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Encyclopedia > U.S. presidential election, 1968
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Presidential electoral votes by state.

The U.S. presidential election of 1968 was a wrenching national experience, and included the assassination of liberal Democratic candidate Robert F. Kennedy, the violence at the 1968 Democratic National Convention, as well as widespread demonstrations against the Vietnam War across American university and college campuses. In the end, and ironically given the Watergate break-in four years later, Richard M. Nixon would win the election on a campaign of "law and order". It is sometimes considered to be a realigning election. Download high resolution version (1182x635, 112 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: U.S. presidential election, 1968 Categories: National Atlas images ... Download high resolution version (1182x635, 112 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: U.S. presidential election, 1968 Categories: National Atlas images ... For the New Zealand cricketer, see Robert Kennedy (cricketer). ... Police and protesters at the Convention The 1968 Democratic National Convention was held in Chicago, Illinois from August 26-29, 1968, by the United States Democratic Party, for the purposes of choosing the Democratic nominee for the 1968 U.S. Presidential Election. ... The Vietnam War or Second Indochina War was a conflict between the Democratic Republic of Vietnam (DRVN, or North Vietnam), allied with the National Liberation Front (NLF, or Viet Cong) against the Republic of Vietnam (RVN, or South Vietnam), and its allies—notably the United States military in support of... The Watergate building. ... Order: 37th President Vice President: Spiro Agnew (1969–1973), Gerald R. Ford (1973–1974) Term of office: January 20, 1969 – August 9, 1974 Preceded by: Lyndon B. Johnson Succeeded by: Gerald R. Ford Date of birth: January 9, 1913 Place of birth: Yorba Linda, California Date of death: April 22... Realigning election or critical election or realignment are terms from political history and political science. ...

Contents


Nominations

Democratic Party nomination

Most Democratic candidates were hesitant to officially enter the Presidential race in 1968, given that Democrat Lyndon Johnson was the incumbent president, and had won the 1964 election in a landslide. The 22nd amendment did not disqualify Johnson from running for a second full term because he had served less than two years of John F. Kennedy's term after Kennedy was assassinated. However, the Vietnam War had become an enormous burden for the Johnson administration, both as a political liability and on the energies of Johnson himself. Senator Eugene McCarthy saw this as an opening, and ran for the Democratic nomination as an anti-war candidate, and achieved early success with a surprisingly strong second place finish in the New Hampshire Primary. Likely due to McCarthy's success, Robert F. Kennedy announced his candidacy for the Democratic nomination in mid-March. On March 31, 1968, Johnson announced he would not seek re-election. Had Johnson remained in the race and won the election, he could have served more than nine years, second only to Franklin D. Roosevelt. After Johnson's announcement, Vice President Hubert H. Humphrey announced his candidacy. 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... Lyndon Baines Johnson (August 27, 1908–January 22, 1973), often referred to as LBJ, was an American politician. ... The incumbent, in politics, is the current holder of a political office. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... The Twenty-second Amendment of the United States Constitution sets a two-term limit for the President of the United States. ... John Fitzgerald Kennedy (May 29, 1917–November 22, 1963), often referred to as John F Kennedy, JFK, or Jack Kennedy, was the 35th President of the United States. ... President Kennedy, with his wife, Jackie, and Texas Gov. ... The Vietnam War or Second Indochina War was a conflict between the Democratic Republic of Vietnam (DRVN, or North Vietnam), allied with the National Liberation Front (NLF, or Viet Cong) against the Republic of Vietnam (RVN, or South Vietnam), and its allies—notably the United States military in support of... Look up Administration on Wiktionary, the free dictionary The word administration is from the Old English administracioun, deriving from the French administration, which is itself derived from the Latin administratio: a compounding of ad (to) and ministratio (to give service). In modern usage, the word has particular meanings in particular... You may be looking for information about another U.S. senator, Joseph McCarthy. ... Anti war protest in Melbourne, Australia, 2003 Anti_war is a name that is widely adopted by any social movement or person that seeks to end or oppose a future or current war. ... The New Hampshire primary to the U.S. presidential election is the first U.S. presidential primary in the United States. ... March is the third month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of seven Gregorian months with the length of 31 days. ... March 31 is the 90th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (91st in Leap years), with 275 days remaining, as the final day of March. ... 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ... Franklin Delano Roosevelt (January 30, 1882 – April 12, 1945), 32nd President of the United States (1933-1945), the longest-serving holder of the office and the only person to be elected President more than twice (he was elected four times, and served just over 12 years), was one of the... The Vice President of the United States is the second-highest executive official of the United States government, the person who, in the words of Adlai Stevenson, is a heartbeat from the presidency. ... Hubert Horatio Humphrey II (May 27, 1911 – January 13, 1978) was the 38th Vice President of the United States, serving under President Lyndon Johnson. ...


While Kennedy was successful in the primaries (in which Humphrey, for the most part, did not compete), thanks to the large role still played in the nominating process by delegate votes controlled by party bosses, the nominee still remained unclear, even after Kennedy defeated McCarthy in the crucial California primary on June 5. That night, Kennedy was shot shortly after midnight by Sirhan Sirhan. He died the next day. 1869 tobacco label featuring Boss Tweed A boss, in political science, is a person who wields de facto power over a particular political region or constituency. ... State nickname: The Golden State Other U.S. States Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger (R) Senators Dianne Feinstein (D) Barbara Boxer (D) Official language(s) English Area 410,000 km² (3rd)  - Land 404,298 km²  - Water 20,047 km² (4. ... June 5 is the 156th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (157th in leap years), with 209 days remaining. ... Sirhan Bishara Sirhan (born March 19, 1944 in Jerusalem) was convicted of the June 5, 1968 assassination of Senator Robert F. Kennedy, by shooting him just minutes after Kennedy had won the California presidential primary. ...


Robert Kennedy's death altered the dynamics of the race, and threw the Democratic party into disarray. Although Humphrey appeared the prohibitive favorite for the nomination, thanks to his support from the institutional structures of the party, he was an unpopular choice with many of the more anti-war elements within the party, who identified him with Johnson's position on the Vietnam War. The media were shocked by television footage of Chicago police brutally beating anti-war protesters in the streets of Chicago while the convention went on inside (itself marred by the strong-arm tactics of Chicago's commissioner Richard J. Daley, who was seen on television angrily mouthing anti-Semitic epithets at Senator Abraham Ribicoff of Connecticut, who made a speech at the convention denouncing the excesses of the Chicago police). In the end, the nomination itself was anticlimactic, with Vice President Humphrey easily winning the nomination over McCarthy and Senator George McGovern (who acted as a stand-in for many of the Kennedy delegates), even though he had not run in a single primary election during the campaign. Anti war protest in Melbourne, Australia, 2003 Anti_war is a name that is widely adopted by any social movement or person that seeks to end or oppose a future or current war. ... Chicago (officially named the City of Chicago) is the third largest city in the United States (after New York City and Los Angeles), with an official population of 2,896,016, as of the 2000 census. ... 2003 GMO USDA protest Protest expresses relatively overt reaction to events or situations: sometimes in favour, more often opposed. ... Commissioner may be used for a variety of official positions, especially that of a high-ranking official, or that of a senior police officer. ... Richard Joseph Daley (May 15, 1902 – December 20, 1976) was an Irish-American politician who served as Chairman of the Cook County Democratic Central Committee from 1953 and Mayor of Chicago from 1955, retaining both positions until his death in 1976. ... Abraham Ribicoff Abraham Alexander Ribicoff (April 9, 1910–February 22, 1998) was an American politician. ... State nickname: The Constitution State Other U.S. States Capital Hartford Largest city Bridgeport Governor M. Jodi Rell (R) Senators Chris Dodd (D) Joe Lieberman (D) Official language(s) English Area 14,371 km² (48th)  - Land 12,559 km²  - Water 1,809 km² (12. ... The Vice President of the United States is the second-highest executive official of the United States government, the person who, in the words of Adlai Stevenson, is a heartbeat from the presidency. ... George McGovern. ... A primary election is an election in which registered voters in a jurisdiction select a political partys candidate for a later election (nominating primary). ...


Other candidates in the Democratic primary race included Senator George A. Smathers from Florida, Senator Stephen M. Young from Ohio, and Governor Roger D. Branigin of Indiana. George Smathers George Armistead Smathers (born November 14, 1913) is an American lawyer and politician who represented Florida in the United States Senate for eighteen years. ... State nickname: Sunshine State Other U.S. States Capital Tallahassee Largest city Jacksonville (largest metropolitan area is Miami) Governor Jeb Bush (R) Senators Bill Nelson (D) Mel Martinez (R) Official language(s) English Area 170,451 km² (22nd)  - Land 137,374 km²  - Water 30,486 km² (17. ... Stephen Marvin Young (May 4, 1889 - December 1, 1984) was an American politician of the Democratic party from Ohio. ... State nickname: The Buckeye State Other U.S. States Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus (largest metropolitan area is Cleveland) Governor Bob Taft (R) Senators Mike DeWine (R) George V. Voinovich (R) Official language(s) None Area 116,096 km² (34th)  - Land 106,154 km²  - Water 10,044 km² (8. ... Roger D. Branigin (July 26, 1902–December 19, 1975) was a Democratic governor of the U.S. state of Indiana from January 11, 1965 to January 13, 1969. ... State nickname: The Hoosier State Other U.S. States Capital Indianapolis Largest city Indianapolis Governor Mitch Daniels (R) Senators Richard Lugar (R) Evan Bayh (D) Official language(s) English Area 94,321 km² (38th)  - Land 92,897 km²  - Water 1,424 km² (1. ...


Republican Party nomination

Richard Nixon campaign rally

The Republican Primary was relatively uneventful. Richard M. Nixon had made a comeback, and handily won the Republican nomination, easily beating back tentative challenges from liberal New York Governor Nelson Rockefeller and rising conservative star and Governor of California Ronald Reagan. Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Order: 37th President Vice President: Spiro Agnew (1969–1973), Gerald R. Ford (1973–1974) Term of office: January 20, 1969 – August 9, 1974 Preceded by: Lyndon B. Johnson Succeeded by: Gerald R. Ford Date of birth: January 9, 1913 Place of birth: Yorba Linda, California Date of death: April 22... State nickname: The Empire State Other U.S. States Capital Albany Largest city New York City Governor George Pataki (R) Senators Charles Schumer (D) Hillary Rodham Clinton (D) Official languages None (English is de facto) Area 141,205 km² or 54,556 square miles (27th)  - Land 122,409 km²  - Water... A governor is also a device that regulates the speed of a machine. ... Nelson Aldrich Rockefeller (July 8, 1908 – January 26, 1979), an American politician, was Governor of New York and the 41st Vice President of the United States of America from December 19, 1974 to January 20, 1977. ... Governors Arnold Schwarzenegger and Gray Davis with President George W. Bush (2003) Seal of the Governor of California (without the Roman numerals designating the governors sequence) See also: List of pre-statehood governors of California, List of Governors of California The Governor of California is the highest executive authority... Ronald Wilson Reagan (February 6, 1911 – June 5, 2004) was the 40th President of the United States (1981–1989) and the 33rd Governor of California (1967–1975). ...


Other nominations

The American Independent Party was formed by George Wallace, whose pro-segregation policies had been rejected by the mainstream of the Democratic party. The impact of the Wallace campaign was substantial, winning the electoral votes of several states in the Deep South. Wallace also accomplished a strong showing in several northern states. Although Wallace did not expect to win the election, his strategy was that he might be able to prevent either major party candidate from winning a preliminary majority in the Electoral College, which would then give him bargaining power to determine the outcome. American Independent Party is a United States American political party. ... George Corley Wallace (August 25, 1919 – September 13, 1998) was an American politician who was elected Governor of Alabama (as a Democrat) four times (1962, 1970, 1974 and 1982) and ran for U.S. President (in 1964, 1968, 1972 and 1976). ... It has been suggested that Apartheid outside South Africa be merged into this article or section. ... The United States Electoral College is the electoral college which chooses the President and Vice President of the United States at the conclusion of each Presidential election. ...


Also on the ballot in some states was black activist Eldridge Cleaver for the Peace and Freedom Party. Comedians Dick Gregory and Pat Paulsen were notable write-in candidates. Eldridge Cleaver (August 31, 1935 - May 1, 1998) was a prominent black leader and activist, beginning as prominent member of the Black Panther Party. ... United States Peace and Freedom Party logo The Peace and Freedom Party (PFP) is a United States political party founded in 1967 as a leftist organization opposed to the Vietnam War. ... Richard Dick Claxton Gregory, born October 12, 1932 in St. ... Pat Paulsen (6 July 1927- 1997) was a United States comedian and satirist notable for his roles on several of the Smothers Brothers TV shows, and for his supposed campaigns for President of the United States in 1968, 1972, 1976, 1992, and 1996, which had comedic rather than political objectives. ... A write-in candidate is a candidate in an election whose name does not appear on the ballot, but for whom voters may vote nonetheless by writing in the persons name. ...


General election

Campaign

The New York Times front page from two days after the election: November 7, 1968.
The New York Times front page from two days after the election: November 7, 1968.

Nixon campaigned on a "law and order" theme, which appealed to many voters afraid of the far left and concerned about the riots and demonstrations that had accompanied the Civil Rights movement and the anti-war movement. He had devised a "southern strategy," which was designed to appeal to the southern voters, who traditionally voted Democratic. New York Times front page: November 7, 1968. ... New York Times front page: November 7, 1968. ... Riots in Newark, New Jersey Riots occur when crowds of people have gathered and are committing crimes or acts of violence. ... This page is about protests. ... Civil rights or positive rights are those legal rights retained by citizens and protected by the government. ... In American politics, the Southern strategy refers to the focus of the Republican party on winning U.S. Presidential elections by securing the electoral votes of the U.S. Southern states, originally through support for states rights. ...


Humphrey campaigned on continuing the Great Society programs initiated by President Johnson. The Great Society was a set of domestic programs enacted in the United States on the initiative of President Lyndon B. Johnson. ...


In the end, the war became the central issue of the campaign, with the Democrats divided and Humphrey hounded by anti-war protesters whenever he made public appearances. Late in the campaign Humphrey, who seemed destined to lose by a large margin, began to distance himself from the Johnson administration on the Vietnam War, calling for a bombing halt. He began to gain momentum, especially when President Johnson actually announced a bombing halt, and even a possible peace deal, shortly before the election. During the campaign, Nixon claimed to have a "secret plan" to end the war. In the final days of the election, much was riding on the success or failure of the Paris Peace Talks with the North Vietnamese. Anti war protest in Melbourne, Australia, 2003 Anti_war is a name that is widely adopted by any social movement or person that seeks to end or oppose a future or current war. ... This article is about explosive devices. ... The Eiffel Tower has become a symbol of Paris throughout the world. ... The Democratic Republic of Vietnam (DRVN), or less commonly, Vietnamese Democratic Republic (Vietnamese: Việt Nam Dân Chủ Cộng Hòa), also known as North Vietnam, was founded by Ho Chi Minh and was recognized by the Peoples Republic of China and the Soviet Union in 1950. ...


Ultimately, the election held on November 5, 1968, was considerably closer than anyone had expected, particularly in the popular vote, but Nixon won the electoral vote by a comfortable margin. November 5 is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 56 days remaining. ... 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ...




Results

Presidential Candidate Party Home State Popular Vote Electoral Vote Running Mate Running Mate's
Home State
Running Mate's
Electoral Vote
Count Percentage
Richard Milhous Nixon Republican California 31,783,783 43.4% 301 Spiro Theodore Agnew Maryland 301
Hubert Horatio Humphrey Democratic Minnesota 31,271,839 42.7% 191 Edmund Sixtus Muskie Maine 191
George Corley Wallace American Independent Alabama 9,901,118 13.5% 46 Curtis Emerson LeMay Ohio 46
Other 243,258 0.3% 0 Other 0
Total 73,199,998 100.0% 538 Total 538
Needed to win 270 Needed to win 270

Source (Popular Vote): Leip, David. 1968 Presidential Election Results. Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections (August 7, 2005). Order: 37th President Vice President: Spiro Agnew (1969–1973), Gerald R. Ford (1973–1974) Term of office: January 20, 1969 – August 9, 1974 Preceded by: Lyndon B. Johnson Succeeded by: Gerald R. Ford Date of birth: January 9, 1913 Place of birth: Yorba Linda, California Date of death: April 22... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... State nickname: The Golden State Other U.S. States Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger (R) Senators Dianne Feinstein (D) Barbara Boxer (D) Official language(s) English Area 410,000 km² (3rd)  - Land 404,298 km²  - Water 20,047 km² (4. ... Spiro Theodore Agnew, born Spiros Anagnostopoulos (November 9, 1918 – September 17, 1996) in Towson, Maryland, was the thirty-ninth Vice President of the United States, serving from 1969 to 1973 under President Richard M. Nixon. ... State nickname: Old Line State; Free State Other U.S. States Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Governor Robert L. Ehrlich (R) Senators Paul Sarbanes (D) Barbara Mikulski (D) Official language(s) English Area 32,160 km² (42nd)  - Land 25,338 km²  - Water 6,968 km² (21%) Population (2000)  - Population 5... Hubert Horatio Humphrey II (May 27, 1911 – January 13, 1978) was the 38th Vice President of the United States, serving under President Lyndon Johnson. ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... State nickname: North Star State, Land of 10,000 Lakes, The Gopher State Other U.S. States Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Governor Tim Pawlenty (R) Senators Mark Dayton (D) Norm Coleman (R) Official language(s) None Area 225,365 km² (12th)  - Land 206,375 km²  - Water 18,990... Edmund Muskie Ed Muskie (March 28, 1914–March 26, 1996) was a Polish-American politician from Maine. ... State nickname: The Pine Tree State Other U.S. States Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Governor John Baldacci (D) Senators Olympia Snowe (R) Susan Collins (R) Official language(s) None Area 86,542 km² (39th)  - Land 80,005 km²  - Water 11,724 km² (13. ... George Corley Wallace (August 25, 1919 – September 13, 1998) was an American politician who was elected Governor of Alabama (as a Democrat) four times (1962, 1970, 1974 and 1982) and ran for U.S. President (in 1964, 1968, 1972 and 1976). ... American Independent Party is a United States American political party. ... State nickname: Camellia State, The Heart of Dixie¹, Yellowhammer State Other U.S. States Capital Montgomery Largest city Birmingham Governor Bob Riley (R) Senators Richard Shelby (R) Jeff Sessions (R) Official language(s) English Area 52,423 mi²/135,775 km² (30th)  - Land 50,750 mi²/131,442 km²  - Water... Curtis Emerson LeMay (November 15, 1906 - October 3, 1990) was a General in the United States Air Force. ... State nickname: The Buckeye State Other U.S. States Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus (largest metropolitan area is Cleveland) Governor Bob Taft (R) Senators Mike DeWine (R) George V. Voinovich (R) Official language(s) None Area 116,096 km² (34th)  - Land 106,154 km²  - Water 10,044 km² (8. ... August 7 is the 219th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (220th in leap years), with 146 days remaining. ... 2005 (MMV) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Source (Electoral Vote): Electoral College Box Scores 1789–1996. Official website of the National Archives. (August 7, 2005). August 7 is the 219th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (220th in leap years), with 146 days remaining. ... 2005 (MMV) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


References

  • Clinton, Bill (2005). My Life. Vintage. ISBN 140003003X.

See also


The President of the United States (unofficially abbreviated POTUS) is the head of state of the United States. ... Results -- Republican holds in light red, pickups in dark red, Democratic holds in light blue, pickups in dark blue The U.S. Senate election, 1968 was an election for the United States Senate which coincided with the 1968 presidential election. ... // Civil rights The assassination of John F. Kennedy in 1963 changed the political mood of the country. ...

U.S. presidential elections

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1900–1949: 1900 | 1904 | 1908 | 1912 | 1916 | 1920 | 1924 | 1928 | 1932 | 1936 | 1940 | 1944 | 1948
1950–1999: 1952 | 1956 | 1960 | 1964 | 1968 | 1972 | 1976 | 1980 | 1984 | 1988 | 1992 | 1996
2000–2049: 2000 | 2004 | 2008
United States presidential elections determine who serves as President and Vice President of the United States for four-year terms, starting on Inauguration Day (January 20th of the year after the election). ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state The U.S. presidential election of 1792 was the second presidential election in the United States, and the first in which each of the original 13 states appointed electors (in addition to newly added states Kentucky and Vermont). ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state The U.S. presidential election of 1804 was the first presidential election conducted following the ratification of the Twelfth Amendment to the United States Constitution. ... The election of 1808 was the first of only two cases where a new President would be elected, but the Vice Presidency remained in the same hands. ... Summary Taking place in the shadow of the War of 1812, the election of 1812 featured an intriguing competition between incumbent President James Madison and the nephew of his former Vice President, DeWitt Clinton (uncle George Clinton had died in office). ... Summary As Secretary of State under James Madison, James Monroe was seen by many as pre-ordained to succeed him into the presidency. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Summary President James Polk, having achieved virtually all of his objectives in one term and suffering from declining health that would take his life less than four months after leaving office, chose not to seek re-election. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Summary Keeping a promise made during the 1876 campaign, incumbent President Rutherford Hayes did not seek re-election. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Summary The election was held on November 6, 1900. ... Summary The election was held on November 8, 1904. ... Major party conventions The 1908 Republican Convention was held in Chicago from 16 June to 19 June. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Electoral College results In 1916, Europe was embroiled in World War I. American sentiment leaned towards the Allied Powers due to the occupation of parts of France and Belgium by the German Empire, but most American voters wanted to avoid involvement in the war, and preferred a policy of strict... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Introduction Incumbent President Coolidge was relatively popular, and the economy was booming. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... The election was held on November 8, 1988. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential election results map. ... Presidential electoral votes by state The U.S. presidential election of 2008 is scheduled to occur on November 4, 2008. ...

External links

  • 1968 popular vote by counties

 
 

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