FACTOID # 3: South Carolina has the highest rate of violent crimes and aggravated assaults per capita among US states.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > UK topics
Shortcut:
UK topics

This is a list of topics related to the United Kingdom. The United Kingdom category contains a more comprehensive selection of UK articles. This is a list of topics related to the United Kingdom. ...

Contents


Geography and the environment

The British Isles consist of Great Britain, Ireland and a number of much smaller surrounding islands. ... Wikimedia Commons has media related to: England Inter. ... Travel guide to Scotland from Wikitravel Transport in Scotland Timeline of Scottish history Caledonia List of not fully sovereign nations Subdivisions of Scotland National parks (Scotland) Traditional music of Scotland Flower of Scotland Wars of Scottish Independence National Trust for Scotland Historic houses in Scotland Castles in Scotland Museums in... National motto: Cymru am byth (Welsh: Wales for ever) Waless location within the UK Official languages English, Welsh Capital Cardiff Largest city Cardiff First Minister Rhodri Morgan Area  - Total Ranked 3rd UK 20,779 km² Population  - Total (2001)  - Density Ranked 3rd UK 2,903,085 140/km² NUTS 1... Royal motto: Quis separabit (Latin: Who will separate?) Northern Irelands location within the UK Official languages English, Irish, Ulster Scots Capital and largest city Belfast First Minister Office suspended Area  - Total Ranked 4th 13,843 km² Population  - Total (2001)  - Density Ranked 4th 1,685,267 122/km² NUTS 1... Crown dependencies are possessions of the British Crown, as opposed to overseas territories or colonies. ... The Channel Islands are a group of islands off the coast of Normandy, France, in the English Channel. ... Flag of Alderney Alderney is also a suburb of Poole in Dorset, England Alderney (French Aurigny, Auregnais Aoeurgny) is the most northerly of the Channel Islands and a British crown dependency. ... Flag of Sark Sark (in French, Sercq, in Sercquiais Sèr) is a small island of the Channel Islands, part of the Bailiwick of Guernsey. ...

Geography of the United Kingdom

Main article: Geography of the United Kingdom (see also: Geography of Ireland) The United Kingdom occupies a substantial part of the British Isles. ... Ireland is sometimes known as the Emerald Isle because of its green scenery. ...

This is a list of places on the British coastline, by country and county (administrative). ... The Shipping Forecast is a regular feature of BBC Radio 4 and is provided by the UK Meteorological Office on behalf of the Maritime and Coastguard Agency. ... Historically, city status was associated with the presence of a cathedral, such as York Minster. ... A lump of coal, surrounded by fish Halford John Mackinder, Britain and the British Seas, 1904 The Economic geography of the United Kingdom as well as reflecting its position in the current economic league tables, also reflects its long history as a trading nation and as a imperial power. ... This is a list of the origins of the names of counties of the United Kingdom. ... This is a list of the extreme points of the United Kingdom: the points that are farther north, south, east or west than any other location. ... A conurbation is formed when towns expand sufficiently that their urban areas join up with each other. ... The Brecon Beacons National Park, looking from the highest point of Pen Y Fan (886 m/2907 feet) to Corn Du (873 m/2864 feet) The national parks of England and Wales are areas of relatively undeveloped and scenic landscape that are designated under the National Parks and Access to... A Site of Special Scientific Interest or SSSI is a conservation designation denoting a protected area in the United Kingdom. ... The subdivisions of the United Kingdom are complex, multi-layered and non-uniform, varying between England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. ... In England, Wales and Northern Ireland, a town is any settlement which has received a charter of incorporation, more commonly known as a town charter, approved by the monarch. ...

England

The division into counties is one of the larger divisions of England. ... The Ceremonial counties of England are areas of England that are appointed a Lord-Lieutenant, and are defined by the government with reference to administrative counties of England. ... The region (also known as government office region) is currently the highest tier of local government subnational entity in England. ... For local government purposes, England is divided into three types of areas - non-unitary authorities, unitary authorities, and London boroughs. ... The traditional counties of England are historic subdivisions of the country into around 40 regions. ... This is a link page for towns and cities in England. ...

Northern Ireland

Royal motto: Quis separabit (Latin: Who will separate?) Northern Irelands location within the UK Official languages English, Irish, Ulster Scots Capital and largest city Belfast First Minister Office suspended Area  - Total Ranked 4th 13,843 km² Population  - Total (2001)  - Density Ranked 4th 1,685,267 122/km² NUTS 1... This is a list page for towns in Northern Ireland. ...

Scotland

Travel guide to Scotland from Wikitravel Transport in Scotland Timeline of Scottish history Caledonia List of not fully sovereign nations Subdivisions of Scotland National parks (Scotland) Traditional music of Scotland Flower of Scotland Wars of Scottish Independence National Trust for Scotland Historic houses in Scotland Castles in Scotland Museums in... The Lieutenancy areas of Scotland are the areas used for ceremonial purposes such as Lord Lieutenancy. ... This is a link page for burghs (pronounced burras) in Scotland. ... The 32 council areas of Scotland form the local government areas of Scotland, all of them unitary authorities. ... The traditional counties of Scotland are historic and cutural divisions of Scotland. ... There are currently two national parks of Scotland, Loch Lomond and the Trossachs National Park, created in 2002, and Cairngorms National Park, created in 2003. ...

Wales

National motto: Cymru am byth (Welsh: Wales for ever) Waless location within the UK Official languages English, Welsh Capital Cardiff Largest city Cardiff First Minister Rhodri Morgan Area  - Total Ranked 3rd UK 20,779 km² Population  - Total (2001)  - Density Ranked 3rd UK 2,903,085 140/km² NUTS 1... The Preserved counties of Wales are the current areas used in Wales for ceremonial purposes such as Lieutenancy. ... This is a link page for towns in Wales. ... For local government purposes, Wales is divided into 22 unitary authorities. ... Wales has thirteen traditional counties (or vice counties). ...

United Kingdom main page

At the April 2001 census, the United Kingdoms population was 58,789,194-- the third-largest in the European Union (behind Germany and metropolitan France) and the 21st-largest in the world. ... Categories: Stub | History of England | Demographics of the United Kingdom ...

Historical states of the British Isles

The British Isles consist of Great Britain, Ireland and a number of much smaller surrounding islands. ... Ancient Britain was a period in the human occupation of Great Britain that extended throughout prehistory, ending with the Roman invasion of Britain in AD 43. ... Avalon is a legendary island somewhere in the British Isles, famous for its beautiful apples. ... Principal sites in Roman Britain Roman Britain is the term applied to that part of Britain lying within the Roman Empire (which never extended to the whole island). ... Caledonia is an old Latin name (given by the Roman Empire) for a region corresponding approximately to the part of modern-day Scotland north of a line between the estuaries of the rivers Forth and Clyde. ... Hibernia is the Roman Latin name for the island of Ireland. ... The term Picts refers to a group of pre-Celtic tribes that Mediterranean classical-era writers said lived in Caledonia, which is now part of Scotland. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Scots (ethnic group). ... A map showing the general locations of the Anglo-Saxon peoples around the year 600. ... Angle, Saxon and Jute states See: Heptarchy East Anglia Norfolk Suffolk Hwicce Essex Kent Lindsey Magonsaetan Mercia Northumbria Bernicia Deira Sussex Wessex Southern Celtic states Afan Arfon Arllechwedd Brycheiniog (Brecknockshire) Buellt (Builth) Calchvynydd Camelot = fictional Cateuchlanium Cornwall Deheubarth Demetae Devon Dumnonia Dunoding Dyfed Dyffryn Clwyd Elfael Ergyng Glyn Rhondda Glywysing... Royal motto: PAX, QUÆRITUR, BELLO (English: Peace is obtained by war)1 Capital London Head of State none Parliament Rump Parliament The Commonwealth was the republican government which ruled first England and then the whole of Britain, Ireland, the colonies and other Crown possessions during the periods from 1649... The Flag of England The Kingdom of England was a kingdom located in Western Europe, in the southern part of the island of Great Britain. ... Capital Dublin Head of state King of Ireland Kings representative: Variously called Judiciar, Lord Deputy or Lord Lieutenant of Ireland Head of government: Chief Secretary for Ireland Parliament: Irish House of Commons and Irish House of Lords The Kingdom of Ireland was the name given to the English-ruled... Royal motto: Nemo me impune lacessit (Latin: No one provokes me with impunity))1 Capital Edinburgh Head of State King of Scots Parliament Parliament of Scotland This article is about the historical state called the Kingdom of Scotland (843-1707). ... Events Treaty of Verdun divides the Carolingian empire between the 3 sons of Louis the Pious. ... Royal motto: Dieu et mon droit (French: God and my right)1 Capital London Head of State King of Great Britain Head of Government Prime Minister Parliament House of Commons, House of Lords This article is about the historical state called the Kingdom of Great Britain (1707-1800). ... Events January 1 - John V is crowned King of Portugal March 26 - The Act of Union becomes law, making the separate Kingdoms of England and Scotland into one country, the Kingdom of Great Britain. ... The Union Flag, in its modern form, was first adopted in 1801. ... 1801 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is a country in western Europe, and member of the Commonwealth of Nations, the G8, the European Union, and NATO. Usually known simply as the United Kingdom, the UK, or (inaccurately) as Great Britain or Britain, the UK has four constituent...

United Kingdom overseas territories

Main article: Dependent territories of the United Kingdom A United Kingdom overseas territory (formerly known as a dependent territory or earlier as a crown colony) is a territory that is under the sovereignty and formal control of the United Kingdom but is not part of the United Kingdom proper (Great Britain and Northern Ireland). ...

Flag of the British Antarctic Territory The British Antarctic Territory is the British claim to land and islands in Antarctica, and is the oldest territorial claim on the continent. ... Ascension Island from space, December 1990 Ascension Island is an island in the South Atlantic Ocean, and includes tiny satellite islands and rocks such as Boatswain Bird Island, Boatswain Bird Rock (East), White Rocks (South), and Tartar Rock (West, at the shore of Georgetown). ... Tristan da Cunha is a remote island in the south Atlantic Ocean, at 37°8′ S 12°28′ W. It is a dependency of St. ... Motto: Leo Terram Propriam Protegat Official language English Capital Grytviken Civil Commisioner Howard Pearce Area  - Total  - % water not ranked 3,093 km² - Population  - Total (2003 E)  - Density not ranked ~100 n/a; Currency Falkland pound (FKP; fixed to GBP) Time zone UTC -4 (DST -3) National anthem God Save the... Map of Akrotiri SBA Akrotiri and Dhekelia are UK Sovereign Base Areas (SBAs) in Cyprus, a former British Crown Colony. ...

Natural environment

The natural environment comprises all living and non-living things that occur naturally on Earth. ... Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB) is a United Kingdom. ... The current climate of the United Kingdom is classified as temperate, with warm summers, cool winters and plentiful precipitation throughout the year. ... The United Kingdoms Climate Change Programme was launched by the British government in response to its commitment to the Kyoto Protocol on global warming. ... This page gives an overview of the complex structure of environmental and cultural conservation in the United Kingdom. ... An Environmentally Sensitive Area (ESA) is a type of designation for an agricultural area which needs special protection because of its landscape, wildlife or historical value. ... In city planning, the Green Belt is a concept for controlling metropolitan growth introduced around London, England by minister of housing Duncan Sandys via a Government Circular. ... A list of great British trees was a list published by the Tree Council to spotlight trees in Great Britain in honour of the Queens Golden Jubilee. ... National Nature Reserve is a United Kingdom government conservation designation for a nature reserve of national significance. ... The standard of the National Trust The National Trust for Places of Historic Interest or Natural Beauty, usually known as The National Trust, NT or The Trust, is an organisation which works to preserve and protect coastline, countryside and buildings in England, Wales and Northern Ireland. ... This is a list of rivers of Great Britain. ... A Special Protection Area or SPA is a designation under the European Commission Directive on the Conservation of Wild Birds (79/409/EEC). ... A Site of Special Scientific Interest or SSSI is a conservation designation denoting a protected area in the United Kingdom. ... This is a links page to the waterfalls found in the United Kingdom (England, Northern Ireland, Scotland and Wales), and includes a list of the highest waterfalls. ... This is a list of natural disasters in the United Kingdom. ... The Great Storm of 1987 occurred on October 15 and 16, 1987, when an unusually strong weather system caused hurricane force winds to hit much of the south of England. ...

Built environment

The expression built environment recognises that much of the physical world in which humans function and thrive has been intentionally created; is something aesthetically and functionally shared; and functions as an organism in the consumption of resources, disposal of wastes, and facilitation of productive enterprise within its bounds. ... Abbeys and priories in England is a link page for any abbey, priory, friary or other monastic religious house in England. ... Abbeys and priories in Northern Ireland is a link page for any abbey, priory, friary or other religious house in Northern Ireland Abbreviations and Key The sites listed are ruins unless indicated thus:- Trusteeship denoted as follows:- NM = National Monument Other abbreviations:- County Antrim County Armagh County Derry Derry: possible... Abbeys and priories in Scotland is a link page to any abbey, priory, friary or other religious house in Scotland Abbreviations and Key The sites listed are ruins unless indicated thus:- Trusteeship denoted as follows:- (HS) = Historic Scotland (NTS) = National Trust for Scotland (CS) = Church of Scotland Other abbreviations:- Aberdeen... Abbeys and priories in Wales is a link page for any abbey, priory, friary or other religious house in Wales. ... Bridges in the United Kingdom is a link page for any bridge in the United Kingdom. ... This is a list of crossings of the River Thames, downstream first, including bridges, tunnels and ferries. ... The council house is a form of public housing found in the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland. ... Historic houses in England is a link page for any stately home, country house or other historic house in England. ... Housing associations in the United Kingdom are independent not-for-profit bodies that provide low cost housing. ... The Housing Corporation is the Non-departmental public body that funds and regulates housing associations in England. ... The National House Building Council (NHBC) was originally set up as the National House Builders Registration Council (NHBRC) in the United Kingdom in 1937. ... A New town or planned community or planned city is a city, town, or community that was designed from scratch, and grew up more or less following the plan. ... A pier in Lillebælt, Denmark A pier was originally a raised walkway over water that is supported by piles or pillars, as opposed to a quay or wharf. ... Reservoirs and dams in the United Kingdom is a link page for any reservoir or dam in the United Kingdom. ... Town and Country Planning is the system by which the British government seeks to maintain a balance between economic development and environmental quality in England. ...

Transport in the United Kingdom

Main article: Transport in the United Kingdom The transport system in the United Kingdom is well developed. ...

The United Kingdom consists of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, and previously consisted of Great Britain and the whole of Ireland. ... The British railway system is the oldest in the world. ... Station Name Postcode External links to Map of station at MultiMap Code External links to livedepartureboards. ... In the United Kingdom, all motor-powered road vehicles (including cars) have had to carry registration plates (more commonly known as number plates) since 1904. ... Britain has a long history, and has many ancient roads and trackways dating back to the Roman occupation and before, including the worlds oldest engineered road yet discovered, the Sweet Track dating from the 3800s BC. With the advent of the car and the huge expansion in the numbers... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with List of cars. ... A complete listing of motorways in the United Kingdom. ... In the United Kingdom, Vehicle Excise Duty (VED) (often known as road tax) is an annual tax on the use of motor vehicles on the public roads. ... Waterways in the United Kingdom is a link page for any river, canal, firth or estuary in the United Kingdom. ... British Waterways is a government body sponsored by the Department for Environment, Food & Rural Affairs (DEFRA) and the Scottish Executive in the United Kingdom. ... // Early history Evidence suggests that the first British canals were built in Roman times, often as irrigation canals or short connecting spurs between navigable rivers, such as Foss Dyke. ... Tunnels in the United Kingdom is a link page for any road, railway, waterway or other form of tunnel, anywhere in the United Kingdom. ... List of cycleways is a link page for any cycleway anywhere in the world. ... The Common Travel Area or, informally the passport free zone, refers to the fact that citizens of the Republic of Ireland, the United Kingdom and Crown Dependencies (the Isle of Man and the Bailiwicks of Guernsey and Jersey) may travel between their countries without a passport. ...

See also

Geological map of Great Britain. ...

History

Main article: History of Britain and history of articles in other sections on this page. The History of Britain, until the last few hundred years, was one of struggle and competition between the separate nation-states that occupied various parts of the island of Great Britain. ...

Portions of this article or section may be outdated. ... England is the largest and most populous of the four main divisions of the United Kingdom. ... The Tower of London. ... This article needs cleanup. ... Stirling Castle has stood for centuries atop a volcanic crag defending the lowest ford of the River Forth. ... The earliest inhabitants of Wales were from continental Europe, who migrated in several waves and who were later subsumed into the culture and race of the Celts. ... The History of Ireland is the story of a large island at the north-west of Europe and is heavily influenced by the concurrent History of Britain, its larger neighbour to the east. ... The British Empire in 1897, marked in pink, the traditional colour for Imperial British dominions on maps The British Empire was the worlds first global power and the largest empire in history. ... The Commonwealth of Nations, usually known as The Commonwealth, is an association of independent sovereign states, almost all of which are former territories of the British Empire. ... Ancient Britain was a period in the human occupation of Great Britain that extended throughout prehistory, ending with the Roman invasion of Britain in AD 43. ... Principal sites in Roman Britain Roman Britain is the term applied to that part of Britain lying within the Roman Empire (which never extended to the whole island). ...

Commerce and industry

Money, economics and business

Money Money is any marketable good or token used by a society as a store of value, a medium of exchange, and a unit of account. ... U.S. Economic Calendar Economics at the Open Directory Project Economics textbooks on Wikibooks The Economists Economics A-Z Daily analysis of economics in the news (UK focus) Institutions and organizations Bureau of Labor Statistics - from the American Labor Department Center for Economic and Policy Research (USA) National Bureau... External links The Rise of a Young Business Tycoon Business Articles Categories: ‪Business‬ | ‪Academic disciplines‬ | ‪School subjects‬ ... The Bank of England is the central bank of the United Kingdom, sometimes known as The Old Lady of Threadneedle Street or The Old Lady. The Bank of England // Functions of the Bank It performs all the recognized functions of a central bank -- to maintain price stability, and subject to... The Governor and Company of the Bank of Scotland is a major commercial bank in Scotland, and, to a lesser extent, in the rest of the United Kingdom and the Republic of Ireland. ... The Royal Bank of Scotland LSE: RBSis one of Scotlands four national clearing banks and one of the oldest in the UK, founded in Edinburgh in 1727 by Royal Charter. ... This article concerns British coinage, the coinage of the United Kingdom. ... British banknotes are the banknotes of the United Kingdom and British Islands, denominated in pounds sterling (GBP). ... The pound sterling is the official currency of the United Kingdom (UK). ... The Financial Times Stock Exchange Index of 100 Leading Shares, or FTSE 100 Index (pronounced footsie), is a share index of the 100 largest companies listed on the London Stock Exchange. ... The Private Finance Initiative specifies a method, developed initially by the United Kingdom government, to provides financial support for Public-Private Partnerships (PPPs) between the public and private sectors. ... The United Kingdom, a leading trading power and financial centre, has the fourth largest economy in the world in terms of market exchange rates and the sixth largest by purchasing power parity (PPP) exchange rates. ... Tourism > Tourism in England Tourism plays a significant part in the economic life of England. ... Tourism > Tourism in Scotland There are several cities and towns which tourists visit in Scotland. ... The Industrial Revolution was the major technological, socioeconomic and cultural change in the late 18th and early 19th century resulting from the replacement of an economy based on manual labour to one dominated by industry and machine manufacture. ... This article deals with the effects of the Great Depression of the 1930s on the United Kingdom. ... This is a list of companies from the United Kingdom. ... British professional bodies The following is a list of professional bodies in the United Kingdom. ...

Regulatory bodies

The Advertising Standards Authority (ASA) is a British regulatory body which monitors advertising, ensuring each advert does not breach the Advertising Code, which requires accuracy and decency in advertising. ... The United Kingdom Financial Services Authority (FSA) is an independent non-governmental body that regulates the UK financial services industry. ... The Housing Corporation is the Non-departmental public body that funds and regulates housing associations in England. ... The Office of Communications, usually known as Ofcom, is the UKs communications regulator. ... The Office of Water Services (Ofwat) is the body which is responsible for economic regulation of the privatised water industry in England and Wales. ... The Press Complaints Commission is a British organisation that has regulated printed newspapers and magazines since 1990. ... The OISC is the One Instruction Set Computer, by humorous analogy with RISC (Reduced Instruction Set Computer) and CISC (Complex Instruction Set Computer). ...

Trade Union Federations

Trades Union Congress headquarters at Congress House in Great Russell Street near Tottenham Court Road, Camden, London. ... The Scottish Trades Union Congress (STUC) is the co-ordinating body of trade unions in Scotland. ...

Politics, monarchy and military

Politics of the United Kingdom

The politics of the United Kingdom are based upon a unitary state and a constitutional monarchy. ... The Houses of Parliament, seen over Westminster Bridge The Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is the supreme legislative institution in the United Kingdom and British overseas territories (it alone has parliamentary sovereignty). ... This is a listing of sessions of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, tabulated with the elections to the House of Commons for each session, and the list of members of the House. ... This is a listing of sessions of the Parliament of Great Britain, tabulated with the elections to the House of Commons for each session, and the list of members of the House. ... The House of Commons is the lower house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, and is now the dominant branch of Parliament. ... Following is a (currently incomplete) list of past and present Members of Parliament of the United Kingdom in alphabetical order. ... This article is about the British House of Lords. ... The agencies responsible for the government of the United Kingdom consist of a number of ministerial departments (usually headed by a Secretary of State) and non-ministerial departments headed by senior civil servants. ... In the United Kingdom, the Prime Minister is the head of government, exercising many of the executive functions nominally vested in the Sovereign, who is head of state. ... In the Politics of the United Kingdom, the Cabinet is a formal body comprised of government officials chosen by the kp. ... The Intelligence and Security Committee is a unique committee, as it is not a committee of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... The United Kingdom is made up of four parts - England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. ... The United Kingdom is divided into four parts, England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. ... // Categorised Adoption Adoption and Permanence Task Force [1] Culture Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew, Sir John Soanes Museum, Wallace Collection, Victoria and Albert Museum, Royal Air Force Museum, United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority, Tate Gallery, Royal Marines Museum, Advisory Committee on Historic Wreck Sites Advisory Committee on the Government Art... It has been suggested that British constitutional law be merged into this article or section. ... The constitutional status of Cornwall, in the southwest of Great Britain, is the subject of ongoing debate. ... The United Kingdom has five distinct types of elections: general, local, regional, European and mayoral. ... Referendums (or referenda) are only occasionally held by the government of the United Kingdom. ... On April 20, 2004, the British Prime Minister Tony Blair announced in the House of Commons that Britain would hold a referendum on its ratification of the proposed Treaty establishing a constitution for Europe when it was agreed by the European Council. ... Political parties in the United Kingdom lists political parties in the United Kingdom. ... Wealth at death of British politicians: based on probate. ... The United Kingdom does not have a single unified judicial system: England and Wales have one system, Scotland another, and Northern Ireland another. ... Pressure groups in the United Kingdom can be divided into two categories. ... British Prime Minister Tony Blair (left) conducting diplomacy, hosted by the President of the United States, George W. Bush at Camp David in March 2003. ... The following is an incomplete list of nations to which the United Kingdom has provided ambassadors. ... The British honours system is a means of rewarding individuals personal bravery, achievement or service to the United Kingdom. ... // Overview Scotland is one of the four constituent nations of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. ... The Scottish Parliament (Pàrlamaid na h-Alba in Gaelic, Scots Pairlament in Scots) is the national unicameral legislature of Scotland. ... Member of the Scottish Parliament (MSP) is the title given to any one of the 129 individuals elected to serve in the Scottish Parliament. ... The Scottish parliamentary election, 1999 was the first general election of the Scottish Parliament, with voting taking place on May 6, 1999. ... The Scottish parliamentary election, 2003, was the second general election of the Scottish Parliament. ... Before 1975 local government in Scotland was organised on the county system. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... The Welsh Assembly Government (WAG) (Welsh: Llywodraeth Cynulliad Cymru, LlCC) is the executive body of the National Assembly for Wales, consisting of the First Minister and his Cabinet. ...

Criminal justice, law, policing and emergency services

Aphorism Critical legal studies Jurisprudence Law (principle) Legal research Legal code Natural justice Natural law Philosophy of law Religious law External links Find more information on Law by searching one of Wikipedias sibling projects: Wikibooks Wikiversity has more about this subject: School of Law The Australian Institute of Comparative... Emergency services are public services that deal with emergencies and other aspects of Public Safety. ... The United Kingdom has arguably the worlds most complex nationality laws, because of its former status as an imperial power. ... The United Kingdom has arguably the worlds most complex nationality laws, because of its former status as an imperial power. ... The British police are a group of similar but independent police services which operate in the United Kingdom. ... The creation of the Serious Organised Crime Agency (SOCA) in the United Kingdom was announced on February 9, 2004. ... Special Branch is the arm of the British, Irish and many Commonwealth police forces that deals with national security matters. ... The Diplomatic Protection Group (the DPG or SO16 of the Metropolitan Police) provides protection and support to Members of the Diplomatic Community and members of HM Government. ... Capital punishment in the United Kingdom, now entirely abolished in all circumstances, has a long history, dating from before the modern United Kingdom actually existed. ... The Crown Prosecution Service is the arm of the Government of the United Kingdom responsible for public prosecutions of people charged with criminal offences in England and Wales. ... The Serious Fraud Office is an arm of the Government of the United Kingdom, accountable to the Attorney-General. ... Schematic of court system for England and Wales The United Kingdom does not have a single unified judicial system - England and Wales have one system, Scotland another, and Northern Ireland a third. ... Her Majestys Prison Service is the British Executive Agency reporting to the Home Office tasked with managing most of the prisons within England and Wales (Scotland and Northern Ireland have their own Prison Services). ... The United Kingdom has one of the highest rates of incarceration in western Europe: on average 109 people in every 100,000 are in prison, but far short of the 702 per 100,000 in the United States. ... This page lists all current and a number of historical prisons in the United Kingdom. ... The National Probation Service of England and Wales is a statutory Criminal Justice Service, mainly responsible for the supervision of offenders in the community. ... 999 is the United Kingdoms emergency telephone number along with the EU standard 112. ... Many countries public telephone networks have a single emergency telephone number, sometimes known as the universal emergency telephone number or occasionally the emergency services number, that allows a caller to contact local emergency services for assistance. ... English law is the law of England and Wales, rather than Scotland and Northern Ireland. ... For the entry on the naval ship U.S.S. Constitution, see: USS Constitution. ... Magna Carta placed certain checks on the absolute power of the English Monarchs. ... The Petition of Right is a document produced by the English (pre-British) Parliament in the run up to the English Civil War. ... The Bill of Rights 1689 is an English Act of Parliament with the long title An Act Declaring the Rights and Liberties of the Subject and Settling the Succession of the Crown and known colloquially in the UK as the Bill of Rights. ... The British Reform Act of 1832 (2 & 3 Will. ... In the United Kingdom, Parliament Act refers to each of two Acts of Parliament, passed in 1911 and 1949 respectively. ... Scots law (or Scottish law) is the law of Scotland. ... This article concerns the common-law legal system, as contrasted with the civil law legal system; for other meanings of the term, within the field of law, see common law (disambiguation). ... The European Union is unique among international organisations in having a complex and highly developed system of internal law which has direct effect within the legal systems of its member states. ... The United Kingdom has a long and established tradition of respect for its citizens human rights. ...

Monarchy

The British monarch or Sovereign is the monarch and head of state of the United Kingdom and its overseas territories, and is the source of all executive, judicial and (as the Queen-in-Parliament) legislative power. ... This is a list of British monarchs, that is, the monarchs on the thrones of some of the various kingdoms that have existed on, or incorporated, the island of Great Britain, namely: England (united with Wales from 1536) up to 1707; Scotland up to 1707; The Kingdom of Great Britain... Members of the Royal Family on the balcony of Buckingham Palace after the Trooping the Colour ceremony The British Royal Family is a group of people closely related to the British monarch. ... British coronations are held in Westminster Abbey. ... Bath Royal Literary and Scientific Institution Royal Air Force Royal Academy Royal Academy of Dramatic Art Royal Academy of Engineering Royal Academy of Music Royal Aero Club Royal Aeronautical Society Royal African Society Royal Agricultural Society of England Royal Aircraft Establishment Royal and Ancient Golf Club of St Andrews Royal... English Regis Bere Regis Bognor Regis Grafton Regis Houghton Regis Lyme Regis Melcombe Regis Rowley Regis Wyke Regis Royal Royal Berkshire Royal Leamington Spa Royal Tunbridge Wells Royal Borough Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea Royal Borough of Kingston upon Thames Royal Borough of Windsor and Maidenhead Former Royal Borough... The line of succession to the British Throne (which includes the sovereignty over fifteen other Commonwealth Realms) is determined by male primogeniture and religion, whereby the eldest legitimate son of the incumbent inherits the throne, unless he is Catholic or has married a Catholic, although the laws preventing Papists from... The precise style of British Sovereigns has varied over the years. ... The quintessential medieval European palace: Palais de la Cité, in Paris, the royal palace of France. ... Class 67, no. ...

Military

The armed forces of the United Kingdom are known as the British Armed Forces or Her Majestys Armed Forces, officially the Armed Forces of the Crown. ... The Royal Navy of the United Kingdom is the senior service of the British armed services, being the oldest of its three branches. ... The Corps of Royal Marines, usually just known as the Royal Marines (RM), are the United Kingdoms amphibious forces and a core component of the countrys Rapid Deployment Force. ... The British Army is the land armed forces branch of the British Armed Forces. ... The Royal Air Force (often abbreviated to RAF) is the air force branch of the British Armed Forces. ... The United Kingdom has a nuclear arsenal but is generally believed not to have any chemical or biological weapons. ... Main Building - The Headquarters of the Ministry of Defence, Whitehall, Westminster, London Tri-service badge of the UK armed forces The Ministry of Defence (MoD) is the United Kingdom government department responsible for implementation of government defence policy and the headquarters of the UK military. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ... The United Kingdom, along with France, declared war on Nazi Germany in 1939 as part of the United Kingdoms pledge to defend Poland to the invasion of Poland. ... During World War II, British and American cryptographers at Bletchley Park broke a large number of Axis codes and ciphers, including the German Enigma machine. ...

Peerage

The Peerage is a system of titles of nobility which exists in the United Kingdom and is one part of the British honours system. ... The Peerage of England comprises all peerages created in the Kingdom of England before the Act of Union in 1707. ... The Peerage of Scotland is the division of the British Peerage for those peers created in the Kingdom of Scotland before 1707. ... The Peerage of Great Britain comprises all extant peerages created in the Kingdom of Great Britain after the Act of Union 1707 but before the Act of Union 1800. ... The Peerage of Ireland is the term used for those peers created by British monarchs in their capacity as Lord or King of Ireland. ... The Peerage of the United Kingdom comprises most peerages created in the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland after the Act of Union in 1801. ... In the United Kingdom, representative peers were individuals elected by the members of the Peerage of Scotland and the Peerage of Ireland to represent them in the British House of Lords. ...

Public inquiries

In the politics and government of Commonwealth countries such as Australia, Canada and the United Kingdom, a public inquiry is an official review of events or actions ordered by the government. ...

Charities and youth organisations

Charities

See also: the Charity Commission A charitable trust (or charity) is a trust organized to serve private or public charitable purposes. ... British Heart Foundation is a charity organisation in the United Kingdom that sponsors the research aimed to prevent heart diseases in humans. ... Cancer Research UK is a cancer research and awareness-promotion group in the United Kingdom, formed in 2002 by the merger of the Cancer Research Campaign and the Imperial Cancer Research Fund. ... ChildLine is a UK-based childrens charity. ... Comic relief is the inclusion of a humorous character or scene or witty dialogue in an otherwise serious work, often to relieve tension. ... Oxfam International, founded in 1995, is a confederation of 12 independent, not-for-profit, secular, community-based aid and development organisations who work with local partners in over 100 countries worldwide to reduce poverty, suffering, and injustice. ... Macmillan Cancer Relief is one of the largest British charities and provides free care and support to sufferers of cancer. ... Mercy Corps is a not-for-profit organization engaged in humanitarian aid and development activities. ... The National Library for the Blind is a public library in the United Kingdom, founded 1882, which aims to ensure that visually impaired people have the same access to library services as sighted people. ... The NSPCC, correctly known as the National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children is the UKs leading charity [1] specialising in child protection and the prevention of cruelty to children. ... The Royal National Institute of the Blind (RNIB) is a United Kingdom charity, which was set up to lobby for and help people who are blind or partially sighted. ... Flag of the Royal National Lifeboat Institution The Royal National Lifeboat Institution (RNLI) is a charity dedicated to saving lives at sea around the coasts of Britain and Ireland. ... The Royal Society of Wildlife Trusts or RSWT is a registered charity, incorporated by Royal Charter to promote conservation and manage environmental funds. ... The Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (RSPCA) is a charity in England and Wales that promotes animal welfare. ... The Royal Society for the Protection of Birds (RSPB) is Europes largest wildlife conservation charity. ... Samaritans (formerly The Samaritans) is a British-based registered charity aimed at providing emotional support to anyone in distress or at risk of suicide. ... SCOPE is a UK based charity for disabled people in England and Wales. ... Scottish Refugee Council was formed in 1985 to provide advice and assistance to refugees and asylum seekers seeking protection in Scotland. ... The Society of St James is a British Charity based in Southampton, providing accommodation with care and support to homeless and vulnerably housed people. ... SOS Childrens Villages UK is an autonomous UK Charity, based in Cambridge, part of the international group SOS Childrens Villages which is the largest international charity group dedicated to the care of orphaned and abandoned children. ... Sue Ryder Care is the name of a charity (originally called the Sue Ryder Foundation) which was founded in 1953 by Sue Ryder, with the creation of a nursing home in Suffolk, UK. There are now 17 Care Centres in the UK -- 6 hospices and 11 neurological centres. ... Sustrans is a British engineering charity which promotes sustainable transport. ... The Terrence Higgins Trust is a British charity that campaigns on various issues related to AIDS and HIV. In particular, the Trust aims to reduce the spread of HIV and promote good sexual health (including safe sex); to provide services on a national and local level to people with, affected... New Wellcome Trust building on Euston Road The Wellcome Trust is a United Kingdom-based charity established in 1936 to disburse the fortune of the pharmaceutical magnate Sir Andy Palmer and the income of Burroughs Wellcome & Co. ... The Charity Commission is the non-ministerial government department that regulates registered charities (and hence to some extent most churches) in England and Wales. ...


Youth organisations

A youth organization is a formal organization aimed at children and adolescents for education and socialization. ... The Boys Brigade Modern Logo The Boys Brigade (BB) is an international non-denominational Christian youth organization. ... Girl Guides was founded as the female version of Lord Robert Baden-Powells Boy Scouts, in 1910 with the assistance of his sister Agnes Baden-Powell. ... Scouting is a worldwide youth organization. ... The Woodcraft Folk is a UK-based educational movement for children and young people, considered the youth arm of the co-operative movement. ... This article is about the Youth Hostel Association, for the IATA code YHA see Port Hope Simpson Airport. ... The Air Training Corps (ATC) is a UK cadet force. ...

Media and communications

Television and radio

This article is an overview article about the Crown chartered British Broadcasting Corporation formed in 1927. ... Independent Television (ITV) is the name given to the original network of British commercial television broadcasters, set up to provide competition to the BBC. In England and Wales the channel was recently rebranded ITV1 by ITV plc who own the regional broadcasting licences for the regions. ... Channel 4 is a public service television broadcaster in the United Kingdom (see British television). ... S4C (Sianel Pedwar Cymru - Channel Four Wales) is a Welsh-language television channel broadcasting in Wales, United Kingdom, which was established in response to demands for a channel to cater for the Welsh-speaking minority population in Wales. ... Five, formerly known as Channel 5, is the United Kingdoms fifth terrestrial TV Channel. ... This is a list of radio stations in the United Kingdom: // National analogue and digital stations BBC Radio 1 BBC Radio 2 BBC Radio 3 BBC Radio 4 BBC Radio Five Live BBC World Service Classic FM talkSPORT Virgin Radio National digital-only stations BBC 1Xtra BBC Five Live Sports... Television stations These channels are available on digital aerial, satellite and cable systems. ... British television broadcasting has a range of different broadcasters, broadcasting multiple channels over a variety of distribution media. ... British humour has a reputation for being puzzling to non-British speakers of English. ... A British sitcom is a situation comedy (sitcom) produced in the United Kingdom. ... British Comedy, in film, radio and television, is known for its consistently quirky characters, plots and settings, and has produced some of the most famous and memorable comic actors and characters in the last fifty years. ... The 100 Greatest Kids TV shows was a poll conducted by the British television channel Channel 4 in 2001. ...

Newspapers

// Origins Regular newspaper publication dates from the mid 17th century. ... // National newspapers Traditionally newspapers could be split into quality, serious-minded newspapers (usually referred to as Broadsheets due to their large size) and tabloid, less serious newspapers. ...

Communications

// Introduction and history Until 1982, the main civil telecommunications system in the UK was a state monopoly known as Post Office Telecommunications. ... The Office of Communications, usually known as Ofcom, is the UKs communications regulator. ... This is a survey of the postage stamps and postal history of the United Kingdom (universally referred to by philatelists as Great Britain). The postal history of Great Britain is notable in at least two respects; first, for the introduction of postage stamps in 1840, and secondly for the establishment... The term postcode in the UK is used rather loosely for any component of a postcode. ... A telephone numbering plan is a system that allows subscribers to make and receive telephone calls across long distances. ... The web site http://www. ... The UK telephone numbering plan, also known as the National Numbering Plan, is regulated by the Office of Communications (Ofcom), which replaced the Office of Telecommunications (Oftel) in 2003. ...

Culture of the United Kingdom

Main article: Culture of the United Kingdom The culture of the United Kingdom is rich and varied, and has been influential on culture on a worldwide scale. ...


British art

Main article: British art British Art is the art of the island of Britain. ...

British Art is the art of the island of Britain. ... The English school of painting is an expression for English (or British) painters who produced characteristically English paintings. ... The National Gallery from Trafalgar Square The National Gallery is an art gallery in London, located on the north side of Trafalgar Square. ... The National Portrait Gallery is an art gallery in central London which was opened in 1856. ... The Tate Gallery in the United Kingdom is a network of four galleries and a virtual presence: Tate Britain (opened 1897), Tate Liverpool (1988), Tate St Ives (1993), Tate Modern (2000) and Tate Online (1998). ... The Turner Prize is an annual prize given to a British visual artist under 50, named after the painter J.M.W. Turner. ...

Music in the UK

Main article: Music in the UK Music from the United Kingdom has achieved great international popularity since the 1960s, when the British Invasion peaked. ...

There are a large number of music festivals in the United Kingdom, covering a wide variety of genres. ...

British popular music

Music from the United Kingdom has achieved great international popularity since the 1960s, when the British Invasion peaked. ... The diverse nations that now make up the United Kingdom were much more distinct from each other prior to modern times. ... The appearance of The Beatles on the The Ed Sullivan Show, February 9, 1964, marked the dramatic start of the British Invasion. ... // NWOBHM Beginnings The New Wave of British Heavy Metal (NWOBHM) emerged in the late 1970s, in part a reaction to the decline of traditional heavy metal bands such as Led Zeppelin, Deep Purple and Black Sabbath. ... Britpop is a British alternative rock movement from the mid 1990s, characterised by the appearance of bands who borrowed many influences from 1960s and 1970s while creating big, catchy hooks, as well as the glamour of earlier pop stardom and the sense that they were creating the soundtrack to the... A one-hit wonder is a Top 40 phenomenon, the combination of artist and song that scores big in the music industry with one smash hit, but is unable to repeat the achievement with another hit. ... Categories: United Kingdom in the Eurovision Song Contest ... Music Hall is a form of British theatrical entertainment which reached its peak of popularity between 1850 and 1960. ...

Classical music

The BBC Symphony Orchestra is the principal orchestra of the British Broadcasting Corporation and one of the leading orchestras in Britain. ... The City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra (CBSO) is based in Birmingham, England. ... The Hallé Orchestra is one of Britains longest established orchestras, and is based in Manchester. ... The Royal Philharmonic Orchestra (RPO) is an English orchestra based in London. ... The Philharmonia is an orchestra based in London. ... The London Symphony Orchestra (frequently abbreviated to LSO) is one of the major orchestras of the United Kingdom. ... The London Philharmonic Orchestra (frequently abbreviated to LPO), based in London, is one of the major orchestras of the United Kingdom. ... A Promenade concert in the Royal Albert Hall, 2004. ... British opera is opera which was composed either in Britain or by a composer of British nationality. ...

Folk music

England has a long and rich musical history. ... Scotland is a Celtic-Germanic country, located to the north of England on the island of Great Britain. ... Wales is a part of the United Kingdom, but has had a long history as a culturally distinct Celtic country. ...

Cultural icons

And did those feet in ancient time is a poem by William Blake from the preface to his work Milton: a Poem (1804). ... Corporate logo of the British Broadcasting Corporation The British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) is the national public service broadcaster of the United Kingdom (see British television). ... A bagpipe performer in Amsterdam. ... Baked beans on scrambled egg on toast. ... The Clock Tower, colloquially known as Big Ben Big Ben is the colloquial name of the Clock Tower of the Palace of Westminster in London, and an informal name for the Great Bell of Westminster, the largest bell in the tower and part of the Great Clock of Westminster. ... In the United Kingdom, a hackney carriage is a taxicab licensed by the Public Carriage Office in the London Metropolitan Area or by the local authority in other parts of England and Wales and the Scottish Executive in Scotland. ... The bowler hat is a hard felt hat created for an Englishman James Coke in 1850. ... This article incorporates text from the public domain 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica. ... Britannia, the British national personification. ... World War I recruiting poster John Bull is a national personification of Britain created by Dr. John Arbuthnot in 1712 and popularized first by British print makers and then overseas by illustrators such as American cartoonist Thomas Nast. ... This article describes the British monarchy from the perspective of the United Kingdom. ... Britpop is a British alternative rock movement from the mid 1990s, characterised by the appearance of bands who borrowed many influences from 1960s and 1970s while creating big, catchy hooks, as well as the glamour of earlier pop stardom and the sense that they were creating the soundtrack to the... Country of origin United Kingdom Classification and breed standards For information about many breeds of the bulldog type, see Bulldog breeds. ... A Cap of Maintenance is a ceremonial crimson velvet cap, lined with ermine. ... Cool Britannia is a term used in some media to describe the contemporary culture of the United Kingdom, coined in the mid-1990s and closely associated with the New Labour government of Tony Blair. ... Coronation Street is Britains longest-running television soap opera, and the UKs consistently highest-rated show. ... A cricket match in progress. ... Stars from Crossroads Crossroads was a British television soap opera set in a motel near Birmingham. ... Coronation Chair and Regalia of England The collective term Crown Jewels denotes the regalia and vestments worn by the sovereign of the United Kingdom during the coronation ceremony and at various other state functions. ... Cutty-sark - Wikipedia /**/ @import /w/skins-1. ... Main article: History of Doctor Who Doctor Who first appeared on BBC television at 5:15 p. ... The Battle of Trafalgar by J. M. W. Turner (oil on canvas, 1822–1824) shows the last three letters of this famous signal flying from the Victory. ... FA Premier League logo The FA Premier League (which, for sponsorship/legal reasons, is often referred to as the Barclays Premiership in the UK and the Barclays English Premier League internationally) is a league competiton for English Football clubs located at the top of the English football league system (above... Fish and chips in wrapping paper Fish and chips or fishnchips, a popular take-away food, consists of deep-fried fish in batter with deep-fried potatoes. ... Federation Internationale de Football Association (FIFA) Asian Football Confederation (AFC) Confederation of African Football (CAF) Confederation of North, Central American and Caribbean Association Football (CONCACAF) Union of European Football Associations (UEFA) South American Football Confederation (CONMEBOL) Oceania Football Confederation (OFC) The Current Laws of the Game (LOTG) The Rec. ... A full English breakfast, or traditional fry-up, is a traditional breakfast meal in England. ... God Save the Queen is a patriotic song whose origin remains a matter of speculation. ... Pipe Major There are many kinds of bagpipes, but the best-known is the piob mhor or Great Highland Bagpipes, which were developed in Scotland. ... In the United Kingdom, a hackney carriage is a taxicab licensed by the Public Carriage Office in the London Metropolitan Area or by the local authority in other parts of England and Wales and the Scottish Executive in Scotland. ... an uncooked small haggis a cooked small haggis content of a haggis Haggis is a traditional Scottish dish. ... Hyacinth Bucket, receiving a call from her son Sheridan. ... Jack the Ripper is the pseudonym given to an unidentified serial killer active in the largely impoverished Whitechapel area of London, England in the second half of 1888. ... ... World War I recruiting poster John Bull is a national personification of Britain created by Dr. John Arbuthnot in 1712 and popularized first by British print makers and then overseas by illustrators such as American cartoonist Thomas Nast. ... The kilt is seen as an item of traditional Scottish Highland dress, although the origin of that tradition is more recent than is commonly believed. ... King Arthur is an important figure in the mythology of Great Britain, where he appears as the ideal of kingship in both war and peace. ... Land of Hope and Glory, also known as Pomp And Circumstance, is an English patriotic song. ... A Promenade concert in the Royal Albert Hall, 2004. ... The current London Bridge, viewed from the south-west London Bridge is a bridge over the River Thames, between the City of London and Southwark. ... The London Eye seen from Westminster Bridge The British Airways London Eye, sometimes called the Millennium Wheel (Coordinates: 51° 30′12″N, 00° 07′11″W), is the first-built and largest observation wheel in the world (a type of or evolution on the Ferris wheel), and has been since... Marks and Spencer plc (known also as M&S, Your M&S, and sometimes colloquially as Marks and Sparks) is a British retailer. ... Pot of Marmite Marmite is a popular British savoury spread, made from yeast extract, a by-product of the beer brewing process. ... Joan Hickson as Miss Marple Jane Marple, usually known as Miss Marple, is a fictional character appearing in many Agatha Christie novels. ... The logo of the mod movement was a stylised target, based on the roundel of the Royal Air Force. ... A Page Three girl is a woman who models for nude and topless photographs published in the UK tabloid The Sun. ... A pint glass is a drinking vessel holding a pint (568ml) of liquid and is usually used for beer. ... 20th century British police call box, similar to that used in Doctor Who A police box is a telephone kiosk or callbox for use by members of the police. ... An amusingly named pub (the Old New Inn) at Bourton-on-the-Water, in the Cotswold Hills of South West England A pub in the Haymarket area of Edinburgh, Scotland A public house, usually known as a pub, is a drinking establishment found mainly in the United Kingdom, Ireland, Canada... Sentry of the Grenadier Guards posted outside St Jamess Palace The Queens Guard and Queens Life Guard are the names given to contingents of cavalry and infantry soldiers charged with guarding the official royal residences in London. ... RMS Queen Mary was a Cunard Line (then Cunard White Star Line) ocean liner that sailed the North Atlantic Ocean from 1936 to 1967. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... A K6 red telephone box designed by Sir Giles Gilbert Scott K2 red telephone boxes behind Enzo Plazzottas bronze, Young Dancer, on Broad Street, Covent Garden, London A red telephone box in Oxford The red telephone box, a public telephone kiosk designed by Sir Giles Gilbert Scott, was a... Binomial name Erithacus rubecula (Linnaeus, 1758) The European Robin (Erithacus rubecula) is a small passerine bird that was formerly classed as a member of the thrush family, but is now considered to be an Old World flycatcher, Muscicapidae. ... Robin Hood is the archetypal English folk hero, an outlaw who, in modern versions of the legend, stole from the rich to give to the poor. ... First London AEC Routemaster, RML 2473 (JJD 473D), on route 7 approaching Ladbroke Grove tube station in April 2002. ... In the United Kingdom, a Royal Warrant is a grant made by senior members of the British Royal Family to companies or tradespeople who supply goods and services to individuals in the family. ... Rule Britannia is a patriotic British national song, originating from the poem Rule Britannia by James Thomson, and put to music by Thomas Arne in 1740. ... Argentina-France Rugby Union match Rugby football refers to sports descended from a common form of football developed at Rugby School. ... Scots Wha Hae ( a calque on the English Scots who have *) is a patriotic song of Scotland which served for a long time as an unofficial National anthem of the country, but has lately been largely supplanted by Scotland the Brave and The Flower of Scotland. ... Sherlock Holmes Sherlock Holmes (1854–1957, according to William S. Baring-Gould) is a fictional detective of the late 19th and early 20th centuries, created by Scottish author and physician Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. ... The Sten (or Sten gun) was a family of British, 9 mm submachine guns used heavily by the British Empire and Commonwealth forces throughout World War II and the Korean War. ... Stilton cheese is a cheese of England. ... Woodstock: the iconic Sixties event The Sixties in its most obvious sense refers to the decade between 1960 and 1969 (see: 1960s), but the expression has taken on a wider meaning over the past 20 years. ... A tartan is a specific woven pattern that often signifies a particular Scottish clan in the modern era. ... A cup of hot tea A tea bush. ... Tea (a meal, as opposed to the beverage), has different meanings according to country. ... BBC Test Card F Test Card F was a test card, an image used to determine the quality of a broadcast television picture, and due to its use on BBC television for more than 30 years when broadcasting was off the air, it is probably the most commonly seen test... The classic Thames Television logo (1969 - 1989), featuring a geographically incorrect montage of London landmarks. ... First World War British soldiers in the trenches Tommy Atkins (often just Tommy) is a term for a common soldier in the British Army that is particularly associated with World War I. German soldiers would call out to Tommy across no mans land if they wished to speak to... US Marine Corps M1917 Brodie pattern helmet The Brodie helmet (also called the shrapnel helmet or Tommy helmet, and in the United States known as a doughboy helmet) was a steel helmet designed and patented in 1915 by John L. Brodie. ... Sir John Sinclair by Henry Raeburn, 1794-95. ... The Tube map is the commonly-used name for the schematic diagram used to represent the lines and stations of the London Underground. ... Twiglets are a crunchy snack food shaped like small twigs and originally flavoured with a substance similar to Marmite or Vegemite, although they now come in several varieties. ... An umbrella is a device used for temporary shade or shelter from precipitation. ... Flag Ratio: 1:2 The Union Flag or Union Jack is the flag most commonly associated with the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland and was also used throughout the former British Empire. ... The current climate of the United Kingdom is classified as temperate, with warm summers, cool winters and plentiful precipitation throughout the year. ... A pair of Wellington boots The Wellington boot, also known as a welly, a wellie, or a gumboot, is a type of boot based upon Hessian boots worn and popularised by Arthur Wellesley, 1st Duke of Wellington and fashionable among the British aristocracy in the early 19th century. ... Woolworths Group plc is a general merchandise business in the United Kingdom. ...

British theatre

Main article: British theatre

RADAs theatre in London Royal Academy of Dramatic Art (RADA) in London, England is a British drama school. ... The Royal National Theatre from Waterloo Bridge The Royal National Theatre of Great Britain is a building and theatre company on Londons South Bank, located immediately east of the southern end of Waterloo Bridge. ... The Laurence Olivier Awards, previously known as The Society of West End Theatre Awards, were renamed in honour of British actor Laurence Olivier, Baron Olivier in 1984, having first been established in 1976. ...

British film

Main article: Cinema of the United Kingdom Michael Caine in Get Carter (1971) The United Kingdom has been influential in the technological, commercial, and artistic development of cinema. ...

The British Film Institute (BFI) is a charitable organisation established by Royal Charter to encourage the development of the arts of film, television and the moving image throughout the United Kingdom, to promote their use as a record of contemporary life and manners, to promote education about film, television and... In 1999 the British Film Institute surveyed 1000 people from the world of UK film and television to produce the BFI 100 list of the greatest British films of the 20th century. ... The British National Film and Television Archive collects, preserves, restores and then shares the films and television programmes which have helped to shape and record British life and times since cinema was invented in the late nineteenth century. ... The British Academy of Film and Television Arts (BAFTA), is a British organization that hosts annual awards shows for film, television, childrens film and television, and interactive media. ... The British Independent Film Awards were created in 1998 to celebrate achievement in independently funded British movies. ... The Carry On films were a long-running series of British popular low-budget comedy films, directed by Gerald Thomas and produced by Peter Rogers. ...

Museums

A museum is typically a non-profit, permanent institution in the service of society and of its development, open to the public, which acquires, conserves, researches, communicates and exhibits, for purposes of study, education enjoyment, the tangible and intangible evidence of people and their environment. ... Museums in England is a link page for any museum in England. ... Museums in Northern Ireland is a link page for any museum in Northern Ireland. ... Museums in Scotland is a link page for any museum in Scotland. ... Museums in Wales is a link page for any museum in Wales. ... This list is intended as a list of museums in Britain. ...

Gardens

Part of a garden in Bristol, England A flower bed in the gardens of Bristol Zoo, England Checkered flower bed in Tours, France Youll find it near, youll find it far. ... Botanical gardens in the United Kingdom is a link page for any botanical garden, arboretum or pinetum in the United Kingdom. ... Gardens in England is a link page for any garden, botanical garden, arboretum or pinetum open to the public in England. ... Gardens in Scotland is a link page for any garden or botanic garden in Scotland. ... Gardens in Wales is a link page for any garden open to the public in Wales. ... Gardens in Northern Ireland is a link page for any garden open to the public in Northern Ireland. ...

Gambling

Gambling in the United Kingdom is regulated by the Gambling Commission on behalf of the governments Department for Culture, Media and Sport (DCMS) under the Gambling Act [2005]. This Act of Parliament significantly updated the UKs gambling laws, including the introduction of a new structure of protections for...

Other

British humour has a reputation for being puzzling to non-British speakers of English. ... Popular British soap operas include: The Archers onBBC Radio 4 Coronation Street on ITV Crossroads (cancelled) Emmerdale on ITV Brookside on Channel 4 (cancelled) EastEnders on BBC1 Neighbours on BBC1, imported from Australia (Grundy). ... British literature is literature from the United Kingdom, the Isle of Man and the Channel Islands. ... British Library Ossulston St entrance, with distinctive red logo. ... British comics is the art form of comics as practiced within the United Kingdom. ... A contemporary dancer rehearsing Dance (from Old French dance, further history unknown) generally refers to human movement either used as a form of expression (see also body language) or presented in a social, spiritual or performance setting. ... A Morris dance is a form of folk dance. ... For the web development framework by the same name, see Maypole framework. ... Festivals in the United Kingdom is a link page for any established festival or carnival in any part of the United Kingdom. ... An amusingly named pub (the Old New Inn) at Bourton-on-the-Water, in the Cotswold Hills of South West England A pub in the Haymarket area of Edinburgh, Scotland A public house, usually known as a pub, is a drinking establishment found mainly in the United Kingdom, Ireland, Canada... CAMRA (the Campaign For Real Ale) is an independent, voluntary, consumer organisation in the United Kingdom, with the main aim of promoting real ale and the traditional British pub. ... A pub quiz is a quiz held in a pub. ... Stiff Upper Lip is a 2000 (see 2000 in music) hard rock album by Australian band AC/DC. The album was recorded at The Warehouse Studio in Vancouver, British Columbia and mastered at Sterling Sound in New York City. ... The 100 Greatest Cartoons was a documentary which featured a poll conducted by the British television channel Channel 4 in 2004. ...

Education

Education in the United Kingdom is covered in the following articles: Education in England Education in Northern Ireland Education in Scotland Education in Wales Grammar schools in the United Kingdom Achievement in British Education List of schools in the United Kingdom British universities School inspection organisations: Office for Standards in... The following is a partial list of schools in the United Kingdom. ... This is a list of universities in the United Kingdom. ... The British undergraduate degree classification system is a grading scheme used to distinguish between the achievements of undergraduate degree holders (such as those gaining bachelors degrees or undergraduate masters degrees) in the United Kingdom. ... A public school, in current English, Welsh and Northern Ireland usage, is a (usually) prestigious independent school, for children usually between the ages of 11 or 13 and 18, which charges fees and is not financed by the state. ... Education in the United Kingdom is covered in the following articles: Education in England Education in Northern Ireland Education in Scotland Education in Wales Grammar schools in the United Kingdom Achievement in British Education List of schools in the United Kingdom British universities School inspection organisations: Office for Standards in... Her Majestys Inspectorate of Education is a body with responsibility for overseeing standards in education in Scotland. ...

Religion and ethnicity

The landmass of the United Kingdom had a long history of immigration from mainland Europe, from the Beaker people of the 3rd millennium BC, to the waves of invasions by the Roman Empire and the Anglo-Saxons and Normans. ... The Commission for Racial Equality is a non-governmental organisation in the United Kingdom which tackles racial discrimination and promotes racial equality. ...

Religion in the United Kingdom

Main article: Religion in the United Kingdom St Pauls Cathedral The United Kingdom is a traditionally Christian state, with two of the four home nations having official faiths: Anglicanism, in the form of the Church of England, is the established church in England. ...

Beliefs Though enormous diversity exists in the beliefs of those who self-identify as Christian, it is possible to venture general statements which describe the beliefs of a large majority . ... The Church of England is the officially established Christian church in England, and acts as the mother and senior branch of the worldwide Anglican Communion, as well as a founding member of the Porvoo Communion. ... The Church of Scotland (C of S, also known informally as The Kirk; until the 17th century officially the Kirk of Scotland) is the Christian national church of Scotland. ... The General Assembly of Unitarian and Free Christian Churches is the umbrella organisation for Unitarian, Free Christian and other liberal religious congregations in the United Kingdom. ... The Methodist movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity. ... The Non-subscribers derive their name and their liberal and tolerant identity from early eighteenth century Presbyterian ministers refusing to subscribe, or sign, the Westminster Confession, a standard Reformed statement of faith, at their ordination, forming in 1725 their Presbytery of Antrim. ... The Catholic Church, also known as the Roman Catholic Church, is the Christian Church whose visible and spiritual head is the Pope, currently Pope Benedict XVI. It teaches that it is the one holy catholic and apostolic Church founded by Jesus Christ, and that the sole Church of Christ which... Logo of The United Reformed Church The United Reformed Church (URC) is a Christian denomination (church) in the United Kingdom. ... The Religious Society of Friends, commonly known as Quakers, or Friends, is a religious community founded in England in the 17th century. ... The temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints located in Salt Lake City, Utah is the largest attraction in the citys Temple Square. ... Basic beliefs What can be said to be common to all Hindus is the belief in Dharma (duties and obligations), Reincarnation (rebirth), Karma (actions, leading to a cause and effect relationship), and Moksha (salvation) of every soul through a variety of paths, such as Bhakti (devotion), Karma (action) and Jnana... Islam - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... // Judaism is the religion of the Jewish people. ... This article is about the history of the Jewish people in England. ... The Golden Temple is a sacred shrine for Sikhs Sikhism (Punjabi: ) is a religion based on the teachings of ten Gurus who lived primarily in 16th and 17th century India. ... Buddhism - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... In the Celtic religion, the modern words Druidry or Druidism denote the practices of the ancient druids, the priestly class in ancient Celtic societies through much of Western Europe north of the Alps and in the British Isles. ... Atheism, in its broadest sense, is an absence of belief in the existence of gods. ... Irreligion or irreligiousness is the absence of religious belief. ... The Jedi census phenomenon was a grassroots movement in 2001 for citizens in a few English-speaking countries to record their religion as Jedi or Jedi Knight (after the fictitious religious order of Force-attuned knights in the Star Wars films) on the national census. ... While the legal structures of the United Kingdom do not satisfy the legal definition of freedom of religion, the United Kingdom is a signatory to Article 9 of the European Convention on Human Rights which provides a right to freedom of thought, conscience and religion. ...

Ethnic groups

An ethnic group is a group of people who identify with one another, or are so identified by others, on the basis of a boundary that distinguishes them from other groups. ... The English people are an indigenous European ethnic group originating in the lowlands of Great Britain and are drawn from a composite population descended from a combination of Romano-Celts and Angles, Saxons and Jutes. ... The Dalriada Scots originated from Ireland, from the north of the now-called countyAntrim. ... The Welsh are a Celtic ethnic group primarily associated with Wales and the Welsh language. ... Ulster-Scots is a term mainly used in Ireland and Britain (Scotch-Irish or Scots-Irishis commonly used in North America) primarily to refer to Presbyterian Scots, or their descendents, who migrated from the Scottish Lowlands to Ulster (the northern province of Ireland), largely across the 17th century. ... The Cornish are a Celtic ethnic group primarily found in Cornwall. ... // The Irish in Britain The Irish diaspora numbers far more people outside of Ireland than at home. ... The British Afro-Caribbean community is generally regarded as the most integrated non-white ethnic grouping of the United Kingdom. ... The term British Asian is used to denote a person of South Asian ancestry or origin, who was born in or is an immigrant to the United Kingdom. ... Chinese British are overseas Chinese born or naturalised in the United Kingdom. ... Irish Travellers are a nomadic or itinerant people of Irish origin living in Ireland, Great Britain and the United States. ... Irish Travellers are a nomadic or itinerant people of Irish origin living in Ireland, Great Britain and the United States. ... The Roma people (pronounced rahma, singular Rom, sometimes Rroma, and Rrom) along with the closely related Sinti people are commonly known as Gypsies in English, and as Tsigany in most of Europe. ... New age travellers or Peace Convoy are a peculiarly British social phenomenon consisting of a group of people who often espouse New age and Neopagan beliefs, and who travel between music festivals and fairs in order to live in a community with others who hold similar beliefs. ...

Languages in the United Kingdom

Main article: Languages in the United Kingdom The United Kingdom has no official language. ...

The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... British English (BrE) is a term used to differentiate the form of the written English language in the United Kingdom from other forms of the English language. ... A dialect (from the Greek word διάλεκτος, dialektos) is a variety of a language used by people from a particular geographic area. ... The regional accents of English speakers show great variation across the areas where English is spoken as a first language. ... The Oxford English Dictionary (OED) is a comprehensive dictionary published by the Oxford University Press (OUP). ... This article outlines the differences between American English, the form of the English language spoken in the United States, and Commonwealth English (often called British English). ... Received Pronunciation (RP) is a form of pronunciation of the English language, sometimes defined as the educated spoken English of southeastern England. It is a dialect of English English often taught to non-native speakers, and represented in the pronunciation schemes of most British dictionaries. ... Estuary English is a name given to the form of English widely spoken in South East England, especially along the river Thames and its estuary. ... Cockney rhyming slang (sometimes abbreviated as CRS) is a form of English slang which originated in the East End of London. ... The word cant can mean more than one thing: Cant is insincere speech, similar to hypocrisy. ... Polari (or alternatively Palare, from Italian parlare, to talk) was a form of cant slang used in the gay subculture in Britain in the 1950s and 1960s. ... Diagram showing the geographical locations of selected languages and dialects of the British Isles. ... The West Country dialects, or West Country accents, are generic terms applied to any of several English dialects or accents used by much of the indigenous population of the south western part of England, the area popularly known as the West Country. ... The Celtic languages are the languages descended from Proto-Celtic, or Common Celtic, spoken by ancient and modern Celts alike. ... Welsh redirects here, and this article describes the Welsh language. ... Note: This page contains phonetic information presented in the International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) using Unicode. ... The Irish language is a minority language in Northern Ireland, known in Irish as Tuaisceart Éireann or na sé chontae (the six counties). ... The Cornish language (in Cornish: Kernowek, Kernewek, Curnoack) is one of the Brythonic group of Celtic languages that includes Welsh, Breton, the extinct Cumbric and perhaps the hypothetical Ivernic. ... Scots or Lallans (Eng: Lowlands), often Lowland Scots to distinguish it from the Scottish Gaelic language of the highlands, is a West Germanic language used in Scotland, parts of Northern Ireland, and border areas of the Republic of Ireland, where it is known in official circles as Ulster Scots or... Ulster Scots (also known as Ullans) refers to a variety of Lowland Scots spoken in parts of Ulster in Ireland. ... British sign language (BSL) is the sign language used in the United Kingdom (UK). ... Romany (or Romani) is the language of the Roma and Sinti, travelling peoples often referred to in English as gypsies. They came originally from the Indian Subcontinent or what is now, northern India and parts of Pakistan, and their language belongs to the Indo-Aryan branch of the Indo-European... Gujarati (ગુજરાતી; also sometimes Gujrati) is a language native to the state of Gujarat in western India. ... Hindi (हिन्दी) is a language spoken mainly in North and Central India. ... Punjabi (also Panjabi, Paṁjābī, ਪੰਜਾਬੀ in Gurmukhī, پنجابی in Shahmukhi) is the language of the Punjab regions of India and Pakistan. ... Urdu (اردو) is an Indo-European language of the Indo-Aryan family which developed under Persian influence in the Indian subcontinent during the time of the Delhi Sultanate and Mughal Empire. ... Bengali or Bangla (বাংলা) is an Indo-Aryan language of South Asia that evolved as a successor to the Sanskrit, Pali, and Prakrit languages. ...

Food

Although it has consistently excelled in its desserts and puddings, in terms of its savoury dishes, British cuisine still suffers from a relatively poor international reputation, being typically represented by dishes consisting of heavily cooked meats and vegetables that need to be accompanied by bottled sauces or heavily seasoned after... The Food and Drink Federation (FDF) is a organisation that represents and advises the UK food and drink manufacturers. ...

Science and technology

// What is science? There are various understandings of the word science. According to empiricism, scientific theories are objective, empirically testable, and predictive — they predict empirical results that can be checked and possibly contradicted. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... This page contains a list of some of the scientific research institutes in the UK that are owned by the government. ...

Sports and games

The following are the major sports; local groups may well play many others. A game is a (often, but not always recreational) activity involving one or more players. ...


Cricket

A cricket match in progress. ... See also: Notable achievements in the 2005 English cricket season The 2005 English cricket season is one of the most eagerly anticipated in recent times. ... Lords 2005 The Marylebone Cricket Club (MCC), founded in 1787, was the original governing body of international cricket. ... Middlesex County Cricket Club is a first-class cricket club in England, named after the historic county of Middlesex which their home ground, Lords Cricket Ground in London, is located. ...

Association football or soccer

Federation Internationale de Football Association (FIFA) Asian Football Confederation (AFC) Confederation of African Football (CAF) Confederation of North, Central American and Caribbean Association Football (CONCACAF) Union of European Football Associations (UEFA) South American Football Confederation (CONMEBOL) Oceania Football Confederation (OFC) The Current Laws of the Game (LOTG) The Rec. ... The British Home Championship (also known as the Home International Championship) was an annual football competition contested between the UKs four national teams, England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland (Ireland before 1921-1922), from the 1883-1884 season until the 1983-1984 season. ... Football is the unofficial national sport of England, and as such has an important place within English national life. ... The Football Association (The FA) is the governing body of football in England (and the Crown dependencies of Jersey, Guernsey and the Isle of Man). ... First International Scotland 0 - 0 England (Partick, Scotland; 30 November 1872) Largest win Ireland 0 - 13 England (Belfast, Northern Ireland; 18 February 1882) Worst defeat Hungary 7 - 1 England (Budapest, Hungary; 23 May 1954) World Cup Appearances 11 (First in 1950) Best result Winners, 1966 European Championship Appearances 7 (First... FA Premier League logo The FA Premier League (which, for sponsorship/legal reasons, is often referred to as the Barclays Premiership in the UK and the Barclays English Premier League internationally) is a league competiton for English Football clubs located at the top of the English football league system (above... The Football League logo The Football League (often referred to as the Coca-Cola Football League for sponsorship reasons) is a league competition for English football (soccer) clubs (though a few Welsh clubs also take part) containing three divisions (the Football League Championship, Football League One and Football League Two... The FA Cups trophy is also known as the FA Cup. ... The English football league system is a series of interconnected leagues for club football in England (though for historical reasons — namely that the league system was originally intended to be United Kingdom-wide — a small number of Welsh clubs also compete). ... The National League System, otherwise known as the football pyramid, is a comprehensive league structure for football clubs in England playing below the level of the FA Premier League and The Football League. ... Association Football is one of the most popular sports in Scotland, and is sometimes considered the national sport. ... The Scottish Football Association (SFA) was formed in 1873 making it the second oldest national football association in the world (after The English Football Association). ... First International Scotland 0 - 0 England (Partick, Scotland; 30 November 1872) Largest win Scotland 9 - 0 Wales (Glasgow, Scotland; 23 March 1878) Worst defeat Uruguay 7 - 0 Scotland (Basel, Switzerland; 19 June 1954) World Cup Appearances 8 (First in 1954) Best result Round 1, all European Championship Appearances 2 (First... Clubs in Membership of the Scottish Premier League Aberdeen F.C. Celtic F.C. Dundee F.C. Dundee United F.C. Dunfermline Athletic F.C. Heart of Midlothian F.C. Hibernian F.C. Inverness Caledonian Thistle F.C. Kilmarnock F.C. Livingston F.C. Motherwell F.C. Rangers F.C... The Scottish Football League is a league of football (soccer) teams in Scotland. ... The Scottish Premier League (SPL for short) is the top division within the current structure of Scottish football. ... The Highland Football League (HFL) is a league of football (soccer) clubs operating not in just the Scottish highlands as the name may suggest, but across all of the North of Scotland. ... The East of Scotland Football League (EoSFL) is a league of football (soccer) teams from South-East Scotland formed in 1927. ... South of Scotland Football League The South of Scotland Football League features these clubs: Abbey Vale, Annan Athletic A, Crichton, Creetown, Dalbeattie Star A, Dumfries, Fleet Star, Mid Annandale, Newton Stewart, Nithsdale Wanderers, St. ... The Scottish Junior Football Association (SJFA) is the organising body for the junior grade of football (soccer) in Scotland. ... The North Caledonian Football League (NCFL) is an amateur football (soccer) league operating in the highlands of Scotland. ... The Scottish Cup The Scottish FA Cup, also known as The Scottish Cup, is the national cup knockout competition in Scottish football. ... The Irish Football Association (IFA) is the organising body for the sport of football (soccer) in Northern Ireland. ... The Irish Football Association (IFA) is the organising body for the sport of football (soccer) in Northern Ireland. ... The Football Association of Ireland (FAI) is the organising body for the sport of Association football (soccer) in the Republic of Ireland. ... First International Ireland 0 - 13 England (Belfast, Ireland; February 18, 1882) Largest win Northern Ireland 7 - 0 Wales (Belfast, Northern Ireland; February 1, 1930) Worst defeat Ireland 0 - 13 England (Belfast, Ireland; February 18, 1882) World Cup Appearances 3 (First in 1958) Best result Quarterfinals, 1958 European Championship Appearances none... The Irish Football League (IFL), or Irish League, is a league of football (soccer) clubs in Northern Ireland. ... The Football League of Ireland, usually known simply as the League of Ireland or the Eircom League (from the leagues sponsorship by Irish telcommunications company Eircom), is a league of football clubs in the Republic of Ireland. ... The Football Association of Wales is the governing body of football in Wales, being a member of both FIFA and UEFA. Established in 1876, it is the third-oldest association in the world, and is one of the five associations (with the English Football Association, the Scottish Football Association, the... First International Scotland 4 - 0 Wales (Glasgow, Scotland; 26 March 1876) Largest win Wales 11 - 0 Ireland (Wrexham, Wales; 3 March 1888) Worst defeat Scotland 9 - 0 Wales (Glasgow, Scotland; 23 March 1878) World Cup Appearances 1 (First in 1958) Best result Quarter-finals, 1958 European Championship Appearances none (First... The League of Wales (also known as the Vauxhall Masterfit Retailers Welsh Premier League for sponsorship reasons) is the national football league for Wales and is at the top of the Welsh football league system. ...

Rugby

Argentina-France Rugby Union match Rugby football refers to sports descended from a common form of football developed at Rugby School. ... Rugby union is a team sport that was developed from the rules used to play football at Rugby School in England. ... The Rugby Football Union (RFU) is the rugby union governing body in England. ... England Rugby is the name of the English national rugby union team. ... The Guinness Premiership is the present name for the leading rugby union league competition for English clubs. ... National Division One is the second tier of the English Rugby Union leagues. ... Rugby Union is the national sport of Wales. ... The Welsh Rugby Union (WRU) (Welsh: Undeb Rygbi Cymru) is the governing body of rugby union in Wales, recognised by the International Rugby Board. ... The Welsh rugby union team, as the highest level of Welsh rugby union, represent Wales at the national sport of rugby union. ... The Celtic League is an annual rugby union competition involving regional sides from Ireland, Scotland and Wales, seen by many as the third major league in Europe, after the English Guinness Premiership and the French TOP 14. ... 2004/2005 Season Aberavon RFC Bedwas RFC Bridgend Ravens RFC Caerphilly RFC Carmarthen RFC Cardiff RFC Cross Keys RFC Ebbw Vale RFC Llandovery RFC Llanelli RFC Llanharan RFC Neath RFC Newbridge RFC Newport RFC Pontypool RFC Pontypridd RFC Swansea Sharks RFC See also Celtic League Categories: Pages needing attention | Welsh... Registered logo of Scottish Rugby Union - used with permission The Scottish Rugby Union plc is the official title of the governing body of rugby union in Scotland, usually referred to as the Scottish Rugby Union (often abbreviated to SRU) or just as Scottish Rugby. Phil Anderton was the Chief Executive... Rugby union in Scotland is administered by the Scottish Rugby Union, a founder member of the International Rugby Board in 1886 with fellow Celtic nations Ireland and Wales. ... The Celtic League is an annual rugby union competition involving regional sides from Ireland, Scotland and Wales, seen by many as the third major league in Europe, after the English Guinness Premiership and the French TOP 14. ... The Calcutta Cup is a rotating trophy awarded to the winner of an annual rugby union match between the national teams of England and Scotland. ... For the Rugby League Powergen Challenge Cup see Challenge Cup The Powergen Cup (centre) seen in the London Irish clubhouse at Sunbury in 2002. ... The official 2005 Lions logo The British and Irish Lions (formerly British Isles and then the British Lions; commonly the Lions) is a Rugby Union side comprising a pick of the best players from the four Home nation unions in Great Britain and Ireland. ... Rugby league is a team sport, played by two teams of 13 players. ... In England, rugby league is one of the four most popular team sports, alongside soccer (which is by a great distance the dominant sport), cricket and rugby union. ... The Rugby Football League (RFL) is the governing body for Rugby League in the United Kingdom. ... Rugby League is a popular team sport played in Scotland. ... The Scotland Rugby League is the governing body for rugby league in Scotland. ... There is a long history of rugby league in Wales. ... This article is about the Rugby League Challenge Cup. ...

Hiking

Beautiful natural scenes are common hiking destinations Hiking is a form of walking, undertaken with the specific purpose of exploring and enjoying the scenery. ... The following long-distance footpaths can be found in the United Kingdom: UK National Trails Cleveland Way round the edge of the North York Moors National Park in England Cotswold Way in England Glyndwrs Way in Wales Great Glen Way in Scotland Hadrians Wall Path in England North... The Ramblers Association is the largest organisation in the British Isles to look after the interests of walkers (or ramblers) in Britain. ...

Rowing

  • Boat Race (Oxford vs Cambridge)
  • Henley Royal Regatta

A coxless pair, sweep-oar rowing to the left of the photo; the bowside rower (or the starboard one, although the British term applied on this occasion) is further towards the bow of the boat. ... Boat Race Logo Exhausted crews at the finish of the 2002 Boat Race The Boat Race is a rowing race between the rowing clubs of the University of Oxford and the University of Cambridge. ... A race taking place at Henley Regatta 2004 Henley Royal Regatta is a rowing event held every year on the river Thames by the town of Henley-on-Thames. ...

Skiing

Skiing is the activity of gliding over snow using skis (originally wooden planks, now usually made from fiberglass or related composites) strapped to the feet with ski bindings. ... The Ski Club of Great Britain is the UKs leading snowsports club, founded on May 6, 1903. ...

Other

The London Olymics (London hosting the Olympic Games) have taken place twice, with a third scheduled for 2012. ... Curling is a game played on ice with granite stones Curling is a precision sport similar to bowls or bocce, but played on ice with polished heavy stones rather than plastic balls. ... Darts is a game in which darts are thrown at a target hung on a wall. ... English billiards is a form of billiards played on a 6 X 12 rectangular table with pockets in the four corners and in the middle of the long sides (see Snooker for markings and a diagram). ... The Eton Wall Game, which originates from Eton College, is a less-than-vigorous hybrid of rugby union and football played on a strip of ground 5 metres wide and 110 metres long next a slightly curved brick wall (which was erected in 1717). ... Fives is a British form of the American game handball in which a ball is propelled against the walls of a special court using gloved or bare hands as though they were a racquet. ... Eton Fives, one code of the British game of Fives, is a hand-ball game, similar to Rugby Fives, played as doubles in a three-sided court. ... Tennis balls This article is about the sport, tennis. ... Skittles is an old European target sport, from which Ten-pin bowling and Candlepin bowling in the United States, and Five-pin bowling in Canada are descended. ... Snooker table Snooker is a billiards sport that is played on a large (12 X 6) baize-covered table with pockets in each of the four corners and in the middle of each of the long cushions. ...

People

This is a partial list of English people of note and of some notable individuals born there, alphabetically within categories: // Actors/Actresses Tom Baker, (1933-) Dame Judi Dench (1934-) George Formby, (1904-1961) Sir Michael Gambon, (1940-) Sir John Gielgud, (1904-2000) John Gregson, (1919-1975) Rupert Grint, (1988-) Sir... This is a list of famous Irish people. ... The following is a list of some of famous, well-known and/or notable people from Scotland: // Actors (see also Humorists) Ian Bannen, (1928-1999) Billy Boyd, (born 1968) Gerard Butler, (born 1969) Peter Capaldi Robert Carlyle, (born 1961) Hamish Clark, (born 1967) Robbie Coltrane, (born 1950) Sean Connery, (born... This is a list of Welsh people. ... Note: This list includes people of Cornish birth, parentage, or longtime residence. ...

Interest groups and societies

British professional bodies The following is a list of professional bodies in the United Kingdom. ... The Womens Institute (WI) is a membership organisation for women in England and Wales. ... This is a partial list of learned societies, grouped by country. ... See Gentlemens club for an explanation of this particular sort of club. ... Pressure groups in the United Kingdom can be divided into two categories. ... The fathers rights movement in the UK consists of a number of diverse pressure groups, ranging from charities (whose activities are regulated by the Charity Commission) and self_help groups to civil disobedience activists, who started to obtain wide publicity in 2003. ...

See also

After many years of discussion through successive governments, in 2003 then British Home Secretary David Blunkett announced that the government intends to introduce a British national identity card linked to a national identity database, the National Identity Register, which will track all residents of the UK throughout their lives. ... This is a list of topics related to the United Kingdom. ...

Welfare state

There are three main interpretations of the idea of a welfare state: the provision of welfare services by the state. ... The logo of the NHS for England and Wales. ... An NHS Foundation Trust, or commonly called a foundation hospital, is a public benefit corporation which is authorised to provide goods and services for the purposes of the National Health Service in England under the Health and Social Care (Community Health and Standards) Act 2003. ... National insurance is a system of taxes, and related social security benefits, that has operated in the United Kingdom since its introduction in 1911, and wider extension by the government of Clement Attlee in 1946. ... For specific national programs, see Social Security (United States), National insurance (UK), Social Security (Sweden) Social security mainly refers to a field of social welfare concerned with social protection, or protection against socially recognized needs, including poverty, old age, disability, unemployment, families with children and others. ...

Miscellaneous

This article is about post-1824 Imperial units, please see also English unit, U.S. customary unit or Avoirdupois. ... Speedometer gauges on a car showing the speed of the vehicle in miles and kilometres per hour. ... There are a number of famous British miles. ... List of United Kingdom disasters by death toll is a list of major disasters (excluding acts of war) which occurred in the United Kingdom or involved UK citizens, in a definable incident, where the loss of life exceeded 40. ... This article is a brief overview of some aspects of UK taxes. ...

See also

  • Lists of country-related topics - similar lists for other countries

  Results from FactBites:
 
United Kingdom - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (4155 words)
The UK is one of the few countries in the world today that does not have a codified constitution, relying instead on customs and separate pieces of constitutional law.
The UK was, with the US, one of the two main contributors in the development of rock and roll, and the UK has provided some of the most famous pop stars, including the Beatles, Queen, Led Zeppelin, Pink Floyd, the Rolling Stones, The Who and many others.
The UK was at the forefront of punk rock music in the 1970s with bands such as the Sex Pistols and The Clash, and the subsequent rebirth of heavy metal with bands such as Motörhead and Iron Maiden.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m