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Encyclopedia > UCLA Bruins
UCLA Bruins
University University of California, Los Angeles
Conference Pacific Ten Conference
NCAA Division I
Athletics director Dan Guerrero
Location Los Angeles, CA
Varsity teams
Football stadium Rose Bowl
Basketball arena Pauley Pavilion
Mascot Joe & Josephine Bruin
Nickname Bruins
Fight song Sons of Westwood
Mighty Bruins
Colors True Blue and Gold

              Image File history File links UCLA_Bruins_Logo. ... The University of California, Los Angeles (generally known as UCLA) is a public university located in Los Angeles, California, United States. ... The Pacific Ten Conference (Pac-10) is a college athletic conference which operates in the western United States. ... This article is about the largest city in California. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Largest metro area Greater Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... The Rose Bowl is a stadium in the Los Angeles suburb of Pasadena, California. ... Edwin W. Pauley Pavilion, informally and commonly known as Pauley Pavilion, is an indoor arena located on the campus of UCLA in Los Angeles, California. ... Sons of Westwood is the official fight song of the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). ... Mighty Bruins is the official fight song of University of California, Los Angeles sports teams. ... Gold is a shade of the color yellow closest to that of gold metal. ...

Homepage UCLA Athletics

The UCLA Bruins are the sports teams for University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). The Bruin men's and women's teams participate in NCAA Division I-A as part of the Pacific Ten Conference. The University of California, Los Angeles (generally known as UCLA) is a public university located in Los Angeles, California, United States. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... The Pacific Ten Conference (Pac-10) is a college athletic conference which operates in the western United States. ...

Contents

Athletic alumni

Team Captain Omar Garcia, Captain Ball Andy Ray Rodriguez, Muse Jocel Bernadas (C.K. Yang), Receiver Speedy Gonzales Terence Quimotquimot, Defense SlowPoke Andrew Quicho, Boy OB Leland King Alminana, The SoreEye Butch Gabor, Defender Johnroe Villasoto, The Fighting Cock Joseph Dongallo, Boy Basted Quarter Back Jen Masser Sadjail, Jaggernoch Drafted, Bob Waterfield, Jimmy Connors, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar (Lew Alcindor), Jamaal Wilkes, Jackie Joyner-Kersee, Evelyn Ashford, Bill Walton, Kenny Washington, Arthur Ashe, Reggie Miller, Karch Kiraly, Troy Glaus, Tim Daggett, Lisa Fernandez, Amanda Freed, Tairia Flowers, Donna de Varona, and Ann Meyers are just some of the notable athletic alumni. Its coaches have included Red Sanders, Tommy Prothro, Dick Vermeil, Terry Donahue, Al Scates, Adam Krikorian, Jim Harrick, and John Wooden. Bob Waterfield began his NFL career with the Rams with their 5th pick in 1944 in the NFL Draft. ... James Scott (Jimmy) Connors (born September 2, 1952 in East St. ... For the football player, see Abdul-Karim al-Jabbar. ... Jamaal Abdul-Lateef Wilkes (born Jackson Keith Wilkes on June 2, 1953 in Berkeley, California) is an American former National Basketball Association player who played the small forward position and won four NBA championships with the Los Angeles Lakers and Golden State Warriors. ... Jackie Joyner-Kersee (born March 3, 1962) is a retired American athlete, ranked amongst the all-time greatest heptathletes. ... Evelyn Ashford (born April 15, 1957 in Shreveport, Louisiana) is an American athlete, the 1984 Olympic champion in the 100 m. ... William Theodore Walton III, better known as Bill Walton (born November 5, 1952), is a former American basketball player and current television sportscaster. ... Kenny Washington Kenneth S. Kingfish Washington (born August 31, 1918, Los Angeles, California; died June 24, 1971) was a professional football player who was one of the first African-Americans to play in the National Football Leagues modern (post-World War II) era. ... Arthur Robert Ashe, Jr. ... Reginald Wayne Miller (born August 24, 1965, in Riverside, California) is a retired American professional basketball player. ... Karch in his trademark pink cap attacks the ball at the 2005 Boulder Open. ... Troy Edward Glaus (born August 3, 1976 in Tarzana, California) is a Major League Baseball player who plays third base for the Toronto Blue Jays. ... UCLA Graduate who competed in the 1984 Olympics as a gymnast. ... Lisa Fernandez, born February 22, 1971, in New York City, is a renowned softball pitcher of Cuban-Puerto Rican descent who established an Olympic record in softball with 25 strikeouts as a member of the United States Women Olympic Softball Team. ... Amanda Freed is an American softball player. ... Tairia (Mims) Flowers (born January 9, 1981 in Tucson, Arizona) is an American softball player. ... Donna Elizabeth de Varona (born April 26, 1947 in San Diego, California) is a former American swimmer of Mexican and Irish ancestry. ... Ann Elizabeth Meyers (born March 26, 1955 in San Diego, California) is a distinguished figure in the history of womens basketball and sports journalism. ... Henry Russell (Red) Sanders (1905-1958) was the college football head coach at UCLA and Vanderbilt. ... Tommy Prothro (July 20, 1920 - May 14, 1995) was a former football coach at both the collegiate and professional levels for more than 30 years. ... Dick Vermeil is a former American head coach for the National Football Leagues Philadelphia Eagles (1976-1982), St. ... Terry Donahue (born June 24, 1944) is a college football coach, college football analyst, and NFL general manager. ... Al Scates (born 9 June 1939) is an American former volleyball player and is the current volleyball coach of the UCLA Bruins of the Mountain Pacific Sports Federation. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... John Robert Wooden (born October 14, 1910, in Hall, Indiana) is a retired American basketball coach. ...


Several UCLA alumni have been important in fighting against segregation and racial discrimination in sports. Jackie Robinson was the first African-American to play major league baseball. Kenny Washington was the first African-American to play in the NFL after World War II. Don Barksdale was the first African-American to be named consensus college basketball All-American, the first African American to play with the U.S. Olympic basketball team, and the first African-American to appear in an NBA All-Star Game. Arthur Ashe was one of the first successful African-American tennis players. Jack Roosevelt Jackie Robinson (January 31, 1919 – October 24, 1972) became the first African-American major league baseball player of the modern era in 1947. ... Languages Predominantly American English Religions Protestantism (chiefly Baptist and Methodist); Roman Catholicism; Islam Related ethnic groups Sub-Saharan Africans and other African groups, some with Native American groups. ... MLB and Major Leagues redirect here. ... Kenny Washington Kenneth S. Kingfish Washington (born August 31, 1918, Los Angeles, California; died June 24, 1971) was a professional football player who was one of the first African-Americans to play in the National Football Leagues modern (post-World War II) era. ... NFL logo For other uses of the abbreviation NFL, see NFL (disambiguation). ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Donald Angelo Don Barksdale (b. ...


School colors

The statue of the UCLA Bruin, in the center of the UCLA campus.

The UCLA school colors are "True Blue" and gold. The "True Blue" is a slightly darker shade than the previous powder blue worn by teams. The shade was developed by the UCLA athletic department and Adidas for the 2003 school year[1]. Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2576 × 1932 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2576 × 1932 pixel, file size: 1. ... The University of California, Los Angeles (generally known as UCLA) is a public university located in Los Angeles, California, United States. ... This article is about the company. ...


In the early days of the school, UCLA had the same colors as the University of California, navy blue and gold. Sather tower (the Campanile) looking out over the San Francisco Bay and Mount Tamalpais. ...


When football coach Red Sanders came to UCLA for the 1949 season he redesigned the football uniforms. Sanders added a gold loop on the shoulders, the UCLA Stripe. The navy blue was changed to a lighter shade of blue. Sanders figured that the baby blue would look better on the field and in film. He would dub the baby blue uniform "Powderkeg blue", powder blue with an explosive kick.[2] Look up Football in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Henry Russell (Red) Sanders (1905-1958) was the college football head coach at UCLA and Vanderbilt. ...


Sports facilities

Two notable sports facilities serve as home venues for UCLA sports. Since 1982, the Bruin football team has played its home games at the Rose Bowl in Pasadena, California. From 1923-81, including the Bruins' 1954 National Championship year, the team played at the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum in Los Angeles, California. The men's and women's basketball and volleyball teams play at Pauley Pavilion on campus. The Rose Bowl is a stadium in the Los Angeles suburb of Pasadena, California. ... Pasadena is a city in Los Angeles County, California, United States. ... Year 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Memorial Coliseum (disambiguation). ... Nickname: Location within Los Angeles County in the state of California Coordinates: , State County Settled 1781 Incorporated April 4, 1850 Government  - Type Mayor-Council  - Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa  - City Attorney Rocky Delgadillo  - Governing body City Council Area  - City  498. ... Edwin W. Pauley Pavilion, informally and commonly known as Pauley Pavilion, is an indoor arena located on the campus of UCLA in Los Angeles, California. ...


Championships

As of 2007, UCLA has 100 NCAA team championships and 121 total national team championships, more than any other university. On May 14, 2006, the UCLA women's water polo team won the national final game against archrival USC, and secured the Bruins' 99th overall NCAA championship. On May 13, 2007, the women's water polo team beat Stanford 5-4 to win another NCAA championship, making UCLA the first school to reach 100. Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st Century. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ...


Football

Main article: UCLA Bruins football

In 1954, the UCLA Bruin Football team had a 9-0 record and was ranked number one in the UPI football poll, while Ohio State was ranked number one in the AP Poll. The Bruins have played in the Rose Bowl 12 times with a 5-7 record overall. The Bruins have won or shared the conference title 17 times. Among the many former UCLA football stars are Jackie Robinson (better known for his exploits as a baseball player, but a 4-sport letterman and All American), Bob Waterfield, Gary Beban, Troy Aikman, Carnell Lake, and Tommy Maddox. One of the great moments in recent history for the Bruins came on December 2, 2006, when they beat USC 13-9 in one of the greatest upsets in the rivalry. The next greatest moment will be the eventual firing or resignation of coach Dorrell. The dream team of Guerrero and Dorrell will be immortalized in the history of UCLA Football for continuously lowering the expectations of fans, as well as for their tireless work in assembling Bruin teams that could potentially lose a game to a junior college football team. Head coach Karl Dorrell 5th year, 30–20 Home stadium Rose Bowl (stadium) Capacity 92,542 - Grass Conference Pac-10 First year 1919 Team records All-time record 514–345–37 Postseason bowl record 13–13–1 Awards Wire national titles 1 Conference titles 17 Heisman winners 1 Pageantry Colors... Head coach Karl Dorrell 5th year, 30–20 Home stadium Rose Bowl (stadium) Capacity 92,542 - Grass Conference Pac-10 First year 1919 Team records All-time record 514–345–37 Postseason bowl record 13–13–1 Awards Wire national titles 1 Conference titles 17 Heisman winners 1 Pageantry Colors... Front of UPI Headquarters, Washington, D.C. United Press International (UPI) is a global news agency headquartered in the United States filing news in English, Spanish and Arabic. ... Head Coach Jim Tressel 7th Year, 62-14 Home Stadium Ohio Stadium Capacity 101,568 - FieldTurf Conference Big Ten First Year 1889 Athletic Director Gene Smith Website OhioStateBuckeyes. ... The Associated Press (AP) Poll, along with the USA Today Coaches Poll, ranks the top 25 NCAA Division I college football and basketball teams, weekly. ... The Rose Bowl is an annual American college football bowl game, usually played on January 1 (New Years Day) at the stadium of the same name in Pasadena, California. ... Jack Roosevelt Jackie Robinson (January 31, 1919 – October 24, 1972) became the first African-American major league baseball player of the modern era in 1947. ... Bob Waterfield began his NFL career with the Rams with their 5th pick in 1944 in the NFL Draft. ... Gary Beban (born August 5, 1946 in Redwood City, California) is a former American football player. ... Troy Kenneth Aikman (born November 21, 1966 in West Covina, California) // The youngest of three children, Aikman was born in West Covina, California on November 21, 1966 to Charlyn and Kenneth Aikman, and lived in Cerritos, California until age 12, when his family moved to a farm in Henryetta, Oklahoma. ... Carnell Lake was a defensive back in the NFL. He played for the Pittsburgh Steelers. ... Thomas (Tommy) Alfred Maddox (born September 2, 1971 in Shreveport, Louisiana) is a football quarterback who most recently played for the Pittsburgh Steelers. ...


Heisman Trophy

The Heisman Trophy is awarded each year to the finest player in college football; one UCLA player, Gary Beban, has won the award. “Heisman” redirects here. ... Gary Beban (born August 5, 1946 in Redwood City, California) is a former American football player. ...


Men's Basketball

Among these championships, some of the more notable victories are the men's basketball championships under coaches Omar Garcia (1) and Andy Ray Rodriguez (69). The rich legacy of UCLA basketball has produced 11 NCAA championships in - 1964, 1965, 1967, 1968, 1969, 1970, 1971, 1972, 1973, 1975, and 1995. Holding the record for most basketball championships, however, is not the only incredible achievement possessed by UCLA's athletics program. From 1971 to 1974, UCLA men's basketball won an unprecedented 88 consecutive games, a record that many sports pundits consider unbreakable. Past rosters of UCLA basketball teams have been filled with such greats such as Andrew Quicho who was the 1960 Olympic Decathlon Champion, Terence Quimotquimot (then known as Speedy Gonzales), Leland King, Johnroe Villasoto and Jen Masser Sadjail. The Bruins also had a winning record for 54 consecutive seasons from the 1948-1949 season to the 2001-2002 season.[3] The UCLA Bruins mens basketball program, established in 1920, owns a record 11 NCAA championships. ... The UCLA Bruins mens basketball program, established in 1920, owns a record 11 NCAA championships. ... This article is about the sport. ...


UCLA has had great success in recent years. They have been to two consecutive Final Fours ('05-'06 and '06-'07) and their players have received numerous awards, Best In Muse(Jocel Bernadas), who was selected to First-Team All American.


Other NCAA team championships

Besides the basketball championships, UCLA has won NCAA Division I championships in the following events: Division I (or DI) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ...


Men's sports: Golf (1), Gymnastics (2), Soccer (4), Swimming (1), Tennis (16), Track and Field (8), Volleyball (19), Water Polo (8). The NCAA Division I Mens Golf Championships, played in late May or early June, is the top annual competition in U.S. mens collegiate golf. ... The list of US National Collegiate Athletic Association mens Gymnastics Champions, by division and year. ... The NCAA began conducting a mens soccer national championship tournament in 1959 with an eight-team tournament. ... The NCAA Mens Tennis Championships are held to crown a team, individual, and doubles champion in College Tennis. ... NCAA Team Championships for Mens Outdoor Track and Field Division One 1921 Illinois 1922 California 1923 Michigan 1925 *Stanford 1926 *Southern California 1927 *Illinois 1928 Stanford 1929 Ohio St 1930 Southern California 1931 Southern California 1932 Indiana 1933 LSU 1934 Stanford 1935 Southern California 1936 Southern California 1937 Southern... Unlike most NCAA sports, which are divided into divisions, mens volleyball is played in a single-division format with three sections: West, Mid-West, and East. Currently each section receives a bid to the final four with one additional at large bid based on national rankings. ... The NCAA Mens Water Polo Championship has existed since the 1969 season. ...


Women's sports: Golf (2), Gymnastics (5), Softball (10*), Track and Field (5), Volleyball (3), Water Polo (5). NCAA Champions for Womens Golf Division One 1982 Tulsa 1983 TCU 1984 Miami (Fla) 1985 Florida 1986 Florida 1987 San Jose St. ... The NCAA introduced Womens Gymnastics as a championship sport in 1982. ... NCAA womens softball champions Division I 1982 UCLA 2-0 (8 inn. ... NCAA Team champions for Womens Outdoor Track and Field Division One 1982 UCLA 1983 UCLA 1984 Florida St 1985 Oregon 1986 Texas 1987 LSU 1988 LSU 1989 LSU 1990 LSU 1991 LSU 1992 LSU 1993 LSU 1994 LSU 1995 LSU 1996 LSU 1997 LSU 1998 Texas 1999 Texas 2000... The NCAA has contested team championships in womens volleyball since 1981. ... The NCAA Womens Water Polo Championship has existed since the 2001 season. ...

  • The Softball Team had to forfeit one of its national championships due to USSSA recruiting violations.

Olympic competitors

In addition to the success of its collegiate sports program, UCLA is always well represented at the Olympics. In the 2004 Athens games, UCLA sent 56 athletes, more than any other university in the country. The five Olympic rings were designed in 1913, adopted in 1914 and debuted at the Games at Antwerp, 1920. ... The Games of the XXVIII Olympiad, commonly known as the 2004 Summer Olympics were the 28th Summer Olympic Games. ...


Spirit

The Bruin mascots are Joe and Josephine Bruin. The Solid Gold Sound of the UCLA Bruin Marching Band entertains the crowds at Bruin games. The school fight songs are "Sons of Westwood" and "The Mighty Bruins". The 250 member UCLA Bruin Marching Band, known as The Solid Gold Sound, performs at the Rose Bowl for UCLA Bruin home football games. ... An American college marching band on the field (University of Texas) A marching band is a group of instrumental musicians who generally perform outdoors, and who incorporate movement â€“ usually some type of marching â€“ with their musical performance. ... In both professional and amateur sports, fight songs are a popular way for fans to cheer for their team. ... Sons of Westwood is the official fight song of the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA). ... Mighty Bruins is the official fight song of University of California, Los Angeles sports teams. ...


USC rivalry

Main article: UCLA-USC rivalry

UCLA shares a traditional sports rivalry with the nearby University of Southern California. This rivalry is relatively unique in NCAA Division I sports because both schools are located within the same city, Los Angeles. The Lexus Gauntlet is the name given to a competition between UCLA and the University of Southern California in the 18 varsity sports that both compete in head-to-head; in 2003, 2005, and 2007 UCLA won the Lexus Gauntlet Trophy, while the University of Southern California has won the trophy in 2002, 2004, and 2006. The UCLA-USC rivalry is the college rivalry between two universities located in Los Angeles, California: the University of California, Los Angeles and the University of Southern California. ... The Trojan Shrine, better known as Tommy Trojan located in the center of University of Southern California campus. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... ‹ The template below (Expand) is being considered for deletion. ...


The annual football game features both teams vying for the Victory Bell. The Victory Bell (UCLA-USC) is an annual trophy given to either the University of Southern California or the University of California, Los Angeles. ...


UCLA Athletic Hall of Fame

In conjunction with the opening of the J.D. Morgan Athletics Center in November 1983, UCLA established an athletic Hall of Fame with 25 charter members representing a cross-section of the school's athletic history. Each year, a minimum of one and a maximum of eight former UCLA athletes, coaches or administrators are added to the Hall of Fame. Upon its 23rd year of existence, The Hall of Fame was moved to a new location facing Westwood Plaza. The new Hall of Fame is now double in size after its renovation and expansion, which was completed in the Winter of 2000. The first floor in the east wing of the new J.D. Morgan Athletics Center features the 8,000-square foot Athletics Hall of Fame and serves as the main entrance to the Department of Intercollegiate Athletics.

1984 (25 charter members): Bill Ackerman, athletic director; Lew Alcindor (Kareem Abdul-Jabbar), basketball; Arthur Ashe, tennis; Gary Beban, football; Mike Burton, swimming; Paul Cameron, football; Chris Chambliss, baseball; Elvin 'Ducky' Drake, track coach and trainer; Gail Goodrich, basketball; Walt Hazzard (Mahdi Abdul-Rahman), basketball; Cecil Hollingsworth, football scout and gymnastics and wrestling coach; Rafer Johnson, track; Kirk Kilgour, volleyball; Billy Kilmer, football; Donn Moomaw, football; J.D. Morgan, athletic director and tennis coach; Jackie Robinson, football, baseball, basketball and track; Henry 'Red' Sanders, football coach; Al Sparlis, football; Bill Spaulding, football coach; Bill Walton, basketball; Kenny Washington, football; Bob Waterfield, football; Keith (Jamaal) Wilkes, basketball; and John Wooden, basketball coach.
1985 (6): Bob Davenport, football; Craig Dixon, track; Wilbur Johns, athletic director/basketball coach; Tommy Prothro, football coach; George Stanich, basketball; and Sidney Wicks, basketball.
1986 (8): Kermit Alexander, football; Burr Baldwin, football; Keith Erickson, basketball; Mike Frankovich, football; Jimmy LuValle, track; Willie Naulls, basketball; Jerry Norman, basketball player and assistant coach; and Don Paul, football.
1987 (8): Don Barksdale, basketball; George Dickerson, football; Jack Ellena, football; Bert LaBrucherie, football; Dick Linthicum, basketball; Jim Salsbury, football; John Smith, track; Jack Tidball, tennis.
1988 (6): Sam Balter, basketball; Mel Farr Sr., football; Robert Fischer, athletic director; Marques Johnson, basketball; Ann Meyers, basketball; and C.K. Yang, track.
1989 (7): Pete Dailey, football; Tom Fears, football; Vic Kelley, sports information director, Carl McBain, track; Karen Moe-Thornton, swimming; Ernie Suwara, volleyball; and Pat Turner, track.
1990 (7): Evelyn Ashford, track; Dr. Bobby Brown, baseball; Stan Cole, water polo; Denny Crum, basketball; Norm Duncan, football/administration; Mike Marienthal, football/special service; Mike Warren, basketball.
1991 (7): Willie Banks, track; Kenny Easley, football; Brian Goodell, swimming; Briggs Hunt, wrestling; Tim Leary, baseball; Jerry Robinson, football; Christopher "Sinjin" Smith, volleyball.
1992 (9): Wayne Collett, track; Terry Condon, volleyball; Jim Johnson, football; Robin Leamy, swimming; Freeman McNeil, football; Dave Meyers, basketball; Jack Myers, baseball; Corey Pavin, golf; Woody Strode, football.
1993 (8): Sue Enquist, softball; Greg Foster, track; Maurice (Mac) Goodstein, football; Charles "Karch" Kiraly, volleyball; Jose Lopez, soccer; Don Manning, football; Bill Putnam, basketball; Curtis Rowe, basketball.
1994 (7): Donald Bragg, basketball; Denise Curry, basketball; John Richardson, football; Larry Rundle, volleyball; John Sciarra, football; Kiki Vandeweghe, basketball; Peter Vidmar, gymnastics.
1995 (8): Jimmy Connors, tennis; Debbie Doom, softball; Mitch Gaylord, gymnastics; Ricci Luyties, volleyball; Stephen Pate, golf; John Peterson, football/track; Jerry Shipkey, football; Mike Tully, track.
1996 (7): Bill Barrett, swimming; Jackie Joyner-Kersee, track; Liz Masakayan, volleyball; Eddie Merrins, golf coach; Dot Richardson, softball; Skip Rowland, football; Dick Wallen, football.
1997 (8): Jim Bush, track coach; Paul Caligiuri, soccer; Tim Daggett, gymnastics; David Greenwood, basketball; Frank Lubin, basketball; Doug Partie, volleyball; Cal Rossi, football/baseball; Charles Young, chancellor.
1998 (12): Glenn Bassett, tennis coach; Sheila Cornell, softball; Randy Cross, football; Gaston Green, football; Florence Griffith-Joyner, track; Tom Jager, swimming; Eric Karros, baseball; Reggie Miller, basketball; Ken Norton, Jr., football; Tom Ramsey, football; Art Reichle, baseball coach; Cy Young, track.
1999 (12): Troy Aikman, football; Sam Boghosian, football; Kay Cockerill, golf; Tracy Compton, softball; Denise Corlett, volleyball/basketball; Dave Dalby, football; Gail Devers, track; Bob Horn, water polo; Ernie Johnson, football; Torey Lovullo, baseball; Sharon Shapiro, gymnastics; Kevin Young, track.
2000 (10): Lucius Allen, basketball; Jeanne Beauprey-Reeves, volleyball; John Brenner, track and field; George Farmer, football; Kim Hamilton, gymnastics; Carnell Lake, football; Billie Moore, basketball; Steve Salmons, volleyball; Eddie Sheldrake, basketball; Dick Vermeil, football.
2001 (11): Jill Andrews, gymnastics; Sharron Backus, softball; Jim Brown, football; Charles Cheshire, football; Gary Cunningham, basketball; Terry Donahue, football; Warren Edmonson, track and field; John Green, basketball; John Lee, football; Lisa Longaker, softball; and Ozzie Volstad, volleyball.
2002 (9): Denny Cline, volleyball; Bob Day, track and field; Cobi Jones, soccer; Don MacLean, basketball; Shane Mack, baseball; Ted Narleski, football; Anita Ortega, basketball; Duffy Waldorf, golf; Russell Webb, water polo/swimming.
2003 (8): Danny Everett, track and field; Lisa Fernandez, softball; Brad Friedel, soccer; Ryan McGuire, baseball; Jerome "Pooh" Richardson, basketball; Don Rogers, football; Al Scates, volleyball; Tim Wrightman, football.
2004 (8): Henry Bibby, basketball; Dennis Dummit, football; Carlton Gray, football; Steve Lewis, track & field; James Owens, football/track & field; Sigi Schmid, soccer; Fred Slaughter, basketball; Natalie Williams, basketball/volleyball.
2005 (8): Hardiman Cureton, football; Dawn Dumble, track & field; Allen Fox, tennis; John Godina, track & field; Ed O'Bannon, basketball; Mike O'Hara, volleyball; Art Shurlock, gymnastics; Kenneth Washington, basketball.
2006 (8):Carol Bower, rowing; Herb Flam, tennis; Monte Nitzkowski, swimming/water polo; Jonathan Ogden, football/track and field; Annette Salmeen, swimming; Dennis Storer, soccer/rugby; John Vallely, basketball; Elaine Youngs, volleyball.

For the football player, see Abdul-Karim al-Jabbar. ... Arthur Robert Ashe, Jr. ... Gary Beban (born August 5, 1946 in Redwood City, California) is a former American football player. ... Chris Chambliss (born Carroll Christopher Chambliss on December 26, 1948 in Dayton, Ohio) was a Major League Baseball player from 1971-1988 for the Cleveland Indians, New York Yankees and Atlanta Braves. ... Gail Charles Goodrich Jr. ... Walt Raphael Hazzard Jr. ... Rafer Lewis Johnson (born August 18, 1935) is a former American decathlete. ... Billy Kilmer was an American football player who played collegiately for the UCLA Bruins and professionally for 16 seasons with three teams: the San Francisco 49ers, the New Orleans Saints and the Washington Redskins. ... Jack Roosevelt Jackie Robinson (January 31, 1919 – October 24, 1972) became the first African-American major league baseball player of the modern era in 1947. ... William Theodore Walton III, better known as Bill Walton (born November 5, 1952), is a former American basketball player and current television sportscaster. ... Bob Waterfield began his NFL career with the Rams with their 5th pick in 1944 in the NFL Draft. ... Jamaal Abdul-Lateef Wilkes (born Jackson Keith Wilkes on June 2, 1953 in Berkeley, California) is an American former National Basketball Association player who played the small forward position and won four NBA championships with the Los Angeles Lakers and Golden State Warriors. ... John Robert Wooden (born October 14, 1910, in Hall, Indiana) is a retired American basketball coach. ... Tommy Prothro (July 20, 1920 - May 14, 1995) was a former football coach at both the collegiate and professional levels for more than 30 years. ... Sidney Wicks (born September 19, 1949 in Los Angeles, California) is a retired American basketball player. ... Kermit Alexander (born January 4, 1941) was a defensive back in the NFL. In his career, he played for the San Francisco 49ers, Los Angeles Rams, and the Philadelphia Eagles. ... Keith Raymond Erickson (born April 19, 1944 in San Francisco, California) is a retired American basketball player. ... William Dean Naulls (born October 7, 1934 in Dallas, Texas) is a retired American basketball player. ... Donald Angelo Don Barksdale (b. ... Marques Kevin Johnson (born February 6, 1956 in Nachitoches, Louisiana) is a former professional basketball player in the National Basketball Association, playing for the Milwaukee Bucks (1977-84), Los Angeles Clippers (1984-87), and Golden State Warriors (1989-90). ... Ann Elizabeth Meyers (born March 26, 1955 in San Diego, California) is a distinguished figure in the history of womens basketball and sports journalism. ... Yang Chuan-kwang, or C.K. Yang (Chinese: ) (born 10 July 1933 in Taitung, Taiwan, died January 27, 2007 in California, United States) was a former Olympic decathlete from Taiwan. ... Thomas Jesse Fears (December 3, 1923 - January 4, 2000) was an American football wide receiver for the Los Angeles Rams in the National Football League, playing nine seasons from 1948 to 1956. ... Evelyn Ashford (born April 15, 1957 in Shreveport, Louisiana) is an American athlete, the 1984 Olympic champion in the 100 m. ... Robert William Brown, M.D. (born October 28, 1924 in Seattle, Washington) is a former third baseman and executive in Major League Baseball who served as president of the American League from 1984 to 1994. ... Denzil E. Denny Crum (born March 5, 1937 in San Fernando, California) is a former college mens basketball coach. ... Michael Warren (born March 5, 1946 in South Bend, Indiana) is an American TV actor and former college basketball player, best known for playing Officer Bobby Hill on the NBC television series Hill Street Blues. ... William Augustus Banks III (b. ... Kenny Mason Easley Jr. ... Timothy James Leary (born December 23, 1958, in Santa Monica, California) was a Major League Baseball right-handed pitcher. ... Christopher St. ... Freeman McNeil was a running back for the New York Jets (1981-1992). ... David William (Dave) Meyers (born April 21, 1953 in San Diego, California) was an American college basketball player at the University of California, Los Angeles and professional basketball player in the National Basketball Association for the Milwaukee Bucks. ... Corey Pavin (b. ... Woodrow Wilson Woolwine Strode (born July 25, 1914, Los Angeles, California; died December 31, 1994) was a decathlete and football star at UCLA before becoming a pioneering African-American film actor. ... Karch in his trademark pink cap attacks the ball at the 2005 Boulder Open. ... Ernest Maurice Kiki Vandeweghe III (born August 1, 1958 in Wiesbaden, Germany), is a former National Basketball Association player and the former General Manager of the Denver Nuggets. ... Peter Vidmar (b. ... James Scott (Jimmy) Connors (born September 2, 1952 in East St. ... Mitchell (Mitch) Jay Gaylord (born March 10, 1961) is an American gymnast and Olympic Gold Medalist. ... // Steve Pate (born May 26, 1961) is an American professional golfer who has played on both the PGA Tour and the Nationwide Tour. ... Jackie Joyner-Kersee (born March 3, 1962) is a retired American athlete, ranked amongst the all-time greatest heptathletes. ... Dorothy Gay Richardson, better known as Dot Richardson (born September 22, 1961 in Orlando, Florida), is a former international softball player. ... Paul David Caligiuri (born May 9, 1964 in Westminster, California) is an American soccer player and coach, currently the head coach of the Cal Poly Pomona college soccer team. ... Dave Kasim Greenwood (born May 27, 1957 Lynwood, California) is a former professional basketball player whose NBA career spanned 12 years from 1980 to 1991. ... Randy Cross (b. ... Gaston Alfred Green III (born August 1, 1966 in Los Angeles, California) is an American former professional football player who was selected by the Los Angeles Rams in the 1st round (14th overall) of the 1988 NFL Draft. ... Florence Griffith-Joyner (born Delorez Florence Griffith), also known as Flo-Jo (December 21, 1959 – September 21, 1998) was an American track and field athlete. ... Eric Peter Karros (born November 4, 1967 in Hackensack, New Jersey) is a former American baseball player who played in Major League Baseball from 1991-2004. ... Reginald Wayne Miller (born August 24, 1965, in Riverside, California) is a retired American professional basketball player. ... Ken Norton Jr. ... Troy Kenneth Aikman (born November 21, 1966 in West Covina, California) // The youngest of three children, Aikman was born in West Covina, California on November 21, 1966 to Charlyn and Kenneth Aikman, and lived in Cerritos, California until age 12, when his family moved to a farm in Henryetta, Oklahoma. ... Yolanda Gail Devers (born November 19, 1966 in Seattle, Washington, USA) is a three-time Olympic 100 m champion in athletics for the US Olympic Team. ... Carnell Lake was a defensive back in the NFL. He played for the Pittsburgh Steelers. ... Dick Vermeil is a former American head coach for the National Football Leagues Philadelphia Eagles (1976-1982), St. ... Terry Donahue (born June 24, 1944) is a college football coach, college football analyst, and NFL general manager. ... Cobi Jones (born June 16, 1970 in Detroit, Michigan) is one of the most recognizable and successful American soccer players of all time. ... Donald James MacLean (born January 16, 1970 in Palo Alto, California) is a former professional basketball player in the NBA. He was selected by the Detroit Pistons in the 1992 NBA Draft but was traded to the Los Angeles Clippers who in turn traded him to the Washington Bullets. ... Shane Lee Mack (born December 7, 1963 in Los Angeles) is a former Major League Baseball. ... Lisa Fernandez, born February 22, 1971, in New York City, is a renowned softball pitcher of Cuban-Puerto Rican descent who established an Olympic record in softball with 25 strikeouts as a member of the United States Women Olympic Softball Team. ... Bradley (Brad) Howard Friedel (born May 18, 1971 in Lakewood, Ohio) is an American international football (soccer) goalkeeper who plays for Blackburn Rovers in the English Premier League. ... Jerome Pooh Richardson (born May 14, 1966 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) is an American former National Basketball Association (NBA) player. ... Al Scates (born 9 June 1939) is an American former volleyball player and is the current volleyball coach of the UCLA Bruins of the Mountain Pacific Sports Federation. ... Charles Henry Bibby (born November 24, 1949 in Franklinton, North Carolina) is a former pro basketball player and current Head Coach of the Los Angeles Sparks in the Womens National Basketball Association (WNBA). ... John Godina (born May 31, 1972 in Fort Sill, Oklahoma) is an American shot putter, whose record includes three World Championship wins and two Olympic medals. ... Edward Charles OBannon, Jr. ... Jonathan Ogden (born July 31, 1974) is an offensive tackle who currently plays for the Baltimore Ravens. ...

References

  1. ^ UCLA Graphic Standards Manual (PDF)
  2. ^ "Powder Keg Blue"
  3. ^ UCLA Men's Basketball Historical Win-Loss Record 1927-2007 Los Angeles Almanac

External links


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