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Encyclopedia > U.S. presidential election, 1980
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Presidential electoral votes by state.

The U.S. presidential election of 1980 featured a contest between incumbent President Jimmy Carter and his Republican opponent, Ronald Reagan. Carter was unpopular because of a stagnant economy at home and a deteriorating situation abroad, especially in the Middle East where the Iran hostage crisis and the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan had marked serious American setbacks. Reagan, the charismatic ex-Governor of California, capitalized on this unpopularity and won a lopsided victory over Carter. This victory marked the beginning of the "Reagan Revolution." Download high resolution version (1182x635, 107 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: U.S. presidential election, 1980 Categories: National Atlas images ... Download high resolution version (1182x635, 107 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: U.S. presidential election, 1980 Categories: National Atlas images ... The President of the United States (fully, President of the United States of America; unofficially abbreviated POTUS) is the head of state of the United States and the chief executive of the federal government. ... James Earl Jimmy Carter, Jr. ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... Ronald Wilson Reagan (February 6, 1911 – June 5, 2004) was the 40th President of the United States (1981–1989) and the 33rd Governor of California (1967–1975). ... The Iran hostage crisis was a 444-day period during which the new regime of Iran after the Iranian Revolution held hostage 66 diplomats and citizens of the United States. ... A Soviet soldier on guard in Afghanistan in 1988. ...

Contents


Background

Through the 1970s, the United States was experiencing a longish period of low economic growth, high inflation, and intermittent energy crises. By the beginning of the election season, the prolonged Iran hostage crisis added to a general feeling of a national "malaise" that followed the Watergate scandal and the end of the Vietnam War. The Iran hostage crisis was a 444-day period during which the new regime of Iran after the Iranian Revolution held hostage 66 diplomats and citizens of the United States. ... The Watergate building. ... The Vietnam War or Second Indochina War was a conflict between the Democratic Republic of Vietnam (DRVN, or North Vietnam), allied with the Communist World, namely the Soviet Union and Red China against the Republic of Vietnam (RVN, or South Vietnam), and its allies — notably the United States military...


Nominations

Republican Party nomination

Republican Candidates

Toward the beginning of the race, the establishment favorite was George Bush, the former director of the Central Intelligence Agency and chairman of the Republican National Committee. However, in the initial debates, conservative Ronald Reagan emerged as a serious candidate, sparring with Bush on economic issues. John Bayard Anderson (born February 15, 1922) was a U.S. Representative from Illinois and presidential candidate in the 1980 election. ... Official language(s) English Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 25th 149,998 km² 340 km 629 km 4. ... Sen. ... State nickname: Volunteer State Official languages English Capital Nashville Largest city Memphis Governor Phil Bredesen (D) Senators Bill Frist (R) Lamar Alexander (R) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 36th 109,247 km² 2. ... The Senate Minority Leader is a member of the United States Senate who is elected by his or her party conference to serve as the chief Senate spokesmen for his or her party and to manage and schedule the legislative and executive business of the Senate. ... George Herbert Walker Bush (born in Milton, Massachusetts, June 12, 1924) was the 41st President of the United States (1989–1993). ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Bush/Cheney, 2004 Campaign Manager Ken Mehlman is the current Chairman of the RNC. The Republican National Committee (RNC) provides national leadership for the United States Republican Party. ... Connallys signature, as used on American currency John Bowden Connally, Jr. ... Official language(s) None. ... Flag of the United States Secretary of the Navy. ... John W. Snow, the current Secretary of the Treasury. ... Phil Crane, right, meets with President George W. Bush and Bill Thomas, chairman of the Ways and Means Committee. ... Official language(s) English Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 25th 149,998 km² 340 km 629 km 4. ... This guy ate Dole bannanas. ... Official language(s) None Capital Topeka Largest city Wichita Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 15th 82,277 mi²; 213,096 km² 211 mi; 340 km 400 mi; 645 km 0. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Ronald Wilson Reagan (February 6, 1911 – June 5, 2004) was the 40th President of the United States (1981–1989) and the 33rd Governor of California (1967–1975). ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 3rd 410,000 km² 402. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Bush/Cheney, 2004 Campaign Manager Ken Mehlman is the current Chairman of the RNC. The Republican National Committee (RNC) provides national leadership for the United States Republican Party. ... Ronald Wilson Reagan (February 6, 1911 – June 5, 2004) was the 40th President of the United States (1981–1989) and the 33rd Governor of California (1967–1975). ...

Ronald Reagan giving his Acceptance Speech at the Republican National Convention, Detroit, Michigan. 7/17/80.
Ronald Reagan giving his Acceptance Speech at the Republican National Convention, Detroit, Michigan. 7/17/80.

Reagan was an adherent to a policy known as "supply side economics." Supply-side economists led the assault on the welfare state built up by the New Deal and Great Society. They assumed that the woes of the U.S. economy were in large part a result of excessive taxation (de-emphasizing the role of high foreign policy, the rise of overseas competition, and massive expenditures on Vietnam), which "crowded out" money away from private investors and thus stifled economic growth. The solution, they argued, was to take economic decisions away from the government and place them in the hands of individuals. This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... The 1980 Republican National Convention was held in july,1980 in Detroit, Michigan ... Supply-side economics is a school of macroeconomic thought which emphasizes the importance of tax cuts and business incentives in encouraging economic growth, in the belief that businesses and individuals will use their tax savings to create new businesses and expand old businesses, which in turn will increase productivity, employment... Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to: New Deal The New Deal is the name given to the series of programs used by Franklin Delano Roosevelt with the goal of stabilizing, reforming and stimulating the United States economy in the Great Depression. ... The Great Society was a set of domestic programs enacted in the United States on the initiative of President Lyndon B. Johnson. ...


Reagan promised an economic revival that would affect all sectors of the population. But since cutting taxes would reduce government revenues, it would also be necessary to target "big government." Otherwise, large federal deficits might negate the effects of the tax cut by requiring the government to borrow in the marketplace, thus raising interest rates and drying up capital for investment once again. Thus, Reagan promised a drastic cut in "big government," which he pledged would produce a balanced budget for the first time since 1969. Bush famously called Reagan's economic policy "voodoo economics." 1969 (MCMLXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday For other uses, see Number 1969. ... Supply-side economics is a school of macroeconomic thought which emphasizes the importance of tax cuts and business incentives in encouraging economic growth, in the belief that businesses and individuals will use their tax savings to create new businesses and expand old businesses, which in turn will increase productivity, employment...


Bush won the Iowa caucuses, and Reagan won big in the New Hampshire primary, causing most of the other candidates to drop out of the race. Anderson dropped out of the primary, running an independent bid. Reagan went on to win most of the subsequent primaries and caucuses, securing the Republican Party nomination. There was wide speculation that Reagan would ask Gerald Ford to be his running mate, but instead Reagan chose Bush. Since 1976, the Iowa caucus has been the first indication of which candidate for President of the United States would win the nomination of his or her political party at that partys national convention. ... The New Hampshire primary to the U.S. presidential election is the first U.S. presidential primary in the United States. ... Gerald Rudolph Ford, Jr. ...


Democratic Party nomination

Democratic Candidates

President Carter's prospects for reelection were weakened by a primary challenge by liberal icon Senator Ted Kennedy of Massachusetts. Kennedy, although a far more magnetic personality than Carter and beloved by the Democratic base, could not transcend personal controversies, most notably a 1969 automobile accident at Chappaquiddick Island in Massachusetts that had left a young woman dead. Although party solidarity caused by the Iranian hostage crisis gave Carter an early lead, forcing Brown from the race, Kennedy made a comeback later in the primary season and the nomination had not been decided by the time of the Democratic National Convention. At the convention, Kennedy conceded the nomination and called for a more liberal party platform in what many saw as the best speech of his career. Edmund Gerald Brown Jr. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 3rd 410,000 km² 402. ... James Earl Jimmy Carter, Jr. ... The President of the United States (fully, President of the United States of America; unofficially abbreviated POTUS) is the head of state of the United States and the chief executive of the federal government. ... Edward Moore Kennedy (born February 22, 1932) is the senior U.S. Senator from Massachusetts, having served since 1963. ... Official language(s) English Capital Boston Largest city Boston Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 44th 27,360 km² 305 km 80 km 25. ... James Earl Jimmy Carter, Jr. ... Edward Moore Kennedy (born February 22, 1932) is the senior U.S. Senator from Massachusetts, having served since 1963. ... Official language(s) English Capital Boston Largest city Boston Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 44th 27,360 km² 305 km 80 km 25. ... 1969 (MCMLXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday For other uses, see Number 1969. ... Chappaquiddick Island is a small island off the eastern end of the larger island of Marthas Vineyard. ... Official language(s) English Capital Boston Largest city Boston Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 44th 27,360 km² 305 km 80 km 25. ... The Iran hostage crisis was a 444-day period during which the new regime of Iran after the Iranian Revolution held hostage 66 diplomats and citizens of the United States. ... Featured at the Democratic National Convention are speeches by prominent party figures. ...


Other nominations

Liberal Republican John Bayard Anderson, after being defeated in the Republican primary, entered the general election as an Independent candidate because of his opposition to the more conservative policies of Reagan. John Bayard Anderson (born February 15, 1922) was a U.S. Representative from Illinois and presidential candidate in the 1980 election. ...


General election

Campaign

Ronald Reagan campaigning with Nancy Reagan in Columbia, South Carolina. 10/10/80.
Ronald Reagan campaigning with Nancy Reagan in Columbia, South Carolina. 10/10/80.

The 1980 election is considered by some to be a realigning election. Reagan ran a campaign of upbeat optimism, together with implications of a more militarily aggressive foreign policy. This contrasted with the "malaise"-ridden attitude of the late Carter administration and its apparent impotence in the face of the Iran hostage crisis. Towards the end of the campaign, as Carter's poll numbers continued to slip and Reagan's rose, Carter responded with more militaristic rhetoric and announced plans to bring back the military draft; this succeeded only in alienating some of Carter's supporters. ( This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... ( This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Realigning election or critical election or realignment are terms from political history and political science. ... The Iran hostage crisis was a 444-day period during which the new regime of Iran after the Iranian Revolution held hostage 66 diplomats and citizens of the United States. ... Conscription is a general term for forced labor demanded by some established authority, e. ...


Reagan promised an end to the drift in post-Vietnam and post-Iran hostage U.S. foreign policy and a restoration of the nation's military strength. Reagan also promised an end to "'trust me' government" and to restore economic health by implementing a supply-side economic policy. Reagan promised a balanced budget within three years (which he said would be "the beginning of the end of inflation"), accompanied by a 30% reduction in taxes over those same years. With respect to the economy, Reagan famously said, "A recession is when your neighbor loses his job. A depression is when you lose yours. And recovery is when Jimmy Carter loses his." Ronald Wilson Reagan (February 6, 1911 – June 5, 2004) was the 40th President of the United States (1981–1989) and the 33rd Governor of California (1967–1975). ... Supply-side economics is a school of macroeconomic thought which emphasizes the importance of tax cuts and business incentives in encouraging economic growth, in the belief that businesses and individuals will use their improved terms of trade to create new businesses and expand old businesses, which in turn will increase... A balanced budget embodies maintaining a net government surplus, meaning the government takes in more in taxes than in spends. ... A recession is usually defined in macroeconomics as a fall of a countrys real Gross Domestic Product in two or more successive quarters of a year. ... WORLD OF WARCRAFT IS THE BEST GAME EVER INVENTED AND PLAY IT. IF YOU DONT PLAY WORLD OF WARCRAFT, YOU ARE A nOOb. ...


Critics charged that Reagan's attacks on the welfare state were merely demagogic, appealing to a white middle class insensitive to the continued plights to victims of socio-economic injustice and with little understanding of the international forces creating the economic problems plaguing the country since the end of the Vietnam War. The Vietnam War or Second Indochina War was a conflict between the Democratic Republic of Vietnam (DRVN, or North Vietnam), allied with the Communist World, namely the Soviet Union and Red China against the Republic of Vietnam (RVN, or South Vietnam), and its allies — notably the United States military...


In August, after the Republican National Convention, Ronald Reagan gave a campaign speech at an annual county fair on the outskirts of Philadelphia, Mississippi. The most important event in Philadelphia, Mississippi prior to Reagan's speech was the Mississippi civil rights worker murders of 1964 about which the movie Mississippi Burning was written. Philadelphia is a city located in Neshoba County, Mississippi. ... Philadelphia is a city located in Neshoba County, Mississippi. ... The Mississippi Civil Rights Workers Murders were the 1964 slayings of three political activists during the American Civil Rights Movement. ... Movie poster for Mississippi Burning Mississippi Burning is a 1988 film which tells a fictionalized version of the investigation into the real-life murders of three civil rights workers in Mississippi in 1964. ...


Reagan announced, "I believe in states' rights." He also said, "I believe we have distorted the balance of our government today by giving powers that were never intended to be given in the Constitution to that federal establishment." He went on to promise to "restore to states and local governments the power that properly belongs to them." [1] Critics claimed that the speech signaled Reagan's opposition to the civil rights reforms of the 1960s. However, Reagan supporters would argue that the speech was simply a statement of Reagan's conservative political ideals.


As in most elections fought against an incumbent, the voters already had a clear impression of Carter, which was largely negative by this time, and both sides spent most of their effort trying to define Reagan, the challenger. The campaign was largely negative, with many voters disliking Carter but also perceiving Reagan as an intellectual lightweight, possibly unable to handle the presidency and with various questionable policies.


The election of 1980 was a key turning point in American politics. It signaled the new electoral power of the suburbs and the Sun Belt; moreover, it was a watershed ushering out the commitment to social justice characteristic of the 1960s civil rights movement and Great Society. It also signaled a commitment to a militaristic, aggressive foreign policy. Reagan's success as a conservative would initiate a realigning of the parties, as liberal Republicans and conservative Democrats would either leave politics or change party affiliations through the 1980s and 1990s to leave the parties much more ideologically polarized. 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday. ... The Sun Belt, highlighted in red The Sun Belt is a region of the United States generally considered to stretch across the South and Southwest. ... The 1960s decade refers to the years from 1960 to 1969, inclusive. ... The Great Society was a set of domestic programs enacted in the United States on the initiative of President Lyndon B. Johnson. ...


In the Debategate scandal, briefing papers that were to have been used by Carter in preparation for the October 28 debate with Reagan had somehow been acquired by Reagan's team. This fact was not divulged to the public until late June 1983, after Laurence Barrett published Gambling With History: Reagan in the White House, an in-depth account of the Reagan administration's first two years. Debategate was a scandal affecting the administration of Ronald Reagan; it involved the final days of the 1980 presidential election. ... October 28 is the 301st day of the year (302nd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 64 days remaining. ... June is the sixth month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with a length of 30 days The month is named after the Roman goddess Juno, wife of Jupiter and equivalent to the Greek goddess Hera. ... 1983 (MCMLXXXIII) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Although Reagan's candidacy was burdened by Representative John B. Anderson of Illinois, a moderate Republican and primary opponent who ran as an independent, the three major issues of the campaign were far greater threats to Carter's prospects for reelection: the economy, national security, and the Iranian hostage crisis. Carter seemed unable to control inflation and had not succeeded in obtaining the release of US hostages in Tehran before the election, losing eight soldiers in a failed attempt to mount a rescue. John Bayard Anderson (born February 15, 1922) was a U.S. Representative from Illinois and presidential candidate in the 1980 election. ... Official language(s) English Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 25th 149,998 km² 340 km 629 km 4. ... The Iran hostage crisis was a 444-day period during which the new government of Iran after the Iranian Revolution held hostage 66 diplomats and citizens of the United States. ... Map of Iran and surrounding lands, showing location of Tehran Tehran is a metropolis of 14 million situated at the foot of the towering Alborz range. ...


Results

The election was held on November 4, 1980. Reagan won a narrow majority of the popular vote, but beat Carter by close to ten percentage points. Republicans also gained control of the Senate for the first time in twenty-five years on Reagan's coattails. The electoral college vote was a landslide, with 489 votes (representing 44 states) for Reagan and 49 for Carter (representing 6 states and the District of Columbia). John Anderson won no electoral votes, but got 5,720,060 popular votes. Anderson's share of the popular vote, totaling 6.6 percent, was moderately impressive for a third party candidate in the United States, demonstrating that a sizable share of moderate voters, while disenchanted with Carter, did not forget that only several years earlier Reagan was regarded as "too conservative" by some on the far-left. Anderson's success in the liberal New England states where Democrats might have expected to do well contributed to Reagan's lopsided electoral college victory. November 4 is the 308th day of the year (309th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar, with 57 days remaining. ... 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday. ... Ronald Wilson Reagan (February 6, 1911 – June 5, 2004) was the 40th President of the United States (1981–1989) and the 33rd Governor of California (1967–1975). ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party), is one of the two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Democratic Party. ... When Ronald Reagan was elected president of the United States in the 1980 election, his victory was accompanied by the change of 12 seats in the U.S. Senate from Democratic to Republican hands. ... John Bayard Anderson (born February 15, 1922) was a U.S. Representative from Illinois and presidential candidate in the 1980 election. ... The term far left refers to the relative position a group or person occupies within the political spectrum. ... An electoral college is a set of electors who are empowered as a deliberative body to elect someone to a particular office. ...


Libertarian Party candidate Ed Clark received 921,299 popular votes. The Libertarians succeeded in getting Clark on the ballot in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. Clark's best showing was in Alaska where he received 12% of the vote; as of 2005, this is the best performance by a Libertarian presidential candidate. Citizens Party candidate Barry Commoner, on the ballots in 31 states, received 234,294 popular votes. His running mate, La Donna Harris, was the second known Native American to run for national office, after Charles Curtis in 1928. The Libertarian Party is a United States political party created in 1971. ... Ed Clark was the Libertarian candidate for President of the United States in the 1980 presidential election. ... Official language(s) English Capital Juneau Largest city Anchorage Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 1st 663,267 mi² / 1,717,854 km² 808 mi / 1,300 km 1,479 mi / 2,380 km 13. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Citizens Party was a short lived United States political party organized by environmental scientist Barry Commoner in approximately 1980. ... Barry Commoner (born May 28, 1917) was an American biologist and college professor. ... La Donna Harris is the wife of former Oklahoma Senator Fred R. Harris. ... Assiniboin Boy, an Atsina Native Americans in the United States (also Indians, American Indians, First Americans, Indigenous Peoples, Aboriginal Peoples, Aboriginal Americans, Amerindians, Amerinds, or Original Americans) are those indigenous peoples within the territory that is now encompassed by the continental United States, and their descendants in modern times. ... Charles Curtis Charles Curtis (January 25, 1860 – February 8, 1936) was a Representative and a Senator from Kansas as well as the 31st Vice President of the United States. ...

Presidential Candidate Party Home State Popular Vote Electoral Vote Running Mate Running Mate's
Home State
Running Mate's
Electoral Vote
Count Percentage
Ronald Wilson Reagan Republican California 43,903,230 50.7% 489 George Herbert Walker Bush Texas 489
James Earl "Jimmy" Carter, Jr. Democratic Georgia 35,480,115 41.0% 49 Walter Frederick Mondale Minnesota 49
John Bayard Anderson (none) Illinois 5,719,850 6.6% 0 Patrick John Lucey Wisconsin 0
Ed Clark Libertarian   921,128 1.1% 0 David H. Koch   0
Barry Commoner Citizens   233,052 0.3% 0 La Donna Harris   0
Other 252,303 0.3% 0 Other 0
Total 86,509,678 100.0% 538 Total 538
Needed to win 270 Needed to win 270

Source (Popular Vote): Leip, David. 1980 Presidential Election Results. Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections (August 7, 2005). Ronald Wilson Reagan (February 6, 1911 – June 5, 2004) was the 40th President of the United States (1981–1989) and the 33rd Governor of California (1967–1975). ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party), is one of the two major political parties in the United States, the other being the Democratic Party. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 3rd 410,000 km² 402. ... George Herbert Walker Bush (born in Milton, Massachusetts, June 12, 1924) was the 41st President of the United States (1989–1993). ... Official language(s) None. ... James Earl Jimmy Carter, Jr. ... It has been suggested that Democratic presidents be merged into this article or section. ... Walter Frederick Fritz Mondale (born January 5, 1928) has been a two-term U.S. Senator, the forty-second vice president of the United States (1977-1981), and the wildly unsuccessful Democratic Party nominee for president in 1984 against the incumbent, Republican Ronald W. Reagan. ... State nickname: North Star State, The Land of 10,000 Lakes, The Gopher State Official languages None Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Governor Tim Pawlenty (R) Senators Mark Dayton (D) Norm Coleman (R) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 12th 225,365 km² 8. ... John Bayard Anderson (born February 15, 1922) was a U.S. Representative from Illinois and presidential candidate in the 1980 election. ... Official language(s) English Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 25th 149,998 km² 340 km 629 km 4. ... Patrick Joseph Lucey (born March 21, 1918) was a member of the Democratic Party who served as governor of the U.S. state of Wisconsin from 1971 to 1977. ... Official language(s) None Capital Madison Largest city Milwaukee Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 23rd 169,790 km² 420 km 500 km 17 42°30N to 47°3N 86°49W to 92°54W Population  - Total (2000)  - Density Ranked 18th 5,453,896 38. ... Ed Clark was the Libertarian candidate for President of the United States in the 1980 presidential election. ... The Libertarian Party is a United States political party created in 1971. ... David Koch David H. Koch (1940-) was the Libertarian Partys vice-presidential candidate in the 1980 U.S. presidential election, sharing the party ticket with Ed Clark. ... Barry Commoner (born May 28, 1917) was an American biologist and college professor. ... The Citizens Party was a short lived United States political party organized by environmental scientist Barry Commoner in approximately 1980. ... La Donna Harris is the wife of former Oklahoma Senator Fred R. Harris. ... August 7 is the 219th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (220th in leap years), with 146 days remaining. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Source (Electoral Vote): Electoral College Box Scores 1789–1996. Official website of the National Archives. (August 7, 2005). August 7 is the 219th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (220th in leap years), with 146 days remaining. ... 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


See also

United States Presidential Elections

1789–1844: 1789 | 1792 | 1796 | 1800 | 1804 | 1808 | 1812 | 1816 | 1820 | 1824 | 1828 | 1832 | 1836 | 1840 | 1844
1848–1904: 1848 | 1852 | 1856 | 1860 | 1864 | 1868 | 1872 | 1876 | 1880 | 1884 | 1888 | 1892 | 1896 | 1900 | 1904
1908–1964: 1908 | 1912 | 1916 | 1920 | 1924 | 1928 | 1932 | 1936 | 1940 | 1944 | 1948 | 1952 | 1956 | 1960 | 1964
1968–2008: 1968 | 1972 | 1976 | 1980 | 1984 | 1988 | 1992 | 1996 | 2000 | 2004 | future: 2008
The President of the United States (fully, President of the United States of America; unofficially abbreviated POTUS) is the head of state of the United States and the chief executive of the federal government. ... Results -- Republican holds in light red, pickups in dark red, Democratic holds in light blue, pickups in dark blue The U.S. Senate election, 1980 was an election for the United States Senate that coincided with Ronald W. Reagans election to the presidency. ... // Changing demographics and the growth of the Sun Belt The most widely discussed demographic phenomenon of the 1970s was the rise of the Sun Belt, the Southwest, Southeast, and especially Florida and California (surpassing New York as the nations most populous state in 1964). ... United States presidential elections determine who serves as President and Vice President of the United States for four-year terms, starting on Inauguration Day (January 20th of the year after the election). ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state The U.S. presidential election of 1792 was the second presidential election in the United States, and the first in which each of the original 13 states appointed electors (in addition to newly added states Kentucky and Vermont). ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state The U.S. presidential election of 1804 was the first presidential election conducted following the ratification of the Twelfth Amendment to the United States Constitution. ... The election of 1808 was the first of only two cases where a new President would be elected, but the Vice Presidency remained in the same hands. ... Summary Taking place in the shadow of the War of 1812, the election of 1812 featured an intriguing competition between incumbent President James Madison and the nephew of his former Vice President, DeWitt Clinton (uncle George Clinton had died in office). ... Summary As Secretary of State under James Madison, James Monroe was seen by many as pre-ordained to succeed him into the presidency. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Summary President James Polk, having achieved virtually all of his objectives in one term and suffering from declining health that would take his life less than four months after leaving office, chose not to seek re-election. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Summary Keeping a promise made during the 1876 campaign, incumbent President Rutherford Hayes did not seek re-election. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Summary The election was held on November 6, 1900. ... Summary The election was held on November 8, 1904. ... Major party conventions The 1908 Republican Convention was held in Chicago from 16 June to 19 June. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Electoral College results In 1916, Europe was embroiled in World War I. American sentiment leaned towards the Allied Powers due to the occupation of parts of France and Belgium by the German Empire, but most American voters wanted to avoid involvement in the war, and preferred a policy of strict... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Introduction Incumbent President Coolidge was relatively popular, and the economy was booming. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... The election was held on November 8, 1988. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential election results map. ... Presidential electoral votes by state The U.S. presidential election of 2008 is scheduled to occur on November 4, 2008. ...

External links

  • 1980 popular vote by counties

 
 

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