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Encyclopedia > UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism

The UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism is a graduate professional school on the campus of University of California at Berkeley. It is among the top graduate journalism schools in the nation, and is designed to produce journalists with a two-year Master of Journalism (MJ) degree. This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... A profession is a specialized work function within society, generally performed by a professional. ... University of California, Berkeley The University of California, Berkeley (also known as California, Cal, UCB, UC Berkeley, The University of California, or simply Berkeley) is a public coeducational university situated east of the San Francisco Bay in Berkeley, California, overlooking the Golden Gate. ... This article does not cite its references or sources. ...


The program is located in UC Berkeley's North Gate Hall, near the intersection of Euclid and Hearst avenues in Berkeley, CA. Its current dean is Orville Schell. Most courses offered by the school are on the graduate level, with few official courses for undergraduates. Orville Hickock Schell III (born May 20, 1940) is the Dean at the University of California, Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism and author of numerous works on the history of China. ...


The school serves host to, or sponsors, a great number of events. Notable speakers from around the world have shared their insights on current events in the media. Recent speakers have included Bill Clinton, Al Gore, Robert McNamara, Hans Blix, George Soros, Cokie Roberts, Paul Krugman, and more recently New York Times correspondent Judith Miller spoke about the consequences of confidential sources. William Jefferson Bill Clinton (born William Jefferson Blythe, III on August 19, 1946) was the 42nd President of the United States, serving from 1993 to 2001. ... Albert Arnold Gore Jr. ... Robert McNamara in 1964 Robert Strange McNamara (born June 9, 1916) is an American business executive and a former United States Secretary of Defense. ... Hans Blix in Vienna 2002. ... George Soros George Soros (born August 12, 1930 in Budapest, Hungary as Schwartz György) is a financial speculator, stock investor, philanthropist, and liberal political activist and donor. ... Martha Mary Coreen Morrison Claiborne Boggs Cokie Roberts (b. ... Paul Krugman Paul Robin Krugman (born February 28, 1953) is a liberal American economist who has written several books and since 2000 has written a twice-weekly column for The New York Times. ... Judith Miller is the name of several people, including: an American journalist a French philosopher This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ...


Like most college journalism schools, the UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism is colloquially known as the J-School.

Contents


Curriculum

The UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism focuses on seven primary mediums of journalism. They include newspaper, magazine, photojournalism, documentary film, radio, television or broadcast media and new media (or internet/multimedia). A collection of magazines A magazine is a periodical publication containing a variety of articles, generally financed by advertising and/or purchase by readers. ... Sports photojournalists at Indianapolis Motor Speedway Photojournalism is a particular form of journalism (the collecting, editing, and presenting of news material for publication or broadcast) that creates images in order to tell a news story. ... Documentary film is a broad category of cinematic expression united by the intent to remain factual or non-fictional. ... Television is a telecommunication system for broadcasting and receiving moving pictures and sound over a distance. ... New Media or Interactive Media is a field of study that has developed around cultural practices with the computer playing a central role as the medium for production, storage and distribution. ...


General reporting classes are split into six areas of emphasis: international, business, investigative, political, science and environment, and urban reporting.


The school has stated a clear mission of providing students a hands-on approach to journalism. While many graduate journalism schools have programs that are more theory-oriented, Berkeley focuses on offering students real world experiences and currently requires every student to perform an internship at a media outlet as a degree requirement -- preferably between their first and second year of study. For information about a medical intern, see the article on Medical residency. ...


Every student is also required to take an introductory news reporting course called J200, (named after its course designation.) A staple of the journalism school, J200 is formulated for students to delve into the world of print journalism by writing stories on local events. Print, or written journalism, is often considered the foundation of all news media, and teaches students the fundamentals in news gathering and production for a mass audience. Stories written by students are published on the school's Web site, North Gate News Online.


In the news

In 1996, U.S. News & World Report, known for its academic rankings, performed its last evaluation of the top 15 graduate schools of journalism in the nation. UC Berkeley tied for ninth place with University of Kansas, White. At the top of the list was University of Missouri, Columbia, followed by Columbia University. Over the next nine years, the UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism has grown in both size and prestige, and some would contend that it would score a higher ranking if a similar survey were held today. U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... The University of Missouri-Columbia (abbreviated UMC and nicknamed Mizzou) is an institution of higher learning located in Columbia, Missouri and is the main campus in the University of Missouri system. ... Columbia University is a private university in the Morningside Heights neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. ...


In 1981 celebrity Carol Burnett won a $1.6 million (later reduced to $800,000) libel award from The National Enquirer over an article that she said implied she had been intoxicated in a Washington restaurant. She donated a portion of that to the UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism saying she hoped the suit would teach aspiring journalists the dangers of defaming individuals in articles. The money was used to fund Law and Ethics courses at the school. Carol Creighton Burnett (born April 26, 1933) was one of the most successful female comedians on American television, thanks largely to her eponymous variety show that ran on CBS from 1967 through 1978. ... The National Enquirer is a national American supermarket tabloid. ...


China expert and author Orville Schell has been serving as Dean of the school since 1996. Preceding his position was Thomas Goldstein, who had served as dean since 1988. Goldstein left to become the dean of Columbia University's Graduate School of Journalism. He stepped down from that position after five years, despite being credited for increasing endowments for that school from $54 million to $84 million over his short stint there. He is currently teaching a news writing class at UC Berkeley's Graduate School of Journalism. Pulitzer Prize winning American media critic Ben Bagdikian also served as a past dean of the UC Berkeley's School of Journalism. Orville Hickock Schell III (born May 20, 1940) is the Dean at the University of California, Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism and author of numerous works on the history of China. ... Columbia University is a private university in the Morningside Heights neighborhood of Manhattan, New York City. ... The Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism is one of the most prestigious schools of journalism in the United States. ... Listen to this article (help) Listen to this article · (info) This audio file was created from the revision dated 2005-04-13, and does not reflect subsequent edits to the article. ... Ben H. Bagdikian Ben Haig Bagdikian (born 1920, Marash, Ottoman Empire; now Turkey) is an American educator and journalist of Armenian descent. ...


North Gate Hall

The UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism is housed in North Gate Hall, a designated historical landmark in the National Register of Historic Places. It is located immediately southeast of the intersection of Euclid and Hearst avenues in Berkeley, CA, on the campus of UC Berkeley. University of California, Berkeley The University of California, Berkeley (also known as California, Cal, UCB, UC Berkeley, The University of California, or simply Berkeley) is a public coeducational university situated east of the San Francisco Bay in Berkeley, California, overlooking the Golden Gate. ...


The name is derived from the general area in front of the school called "North Gate," represented by two stone pillars. It serves as the northern most entrance of the primary University compound, and is opposite to Sather Gate, the southern most entrance of the University. Sather Gate Sather Gate is a prominent landmark separating Sproul Plaza and the bridge over Strawberry Creek leading to the heart of the University of California, Berkeley campus. ...


North Gate Hall was built in 1904 as a 1,800 square foot building known at the time as the "Ark" to house the architectural department. The building cost $4,394.59 to construct and consisted of an atelier, office for John Galen Howard and an architectural library with volumes donated by Phoebe Apperson Hearst -- mother to William Randolph Hearst. John Galen Howard (May 8, 1864–July 18, 1931) was an American architect. ... Phoebe Apperson Hearst (1842-1919) was born in Franklin County, Missouri. ... William Randolph Hearst William Randolph Hearst (April 29, 1863 – August 14, 1951) was an American newspaper magnate, born in San Francisco, California. ...


The building was one of many on campus which did not follow the typical Beaux-Arts Classical style, which had been regarded the most cultured, beautiful and "scientific" style of the cultural establishment at the time. Instead, the building was made only to be temporary, non-academic, or not particularly "serious." Other such buildings in the shingle or "Collegiate Gothic" style on campus include: North Gate Hall, Dwinelle Annex, Stephens Hall and the Men's Faculty Club. Beaux Arts was an architectural style that was popular in the early twentieth century. ... Victoria Tower at the Palace of Westminster, London: Gothic details provided by A.W.N. Pugin The Gothic revival was a European architectural movement with origins in mid-18th century England. ...


A second addition to the Ark was completed in 1908, increasing the size of the building to 3,400 square feet. The new addition was built further up the hill (easterly) and houses what is known today as the Greenhouse and upper and lower newsrooms.


In 1936, Walter Steilberg designed a library wing composed of reinforced concrete-panel, a stark contrast to the dark shingled appearance of the original building.


In 1957, the architecture school was united with the departments of Landscape Architecture, City and regional Planning, and Decorative Arts to form the College of Environmental Design. The "Ark" was relocated to Wurster Hall in 1964, and the building was renamed the Engineering Research Services Building. It later was renamed "North Gate Hall," and served as the location for the Graduate School of Journalism.


In 1993 the building underwent extensive seismic renovations causing uproar from Berkeley preservationists who had saved the building from destruction 17 years earlier. It was reported by the San Francisco Chronicle that dry rot had set in to much of the building. Damage from aging was so bad, one teacher said he could puncture a supporting column with his fountain pen. It was classified as Berkeley campus' most vulnerable buildings in an earthquake. Historic preservation is the theory and practice of creatively maintaining the historic built environment and controlling the landscape component of which it is an integral part. ... The San Francisco Chronicle, the self-described Voice of the West, is Northern Californias largest newspaper. ...


External link

  • official website
  • history of North Gate Hall

  Results from FactBites:
 
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The UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism is a graduate professional school on the campus of University of California at Berkeley.
The UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism focuses on seven primary mediums of journalism.
While many graduate journalism schools have programs that are more theory-oriented, Berkeley focuses on offering students real world experiences and currently requires every student to perform an internship at a media outlet as a degree requirement -- preferably between their first and second year of study.
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