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Encyclopedia > UN Security Council Resolution 1701
 This article documents a current event.
Information may change rapidly as the event progresses.

United Nations Security Council Resolution 1701 is a resolution intended to resolve the 2006 Israel-Lebanon conflict. Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... A United Nations resolution (or UN resolution) is a decision of a United Nations (UN) bodies. ... Combatants Hezbollah Israel Commanders Hassan Nasrallah (Secretary General) Dan Halutz (CoS) Moshe Kaplinsky[5] Udi Adam (Regional) Strength 1,000-10,000[2] militants 30,000 ground troops [6] (plus IAF & ISC) Casualties Hezbollah militia:  Dead:    Hezbollah: 74[3]    IDF: 540[4]  Captured: 21 Allied militia:   Amal: 17[3]   LCP...


It was unanimously approved by the United Nations Security Council on 11 August 2006. The Lebanese cabinet, which includes two members of Hezbollah, unanimously approved the Resolution on 12 August 2006. The same day, Hezbollah leader Hassan Nasrallah said that his militia would honor the call for a cease-fire. He also said that once the Israeli offensive stops, Hezbollah's rocket attacks on Israel would stop. On 13 August the Israeli Cabinet voted 24-0 in favor of the resolution, with one abstention. The UN-brokered cease-fire began on Monday, 14 August 2006 at 8:00 AM local time, after increased attacks by both sides. The United Nations Security Council (UNSC) is the organ of the United Nations charged with maintaining peace and security among nations. ... August 11 is the 223rd day of the year (224th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Hezbollah flag For other uses, see Hezbollah (disambiguation). ... August 12 is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... August 13 is the 225th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (226th in leap years), with 140 days remaining. ... August 14 is the 226th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (227th in leap years), with 139 days remaining. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

Contents


The Resolution

The Resolution demands:[1]

  • Full cessation of hostilities (OP1)
  • Israel to withdraw all of its forces from Lebanon in parallel with Lebanese and UNIFIL soldiers deploying throughout the South (OP2)
  • Hezbollah to be disarmed (OP3)
  • Full control of Lebanon by the government of Lebanon (OP3)
  • No paramilitary forces, including (and implying) Hezbollah, will be south of the Litani River (OP8).

The Resolution at the same time also emphasizes:[1] DAF YP 408 from UNIFIL The United Nations Interim Force In Lebanon, or UNIFIL, was created by the United Nations, with the adoption of Security Council Resolution 425 and 426 on 19 March 1978, to confirm Israeli withdrawal from Lebanon (following its incursion a few days earlier in Operation Litani... The Litani River in red The Litani River (Arabic: نهر الليطاني; transliterated: Nahr al-Lytany) is an important waterway in southern Lebanon. ...

  • The need to address urgently the unconditional release of the abducted Israeli soldiers, that have given rise to the current crisis.

Disarmament of Armed Groups in Lebanon

The Resolution calls for "full implementation of the relevant provisions of the Taif Accords, and of resolutions 1559 (2004) and 1680 (2006), that require the disarmament of all armed groups in Lebanon, so that, pursuant to the Lebanese cabinet decision of July 27, 2006, there will be no weapons or authority in Lebanon other than that of the Lebanese state."


Hezbollah

Nevertheless, shortly after the resolution was adopted Hezbollah said that it was not in favor of being disarmed, Lebanon said that it would not disarm Hezbollah, and the UN indicated it also would not disarm Hezbollah.


On August 14, Hezbollah Secretary General Hassan Nasrallah said on Hezbollah's Al-Manar TV that he is not in favor of Hezbollah's disarmament, since the Lebanese army is not strong enough to defend Lebanon and the Israeli army is still occupying Lebanon, [2] and that his fighters would not be forced to disarm by "intimidation or pressure."[3] Along the same lines, on August 16, 2006, senior Hezbollah official Hassan Fadlallah stated that the issue of his organization's disarmament was not on the agenda.[4] August 14 is the 226th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (227th in leap years), with 139 days remaining. ... Al-Manar logo Al Manar (المنار; Arabic for Beacon) is the television station of the controversial Lebanese organization Hezbollah. ...


Similarly, after adoption of the resolution Lebanese Defence Minister Elias Murr said on August 14, 2006, in a television interview that "the army won't be deployed to south Lebanon to disarm Hezbollah." Elias Murr is the outgoing Lebanese Defense Minister. ...


As for the UN, Annan asserted that "dismantling Hizbullah is not the direct mandate of the UN," which could only help Lebanon disarm the organization.[5]


Anan then said on August 25, 2006, that as to the disarmament of Hezbollah in Lebanon, "The understanding was that it would be the Lebanese who would disarm [Hezbollah]. I think it is also generally accepted that the disarmament of Hezbollah cannot be done by force. It has to be a political agreement between the Lebanese; there has to be a Lebanese consensus and an agreement among them to disarm. In fact, before the war, this issue was part of a national dialogue going on in Lebanon; I hope they will return to it in earnest. Obviously, if at some stage they need advice or some help from the international community and they were to approach us, we would consider it, but the troops are not going in there to disarm." [7]


Israel, for its part, has indicated that if Hezbollah is not disarmed, as called for in the Resolution, Israel will resume operations in Lebanon.[6]


Hezbollah has agreed to disarm its forces south of the Litani River, but will not pull its forces out of southern Lebanon where its members live. "Hezbollah individuals are people who live in the south and they will not leave their homes and villages, but an armed Hezbollah will not be in the south," said Mohamad Chatah on August 16, a senior adviser to Lebanese Prime Minister Fouad Siniora. UN Resolution 1701 prohibits all armed militias from operating anywhere in all of Lebanon ("no weapons or authority in Lebanon other than that of the Lebanese state" and "full implementation of the relevant provisions of the Taif Accords, and of resolutions 1559 and 1680, that require the disarmament of all armed groups in Lebanon, so that, pursuant to the Lebanese cabinet decision of 27 July 2006, there will be no weapons or authority in Lebanon other than that of the Lebanese State"), but does not specify whether the militias should disarm or be put under the control of the Lebanese government. Hezbollah and the Lebanese government seem to understand this as pertaining only to southern Lebanon, and as such seem to be reserving the right merely to have Hezbollah armed forces pull out of southern Lebanon. UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan will send two envoys to Israel and Lebanon to follow up on the implementation of the cease-fire resolution, the UN announced. Annan met with Israeli Foreign Minister Tzipi Livni, who said she discussed Israel's desire for a mixed force of troops from European and Muslim nations. She said Israel fully supports the U.N.-brokered cease-fire with Hezbollah and that the "ball is now in the court of the government of Lebanon" to ensure no armed militias operate in southern Lebanon.[7] Tzipi Livni, Israeli Foreign Minister Tzipora (Tzipi) Livni (Hebrew: ציפי לבני) (born July 5, 1958) is a senior Israeli politician currently serving as Foreign Affairs Minister, with the recently added title of Vice Prime Minister. ...


Israeli Foreign Ministry spokesman Mark Regev told Associated Press on August 18 that Israel is keeping its commitments in the U.N. cease-fire resolution and expects Lebanon to do the same. "That resolution clearly calls for the creation of a Hezbollah-free zone south of the Litani River, and anything less would mean that the resolution is not being implemented," Regev told AP.[8] Mark Regev is the Spokesman of the Israel Ministry of Foreign Affairs. ... The Litani River in red The Litani River (Arabic: نهر الليطاني; transliterated: Nahr al-Lytany) is an important waterway in southern Lebanon. ...


"The cease-fire is based on U.N. resolution 1701 which calls for an international arms embargo against Hezbollah," Israeli Foreign Ministry spokesman Mark Regev said on August 19. "In the absence of that presence, arms transfers to Hezbollah are a clear violation of 1701 and Israel is entitled to respond. When the international forces and the Lebanese Army are enforcing the embargo, Israeli action becomes superfluous."[9]


On August 21, the Turkish newspaper Hurriyet reported that Turkish authorities intercepted five Iranian cargo aircraft and one Syrian aircraft carrying missiles to Hezbollah. The aircraft were forced to land at Diyarbakir Airport in southeastern Turkey. The aircraft were not allowed to take off after US intelligence sources found there were three missile launchers and crates of C-802 missiles on board the planes which were identical to the missile that struck the Israeli Navy Ship "Hanit" during the war. Israeli Defense Minister Amir Peretz said that Israel would continue to prevent weapons from reaching Hezbollah from Syria and Iran. "I will not allow the situation that happened before the war to return," said Peretz during a meeting with Turkish Foreign Minister Abdullah Gul. He also asked that Turkey send troops to the international force deploying in Lebanon.[10] August 21 is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... Diyarbakir (Syriac: ܐܡܝܕ; Greek: Amida; Turkish spelling: Diyarbakır) is a city in Turkey, situated on the banks of the River Tigris. ... The Ying Ji-82 (NATO reporting name CSS-N-8 Saccade) is a Chinese anti-ship missile developed by the China Hai-Ying Electro-Mechanical Technology Academy (CHETA), also known as the CASIC 3rd Academy. ... Amir Peretz, MK, Chairman of the Israel Labour Party Amir Peretz (Hebrew: עמיר פרץ; Arabic: عمير بيريتس; born March 9, 1952) is an Israeli politician and Defense Minister of Israel. ... A minister for foreign affairs, or foreign minister, is a cabinet minister who helps form the governmental foreign policy of a sovereign nation. ...


Fatah

The Lebanese government did, however, demand that Palestinians in refugee camps in the Litani area disarm in accordance with the Resolution, senior Fatah operative in Lebanon, Monir Al-Makdah, said on August 28, 2006. Reportedly, Lebanese Prime Minister Saniora made the request to Fatah representative in Lebanon, Abbas Za'aki. Al-Makdah rejected the demand in an interview with Jordanian newspaper Al-Dostur, saying that the Security Council resolution was illegal since it did not include the right of return for Palestinian refugees.[8] Fatah (Arabic: فتح); a reverse acronym from the Arabic name Harakat al-Tahrir al-Watani al-Filastini (literally: Palestinian National Liberation Movement) is a major Palestinian political party and the largest organization in the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO), a multi-party confederation. ...


New UN troops -- UNIFIL II

As of June 30, 2006, UNIFIL was made up of 1,990 troops from China, France, Ghana, India, Ireland, Italy, Poland, and the Ukraine, supported by 50 military observers from UN Truce Supervision Organization and about 400 civilian staff members.


Several countries have been reported as willing to send UNIFIL II troops to Lebanon. They include Italy (3,000) -- which will be in command of the mission after February 2007, France (2,000) -- which will be in command of the mission until February 2007, Germany (1,200, and surveillance ships and planes), Spain (1,200, and armored vehicles), Turkey (1,000), Nepal (850), Poland (800), a Nordic force (Finland (250), Sweden, and Norway (100, and a ship)) (6-700, and warships), Belgium (400), Denmark (150, and warships), Portugal (140; military construction engineers), and Slovenia (10-20) .[9] 2007 (MMVII) will be a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2007 (MMVII) will be a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Nordic countries (Greenland not shown) The Nordic countries is a term used collectively for five countries in Northern Europe. ...


Other countries have been reported as willing to send troops, but have not shared troop numbers. They include: Australia, Bulgaria, China, Greece, Luxembourg, Lithuania, Morocco, New Zealand, Russia, and Thailand. [11][12][13][14][15].[16].[17] [18]


India, at the same time, is considering withdrawing it current peacekeeping forces from southern Lebanon. [10]


Britain: technical aid and equipment Denmark: three ships Germany: is to send their navies to patrol Lebanon's Mediterranean coast Greece: will provide a frigate, helicopter and Special Forces


Deployment of UNIFIL II

The Resolution, in Paragraph 2, "calls upon the Government of Lebanon and UNIFIL as authorized by paragraph 11 to deploy their forces together throughout the South."


Paragraph 11 then states that Security Council decided: "that the [UNIFIL II] force shall, in addition to carrying out its mandate under resolutions 425 and 426 (1978): ... (b) Accompany and support the Lebanese armed forces as they deploy throughout the South, including along the Blue Line ... (c) Coordinate its activities related to paragraph 11(b) with the Government of Lebanon and the Government of Israel ...."


Complicating matters, Syria threatened to close the Lebanese/Syrian border -- Lebanon's only land outlet -- if UN troops are sent there.


Syrian President Bashar al-Assad also warned that deploying foreign troops along the border would be a “hostile” act against Syria.


"At the moment we are seeing some very unconstructive signals from Syria," Germany's Merkel said. [11] Merkel may refer to: the town of Merkel, Texas to any of the following people: Angela Merkel, German Chancellor Friedrich Sigmund Merkel, German anatomist Gustav Merkel, composer Jim Merkel, American author and engineer Tess Merkel, member of the Swedish band Alcazar Una Merkel, the American actress or to: Merkel cells...


As to the UN's position, however, Anan advanced the view afterward that the resolution did not require the UN to deploy UNIFIL II anywhere unless invited to do so by the Lebanese government. He said on August 25, however: "the resolution does not require deployment of UN troops to the [Syria]n border. It indicates that, if the Lebanese government were to ask for it, we should assist. The Lebanese Government has not made any such request." [12]


Israeli commando raid

Following a commando raid by Israel on a Hezbollah stronghold in eastern Lebanon on August 19, 2006, Siniora called the operation 'a naked violation of the cessation of hostilities declared by the Security Council.' [19] In a statement attributable to the Spokesman of Kofi Anan the actions were described as 'a violation by the Israeli side of the cessation of hostilities as laid out in Security Council resolution 1701. According to UNIFIL, there have also been several air violations by Israeli military aircraft.'[20] Israel said the attack was defensive, designed to disrupt weapons supplies to Hezbollah from Syria and Iran.[19]


It should be noted that one of the requirements of the agreement is that Hezbollah must disarm. If it where true that Hizbollah is in fact re-arming, that fact in and of itself would constitute a breach of the cease fire. Supporters of Israel point out that it is not fair to only criticize Israel for breaches of the agreement.


In addition, one of the requirements is the return of the kidnapped Israeli soldiers. Without their return, many are of the opinion that Resolution 1701 has no bearing.


Full text

For the full text of the resolution, see Wikisource: United Nations Security Council Resolution 1701


Background

This resolution was based on an initial draft prepared by France and the United States. The draft resolution was strongly criticized by Lebanon and the Arab League for not requiring Israel to withdraw from southern Lebanon, and for allowing Israel to continue "defensive operations," as Israel had asserted that the confrontation was a "defensive operation." Lebanon and the Arab League pressed to have parts of the Siniora Plan included in the final resolution. Flag of the League of Arab States The Arab League or League of Arab States (Arabic: جامعة الدول العربية), is an organization of Arab states (compare Arab world). ... Southern Lebanon is the geographical area of Lebanon composed of two Governates: the South Lebanon Governate and the Nabatiyeh Governate. ... now. ...


The resolution emphasizes the need to address urgently the unconditional release of the abducted Israeli soldiers, but does not call for immediate return of Lebanese prisoners.


August 6th-7th

Lebanon's Prime Minister Fouad Siniora said on August 6th that the draft resolution was "not adequate," and House Speaker Nabih Berri, who served as a diplomatic conduit for Hezbollah, rejected the draft. The draft resolution made no mention of a withdrawal of Israeli forces from Lebanon. [21] Sir Robert Walpole, the first Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. ... Fouad Siniora Fouad Siniora (alternative spellings: Fuad Siniora, Fouad Seniora) is the Prime Minister of Lebanon, a position he assumed on 19 July 2005, succeeding Najib Mikati. ... Nabih Berri Nabih Berri (born January 28, 1938) is the speaker of the Lebanese National Assembly. ...


Lebanon proposed changes to the draft resolution on August 7th. Lebanon's government agreed to dispatch 15,000 troops to its southern border if Israeli troops would leave the country, handing over their positions to the UN Interim Force as they withdrew. UNIFIL then would hand over control to Lebanese forces within 72 hours and help them deploy, according to a draft Lebanese plan. And Lebanese troops would ensure "total respect of the cessation of hostilities in the area.[22]The draft UN resolution called for "the immediate cessation by Hezbollah of all attacks and the immediate cessation by Israel of all offensive military operations." A second resolution would later establish an international peacekeeping force that would help Lebanon's army take control of the country's southern border, where Hezbollah had held sway since the Israeli withdrawal in 2000.[23] This article is about the year 2000. ...


The most significant changes were that the final resolution was not based on Chapter 7, which authorizes use of force and sanctions; that the Lebanese Army forces were to have a major role in southern Lebanon; that the peacekeeping force would not be an entirely new force with a new mandate, but based on strengthening the existing UNIFIL force with additonal troops, consisting of up to 15,000 soldiers; and that the call for return of Israeli soldiers was moved from the operational section to the preamble. The Lebanese Armed Forces (LAF) consists of three branches: Lebanese Army Lebanese Air Force Lebanese Navy // General overview The Lebanese Armed Forces primary missions include maintaining security and stability in the country, guarding the countrys borders, port security, relief operations, rescue operations, fire fighting, and fighting drug smuggling. ... DAF YP 408 from UNIFIL The United Nations Interim Force In Lebanon, or UNIFIL, was created by the United Nations, with the adoption of Security Council Resolution 425 and 426 on 19 March 1978, to confirm Israeli withdrawal from Lebanon (following its incursion a few days earlier in Operation Litani...


The resolution stated that Israeli forces shall withdraw in parallel with the deployment of Lebanese and UNIFIL forces into the southern Lebanon, and established that the Lebanese government should have control over all Lebanese territory, and that "there will be no weapons without the consent of the government of Lebanon and no authority other than that of the government of Lebanon."


August 8th

On August 8th, a delegation from the Arab League met with representatives of the UN, France, and the US. As a result, several changes were made to the proposal. Lebanon and its Arab League allies pressed the UN to call for an immediate Israeli withdrawal. Such a withdrawal had not been mentioned in the draft resolution; an omission that Lebanon's government and Arab League diplomats called unacceptable. Lebanese Prime Minister Siniora's Cabinet, which included two ministers from Hezbollah, made its decision on troop deployment unanimously, ministers said. The deployment of Lebanese national troops to the south was part of the US- and French-backed peace plan under discussion at the UN. The August 7th proposal did not call for Hezbollah to disarm, but the Cabinet said it would allow only Lebanese government troops and UN peacekeepers to operate south of the Litani River, Finance Minister Jihad Azour said. Lebanon preferred a single resolution that would deal with a cease-fire and all of the political issues, rather than a 2-phase approach that the Lebanese Embassy's charge d'affaires in Washington, Carla Jazzar, said would give Hezbollah a pretext to continue fighting. The Lebanese proposal called for Israel to hand over the disputed territory of Shebaa Farms to the UN, "pending delineation of the border." And it would bolster UNIFIL rather than create a new peacekeeping force with more robust rules of engagement.[24] Shebaa Farms is a disputed, agricultural area consisting of a dozen or more abandoned farms located southwest of Shebaa, a Lebanese village on the northwestern slopes of Mount Hermon, at the junction of Syria, Lebanon and Israel. ...


August 9th

"It is time to bring this conflict to an end," said Dan Gillerman, Israel's Ambassador to the UN, on August 9th. "But speeches and resolutions do not themselves end conflicts. Neither do good intentions. Conflicts are ended by actions, not by words. They are ended when those who sparked the conflict and those who seek to continue to threaten the region are confronted and overcome. We will leave, and we will be happy to withdraw the minute the area has been stabilized, the minute the international presence will make sure that the Hezbollah has been removed and disarmed." Gillerman also said he had problems with the idea of a UN force being deployed to stabilize the region, and pointed to the UN Interim Force in Lebanon as an example. "This interim period has lasted 28 years," he said. "It's an interesting timeframe for an interim force. During that time it has been totally incompetent, impotent, in preventing any terror attacks against Israel." Israel's Security Cabinet recommended that the Israeli military expand its campaign against Hezbollah in southern Lebanon. Cabinet Minister Eli Yishai told The Associated Press the proposed operation was expected to take 30 days, although a UN cease-fire resolution was expected before then. The plan would go into effect once formally approved by Israel's Prime Minister Ehud Olmert and Defense Minister Amir Peretz, according to a statement from Olmert's office. The ministers were expected to sign off quickly on the plan, but the Associated Press, citing an Israeli Security Cabinet minister, reported Israel's offensive would not begin for two or three days to allow time for further UN debate on a cease-fire resolution.[24] Dan Gillerman (born in Israel in 1944) is the 13th Israels Permanent Representative to the United Nations. ... Eliyahu (Eli) Yishai (in Hebrew אליהו (אלי) ישי) (born December 26, 1962) is the leader of the Haredi Sephardi Shas party in Israel. ... Associated Press logo This article concerns the news service. ... Ehud Olmert (IPA ; Hebrew: אהוד אולמרט; born September 30, 1945) is the 12th and current Prime Minister of Israel. ... Amir Peretz, MK, Chairman of the Israel Labour Party Amir Peretz (Hebrew: עמיר פרץ; Arabic: عمير بيريتس; born March 9, 1952) is an Israeli politician and Defense Minister of Israel. ... Associated Press logo The Associated Press, or AP, is an American news agency, the worlds largest such organization. ...


Also on August 9th, a Bush administration official said the White House is "sympathetic" to the concerns raised by an Arab delegation. But the official said, "We want a final product that has a reasonable chance of success." The US is concerned the Lebanese army will be not able or willing to stop the resupply of Hezbollah and is not convinced that a bolstered UN peacekeeping force could do the job either. The official added that Israel has "even stronger" views. Nonetheless, the US-backed draft resolution called for an international peacekeeping force. Meanwhile, diplomats still hoped for a vote on August 10 on the UN resolution aimed at ending the conflict, but an Arab-backed proposal that called for a full Israeli withdrawal threatened to tip "a very delicate balance" and set the process back again, a Bush administration official said. Senior White House officials said it did not appear likely that a vote would come August 10 on the resolution. The US warned both sides against enlarging the conflict. "The escalation is something that we do not want to see," White House spokesman Tony Snow said. "But also, you have to have a resolution that addresses the root cause of Hezbollah, has a practical solution to making sure that the Lebanese government will be able to have military and political control of the south." The US and France were trying to agree on certain segments of a revised draft, officials said. There was also some disagreement on the timing of a deployment of Lebanese and UN troops to the region. The US says it was pushing for "flexibility" so Israel can monitor the deployment before pulling out, a position the Israelis favor. "Everybody wants to see that the deployment of 15,000 Lebanese troops to the border used to transform the situation in the region, which means fundamentally that we don't want Hezbollah to reinfiltrate the southern part of Lebanon," said US Ambassador to the UN John R. Bolton.[25] The Bush administration includes President George W. Bush, Vice President Richard Cheney, Bushs Cabinet, and other select officials and advisors. ... John R. Bolton John Robert Bolton (born November 20, 1948) is an American diplomat, serving currently as the interim U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations. ...


August 10th-11th

United Nations Secretary-General Kofi Annan pushed the Security Council to come up with a plan by week's end, August 12 to August 13, for ending the conflict. "The secretary-general believes that it ought to be possible for the Security Council to adopt a resolution by the end of the week," his office said.[26] The United Nations Secretary-General is the head of the Secretariat, one of the principal divisions of the United Nations. ... Kofi Atta Annan (born April 8, 1938) is a Ghanaian diplomat and the seventh and current Secretary-General of the United Nations. ...


Israeli PM Olmert ordered the Israeli army to prepare to expand its ground offensive longer inside Lebanon[27] under the belief that the UN resolution did not satisfy Israeli security concerns, Olmert's spokesman, Asaf Shariv, told the Associated Press on August 11th. But even as Israeli forces massed along the border with Lebanon, Israeli Foreign Ministry spokesman Mark Regev told AP that Israel was still open to a negotiated solution. "Our action does not exclude a diplomatic option. On the contrary, we are following developments in New York closely," he said. Associated Press logo The Associated Press, or AP, is an American news agency, the worlds largest such organization. ...


In Beirut, sources close to the negotiations said the deal of France and the US with the UN would create a 400-square-mile zone inside Lebanon from which Hezbollah militia would be excluded. Lebanese government officials, cited by AP, said Siniora was studying the deal and contacting politicians in his country for their input. Diplomats at the UN and in Beirut stepped up efforts to secure a UN resolution.


US Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice headed to the UN to push for a vote at the Security Council, a senior State Department official said. "There is still work to be done, and the secretary will work to close the remaining items," the official said.[28] Condoleezza Rice (born November 14, 1954) is the 66th and current United States Secretary of State, and the second in the administration of President George W. Bush. ... The United States Department of State, often referred to as the State Department, is the Cabinet-level foreign affairs agency of the United States government, equivalent to foreign ministries in other countries. ...


August 12th

Despite the expanded ground campaign, the Israeli Security Cabinet was likely to sign off on the UN resolution at its meeting on August 13, Israel's Ambassador to the US, Daniel Ayalon, said before the Council vote. "I do not want to pre-empt the Cabinet decision, but the language as I see it now -- and I'm being careful -- if the language of the resolution doesn't change, I view this resolution very positively and, of course, the crux is implementation," Ayalon said. "If this resolution will be enforced, then we solve the problem of Lebanon."[29] Daniel (Danny) Ayalon (Hebrew דניאל איילון) (born 1955) is the Israeli Ambassador to the United States. ...


A final text of the resolution was distributed to the full UN Security Council by the US and France in a closed-door session. Under the draft resolution, the UN troops in the area would be joined by 15,000 Lebanese troops.[28]Before the vote, Annan said he "wholeheartedly" welcomed the resolution, but he chastised the Council for not acting sooner. "I would be remiss if I did not tell you how profoundly disappointed I am that the council did not reach this point much, much earlier," Annan said. "All members of this council must be aware that its inability to act sooner has badly shaken the world's faith in its authority and integrity."[29]


The UN resolution was unanimously accepted by the Security Council. The resolution, drawn up by France and the US, demands a full cessation of all hostilities and the release of abducted Israeli soldiers. Annan said he will work with both governments to decide on the exact date and time for a ceasefire. The resolution also authorises the deployment of 15,000 international troops to police the Lebanon-Israel border -- an increase from the then-current 2,000.[30]The deal also calls for the release of two Israeli soldiers whose capture by guerrillas sparked the conflict that killed nearly 1,000 people.[29]It lays the groundwork for a more permanent cease-fire agreement.[31]


Tzipi Livni, Israel’s foreign minister, insisted that Israeli troops would remain in southern Lebanon until a multinational UN force is deployed, implying that deployment of Lebanese forces would not be sufficient for Israeli withdrawal. [32] Tzipi Livni, Israeli Foreign Minister Tzipora (Tzipi) Livni (Hebrew: ציפי לבני) (born July 5, 1958) is a senior Israeli politician currently serving as Foreign Affairs Minister, with the recently added title of Vice Prime Minister. ...


Initial reactions

Leaders around the world praised the agreement, while noting this was not the end of the crisis.[33]


The Lebanese cabinet voted unanimously to accept the terms on 12 August. August 12 is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ...


Nasrallah, in a speech televised on Hezbollah's Al-Manar television on 12 August, said: "We will not be an obstacle to any decision taken by the Lebanese government".[34] August 12 is the 224th day of the year (225th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ...


The Israeli government accepted the terms on 13 August, but did not cease offensive actions until its deadline at 8:00 a.m. (local time) 14 August. On 13 August, Israel advanced to capture as much high-ground territory as possible before the ceasefire, and bombed targets up to 15 minutes before the deadline. Hezbollah also continued what they called "defensive operations," and vowed not to cease their operations as long as Israel occupies Lebanon. [35] Hezbollah launched 250 rockets into Israel, the most since the war began. Hezbollah and the IDF fought the fiercest engagements of the conflict; 32 Israeli soldiers were killed, but Hezbollah did not release any casualty numbers.[citation needed] August 13 is the 225th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (226th in leap years), with 140 days remaining. ... August 14 is the 226th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (227th in leap years), with 139 days remaining. ... August 13 is the 225th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (226th in leap years), with 140 days remaining. ...


The French government criticized the rules of engagement. "I remember the unhappy experiences of other operations where UN forces had neither a sufficiently precise mission nor the means to act," French Defence Minister, Michèle Alliot-Marie, said. "You cannot send out men and tell them that they should watch what's happening but that they have no right to defend themselves or fire."[36] Michèle Alliot-Marie Michèle Alliot-Marie (born 10 September 1946) is the French Minister of Defence and Veterans Affairs. ...


See also

United Nations Security Council Resolution 1559 was a resolution adopted by the United Nations Security Council on September 2, 2004. ...

References

  1. ^ a b UN Security Council Resolution/1701
  2. ^ [1]
  3. ^ [2]
  4. ^ [3]
  5. ^ [4]
  6. ^ [5]
  7. ^ "Lebanese troops to head south Thursday", CNN, 2006-08-16.
  8. ^ "Cheers, flags greet national army in south Lebanon", CNN, 2006-08-18.
  9. ^ "Israel targets transfer of weapons", CNN, 2006-08-19.
  10. ^ "Turks intercept Iranian missile shipment to Hizballah", Israel Today, 2006-08-21.
  11. ^ [6]
  12. ^ Israel indicated that it is not in favor of troops being included from countries that have offered to send troops but do not recognize Israel as a State, such as Bangladesh (1,000), Malaysia (1,000), and Indonesia (1,000). <ref>[http://www.atimes.com/atimes/Middle_East/HH17Ak04.html]</li> <li id="_note-7">'''[[#_ref-7|^]]''' [http://www.tehrantimes.com/Description.asp?Da=8/15/2006&Cat=2&Num=018]</li> <li id="_note-8">'''[[#_ref-8|^]]''' [http://www.bt.no/lokalt/bergen/article290270.ece]</li> <li id="_note-9">'''[[#_ref-9|^]]''' [http://today.reuters.com/news/newsArticle.aspx?type=topNews&storyID=2006-08-24T195629Z_01_L13492527_RTRUKOC_0_US-MIDEAST.xml&WTmodLoc=NewsHome-C1-topNews-2]</li> <li id="_note-10">'''[[#_ref-10|^]]''' [ [http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601087&sid=atuQpHlBqwSU&refer=home]</li> <li id="_note-11">'''[[#_ref-11|^]]''' [ [http://www.ctv.ca/servlet/ArticleNews/story/CTVNews/20060819/belgium_lebanon_troops_060825/20060825?hub=World]</li> <li id="_note-12">'''[[#_ref-12|^]]''' [http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2006-08/27/content_5014170.htm]</li> <li id="_note-UNvioYNET">^ [[#_ref-UNvioYNET_0|<sup>'''''a'''''</sup>]] [[#_ref-UNvioYNET_1|<sup>'''''b'''''</sup>]] {{cite news|url= http://www.ynetnews.com/articles/0,7340,L-3293136,00.html|title=Annan: Israeli raid in Lebanon violates truce|date=[[2006-08-20]]|accessdate=2006-08-20|publisher=[[Ynetnews]]}}</li> <li id="_note-13">'''[[#_ref-13|^]]''' {{cite web|url=http://www.un.org/apps/sg/sgstats.asp|title=Statement attributable to the Spokesman of the Secretary-General on Israel and Lebanon|date=[[2006-08-19]]|accessdate=2006-08-19|publisher=[http://www.un.org UN.org]}}</li> <li id="_note-CNN-08-06">'''[[#_ref-CNN-08-06_0|^]]''' {{cite news|title=Hezbollah rockets pound northern Israel: report|date=[[2006-08-06]]|publisher=[[CNN]]|url=http://www.cnn.com/2006/WORLD/meast/08/06/mideast.main/index.html}}</li> <li id="_note-2006-08-08">'''[[#_ref-2006-08-08_0|^]]''' {{cite news|title=Arab League takes Lebanon concerns to U.N. council: report|date=[[2006-08-08]]|publisher=CNN|url=http://www.cnn.com/2006/WORLD/meast/08/08/mideast.main/index.html}}</li> <li id="_note-2006-08-07">'''[[#_ref-2006-08-07_0|^]]''' {{cite news|title=40 killed in airstrike, Lebanon's PM says:report|date=[[2006-08-07]]|publisher=CNN|url=http://www.cnn.com/2006/WORLD/meast/08/07/mideast.main/index.html}}</li> <li id="_note-CNN-08-08">^ [[#_ref-CNN-08-08_0|<sup>'''''a'''''</sup>]] [[#_ref-CNN-08-08_1|<sup>'''''b'''''</sup>]] {{cite news|title=Fighting rages as diplomatic efforts heat up: report|date=[[2006-08-08]]|publisher=CNN|url=http://www.cnn.com/2006/WORLD/meast/08/08/mideast.main/index.html}}</li> <li id="_note-CNN-08-09">'''[[#_ref-CNN-08-09_0|^]]''' {{cite news|title=Israeli tanks stream into Lebanon|date=[[2006-08-09]]|publisher=CNN|url=http://www.cnn.com/2006/WORLD/meast/08/09/mideast.main/index.html}}</li> <li id="_note-CNN-08-10">'''[[#_ref-CNN-08-10_0|^]]''' {{cite news|title=Israel strikes at heart of Beirut, drops warning leaflets|date=[[2006-08-10]]|publisher=CNN|url=http://www.cnn.com/2006/WORLD/meast/08/10/mideast.main/index.html}}</li> <li id="_note-14">'''[[#_ref-14|^]]''' {{cite news|title=Israel 'set to widen offensive'|date=[[2006-08-11]]|publisher=[[BBC News]]|url=http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/middle_east/4785001.stm}}</li> <li id="_note-CNN-08-11">^ [[#_ref-CNN-08-11_0|<sup>'''''a'''''</sup>]] [[#_ref-CNN-08-11_1|<sup>'''''b'''''</sup>]] {{cite news|title=Diplomats scramble for U.N. vote on Lebanon|date=[[2006-08-11]]|publisher=CNN |url=http://www.cnn.com/2006/WORLD/meast/08/11/mideast.main/index.html}}</li> <li id="_note-CNN-08-12">^ [[#_ref-CNN-08-12_0|<sup>'''''a'''''</sup>]] [[#_ref-CNN-08-12_1|<sup>'''''b'''''</sup>]] [[#_ref-CNN-08-12_2|<sup>'''''c'''''</sup>]] {{cite news|title=Security Council passes proposal to end Mideast conflict|date=[[2006-08-12]]|publisher=CNN|url=http://www.cnn.com/2006/WORLD/meast/08/12/mideast.main/index.html}}</li> <li id="_note-15">'''[[#_ref-15|^]]''' {{cite news|title=UN Votes 'Yes' For Peace|date=[[2006-08-11]]|publisher=[[Sky News]]|url=http://news.sky.com/skynews/article/0,,30000-1230691,00.html}}</li> <li id="_note-CNN-08-13">'''[[#_ref-CNN-08-13_0|^]]''' {{cite news|title=Israel hits Lebanon ahead of cease-fire|date=[[2006-08-13]]|publisher=CNN|url=http://www.cnn.com/2006/WORLD/meast/08/13/mideast.main/index.html}}</li> <li id="_note-16">'''[[#_ref-16|^]]''' {{cite news | title = Lebanon conflict intensifies | url = http://www.ft.com/cms/s/4d09e6b4-2b01-11db-b77c-0000779e2340.html | publisher = ''[[Financial Times]]'' | date [[2006-08-13]] | accessdate = 2006-08-13 }}</li> <li id="_note-17">'''[[#_ref-17|^]]''' {{cite news | title = World governments hail UN resolution | url = http://www.bangkokpost.com/breaking_news/breakingnews.php?id=112170 | publisher = ''[[Bangkok Post]]'' | date = [[2006-08-13]] | accessdate = 2006-08-13 }}</li> <li id="_note-18">'''[[#_ref-18|^]]''' {{cite news | title = Lebanon conflict intensifies | url = http://www.ft.com/cms/s/4d09e6b4-2b01-11db-b77c-0000779e2340.html | publisher = ''Financial Times'' | date [[2006-08-13]] | accessdate = 2006-08-13 }}</li> <li id="_note-19">'''[[#_ref-19|^]]''' [http://www.nytimes.com/2006/08/14/world/middleeast/14cnd-mide.html "Truce Allows Thousands of Lebanese to Return Home"], ''[[New York Times]]'', [[August 14]], [[2006]]</li> <li id="_note-20">'''[[#_ref-20|^]]''' ''[[Globe and Mail]]'', August 19, 2006 [http://www.theglobeandmail.com/servlet/story/LAC.20060819.MIDEFRANCE19/TPStory/TPInternational/Europe/ Past experience gives French qualms about Lebanon mission] Accessed August 19, 2006</li></ol></ref>

2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... August 16 is the 228th day of the year (229th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... August 18 is the 230th day of the year (231st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... August 19 is the 231st day of the year (232nd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ... 2006 (MMVI) is a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... August 21 is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar. ...

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UN Security Council Resolution/1701
Wikinews has news related to:
Talks continue over UN resolution on Lebanon war

 
 

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