Andrew Samuel Andy Griffith (born June 1, 1926) is an American actor, writer and producer from Mount Airy, North Carolina. ... Mia Hamm (born Mariel Margret Hamm on March 17, 1972 in Selma, Alabama) is an American soccer player. ... Allen K. Johnson (born March 1, 1971) is a hurdling athlete and won Olympic Gold in the 110 m hurdles at the 1996 games in Atlanta, Georgia. ... Marion Jones (born October 12, 1975 in Los Angeles, California) is an American athlete, winner of five medals at the 2000 Summer Olympics. ... Athletics, also known as track and field or track and field athletics, is a collection of sport events. ... Michael Jordan Michael Jeffrey Jordan (born February 17, 1963, in Brooklyn, New York) is a former National Basketball Association player, considered by many to be the greatest basketball player of all time. ... Basketball Basketball is a ball sport in which two teams of five players each try to score points by throwing a ball through a hoop. ... Charles Kuralt (10 September 1934 – 4 July 1997) was an award-winning American journalist. ... Howard Little (February 12, 1842-January 7, 1911) was an American artist. ... Davis Love III is an American professional golfer who was born in Charlotte, North Carolina on April 13, 1964. ... Golfer teeing off at the start of a hole Golf is an outdoor game where individual players or teams play a small ball into a hole using various clubs. ... A gay novelist and San Francisco resident, Armistead Maupin (born May 13, 1944 in Washington D.C.) rose to fame for his hexalogy Tales of the City, the first parts of which where initially published as a newspaper serial in the San Francisco Chronicle. ... Oliver (William Oliver Swofford, February 22, 1945–February 13, 2000) was an American pop singer. ... Jack Palance (born Vladimir Palanuik) (born February 18, 1919) is an American actor. ... Julius Peppers. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... Walker Percy (May 28, 1916 - May 10, 1990) was an American author, born in Birmingham, Alabama. ... Order: 11th President Vice President: George M. Dallas Term of office: March 4, 1845 – March 4, 1849 Preceded by: John Tyler Succeeded by: Zachary Taylor Date of birth: November 2, 1795 Place of birth: Mecklenburg County, North Carolina Date of death: June 15, 1849 Place of death: Nashville, Tennessee First... Seal of the President of the United States The President of the United States is the head of state of the United States. ... Terry Sanford Terry Sanford (20 August 1917 – 18 April 1998) was a Southern Democratic politician. ... Seal of the Senate The Senate is one of the two houses of the Congress of the United States, the other being the House of Representatives. ... The Governor of North Carolina is the top executive of the government of the U.S. state of North Carolina. ... State nickname: Tar Heel State Other U.S. States Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Governor Michael Easley Official languages English Area 139,509 km² (28th)  - Land 126,256 km²  - Water 13,227 km² (9. ... Stuart Scott (born 19 July 1965 in Chicago, Illinois) is an American sportscaster. ... Lawrence Julius Taylor (born February 4, 1959, in Williamsburg, Virginia) is a retired Hall of Fame American Football linebacker for the NFL New York Giants. ... Zebulon Baird Vance (May 13, 1830--April 14, 1894) was an American Civil War hero and three-time Governor of North Carolina. ... The Governor of North Carolina is the top executive of the government of the U.S. state of North Carolina. ... Paul David Wellstone (July 21, 1944 – October 25, 2002) was an American politician and two-term U.S. Senator from Minnesota. ... Seal of the Senate The Senate is one of the two houses of the Congress of the United States, the other being the House of Representatives. ... State nickname: North Star State Other U.S. States Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Governor Tim Pawlenty Official languages None Area 225,365 km² (12th)  - Land 206,375 km²  - Water 18,990 km² (8. ... Thomas Clayton Wolfe (October 3, 1900–September 15, 1938) was a famous American novelist. ...

List of University presidents

Presiding Professors of the University of North Carolina

  • David Ker (1794-1796)
  • Charles W. Harris (1796)
  • Joseph Caldwell (1796-1797)
  • James S. Gillespie (1797-1799)
  • Joseph Caldwell (1799-1804)

Presidents of the University of North Carolina

  • Joseph Caldwell (1804-1812)
  • Robert Hett Chapman (1812-1816)
  • Joseph Caldwell (1816-1835)
  • Elisha Mitchell (acting president, February-December 1835)
  • David Lowry Swain (1835-1868)
  • Solomon Pool (1869-1872)

(Presidency vacant 1872-1874) Gov. ...

  • Charles Phillips (chairman of the faculty, 1875-1876)
  • Kemp Plummer Battle (1876-1891)
  • George Tayloe Winston (1891-1896)
  • Edwin Anderson Alderman (1896-1900)
  • Francis Preston Venable (1900-1913)
  • Edward Kidder Graham (acting president, 1913-1914; president, 1914-1918)
  • Marvin Hendrix Stacy (chairman of the faculty, 1918-1919)
  • Harry Woodburn Chase (1919-1930)
  • Frank Porter Graham (1930-1949)

Frank Porter Graham (14 October 1886 - 16 February 1972) was a Democratic U.S. Senator from the state of North Carolina between 1949 and 1950. ...

Chancellors of the University of North Carolina

  • Robert Burton House (dean of administration, 1934-1945; chancellor, 1945-1957)
  • William Brantley Aycock (1957-1963)

Chancellors of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

  • William Brantley Aycock (1963-1964)
  • Paul F. Sharp (1964-1965)
  • J. Carlyle Sitterson (1965-1972)
  • N. Ferebee Taylor (1972-1980)
  • Christopher C. Fordham (1980-1988)
  • Paul Hardin (1988-1995)
  • Michael Hooker (1995-1999)
  • William O. McCoy (acting and interim chancellor, 1999-2000)
  • James Moeser (2000- )

External links


Schools of the University of North Carolina System:

Appalachian | East Carolina | Elizabeth City | Fayetteville | NC A&T
NC Central | NC School of the Arts | NC State | UNC-Asheville | UNC-Chapel Hill
UNC-Charlotte | UNC-Greensboro | UNC-Pembroke | UNC-Wilmington
Western Carolina | Winston-Salem | NC School of Science and Math The University of North Carolina, often called the University of North Carolina System to avoid confusion, is a federation of all sixteen public universities in North Carolina. ... Appalachian State University is the sixth-largest university in the system of the University of North Carolina. ... East Carolina University (ECU) is a public university located in Greenville, North Carolina. ... Elizabeth City State University (ECSU) is an institution of higher learning located in Elizabeth City, North Carolina. ... Fayetteville State University is a four-year university located in Fayetteville, North Carolina. ... North Carolina Agricultural and Technical State University (NC A&T) is a four-year university located in Greensboro, North Carolina. ... North Carolina Central University (NCCU) is a historically black college located in Durham, North Carolina. ... The North Carolina School of the Arts is an internationally recognized conservatory of the performing arts located in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. ... North Carolina State University Seal North Carolina State University is an institution of higher learning located in Raleigh, North Carolina. ... The University of North Carolina at Asheville is a public university in Asheville, North Carolina. ... The University of North Carolina at Charlotte is a public university located in Charlotte, North Carolina. ... University Seal The University of North Carolina at Greensboro is a public university in Greensboro, North Carolina. ... The University of North Carolina at Pembroke is a public university in Pembroke, North Carolina. ... The University of North Carolina at Wilmington is a public university located in Wilmington, North Carolina. ... Western Carolina University was founded in August 1889 as a semi-public school. ... Winston-Salem State University is a four-year university located in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. ... The North Carolina School of Science and Mathematics (NCSSM) is a two-year, public residential high school located in Durham, North Carolina. ...



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