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Encyclopedia > UK General Election of 2005
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The United Kingdom general election of 2005 was held on Thursday, 5 May 2005 and won by the Labour Party, led by Tony Blair. The Labour Party secured an overall majority of 66. For details by constituency see 2005 general election results. May 5 is the 125th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (126th in leap years). ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Labour Party has historically been the principal left wing political party of the United Kingdom since its formation in the early 20th century (see British politics). ... The Right Honourable Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born 6 May 1953) is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, First Lord of the Treasury and Minister for the Civil Service. ... Wikinews has news related to this article: Results of 2005 United Kingdom General Election Results of the United Kingdom general election, 2005. ...


The general election took place in 646 constituencies across the United Kingdom, for seats in the House of Commons. All but one constituency polled on 5 May; in the remaining seat of South Staffordshire it was postponed due to the death of a candidate and took place on 23 June. The United Kingdom has five distinct types of elections: general, local, regional, European and mayoral. ... To see the list in alphabetical order see the categories UK Parliamentary constituencies and UK Parliamentary constituencies (historic). ... The House of Commons is the lower house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, and is now the dominant branch of Parliament. ... May 5 is the 125th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (126th in leap years). ... South Staffordshire is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... June 23 is the 174th day of the year (175th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 191 days remaining. ...


The election was held under the first-past-the-post system. Local elections in parts of England and in Northern Ireland were held on the same day. The polls were open for 15 hours, from 07:00 to 22:00 BST (06:00 to 21:00 UTC). The election came just over three weeks after the dissolution of Parliament on 11 April by Queen Elizabeth II, at the request of the Prime Minister, Tony Blair. The First Past the Post electoral system, is a voting system for single-member districts. ... Elections for local government are being held in the United Kingdom on May 5, 2005 along with the 2005 general election. ... Royal motto (French): Dieu et mon droit (Translated: God and my right) Englands location (dark green) within the British Isles Languages English (de facto) Capital London de facto Largest city London Area – Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population – Total (mid-2004) – Total (2001 Census) – Density Ranked 1st... Dieu et mon droit (Royal motto) (French for God and my right)2 Northern Irelands location within the UK Main language English Other recognised languages Irish, Ulster Scots Capital and largest city Belfast First Minister Office suspended Secretary of State for Northern Ireland Peter Hain MP Area  - Total Ranked... British Summer Time (BST), known in Ireland as Irish Summer Time (IST), is the daylight saving time in effect in the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland between the last Sunday in March and the last Sunday in October each year. ... UTC also stands for the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Coordinated Universal Time or UTC, also sometimes referred to as Zulu time, the basis for civil time, differs by an integral number of seconds from atomic time and a fractional number of seconds from UT1. ... In parliamentary systems, a dissolution of parliament is the dispersal of a legislature at the call of an election. ... The Houses of Parliament, seen over Westminster Bridge The Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is the supreme legislative institution in the United Kingdom and British overseas territories (it alone has parliamentary sovereignty). ... April 11 is the 101st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (102nd in leap years). ... Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor), born 21 April 1926, is Queen of sixteen independent nations known as the Commonwealth Realms (and has previously been Queen of sixteen others). ... The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is the head of government and so exercises many of the executive functions nominally vested in the Sovereign, who is head of state. ...

Contents


Overview

For events leading up to the date of the election, see article: Pre-election day events of the United Kingdom general election, 2005
A map showing the regional victors of the UK General Elections by their party colours.
A map showing the regional victors of the UK General Elections by their party colours.

The governing Labour Party, led by Tony Blair, was looking to secure a third consecutive term in office and to retain a large majority. The Conservative Party was seeking to regain seats lost to both Labour and the Liberal Democrats in the 1997 election, and become the governing party. The Liberal Democrats hoped to make gains from both parties, but especially the Conservative Party, with a "decapitation" strategy targeting specific constituencies. Like the Conservatives, the Lib Dems had ambitions to become the governing party, but more realistically aimed to become the Official Opposition, replacing the Conservatives. In Northern Ireland, the elections was contested by the Democratic Unionist Party, looking to make further gains over the Ulster Unionist Party in unionist politics, and by Sinn Féin and the Social Democratic and Labour Party in nationalist politics. The pro-independence Scottish National Party and Plaid Cymru (Party of Wales) stood candidates in every constituency in Scotland and Wales respectively The Pre-election day events of the United Kingdom general election, 2005 are the activities that were undertaken by the candidates and their political parties in the lead up to the United Kingdom general election, 2005. ... Download high resolution version (629x1019, 24 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (629x1019, 24 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The Labour Party has historically been the principal left wing political party of the United Kingdom since its formation in the early 20th century (see British politics). ... The Right Honourable Anthony Charles Lynton Blair (born 6 May 1953) is the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, First Lord of the Treasury and Minister for the Civil Service. ... The Conservative Party is the largest political party on the right-of-centre in the United Kingdom. ... The Liberal Democrats, often shortened to Lib Dems, are a liberal political party based in the United Kingdom. ... The UK general election, 1997 was held on 1 May 1997. ... The Official Opposition (more formally, Her Majestys Loyal Opposition) in the United Kingdom is usually the largest political party or coalition which is not a member of the government. ... The Democratic Unionist Party is a right wing unionist party in Northern Ireland led by Ian Paisley. ... The Ulster Unionist Party (UUP, sometimes referred to as the Official Unionist Party or OUP or, in a historic sense, simply the Unionist Party ) is a moderate unionist political party in Northern Ireland, which formed its government between 1921 and 1972 and was supported by most unionists throughout the Troubles. ... In the context of Irish politics, Unionists are people in Northern Ireland, who wish to see the continuation of the Act of Union 1800, as amended by the Government of Ireland Act 1920, under which Northern Ireland, created in that latter Act, remains part of the United Kingdom of Great... It has been suggested that Provisional Sinn Féin be merged into this article or section. ... The Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP — Irish: Páirtí Sóisialta Daonlathach an Lucht Oibre) is the smaller of the two major nationalist parties in Northern Ireland. ... Irish nationalism refers to political movements that desire greater autonomy or the independence of Ireland from Great Britain. ... In Scotland, the Scottish National Party (SNP) (Pàrtaidh Nàiseanta na h-Alba in Scottish Gaelic) is a centre-left political party which campaigns for Scottish independence. ... Plaid, in full Plaid Cymru (pronounced IPA: ) – The Party of Wales, is the principal nationalist political party in Wales. ...


Many seats were contested by other parties, including several parties without incumbents in the House of Commons. Parties that were not represented at Westminster, but had seats in the devolved assemblies and European Parliament included the Alliance Party of Northern Ireland, the United Kingdom Independence Party, the various national Green parties, and the Scottish Socialist Party. The Health Concern party also stood for election again. A full list of parties which declared their intention to run can be found on the list of parties contesting the UK general election, 2005. For devolution as a term sometimes misapplied to evolution, see devolution (fallacy) Devolution or home rule is the granting of powers from central government to government at regional or local level. ... The European Parliament is the parliamentary body of the European Union (EU), directly elected by EU citizens once every five years. ... The Alliance Party of Northern Ireland (APNI), is a political party operating in Northern Ireland. ... The United Kingdom Independence Party (commonly known as UKIP, pronounced you-kip) is a Eurosceptic political party that aims at British withdrawal from the European Union. ... The Green Party was formed in 1973 as the Ecology Party. ... The Scottish Socialist Party (SSP) is a far left wing Scottish political party which campaigns for a socialist economic platform and Scottish independence. ... Independent Kidderminster Hospital and Health Concern (often known by the shorter name Health Concern) is a political party based in Kidderminster, England. ... The United Kingdom general election of 2005 saw significant numbers of minor or single issue candidates standing for election. ...


During the period between the announcement of the election and the actual election itself, all of the parties embarked on intensive campaigns to win voters over. They did this by releasing manifestos, party political broadcasts and touring the country in buses (commonly referred to as "Battle Buses"). A manifesto is a public declaration of principles and intentions, often political in nature. ... A party political broadcast is a short television or radio broadcast made by a political party. ...


Seats in Scotland

Several years after the Scottish Parliament had been established by the Scotland Act 1998, the target size of Westminster Parliamentary seats in Scotland was adjusted to become the same as that for England. This removed the deliberately smaller constituencies which had been intended to compensate Scotland for its status as a nation, its lower population density which causes very large constituencies geographically, and its distance from the seat of Parliament in Westminster. These problems were perceived to have been largely overcome with the establishment of the Scottish Parliament in 1999. For the national legislative body adjourned in 1707, see Parliament of Scotland. ... The Scotland Act 1998 is an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom at Westminster. ... Royal motto: Nemo me impune lacessit (English: No one provokes me with impunity) Scotlands location within the United Kingdom Languages English, Gaelic, Scots Capital Edinburgh Largest city Glasgow First Minister Jack McConnell Area - Total - % water Ranked 2nd UK 78,782 km² 1. ... Royal motto (French): Dieu et mon droit (Translated: God and my right) Englands location (dark green) within the British Isles Languages English (de facto) Capital London de facto Largest city London Area – Total Ranked 1st UK 130,395 km² Population – Total (mid-2004) – Total (2001 Census) – Density Ranked 1st... 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday, and was designated the International Year of Older Persons by the United Nations. ...

The effect of the Boundary Commission's reform and the 2005 general election upon Scottish seats
The effect of the Boundary Commission's reform and the 2005 general election upon Scottish seats

The Boundary Commission for Scotland therefore started work on redrawing the boundaries, and in 2003 produced a scheme in which there were 59 constituencies, reduced from 72. In 2004, the Government passed the Scottish Parliament (Constituencies) Act 2004 which instituted these changes and broke the link between British- and Scottish-Parliamentary constituencies. Image File history File links Scotselectionreshuffle. ... Image File history File links Scotselectionreshuffle. ... In the United Kingdom, the four Boundary Commissions are responsible for determining the boundaries of House of Commons constituencies. ... In the United Kingdom, the four Boundary Commissions are responsible for determining the boundaries of House of Commons constituencies. ... 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Scottish Parliament (Constituencies) Act 2004 is a United Kingdom Act of Parliament that amends the Scotland Act 1998 which established the Scottish Parliament. ...


Three constituencies were left unchanged - the island seats of Orkney and Shetland, the Western Isles, though the latter changed its official name to the Gaelic "Na h-Eileanan an Iar", and Eastwood, which changed its name to "East Renfrewshire". Several other constituency names were carried forward, however in all cases the new seats had altered boundaries. Orkney and Shetland is a constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Na h-Eileanan an Iar is a constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, created in 1918. ... Scottish Gaelic (Gàidhlig; IPA: ) is a member of the Goidelic branch of Celtic languages. ... For other things called Renfrewshire East see Renfrewshire East. ...


Predicted result of redrawn boundaries

Although it was impossible to guarantee a wholly accurate prediction of the strength of the parties within the 59 new constituencies, as this was be the first election in which they were used, estimates had been made prior to the poll on May 5th on the basis of a ward-by-ward breakdown of local council election results. An agreed set used by all media reports and most political commentators indicated that, had the new boundaries been used in the 2001 election, Labour would have won 46 seats, with the Liberal Democrats on 9 seats, the Scottish National Party on 4, and the Conservatives none. This represented a loss of 10 seats to Labour and one each for the Liberal Democrats, Scottish National Party and the Conservatives. The arithmetic was however complicated by the fact that the boundary revision had produced some seats that were notionally highly marginal.


The results of the 2005 election showed some of the highest changes of the share of the vote for particular parties occurring in Scottish seats, leading some commentators to speculate that either the notional results were in error and/or they were unable to take into account factors such as personal votes, tactical voting and parties having stong support in local government but historically failing to convert that into a general election vote. In voting systems, tactical voting (or strategic voting) occurs when a voter misrepresents his or her sincere preferences in order to gain a more favorable outcome. ...


Actual result of redrawn boundaries

Labour in fact only won 41 seats (5 fewer than attributed to them by the breakdown of 2001 results detailed above), the Liberal Democrats won 11 (2 more than attributed to them by the breakdown of 2001 results), the SNP won 6 seats (2 more than attributed to them by the breakdown of 2001 results) and in Dumfriesshire, Clydesdale and Tweeddale the Conservatives won their only seat (breakdown of 2001 election results had indicated no Conservative constituencies)[1]. Compared to the actual results of 2001 this then represented a loss of 14 seats for Labour, a gain of 1 seat for the SNP and Liberal Democrats, and no change for the Conservatives. [2] Dumfriesshire, Clydesdale and Tweeddale was created as a constituency of the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom for the general election of 2005. ...


See also the list of parties standing in Scotland. The United Kingdom general election of 2005 will see significant numbers of minor or single issue candidates standing for election. ...


The election in Northern Ireland

In Northern Ireland, the election was dominated in the unionist community by a battle between the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP) and the Democratic Unionist Party (DUP) to be the region's largest unionist party in Parliament. Similarly, in the nationalist community, there was a battle between the Social Democratic and Labour Party and Sinn Féin. Dieu et mon droit (Royal motto) (French for God and my right)2 Northern Irelands location within the UK Main language English Other recognised languages Irish, Ulster Scots Capital and largest city Belfast First Minister Office suspended Secretary of State for Northern Ireland Peter Hain MP Area  - Total Ranked... The Ulster Unionist Party (UUP, sometimes referred to as the Official Unionist Party or OUP or, in a historic sense, simply the Unionist Party ) is a moderate unionist political party in Northern Ireland, which formed its government between 1921 and 1972 and was supported by most unionists throughout the Troubles. ... The Democratic Unionist Party is a right wing unionist party in Northern Ireland led by Ian Paisley. ... The Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP — Irish: Páirtí Sóisialta Daonlathach an Lucht Oibre) is the smaller of the two major nationalist parties in Northern Ireland. ... It has been suggested that Provisional Sinn Féin be merged into this article or section. ...


As expected, the DUP and Sinn Féin have emerged as the largest unionist and nationalist parties respectively, at the expense of the more moderate UUP and SDLP. The UUP fared particularly badly, with leader David Trimble losing Upper Bann, and the party's representation being reduced to one seat, North Down, held by Sylvia Hermon. Although the UUP won more MPs at the 2001 General Election, the defection of Lagan Valley MP Jeffrey Donaldson to the DUP in January 2004 reversed the position. Other elections in the province have shown both a shift in votes towards the DUP but also a collapse of support for the cross-community Alliance Party which is likely to be more marked in a first past the post election and thus which may work in the UUP's favour. Shortly afterwards, on May 7, Trimble announced his resignation as party leader. David Trimble The Right Honourable William David Trimble (born on October 15, 1944) is a Northern Ireland politician, who served as leader of the Ulster Unionist Party (UUP) and the first First Minister of Northern Ireland. ... Upper Bann is a Parliamentary Constituency in the House of Commons and also an Assembly constituency in the Northern Ireland Assembly. ... North Down is a Parliamentary Constituency in the House of Commons and also an Assembly constituency in the Northern Ireland Assembly. ... Lady Sylvia Hermon (born 11 August 1955) is a Northern Ireland unionist politician. ... The Alliance Party of Northern Ireland (APNI), is a political party operating in Northern Ireland. ... The plurality voting system, also known as first past the post, is a voting system used to elect a single winner in a given election. ... May 7 is the 127th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (128th in leap years). ...


In the nationalist community, recent elections have shown a clear shift in support from the SDLP to Sinn Féin but events such as the Northern Bank robbery and the murder of Robert McCartney have been used by Sinn Féin's opponents, including the British and Irish governments, to criticise their alleged links to the Provisional IRA, in the hope of reversing this trend. Notes such as this Northern Bank £20 note were stolen. ... Robert McCartney (1971 – 31 January 2005) was the victim of a murder in Belfast, in Northern Ireland, carried out by members of the Provisional Irish Republican Army. ... The Provisional Irish Republican Army (PIRA; more commonly referred to as the IRA, the Provos, or by some of its supporters as the army or the RA) is an Irish Republican paramilitary organisation dedicated to the end of British rule in Northern Ireland and to a United Ireland. ...


Two of the three SDLP MPs elected in 2001 had retired, while all four of the Sinn Féin MPs stood again. Sinn Féin's victory over the SDLP in Newry and Armagh, giving it a fifth seat, will reduce the number of Northern Ireland MPs who vote in Westminster because Members of Parliament cannot formally take their seats until they swear allegiance to the Queen (which Sinn Féin members refuse to do). The big shock of the election came in South Belfast where the SDLP won the traditionally unionist seat, aided by a split between the two big unionist parties. This, together with their retention of two other seats did much to boost the party's fortunes and morale when many commentators had been predicting a disaster as great as that which met the UUP. Newry and Armagh is a Parliamentary Constituency in the House of Commons and also an Assembly constituency in the Northern Ireland Assembly. ... South Belfast is a Parliamentary Constituency in the House of Commons and also an Assembly constituency in the Northern Ireland Assembly. ...


See also the list of parties standing in Northern Ireland. The United Kingdom general election of 2005 will see significant numbers of minor or single issue candidates standing for election. ...


The ballot

A polling station situated inside a suburban library in the north of Cambridge. Two tellers, wearing party rosettes, are seated collecting voter registration numbers.
A polling station situated inside a suburban library in the north of Cambridge. Two tellers, wearing party rosettes, are seated collecting voter registration numbers.

At the close of voting (2200 BST) the ballot boxes are sealed and returned to the counting centre where counting proceeds under the supervision of the returning officer who is obliged to declare the result as soon as it is known. There has been stiff competition amongst constituencies to be first to declare. Sunderland South has repeated its performance in the last three elections and in 2005 declared Labour incumbent Chris Mullin re-elected as MP with a majority of 11,059 at approximately 2245 BST (failing by two minutes to beat its previous best, but making it eligible for entry into the Guinness Book of World Records as longest consecutive delivery of first results). The vote itself represented a swing (in a safe Labour seat, in a safe Labour region) of approximately 4% to the Conservatives and 4.5% to the Liberal Democrats. This was somewhat below the prediction of BBC/ITV exit polls published shortly after 2200 BST. Download high resolution version (852x1082, 213 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (852x1082, 213 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... British Summer Time (BST), known in Ireland as Irish Summer Time (IST), is the daylight saving time in effect in the United Kingdom and Republic of Ireland between the last Sunday in March and the last Sunday in October each year. ... In United Kingdom, a Returning Officer is responsible for overseeing elections in one or more constituencies. ... Sunderland South is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Chris Mullin MP Christopher John Mullin is an UK Labour politician, currently the member of Parliament for the English constituency of Sunderland South. ... The Guinness Book of Records (or in recent editions Guinness World Records, and in previous US editions Guinness Book of World Records) is a book published annually, containing an internationally recognized collection of superlatives: both in terms of human achievement and the extrema of the natural world. ...


Sunderland North were the next to declare, followed by Houghton & Washington East, both Labour holds but with reductions in the incumbent majorities of up to 9%. The first Scottish seat to declare was Rutherglen and Hamilton West — another safe Labour seat, it too was a hold, but with a reduced majority by 4%. The first seat to change hands was Putney, where Labour's majority of around 2500 fell to a strong Conservative challenge, with a total swing of about 5000 (or 6.2%). This was also the first seat to be declared for the Conservatives. The first Liberal Democrat seat to be declared was North East Fife, the constituency of LibDem party deputy leader Sir Menzies Campbell and a hold from 2001. Rt. ...


Exit polls

Following problems with exit polls in previous British and American elections, the BBC and ITV agreed for the first time to pool their respective data, using results from Mori and NOP. More than 20,000 people were interviewed for the poll at 120 polling stations across the country. The predictions were excellent - initial projections saw the Labour party returned to power with a majority of 66 (down from 160),[3] and the final result (including Staffordshire South, where the election was postponed due to the death of a candidate) was a Labour majority of 66. The Sky News network has refused to use exit polls since the 1980s, citing their previous inaccuracies. An exit poll is an opinion poll taken after voters have exited the polling stations and is designed to give an early indication as to how an election has turned out as the actual result may take hours to count (such as in UK General Elections) and are usually done...


The projected shares of the vote were Labour 37% (down 5% on 2001), Conservatives 33% (unchanged), Liberal Democrats 22% (up 3%) and other parties 8% (up 2%) [4]. The Conservatives were expected to make the biggest gains, however — forty-four seats according to the exit numbers — with the Liberal Democrats expected to take as few as two. Whilst the exit-poll-predicted vote share for the Lib Dems was accurate (22.6% vs an actual 22.0%), they had actually done better in some Lib Dem-Labour marginals than predicted on the basis of the national share of the vote, producing a net gain of 11 seats.


Election results

At 0428 BST, it was announced that Labour had won Corby, giving them 324 of the 646 seats in the House of Commons, and as a result an overall majority. This was despite polling only 36% of the popular vote, equating to approximately 22% of the electorate based on the estimated turnout of 61.3%. However, turnout rose from 59.2% in 2001, a change that has been mostly attributed to the extension and promotion of postal voting. Wikinews has news related to this article: Results of 2005 United Kingdom General Election Results of the United Kingdom general election, 2005. ... This is a list of MPs elected in the UK general election, 2005 to the House of Commons for the Fifty-Fourth Parliament of the United Kingdom at the United Kingdom general election, 2005, arranged by constituency. ... Image File history File links Wikinews-logo. ... Wikinews is a free content news source and a project of the Wikimedia Foundation. ... Corby is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... 2001: A Space Odyssey. ... Postal Voting describes the method of voting in an election whereby ballot papers are distributed and/or returned by post to electors, in contrast to electors voting in person at a Polling station or electronically via an Electronic voting system. ...


The results were interpreted by the UK media as an indicator of a breakdown in trust in the government, and in the Prime Minister, Tony Blair, in particular. As expected, voter disenchantment led to an increase of support for the opposition parties, and caused many Labour voters to remain home on election day. However, ultimately, domestic policy factors helped Labour achieve a historic third term in office. In this context, the new, reduced Labour majority of 67, (as it was before the declaration of South Staffordshire), was viewed by many across the political spectrum as a positive development, a counter to an alleged presidential style of government. After Labour victory became clear, Michael Howard, the leader of the Conservative party, announced that he would resign once the internal affairs of his party were stabilised. The final seat to declare was the delayed poll in South Staffordshire, at just after 1 AM on Friday 24 June. The United Kingdom has a diverse range of different types of media. ... Apathy is the lack of emotion, motivation, or enthusiasm. ... President is a title held by many leaders of organizations, companies, universities, and countries. ... The Rt. ... June 24 is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 190 days remaining. ...


The election was also characterised by a number of smaller battles. In Bethnal Green and Bow, London, former Labour MP George Galloway, running as a candidate for the anti-war Respect, successfully defeated Oona King (Labour), despite a previous majority of 10,000. Following the result, a hostile interview with Jeremy Paxman attracted press attention. In Blaenau Gwent, Peter Law, a former Labour politician, ran as an Independent in protest at the impostion of an all-female candidate shortlist by the national Labour Party. He successfully overturned a 19,313 Labour majority. In Enfield Southgate, Conservative David Burrowes ousted Labour Stephen Twigg, who had famously defeated Michael Portillo for that seat in the 1997 elections. Labour regained one of its by-election losses, Leicester South, but saw an increased Liberal Democrat majority in the other, Brent East. Bethnal Green and Bow is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... The Houses of Parliament and the clock tower containing Big Ben Part of the London skyline viewed from the South Bank London (see Wiktionary:London for the name in other languages) is the capital of the United Kingdom and England. ... George Galloway George Galloway (born 16 August 1954) is a British politician noted for his socialist views, confrontational style, and rhetorical skill. ... RESPECT The Unity Coalition is a left wing British political party founded on January 25, 2004 in London. ... Oona King Oona Tamsyn King (born October 22, 1967) is a British politician, and was Member of Parliament for Bethnal Green & Bow until the 2005 election. ... Jeremy Paxman hosting BBC Newsnight Jeremy Paxman (born 11 May 1950) is a BBC journalist, news presenter and author. ... Blaenau Gwent is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Peter Law in the 2005 General Elections, standing next to Maggie Jones, the Labour party candidate as the results are declared. ... Enfield Southgate is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... David John Barrington Burrowes (born 1969} British politician. ... Stephen Twigg (born December 25, 1966) is a British politician and former Labour Member of Parliament for Enfield Southgate. ... Rt. ... The UK general election, 1997 was held on 1 May 1997. ... A by-election or bye-election is a special election held to fill a political office when the incumbent has died or resigned. ... Leicester South is a Parliamentary Constituency in the House of Commons. ... Brent East is constituency of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ...


Others were less fortunate. Robert Kilroy-Silk, a former BBC presenter who joined UKIP, and then set up his own party, Veritas, failed to win a seat in Erewash. He was placed fourth, receiving only 2,957 votes. (The seat was taken by Liz Blackman, Labour) The so-called decapitation policy of targeting Conservative front-benchers, allegedly pursued by the Lib Dems, was also unsuccessful, removing only Tim Collins in Westmorland and Lonsdale. The election also saw regional surges in support for the British National Party, a development that was greeted by many with alarm. However, they failed to win any seats, their highest poll being 16.9% in Barking, East London. Robert Kilroy-Silk Robert Kilroy-Silk (born 19 May 1942) is a British politician and is well-known as the presenter of his former daytime television confessional talk show Kilroy. ... The United Kingdom Independence Party (commonly known as UKIP, pronounced you-kip) is a right-wing political party that aims at British withdrawal from the European Union. ... Veritas is a political party in the United Kingdom, formed in February 2005 by politician-celebrity Robert Kilroy-Silk following a split from the United Kingdom Independence Party (UKIP). ... Erewash is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... Elizabeth Marion Liz Blackman (born September 26, 1949, Penrith, Cumbria) is a British politician, and member of Parliament for Erewash. ... Timothy William George Collins CBE (born May 7, 1964) is a British politician. ... Creation 1983 MP Tim Farron Party Liberal Democrat Type House of Commons County Cumbria EP constituency North West England Westmorland and Lonsdale is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... The British National Party (BNP) is the largest political party of the far right in the United Kingdom. ... Barking is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ...


The election was followed by further criticism of the UK electoral system. Calls for reform came particularly from Lib Dem supporters, citing that they received only 10% of the overall seats, despite having over 20% of the popular vote. There have also been calls for reform by some in England, where the Conservative party polled 60,000 more votes than Labour yet received 90 fewer seats. In fact, with the exception of Labour, the Democratic Unionist Party, Sinn Fein and the minor Health Concern, every party received a smaller percentage of seats than votes.


Postal Votes have themselves been criticised amid fears the system at present is not secure enough and makes electoral fraud too easy.


Interpretation of Result

The Labour party claimed that being returned to office for a record-breaking third term showed the remarkable achievements of New Labour and the continued unpopularity of the Conservatives. Nevertheless, Labour's vote declined to 35%, a mere 3% above their nearest rivals.


The Conservatives claimed that their increased number of seats showed disenchantment with the Labour government and was a precursor of a Conservative breakthrough at the next election. After four consecutive elections of declining representation, 2005 was the first election where the number of Conservative seats increased substantially. Yet, as the Conservatives' vote share barely increased, this could only be mainly because of Labour to Liberal defections and tactical unwind. It also marked the third election in which the Conservative share of the vote was below 35%.


The Liberal Democrats claimed that their continued gradual increase showed they were in a position to make further gains from both parties. They pointed in particular to the 2005 election being the first at which Labour lost seats and Liberals/Liberal Democrats gained them, and to the fact that they were now in second place in roughly 190 constituencies.


The Liberal Democrats increased their percentage of the vote by 3.7%, the Conservatives increased their percentage of the vote by 0.6%, and Labour lost 5.5% of the vote. While most seats lost by Labour changed to the Conservatives, most votes changed to the Liberal Democrats. However, the Liberals lost more seats than the Conservatives did, and lost all of them to Conservative candidates. This may be another example of tactical unwind, or it may be that the Liberals are perceived to have become more left-wing.


The election was the first time since the 1929 election that no party received more than 10 million votes. This can be attributed to the close race between Labour and the Conservatives and to the strength of the Liberal Democrats. In terms of overall shares of the vote it was the most three-cornered election since 1923, although the electoral system produced a result that did little to reflect this fact. The 1929 UK general election was held on 30th May 1929, and resulted in a hung parliament. ... The UK general election of 1923 was held on 5th December 1923. ...


Total seats for each party

Ordered by number of votes; for the results in order number of seats won, see results by number of seats won.
edit
Summary of the 5 May 2005 House of Commons of the United Kingdom election results
Parties
This table indicates those parties with over 500 votes nationwide
Seats Gains Losses Net
Gain/Loss
Seats % Votes % Votes +/-
Labour 356 0 47 -47 55.2 35.3 9,562,122 -5.5%
Conservative 198 36 3 +33 30.7 32.3 8,772,598 +0.6%
Liberal Democrats 62 16 5 +11 9.6 22.1 5,981,874 +3.7%
UK Independence 0 0 0 0 0 2.2 603,298 +0.8%
Scottish National Party 6 2 0 +2 0.9 1.5 412,267 -0.3%
Green 0 0 0 0 0 1.0 257,758 +0.4%
Democratic Unionist 9 4 0 +4 1.4 0.9 241,856 +0.2%
British National 0 0 0 0 0 0.7 192,746 +0.5%
Plaid Cymru 3 0 1 -1 0.5 0.6 174,838 -0.1%
Sinn Féin 5 1 0 +1 0.8 0.6 174,530 -0.1%
Ulster Unionist 1 0 5 -5 0.2 0.5 127,414 -0.3%
Social Democratic & Labour 3 1 1 0 0.5 0.5 125,626 -0.1%
Independent 1 1 0 0 0.2 0.5 122,000 +0.1%
Respect 1 1 0 +1 0.2 0.3 68,094 N/A
Scottish Socialist Party 0 0 0 0 0 0.2 43,514 -0.1%
Veritas 0 0 0 0 0 0.1 40,481 N/A
Alliance (NI) 0 0 0 0 0 0.1 28,291 0.0%
Scottish Green Party 0 0 0 0 0 0.1 25,760 +0.1%
Socialist Labour 0 0 0 0 0 0.1 20,192 0.0%
Liberal 0 0 0 0 0 0.1 19,068 0.0%
Health Concern 1 0 0 0 0.2 0.1 18,739 0.0%
English Democrats 0 0 0 0 0 0.1 14,506
Socialist Alternative 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 9,398 N/A
National Front 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 8,079 0.0%
Legalise Cannabis 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 6,985 0.0%
Community Action 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 6,557 N/A
Monster Raving Loony 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 6,311 0.0
Christian Vote 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 4,004 N/A
Mebyon Kernow 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 3,552 0.0%
Forward Wales 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 3,461 N/A
Christian Peoples 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 3,291 N/A
Rainbow Dream Ticket 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 2,463 N/A
Community Group 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 2,365 N/A
Ashfield Independents 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 2,292
Alliance for Green Socialism 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 1,978
Residents' Association of London 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 1,850
Workers Party 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 1,669 0.0%
Socialist Environmental 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 1,649 N/A
Scottish Unionist 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 1,266 0.0%
Workers' Revolutionary 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 1,143 0.0%
New England Party 0 0 0 0 0.0 1,224
Communist 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 1,124
The Community (Hounslow) 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 1,118
Peace and Progress 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 1,036
Scottish Senior Citizens 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 1,017 N/A
Your Party 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 1,006
SOS! Northampton 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 932
Independent Working Class 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 892
Democratic Labour 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 770
British Public Party 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 763
Free Scotland Party 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 743
Pensioners Party Scotland 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 716
Publican Party 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 678
English Independence Party 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 654
Socialist Unity 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 581
Local Community Party 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 570
Clause 28 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 516
UK Community Issues Party 0 0 0 0 0 0.0 502
Total 646 27,110,727

Wikinews has news related to this article: Results of 2005 United Kingdom General Election Results of the United Kingdom general election, 2005. ... The House of Commons is the lower house of the Parliament of the United Kingdom, and is now the dominant branch of Parliament. ... The Labour Party has historically been the principal left wing political party of the United Kingdom since its formation in the early 20th century (see British politics). ... The Conservative Party is the largest political party on the right-of-centre in the United Kingdom. ... The Liberal Democrats, often shortened to Lib Dems, are a liberal political party based in the United Kingdom. ... The United Kingdom Independence Party (commonly known as UKIP, pronounced you-kip) is a Eurosceptic political party that aims at British withdrawal from the European Union. ... In Scotland, the Scottish National Party (SNP) (Pàrtaidh Nàiseanta na h-Alba in Scottish Gaelic) is a centre-left political party which campaigns for Scottish independence. ... The Green Party of England and Wales is the principal Green party in the United Kingdom (see British politics). ... The Democratic Unionist Party is a right wing unionist party in Northern Ireland led by Ian Paisley. ... The British National Party (BNP) is the largest political party of the far right in the United Kingdom. ... Plaid, in full Plaid Cymru (pronounced IPA: ) – The Party of Wales, is the principal nationalist political party in Wales. ... It has been suggested that Provisional Sinn Féin be merged into this article or section. ... The Ulster Unionist Party (UUP, sometimes referred to as the Official Unionist Party or OUP or, in a historic sense, simply the Unionist Party ) is a moderate unionist political party in Northern Ireland, which formed its government between 1921 and 1972 and was supported by most unionists throughout the Troubles. ... The Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP — Irish: Páirtí Sóisialta Daonlathach an Lucht Oibre) is the smaller of the two major nationalist parties in Northern Ireland. ... RESPECT The Unity Coalition is a left wing British political party founded on January 25, 2004 in London. ... The Scottish Socialist Party (SSP) is a far left wing Scottish political party which campaigns for a socialist economic platform and Scottish independence. ... Veritas is a political party in the United Kingdom, formed in February 2005 by politician-celebrity Robert Kilroy-Silk following a split from the United Kingdom Independence Party (UKIP). ... The Alliance Party of Northern Ireland (APNI), is a political party operating in Northern Ireland. ... The Scottish Green Party (Pàrtaidh Uaine na h-Alba in Scottish Gaelic) is the Green party of Scotland, and a full member of the European Federation of Green Parties. ... The Socialist Labour Party (SLP) is a small left-wing political party in the United Kingdom. ... The Liberal Party is a minor United Kingdom political party. ... Independent Kidderminster Hospital and Health Concern (often known by the shorter name Health Concern) is a political party based in Kidderminster, England. ... The English Democrats Party, previously the English National Party, is a political party in England, which seeks the establishment of a Parliament for England with at least the same powers as those granted to the Scottish Parliament. ... The Socialist Party is a Trotskyist political party active in England and Wales and part of the Committee for a Workers International. ... In the United Kingdom, the British National Front (most commonly called the National Front or NF) is a far right-wing political party that had its heyday during the 1970s and 80s. ... Cannabis leaves The Legalise Cannabis Alliance (LCA) is a political party registered in the United Kingdom with the cannabis leaf image as its emblem. ... The Community Action Party is a British political party mostly active in Cheshire and Greater Manchester. ... The Official Monster Raving Loony Party (OMRLP) is a registered political party established in the United Kingdom in 1983 by musician and anti-politician David Sutch, also known as Screaming Lord Sutch. ... Operation Christian Vote (OCV) is a minor British Political Party founded in May 2004. ... Mebyon Kernow (Cornish for Sons of Cornwall, often abbrieviated MK) is a political party in the United Kingdom. ... Forward Wales (or Cymru Ymlaen in Welsh) is a political party operating in Wales. ... This article reads like an advertisement. ... Vote For Yourself Rainbow Dream Ticket is a United Kingdom Political party which advocates the abolition of parliament in favour of devolution to city states and decision-making by referendum. ... Community Group are a political party in the United Kingdom whose representative Martin Williams contested the constituency of Doncaster North at the 2005 general election, receiving 2,365 votes (the elected Labour MP, Ed Miliband, received 19,788 votes). ... Ashfield Independents are a political party in the United Kingdom whose representative, Roy Adkins, contested the 2005 general election in the constituency of Ashfield, obtaining 2,292 votes (the elected Labour MP, Geoff Hoon, received 20,433 votes). ... The Alliance for Green Socialism is a socialist grouping based in Leeds in the United Kingdom. ... The Residents Association of London is a minor political party in the United Kingdom, based in the London Borough of Havering, where its member Malvin Brown holds a seat on the council. ... The Workers Party (in Irish Páirtí na nOibrithe) is an Irish left wing political party that evolved from Official Sinn Féin. ... The Socialist Environmental Alliance (SEA) are a minor political party operating in Northern Ireland. ... The Scottish Unionist Party is a name of two organisations, one now subsumed into the UK Conservative Party, and the other being a recent creation in response to the Conservative Partys support of the Anglo-Irish Agreement. ... The Workers Revolutionary Party was a Trotskyist political party in the United Kingdom. ... New England Party are a political party in the United Kingdom whose representative Michael Tibby contested the constituency of Dartford at the 2005 general election, receiving 1,224 votes (the elected Labour MP, Howard Stoate, received 19,909 votes). ... The Communist Party of Britain is a small socialist party operating in the United Kingdom, although it chooses not to be active in Northern Ireland where the Communist Party of Ireland works. ... Peace and Progress Party A British political party founded by Vanessa Redgrave to campaign for human rights, Peace and Progress has been seen as an-anti SWP version of RESPECT. Combining members like the Redgraves from the traditional Trotskyist mileau with others from the media and legal fields, the party... The Scottish Senior Citizens Unity Party (SSCUP) were formed in February 2003, in time to contest that years elections to the Scottish Parliament. ... Your Party was formed at the beginning of 2004. ... The Independent Working Class Association is a small left-wing political party in Britain with the avowed aim of promoting the political and economic interests of the working class. ... This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... The Free Scotland Party (FSP) is a political party operating in Scotland advocating Scottish independence. ... The Pensioners Party are a minor political party operating in Scotland. ... Publican Party - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... The English Independence Party is a small, active, English political party. ... The Socialist Green Unity Coalition is an electoral alliance formed by leftist parties and political organisations in Great Britain to contest English and Welsh seats in the 2005 parliamentary election. ... The Local Community Party is a minor political party in England, based in Tameside. ... Clause 28 Childrens Protection Christian Democrats are a very minor political party in the United Kingdom. ... The UK Community Issues Party is a minor political party based in North West Surrey and [[South West London. ...

Formation of the new government

Following the election result, Labour remained in power and Tony Blair remained Prime Minister. The first job he undertook was to select a new Cabinet. This was done over the weekend afterwards and formally announced on May 9 2005. The most senior positions of Chancellor, Home Secretary and Foreign Secretary remained the same, but a few new faces were added; most notably David Blunkett who returned to cabinet as the Work and Pensions Secretary. The Prime Minister of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is the head of government and so exercises many of the executive functions nominally vested in the Sovereign, who is head of state. ... In the Politics of the United Kingdom, the Cabinet is a formal body comprised of government officials chosen by the kp. ... May 9 is the 129th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (130th in leap years). ... The Rt. ... The Home Secretary (official full title Secretary of State for the Home Department) is the chief United Kingdom government minister responsible for law and order in England and Wales; his or her remit includes policing, the criminal justice system, the prison service, internal security, and matters of citizenship and immigration. ... The Secretary of State for Foreign and Commonwealth Affairs (colloquially called the Foreign Secretary) is a member of the British Government responsible for relations with foreign countries, heading the Foreign and Commonwealth Office (often called simply the Foreign Office). ... The Secretary of State for Work and Pensions is a position in the UK cabinet, responsible for the Department for Work and Pensions. ...


The new Parliament met on May 11 for the election of the Speaker of the House of Commons. May 11 is the 131st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (132nd in leap years). ... In the United Kingdom, the Speaker of the House of Commons is the presiding officer of the House of Commons, and is seen historically as the First Commoner of the Land. ...


New party leaders

On May 6, Michael Howard announced he would be standing down as leader of the Conservative Party, but not before a review of the rules for electing a leader had been reviewed. The formal leadership election began in October, and was ultimately won by David Cameron. See Conservative Party (UK) leadership election, 2005. The following day David Trimble resigned as leader of the Ulster Unionist Party. His successor, Sir Reg Empey, was elected at the meeting of the Ulster Unionist Council on June 24. See Ulster Unionist Party leadership election, 2005. May 6 is the 126th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (127th in leap years). ... The Rt. ... David William Donald Cameron (born 9 October 1966) is a British politician, Leader of the Conservative Party, and Leader of Her Majestys Loyal Opposition in the House of Commons. ... The 2005 Conservative leadership election was announced by party leader Michael Howard on May 6, 2005, when he announced that he would be stepping down as leader in the near future. ... Sir Reginald Norman Morgan Empey (born on October 26, 1947) is a Northern Ireland politician and a Member of the Northern Ireland Assembly for East Belfast. ... June 24 is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 190 days remaining. ... The 2005 Ulster Unionist Party leadership election began on May 6, 2005 when David Trimble resigned as leader of the Ulster Unionist Party following his partys poor performance in the 2005 general election when it lost all but one of its seats, including Trimbles own. ...

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United Kingdom general elections are the elections held when the Members of Parliament (MPs) forming the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom are elected. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... The election to the 2nd Parliament of the United Kingdom was the first to be held after the Union of Great Britain and Ireland (as the 1801-1802 Parliament was composed of members elected to the former Parliaments of Great Britain and Ireland). ... The election to the 3rd Parliament of the United Kingdom was the second general election to be held after the Union of Great Britain and Ireland. ... The election to the 4th Parliament of the United Kingdom was the third general election to be held after the Union of Great Britain and Ireland. ... The election to the 5th Parliament of the United Kingdom was the fourth general election to be held after the Union of Great Britain and Ireland. ... 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The 1837 UK general election saw Robert Peels Conservatives close further on the position of the Whigs, who won their third election of the decade. ... The 1841 UK general election saw a big swing as Robert Peels Conservatives took control of the House of Commons. ... The 1847 UK general election saw candidates calling themselves Conservatives win the most seats, in part because they won a number of uncontested seats. ... The 1852 UK general election was very close, Lord John Russells Whigs again winning the popular vote, but once again Conservative candidates won a very slight majority. ... The 1857 UK general election saw the Whigs, led by Lord Palmerston, finally win a majority in the House of Commons as the Conservative vote fell significantly. ... The 1859 UK general election saw the Whigs, led by Lord Palmerston, hold their majority in a much enlarged House of Commons over the Earl of Derbys Conservatives. ... The 1865 UK general election saw the Liberals, led by Lord Palmerston, increase their large majority over the Earl of Derbys Conservatives. ... The 1868 UK general election was the first after passage of the Reform Act 1867, which enfranchised all male householders, thus greatly increasing the number of men who could vote in elections in the United Kingdom. ... The 1874 UK general election ended with the Liberals, led by William Gladstone, winning a majority of the votes cast, but Benjamin Disraelis Conservatives winning the majority of seats in the House of Commons, largely because they won a number of uncontested seats. ... In the UK general election of 1880, also known as the Midlothian Campaign, the Liberals, led by the fierce oratory of retired former Liberal leader William Gladstone in attacking the supposedly immoral foreign policy of the Beaconsfield government, secured one of their largest ever majorities, leaving the Conservatives a distant... The 1885 UK general election was from the 24th November - 18th December 1885. ... The 1886 UK general election took place from July 1-27, 1886. ... The 1892 UK general election was held from 4th - 26th July 1892. ... The UK general election of 1895 was held from 13th July - 7th August 1895. ... The UK general election of 1900 was from 25th September - 24th October 1900. ... The UK general election of 1906 was from 12th January – 8th February 1906. ... The UK general election of January 1910 was held from 15th January – 10th February 1910. ... The UK general election of December 1910 was the last held over several days, from 3rd – 19th December 1910. ... The United Kingdom general election of 1918 held on 14th December 1918, after the Representation of the People Act 1918. ... The UK general election of 1922 was held on 15th November 1922. ... The UK general election of 1923 was held on 5th December 1923. ... The 1924 UK general election was held on 29th October 1924. ... The 1929 UK general election was held on 30th May 1929, and resulted in a hung parliament. ... The UK general election on Tuesday 27 October 1931 was the last in the United Kingdom not held on a Thursday. ... The UK general election held on 14th November 1935 resulted in a large, though reduced, majority for the National Government now led by Stanley Baldwin. ... The United Kingdom General Election of 1945 held on 5 July 1945 but not counted and declared until 26 July 1945 (due to the time it took to transport the votes of those serving overseas) was one of the most significant general elections of the 20th century. ... The United Kingdom general election in 1950 was the first general election ever after a full term of a Labour government. ... The 1951 election was held soon after the UK general election, 1950, which Labour won, but with an unworkable majority. ... The 1955 United Kingdom general election was held on May 26, 1955, four years after the previous general election. ... This United Kingdom general election was held on October 8, 1959, and marked a third successive victory for the ruling Conservative party, led by Harold MacMillan. ... The United Kingdom general election of 1964 result was a very slim majority for the Labour Party, of 4, and led to their first government since 1951. ... The UK general election in 1966 was called by Harold Wilson because his government, elected in the 1964 election, had an unworkably small majority. ... The United Kingdom general election of 1970 was held on June 18, 1970, and resulted in a surprise loss of power for Labour under Harold Wilson, who was replaced as Prime Minister by the Conservative leader, Edward Heath. ... The UK general election of February 1974 was held on February 28, 1974. ... The UK general election of October 1974 took place on October 10, 1974. ... The UK general election, 1979 was held on May 3, 1979 and is regarded as a pivotal point in 20th century British politics. ... The UK general election, 1983 was held on June 9, 1983 and gave the Conservatives and Margaret Thatcher the most decisive election victory since that of Labour in 1945. ... The UK general election, 1987 was held on June 11, 1987 and was the third victory in a row for Margaret Thatcher and the Conservatives. ... The UK general election, 1992 was held on April 9, 1992, and was the fourth victory in a row for the Conservatives. ... The UK general election, 1997 was held on 1 May 1997. ... The UK general election, 2001 was held on 7 June 2001 and was dubbed the quiet landslide by the media. ... The next United Kingdom general election must be held on or before 3 June, 2010. ...

External links

Media coverage

Electoral information

Manifestos

The Alliance Party of Northern Ireland (APNI), is a political party operating in Northern Ireland. ... PDF is an abbreviation with several meanings: Portable Document Format Post-doctoral fellowship Probability density function There also is an electronic design automation company named PDF Solutions. ... The British National Party (BNP) is the largest political party of the far right in the United Kingdom. ... The Conservative Party is the largest political party on the right-of-centre in the United Kingdom. ... The Democratic Unionist Party is a hardline Unionist party in Northern Ireland led by Ian Paisley. ... The Green Party of England and Wales is the principal Green party in the United Kingdom (see British politics). ... The Labour Party has historically been the principal left wing political party of the United Kingdom since its formation in the early 20th century (see British politics). ... The Liberal Democrats, often shortened to Lib Dems, are a liberal political party based in the United Kingdom. ... The Official Monster Raving Loony Party (OMRLP) is a registered political party established in the United Kingdom in 1983 by musician and anti-politician David Sutch, also known as Screaming Lord Sutch. ... In Scotland, the Scottish National Party (SNP) (Pàrtaidh Nàiseanta na h-Alba in Scottish Gaelic) is a centre-left political party which campaigns for Scottish independence. ... Plaid, in full Plaid Cymru (pronounced IPA: ) – The Party of Wales, is the principal nationalist political party in Wales. ... The English Democrats Party, previously the English National Party, is a political party in England, which seeks the establishment of a new Parliament for England with at least the same powers as those granted to the Scottish Parliament. ... RESPECT The Unity Coalition is a left wing British political party founded on January 25, 2004 in London. ... The Scottish Socialist Party (SSP) is a far left wing Scottish political party which campaigns for a socialist economic platform and Scottish independence. ... The Social Democratic and Labour Party (SDLP — Irish: Páirtí Sóisialta Daonlathach an Lucht Oibre) is the smaller of the two major nationalist parties in Northern Ireland. ... Sinn Féin (in the Irish language ourselves or we ourselves; not as sometimes incorrectly translated, ourselves alone) is an Irish political party. ... Predicted properties Name, Symbol, Number ununpentium, Uup, 115 Chemical series presumably poor metals Group, Period, Block 15, 7 , p Appearance unknown Atomic weight [288] amu (a guess) Electron configuration [Rn] 5f14 6d10 7s27p3 (a guess based upon bismuth) e-s per energy level 2, 8, 18, 32, 32, 18, 5... The United Kingdom Independence Party (commonly known as UKIP, pronounced you-kip) is a Eurosceptic political party that aims at British withdrawal from the European Union. ...

Miscellaneous

  • Who should you vote for? - A tool to show which party's policies most closely match your priorities
  • Who Do I Vote For? - An alternative tool to show which party's policies most closely match your opinions on 20 key policy areas
  • The Christian Institute - Includes an election briefing that analyses party manifestos in the light of their perception of Christian beliefs
  • OSCE Final Report on the United Kingdom general election on 2005-05-05, by the Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe

  Results from FactBites:
 
UK general election, 2005 - definition of UK general election, 2005 in Encyclopedia (1080 words)
Although a general election is not required to be held until 2006, it has been widely speculated that there will be a general election some time in 2005.
If the election is held before June 2005, the government will be returning to the poll slightly under four years into the parliamentary term, but the 2001 election was delayed by one month to take account of the Foot and Mouth Disease outbreak.
Legislation was passed by the UK Parliament in September 2004, which will come into effect upon the dissolution of the current UK Parliament, to break the linkage between UK Parliament constituencies and Scottish Parliament constituencies; therefore this election will mark a reduction of the number of constituencies for the UK Parliament.
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