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Encyclopedia > UK postcodes

UK postal codes are known as postcodes. Postal codes are generally clearly visible outside local Australian post offices. ...


UK postcodes are alphanumeric. These codes were introduced by the Royal Mail over a 15-year period from 1959 to 1974 — the full list is now available electronically from the Royal Mail as the Postcode Address File. They have been widely adopted not just for their original purpose of automating the sorting of mail but for many other purposes such as insurance premium calculations (see Postcode lottery) and as a way to describe United Kingdom locations to route planning software. Royal Mails logo Royal Mail is the national postal service of the United Kingdom. ... The Postcode Address File (PAF) is a data file available from the Royal Mail. ... UK postal codes are known as postcodes. ... Route planning software is computer software designed to plan a route between two geographical locations. ...


However, as the format of the codes does not achieve its objective of primarily identifying the main sorting office and sub-office they have been supplemented by a newer system of five-digit codes called Mailsort. Mail users who can deliver mail to the post office sorted by Mailsort code receive discounts, whilst delivery by postcode provides no such incentive. Mailsort is a five-digit address-coding scheme used internally by the Royal Mail (the UKs postal service) for the automatic direction of mail. ...

Contents

Postcode history

In January 1959 the Post Office analysed the results of a survey on public attitudes towards the use of postal codes. The next step would be choose a town in which to experiment with coded addresses. The envisaged format was to be a six character alphanumeric code with three letters designating the geographical area and three numbers to identify the individual address.[1] On 28 July Ernest Marples, the Postmaster General, announced that Norwich had been selected, and that each of the 150,000 private and business addresses would receive a code by October. Norwich had been selected as it already had eight automatic mail sorting machines in use.[2] The codes were in the form NOR followed by three digits. Year 1959 (MCMLIX) was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... July 28 is the 209th day (210th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 156 days remaining. ... (Alfred) Ernest Marples, Baron Marples (9 December 1907 – 6 July 1978) was a British politician. ... In the United Kingdom, the Postmaster General is a now defunct ministerial position. ... Norwich is a city in East Anglia, in Eastern England. ...


In October 1965 it was confirmed that postal coding was to be extended to the rest of the country in the "next few years".[3] On 5 November 1966 post codes were introduced in Croydon. The codes for central Croydon started with the letters CRO, and those of the surrounding post towns with CR2, CR3 and CR4. This was to be the beginning of a ten year plan, costing an estimated £24 million. Within two years it was expected that coding would be used in Aberdeen, Belfast, Brighton, Bristol, Bromley, Cardiff, Coventry, Manchester, Newcastle upon Tyne, Newport, Reading, Sheffield, Southampton and the western district of London.[4] By 1967 codes had been introduced to Aberdeen, Southampton, Brighton and Derby.[5] In 1970 codes were introduced to the Western and North West London areas.[6] In December 1970 Christmas mail was franked with the message "Remember to use the Postcode", although codes were only used to sort mail in a handful of sorting offices.[7] 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1965 calendar). ... November 5 is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 56 days remaining. ... 1966 (MCMLXVI) was a common year starting on Saturday (the link is to a full 1966 calendar). ... Croydon is a large town and major commercial centre in southern England, and is also an area of Greater London, being the main settlement in the London Borough of Croydon. ... For other uses, see Aberdeen (disambiguation). ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 54. ... For other places with the same name, see Brighton (disambiguation). ... Bristol (IPA: ) is a city, unitary authority and ceremonial county in South West England, 115 miles (185 km) west of London and between the cities of Bath, Gloucester and the borough of Swindon. ... Bromley is the principal town in the London Borough of Bromley, England. ... Cardiff (English:  Welsh: ) is the capital, largest and core city of Wales. ... The Precinct in Coventry city centre. ... Manchester is a city and metropolitan borough, in the metropolitan county of Greater Manchester, North West England. ... This article is about a city in the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see Newport (disambiguation). ... Reading is a town, unitary authority (the Borough of Reading) and urban area in the English county of Berkshire. ... For other uses, see Sheffield (disambiguation). ... Southampton is a city, unitary authority and major port situated on the south coast of England. ... 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar (the link is to a full 1967 calendar). ... For other places with the same name, see Brighton (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Derby (disambiguation). ... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1970 calendar). ...


During 1971 occupants of addresses began to receive notification of their postcode. Asked in the House of Commons about the completion of the coding exercise, the Postmaster General, Sir John Eden stated it was expected to be completed during 1972.[8] 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday. ... The House of Commons is the lower house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... John Benedict Eden, Baron Eden of Winton Bt, PC (born 15 September 1925) is a British Conservative politician. ... 1972 (MCMLXXII) was a leap year starting on Saturday. ...


The scheme was finalised in 1974 when Norwich was completely re-coded but the scheme tested in Croydon was sufficiently close to the final design for it to be retained.[9] Newport was originally allocated NPT, in a similar way to Norwich and Croydon, with the surrounding towns allocated NP1-NP8. This lasted into the mid 1980s when for operational reasons (NPT being non-standard, and too similar to NP7) it was recoded. 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ...


The legacy of the Croydon trial can still be seen today:

  • CR0 was the only postal district with a zero in that position: all others start with 1. This caused one of the PAF (see above) software products produced by the Royal Mail themselves to misbehave slightly. Subsequently, the "zeroth" district has been used in some other postcode areas, such as Bolton, Harrow and the Dengie peninsula in Essex.
  • A separate postal "district", CR9 is used for large users and PO Box holders. This policy has been used elsewhere, with normal postcodes "growing" upwards from district 1 and large-user postcodes "growing" downwards from district 99.
  • The CR0 district contains far more addresses than any other postal district in the country.
  • CR1 has never been used — possibly left spare for rationalisation. (The other CR districts, CR2 etc. were coded later and conform to the general standards.)
  • There was at one point a movement to change all CR0 postcodes to CR1, but this was rejected.
  • CR0 is often incorrectly written as CRO, although in some type faces the digit '0' and letter 'O' are identical -- the problem is exacerbated as it is often pronounced 'Sea Arr Oh' rather than 'Sea Arr Zero'.

Dengie is a peninsula in Essex, England, that once formed a hundred of the same name (sometimes spelled Dengy). ...

Format

The format of UK postcodes is generally:

A9 9AA
A99 9AA
A9A 9AA
AA9 9AA
AA99 9AA
AA9A 9AA

where A signifies a letter and 9 a digit. It is a hierarchical system, working from left to right — the first letter or pair of letters represents the area, the following digit or digits represent the district within that area, and so on. Each postcode generally represents a street, part of a street, or a single premises. This feature makes the postcode useful to route planning software. Route planning software is computer software designed to plan a route between two geographical locations. ...


The part of the code before the space is the outward code or out code used to direct mail from one sorting office to the destination sorting office, while the part after the space is the inward code or in code used to sort the mail into individual delivery rounds, each separate code usually identifying the address to within 80 properties (with an average of 14 properties per postal code), although a large business may have a unique code. The outward code can be split further into the area part (letters identifying one of 124 postal areas) and the district part (usually numbers); similarly, the inward code is split into the sector part (number) and the unit part (letters).

Name Location Component Format Number
postcode area out code A or AA 124
postal district out code 9, 99 or 9A 3,064
sector in code 9 11,598
unit in code AA 1,780,000
Postcode Addresses 27,000,000

The letters in the outward code may give some clue to its geographical location (but see London below). For example, BS indicates Bristol, G indicates Glasgow and CF indicates Cardiff; see List of postcode areas in the United Kingdom for a full list. Although BT indicates Belfast, it covers the whole of Northern Ireland. The letters in the inward code, however, are restricted to the set ABDEFGHJLNPQRSTUWXYZ (excluding CIKMOV), which generally do not resemble digits or each other when hand-written. The Postcode Address File (PAF) is a data file available from the Royal Mail. ... Bristol (IPA: ) is a city, unitary authority and ceremonial county in South West England, 115 miles (185 km) west of London and between the cities of Bath, Gloucester and the borough of Swindon. ... For other uses, see Glasgow (disambiguation). ... Cardiff (English:  Welsh: ) is the capital, largest and core city of Wales. ... The UK postal system runs on a system of alphanumeric codes, or postcodes. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 54. ... Motto:  (Latin for Who will separate us?)[1] Anthem: UK: God Save the Queen Regional: (de facto) Londonderry Air Capital Belfast Largest city Belfast Official language(s) English (de facto), Ulster Scots, Irish3, Northern Ireland Sign Language, Irish Sign Language Government Constitutional monarchy  - Queen Queen Elizabeth II  - Prime Minister of...


There are at least two exceptions (other than the overseas territories) to this format:

Small-town post office and town hall in Lockhart, Alabama A post office is a facility (in most countries, a government one) where the public can purchase postage stamps for mailing correspondence or merchandise, and also drop off or pick up packages or other special-delivery items. ... Girobank was founded in 1968 and originally was known as National Girobank. ... For the 1973 childrens picture book by Raymond Briggs, see Raymond Briggs. ...

Greater London postcodes

In the London Postal Area postcodes are slightly different, being based on the 1856 system of Postal Districts which was refined in 1917 by numbering the 163 Sub-Districts; predating by many years the introduction of postcodes in the 1960s: The system of London postal districts predate the introduction of postcodes throughout the United Kingdom in the 1960s and have been adapted over time. ... The London postal districts are divisions of the London post town in England and are primarily used for the direction of mail. ... The London postal districts are divisions of the London post town in England and are primarily used for the direction of mail. ... Dr. Seuss Jean Shepherd Ringo Starr John Steinbeck Gloria Steinem Tom Stoppard Hunter S. Thompson Gore Vidal Peter Vincent Kurt Vonnegut Andy Warhol Alan Watts Bob Weir Brian Wilson Tom Wolfe There were six Olympics held during the decade. ...

  • In central London, WC and EC (West Central and East Central)
  • In the rest of the London Postal Area, N, NW, SW, SE, W and E.

The London postal districts rarely coincide with the boundaries of the London boroughs (even the former, smaller Metropolitan Boroughs). The numbering system appears arbitrary on the map: for example, NW1 is close to central London, but NW2 is a long way out. This is because (after starting with 1 for the area containing the main sorting office) they were numbered alphabetically by the name of the main sorting office. The administrative area of Greater London contains thirty-two London boroughs. ...


The area covered by the London postal districts was somewhat larger than the County of London, and included parts of Kent, Essex, Surrey, Middlesex and Hertfordshire. In 1965 the creation of Greater London caused this situation to be reversed as the boundaries of Greater London went beyond most of the existing London postal districts. The County of London (in red), super imposed upon todays Greater London area, to show the difference in size with post-1965 Borough boundaries The County of London was an administrative county of England from 1888 to 1965. ... This article is about the county in England. ... Essex is a county in the East of England. ... Not to be confused with Surry. ... Middlesex is one of the 39 historic counties of England and the second smallest (after Rutland). ... Hertfordshire (pronounced Hartfordshire and abbreviated as Herts) is an inland county in the United Kingdom and part of the East of England Government Office region. ... 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (the link is to a full 1965 calendar). ... Greater London is the top level administrative subdivision covering London, England. ...


Those places not covered by the existing districts received postcodes as part of the national coding plan, so the postcode areas of "EN" Enfield, "KT" Kingston upon Thames, "HA" Harrow, "UB" Uxbridge", "TW" Twickenham, "SM" Sutton, "CR" Croydon, "DA" Dartford, "BR" Bromley, "RM" Romford and "IG" Ilford cross administrative boundaries and cover parts of neighbouring counties as well as parts of Greater London. Enfield is the name of several places. ... Kingston upon Thames, part of the Royal Borough of Kingston upon Thames, is an ancient market town where Saxon kings were crowned, and is now a lively suburb of London. ... Alternative meanings: Harrow, London, a place in the London Borough of Harrow; Harrow School, a famous public school in the United Kingdom; The Harrow, a fantasy and horror magazine. ... Uxbridge is a place in the London Borough of Hillingdon in West London, England. ... Twickenham is a suburb in the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames, south west London. ... Sutton is the principal town in the London Borough of Sutton. ... Croydon is a large town and major commercial centre in southern England, and is also an area of Greater London, being the main settlement in the London Borough of Croydon. ... Dartford is the principal town in the borough of Dartford. ... Bromley is the principal town in the London Borough of Bromley, England. ... Romford is a town in East London, England and the principal settlement of the London Borough of Havering. ... Ilford is a district in the London Borough of Redbridge in East London, England. ...


A further complication is that in some of the most central London areas, a further graduation has been necessary to produce enough postcodes, giving codes like EC1A 1AA.


While most postcodes are allocated by administrative convenience, a few are deliberately chosen. For example in Westminster: Westminster is a district within the City of Westminster in London. ...

The House of Commons is the lower house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the British House of Lords. ... The Palace of Westminster, also known as the Houses of Parliament or Westminster Palace, in London, England is where the two Houses of the Parliament of the United Kingdom (the House of Lords and the House of Commons) meet to conduct their business. ... Buckingham Palace and the Victoria Memorial. ... // Overview Number Ten Downing street is the official residence of the First Lord of Her Majesty’s Treasury and Prime Minister of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. ... The Prime Minister is in practice the most important political office in the United Kingdom. ... The First Lord of the Treasury is the head of the commission exercising the ancient office of Lord High Treasurer in the United Kingdom, usually but not always the Prime Minister. ... 11 Downing Street (commonly known as Number 11), is the official residence of the Second Lord of the Treasury, who in modern times has always been the British Chancellor of the Exchequer. ... The Chancellor of the Exchequer is the title held by the British cabinet minister responsible for all financial matters. ... The new eastern entrance to HM Treasury HM Treasury, in full Her Majestys Treasury, informally The Treasury, is the United Kingdom government department responsible for developing and executing the UK Governments financial and economic policy. ...

Postcode lottery

Postcodes were devised solely for the purposes of sorting and directing mail and rarely coincide with political boundaries. However, over time they have become a geographical reference in their own right with postcodes and postcode groups becoming synonymous with certain towns and districts. Further to this, the postcode has been used by organisations for other applications including government statistics, marketing, calculation of car and household insurance premiums and credit referencing.


There are several groups, mostly on the fringes of major population centres, who are affected in one way or another by the associations of their postcode. There is a movement in the Royal Borough of Windsor and Maidenhead to change the first two characters of their postcodes from "SL" to "WM" for vanity, so as not to be associated with Slough. A businessman in Ilford wishes to have the postcode of IG1 changed to E19 as he claims customers do not realise his business is based in London. The Royal Borough of Windsor and Maidenhead is a unitary authority in Berkshire, South East England. ... Slough (pronounced ) is a town and unitary authority (Borough of Slough) in Berkshire, England. ... Ilford is a district in the London Borough of Redbridge in East London, England. ... IG1 is the postcode for Ilford in the London Borough of Redbridge in East London. ...


Residents of West Heath in SE2 wish to have their postcodes changed to that of adjacent Bexleyheath, citing higher insurance premiums as reason to change. Some residents of Kingston Vale in London SW15 wish to have their postcodes changed to adjacent Kingston upon Thames for the same reasons. Residents of Denham, Buckinghamshire have postcodes associated with Uxbridge, which causes confusion to delivery drivers. SE2 is the postcode for Abbey Wood in the London Borough of Greenwich. ... Bexleyheath, formerly known as Bexley New Town, part of the London Borough of Bexley, consists of a suburban development located 12 miles (19. ... Kingston Vale is a place in the Royal Borough of Kingston upon Thames. ... SW15 is the postcode for Putney in the London Borough of Wandsworth The post town for this postcode is LONDON. Robert Louis Stevenson once lived here. ... Kingston upon Thames, part of the Royal Borough of Kingston upon Thames, is an ancient market town where Saxon kings were crowned, and is now a lively suburb of London. ... Denham is a village in Buckinghamshire, England. ... Uxbridge is a place in the London Borough of Hillingdon in West London, England. ...


In all these cases Royal Mail has said that there is "virtually no hope" of changing their postcode referring to their policy of changing postcodes only to match changes in their operations. [5] Under this policy residents of the Wirral Peninsula had their postcodes changed from the "L" (Liverpool) to "CH" (Chester) group when a new sorting office was opened. [11] The Wirral is a peninsula in North West England bounded by the River Dee to the west and the River Mersey to the east. ...


Some postcode areas straddle England's borders with Wales and Scotland. Examples of such postcodes include CH4, HR3, SY10, NP16 and TD15. This has led to British Sky Broadcasting subscribers receiving the wrong BBC and ITV regions, and newly-licensed radio amateurs being given incorrect call signs. Motto: (French for God and my right) Anthem: God Save the King/Queen Capital London (de facto) Largest city London Official language(s) English (de facto) Unification    - by Athelstan AD 927  Area    - Total 130,395 km² (1st in UK)   50,346 sq mi  Population    - 2006 est. ... This article is about the country. ... Motto: (Latin) No one provokes me with impunity1 Anthem: Multiple unofficial anthems Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow Official language(s) English, Gaelic, Scots2 Government  - Queen Queen Elizabeth II  - UK Prime Minister Tony Blair MP  - First Minister Jack McConnell MSP Unification    - by Kenneth I 843  Area    - Total 78,772 km... British Sky Broadcasting (BSkyB — formerly two companies, Sky Television and BSB) is a company that operates Sky Digital, the most popular subscription television service in the UK and the Republic of Ireland. ... Ham radio station with modern solid-state transceiver featuring LCD display and DSP capabilities Ham radio station with vintage vacuum tube gear featuring separate transmitter, receiver and power supply Amateur radio, often called Ham radio, is a hobby and public service enjoyed by about 6 million people throughout the world. ... Call sign can refer to different types of call signs: Airline call sign Aviator call sign Cosmonaut call sign Radio and television call signs Tactical call sign, also known as a tactical designator See also: International Callsign Allocations, Maritime Mobile Service Identity This is a disambiguation page — a navigational...


Other areas' postcodes

Until the 1960s, Postal Areas such as Belfast, Birmingham, Bradford, Edinburgh, Glasgow, Leeds, Liverpool, Manchester, Salford, Newcastle upon Tyne and Sheffield were divided into numbered Postal Districts, e.g. Toxteth in Liverpool was Liverpool 8. When the national postcode system was introduced, these were incorporated into it, so that postcodes in Toxteth start with L8, followed by the rest of the postcode. A similar system is still used in the Republic of Ireland for Dublin's postal districts. Dr. Seuss Jean Shepherd Ringo Starr John Steinbeck Gloria Steinem Tom Stoppard Hunter S. Thompson Gore Vidal Peter Vincent Kurt Vonnegut Andy Warhol Alan Watts Bob Weir Brian Wilson Tom Wolfe There were six Olympics held during the decade. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 54. ... This article is about the city in England. ... The larger City of Bradford Metropolitan District includes other settlements in the surrounding area. ... Edinburgh (pronounced ; Scottish Gaelic: ) is the capital of Scotland and its second-largest city. ... For other uses, see Glasgow (disambiguation). ... Leeds is a major city in West Yorkshire, England. ... Liverpool, city and metropolitan borough in Merseyside, England, along the eastern side of the Mersey Estuary. ... Manchester is a city and metropolitan borough, in the metropolitan county of Greater Manchester, North West England. ... Statistics Population: 72,750 Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: SJ805985 Administration Borough: Salford Metropolitan county: Greater Manchester Region: North West England Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: Greater Manchester Historic county: Lancashire Services Police force: Greater Manchester Police Fire and rescue: {{{Fire}}} Ambulance: North West Post... This article is about a city in the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see Sheffield (disambiguation). ... A picture of some derelict terraces in Toxteth. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 53. ... Street sign in Dublin, displaying name of the street in Irish and English, with postal district number. ...


A single numbering sequence was split between Manchester and Salford. Letters would be addressed to Manchester 1 or Salford 4. However in the 1960's, all the districts in both Manchester and Salford gained "M" postcodes, so "Salford 4" became M4, etc., much to the chagrin of Salfordians. The old coding lives on in a handful of street signs which are still embossed with "Salford 4" etc, at the bottom.


Glasgow shared with London a distinction from all other UK cities as it had compass postal districts due to its claimed status as the Second City of the British Empire, i.e., C, W, NW, N, E, S, SW, SE. When postcodes were introduced these were mapped into the new 'G' postcode area thusly: C1 became G1, W1 became G11, N1 became G21, E1 became G31, S1 became G41, SW1 became G51, and so on.


Validation

The consequence of the complexity outlined above is that for almost every rule concerning UK postcodes, an exception can be found. Automatic validation of postcodes on the basis of pattern feasibility is therefore almost impossible to design, and the system contains no self-validating feature such as a check digit. Completely accurate validation is only possible by attempting to deliver mail to the address, and verifying with the recipient.


Validation is usually performed against a copy of the "Postcode Address File" (PAF), which is generated by the Royal Mail and contains about 27 million UK commercial and residential addresses. However, even the PAF cannot be relied on as it contains errors, and because new postcodes are occasionally created and used before copies of the PAF can be distributed to users. The Postcode Address File (PAF) is a data file available from the Royal Mail. ... Royal Mails logo Royal Mail is the national postal service of the United Kingdom. ...


It is possible to validate the format of a postcode using the rules defined by British Standard BS 7666[12]. In general, the format is one of "A9 9AA", "A99 9AA", "AA9 9AA", "AA99 9AA", "A9A 9AA" or "AA9A 9AA", where A is an alphabetic character and 9 is a numeric character. There are restrictions on the set of alphabetic characters dependent on the position they are in. British Standards is the new name of the British Standards Institute and is part of BSI Group which also includes a testing organisation. ...


As can be seen, the first character is always alphabetical and the final three characters are always a numeric character followed by two alphabetic characters.


A regular expression to implement the BS 7666 rules in a basic fashion is provided in the BS7666 schema[13]: In computing, a regular expression (abbreviated as regexp or regex, with plural forms regexps, regexes, or regexen) is a string that describes or matches a set of strings, according to certain syntax rules. ...

 [A-Z]{1,2}[0-9R][0-9A-Z]? [0-9][A-Z-[CIKMOV]]{2} 

A more complex regular expression is also given in the comments of the schema, which implements full checking of all the stated BS 7666 postcode format rules. That regular expression can be restated as a "traditional" regular expression:

 –(GIRs{0,1}0AA|[A-PR-UWYZ]([0-9]{1,2}|([A-HK-Y][0-9]|[A-HK-Y][0-9]([0-9]|[ABEHMNPRV-Y]))|[0-9][A-HJKS-UW])s{0,1}[0-9][ABD-HJLNP-UW-Z]{2})59.160.73.115 14:01, 2 March 2007 (UTC)Debashish Saha 

The BS 7666 rules do not match British Forces Post Office postcodes, which have the format "BFPO NNN" or "BFPO c/o NNN", where NNN is 1 to 4 numerical digits. The British Forces Post Office (BFPO) is an agency that provides a postal service to HM Forces, separate from that provided by Royal Mail in the United Kingdom. ...


Non-geographic postcodes

Almost all postcodes map directly to a geographic area, but there are some which are used simply for routing, mostly for the purposes of direct marketing, and cannot be used for navigation or distance-finding applications. Wikibooks has more about this subject: Marketing Direct marketing is a discipline within marketing that involves contacting individual customers (business-to-business or consumer) directly and obtaining their responses and transactions for the purpose of developing and prolonging mutually profitable customer relationships. ...


These codes include: BS98, BS99, NE98, NE99 and WC99.


Application

The PAF is commercially licenseable and is often incorporated in address management software packages. The capabilities of such packages allow an address to be constructed solely from the postcode and house number for most addresses. By including the map references of postcodes in the address database, the postcode can be used automatically to pinpoint a postcode area on a map. See http://www.streetmap.co.uk for an example of this in practice. The Postcode Address File (PAF) is a data file available from the Royal Mail. ...


Northern Ireland

Northern Ireland was the last part of the UK to be postcoded, between 1970 and 1974. While Belfast was already divided into postal districts, rural areas known as townlands posed an additional problem, as (at the time) many roads were not named, and houses were not numbered. Consequently, many people living in such areas shared the same postal address, which still occurs in the Republic of Ireland. Today every road in Northern Ireland is named and most houses (even in rural areas) are allocated a number. Motto:  (Latin for Who will separate us?)[1] Anthem: UK: God Save the Queen Regional: (de facto) Londonderry Air Capital Belfast Largest city Belfast Official language(s) English (de facto), Ulster Scots, Irish3, Northern Ireland Sign Language, Irish Sign Language Government Constitutional monarchy  - Queen Queen Elizabeth II  - Prime Minister of... 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link is to a full 1970 calendar). ... 1974 (MCMLXXIV) was a common year starting on Tuesday. ... A townland is a small geographical unit of land used in Ireland and Scotland, and believed to be of Gaelic or Goidelic origin. ...


Crown dependencies

The Channel Islands (Jersey and Guernsey) and the Isle of Man established their own postal administrations separate from the UK in 1969, and did not adopt postcodes until the early 1990s. Their postcodes follow the UK format, with Jersey being postcode area JE, Guernsey GY, and Isle of Man IM. In the Isle of Man some choose to use EV as opposed to IM.[citation needed] EV stands for Ellan Vannin, the name of the Isle of Man in the native Manx language, and is sometimes used when an address is written in Manx. This article is about the British dependencies, for the islands off Southern California, please see Channel Islands of California. ... For the Stargate SG-1 episode, see 1969 (Stargate SG-1). ... This article is 150 kilobytes or more in size. ... See also the Isle of Man (Nicobar Islands) and the Isle of Mam. ... Manx (Gaelg or Gailck), also known as Manx Gaelic, is a Goidelic language spoken on the Isle of Man. ...


British Forces Post Office (BFPO)

The British Forces Post Office (BFPO) is an agency that provides a postal service to HM Forces, separate from that provided by Royal Mail in the United Kingdom. BFPO addresses are used for the delivery of mail in the UK and around the world. BFPO codes such as BFPO 801 serve the same function as postal codes for civilian addresses. The British Forces Post Office (BFPO) is an agency that provides a postal service to HM Forces, separate from that provided by Royal Mail in the United Kingdom. ...


Overseas territories

Some of the UK's overseas territories have their own postcodes, which are used for all addresses in those territories: A United Kingdom overseas territory (formerly known as a dependent territory or earlier as a crown colony) is a territory that is under the sovereignty and formal control of the United Kingdom but is not part of the United Kingdom proper (almost exclusively Great Britain and Northern Ireland). ...

These were introduced because mail was often sent to the wrong place, e.g: St Helena to St Helens, Merseyside, and Ascension Island to Asunción, Paraguay. In addition, many online companies would not accept addresses without a postcode. Mail from the UK continues to be treated as international, not inland, and sufficient postage must be used. Anthem: God Save the Queen Capital Georgetown Largest city Georgetown Official languages English Government Dependency of St. ... Flag of the British Antarctic Territory The British Antarctic Territory is the British claim to land and islands in Antarctica, and is the oldest territorial claim on the continent. ... Motto: Leo Terram Propriam Protegat (Latin: Let the Lion protect his own land or May the Lion protect his own land) Official language English Capital Grytviken Commissioner Alan Huckle Area  - Total  - % water not ranked 3,903 km² - Population  - Total (2006 E)  - Density not ranked ~20 n/a; Currency GBP Time... Motto: Our faith is our strength Anthem: God Save the Queen Capital Edinburgh of the Seven Seas Status Dependency of Saint Helena Official language(s) English Governor Michael Clancy Administrator Mike Hentley Area 201 km² Population ~280 Currency Saint Helenian pound (SHP) at parity with the UK Pound Sterling (GBP... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Bermuda, the UK's most populous remaining overseas territory, has developed its own, entirely separate, postcode system, with unique postcodes for street and PO Box addresses, as have Cayman Islands. Anguilla, British Virgin Islands, Montserrat do not have postcodes, although a postcode system is under consideration in Gibraltar. [15]


See also

ACORN is a geodemographic classification system developed by CACI Limited. ... ADDRESS-POINT® is a mapping/GIS data product supplied by the United Kingdoms national mapping agency, Ordnance Survey. ... Australia Post is the government-owned postal service of Australia. ... The British Forces Post Office (BFPO) is an agency that provides a postal service to HM Forces, separate from that provided by Royal Mail in the United Kingdom. ... The UK postal system runs on a system of alphanumeric codes, or postcodes. ... P² People & Places is a geodemographic classification system for the United Kingdom developed by Beacon Dodsworth Limited. ... A post town is a required part of all UK postal addresses. ... The Postcode Address File (PAF) is a data file available from the Royal Mail. ... Royal Mails logo Royal Mail is the national postal service of the United Kingdom. ... This is a list of topics related to the United Kingdom. ... Mr. ... Motto: (traditional) In God We Trust (official, 1956–present) Anthem: The Star-Spangled Banner Capital Washington, D.C. Largest city New York City Official language(s) None at the federal level; English de facto Government Federal Republic  - President George W. Bush (R)  - Vice President Dick Cheney (R) Independence - Declared - Recognized... For lists of individual countries postal and ZIP Codes around the world, please refer to the lists of postal codes index. ... RM4SCC is a name of a Barcode symbology used by the Royal Mail for Cleanmail. ...

References

  1. ^ Postal codes to speed up mail, The Times, January 15, 1959
  2. ^ Norwich to use postal codes - Experimenting in automation, The Times, July 29, 1959
  3. ^ G.P.O. robot postman sorts 20,000 letters an hour, The Times, October 5, 1965
  4. ^ Someone, Somewhere in postal code, The Times, October 12, 1966
  5. ^ Post Office plans faster service, The Times, July 4, 1967
  6. ^ London in brief, The Times, September 15, 1970
  7. ^ Inside the Post Office, The Times, January 18, 1971
  8. ^ Postal code programme, The Times, April 20, 1972
  9. ^ British Postal Museum & Archive's Information Sheet on the history of Postcodes - PDF
  10. ^ [1], [2], [3], [4]
  11. ^ http://archive.thisiswirral.co.uk/1999/09/09/13953.html
  12. ^ UK Government Data Standards Catalogue - BS7666 Address.
  13. ^ BS7666 XML schema (XSD).
  14. ^ http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/4129636.stm
  15. ^ http://www.gibraltarnewsonline.com/2006/06/30/government-set-to-introduce-post-codes

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
UK postcodes - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2762 words)
Postcodes were devised solely for the purposes of sorting and directing mail and rarely coincide with political boundaries.
Almost all postcodes map directly to a geographic area, but there are some which are used simply for routing, mostly for the purposes of direct marketing, and cannot be used for navigation or distance-finding applications.
Northern Ireland was the last part of the UK to be postcoded, between 1970 and 1974.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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