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Encyclopedia > U.S. presidential election, 1956
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Presidential electoral votes by state.

At the time of the U.S. presidential election of 1956, the Eisenhower administration remained popular with the public after his first term. Download high resolution version (1182x635, 99 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: U.S. presidential election, 1956 Categories: National Atlas images ... Download high resolution version (1182x635, 99 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: U.S. presidential election, 1956 Categories: National Atlas images ... The United States presidential elections determine who becomes the President of the United States for the next four years. ... 1956 was a leap year starting on Sunday. ...


Racial segregation was a hot topic. After debate, both major parties endorsed planks giving lukewarm support for the right of the Supreme Court to decide issues like Brown v. Board of Education as to school desegregation; groups of delegates failed to get planks endorsing end to Jim Crow laws on one hand or support for continuing segregation on the other. Racial segregation is a kind of formalized or institutionalized discrimination on the basis of race, characterized by the races separation from each other. ... The Supreme Court Building, Washington, D.C. The Supreme Court of the United States, located in Washington, D.C., is the highest court (see supreme court) in the United States; that is, it has ultimate judicial authority within the United States to interpret and decide questions of federal law, including... Holding Racial segregation in public education violates the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment; separate facilities are “inherently unequal. ... A depiction of T.D. Rices Jim Crow In the United States, the so-called Jim Crow laws were made to enforce racial segregation, and included laws that would prevent African Americans from doing things that a white person could do. ...

Contents

Nominations

Republican Party nomination

Although there was some speculation that Eisenhower would not run for a second term due to ill health, he did seek the nomination and won with little opposition. The Republican Party convention was held in San Francisco, California. San Francisco skyline. ...


Democratic Party nomination

Losing 1952 nominee Adlai Stevenson fought a tight battle with populist Tennessee Senator Estes Kefauver for the nomination. In the end Stevenson won and chose Kefauver as his running mate. 1952 - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... Portrait of Adlai Stevenson Adlai Ewing Stevenson II (February 5, 1900 – July 14, 1965) was an American politician and statesman, noted for his skill in debate and oratory. ... State nickname: Volunteer State Other U.S. States Capital Nashville Largest city Memphis Governor Phil Bredesen Official languages English Area 109,247 km² (36th)  - Land 106,846 km²  - Water 2,400 km² (2. ... Estes Kefauver Carey Estes Kefauver (July 26, 1903 - August 10, 1963) was an American politician from Tennessee. ...


General election

Campaign

Stevenson campaigned hard against Eisenhower, with television ads for the first time being the dominant medium for both sides. The most notable ad for "Ike" Eisenhower was the plethora of "housewife" focused ads, as his 1952 election victory was due, in large part, by winning the female vote.


Stevenson proposed significant increases in social programs and treaties with the Soviet Union to lower military spending and nuclear testing on both sides. However, Eisenhower was highly popular and maintained a comfortable lead throughout the campaign.


In the end Eisenhower won with a large lead in the popular vote and the electoral votes of 41 states.


[Source: livingroomcandidate.movingimage.us]--66.92.238.81 13:17, 12 May 2005 (UTC)


Results

Presidential Candidate Party Home State Popular Vote Electoral Vote Running Mate Running Mate's
Home State
Running Mate's
Electoral Vote
Count Percentage
Dwight David Eisenhower Republican Pennsylvania 35,581,003 57.6% 457 Richard Milhous Nixon California 457
Adlai Ewing Stevenson II Democrat Illinois 25,738,765 41.7% 73 (Carey) Estes Kefauver Tennessee 73
Walter Burgwyn Jones Democrat Alabama (a) (a) 1 Herman Talmadge Georgia 1
T. Coleman Andrews   Virginia 107,929 0.2% 0     0
Other(b) 306,191 0.5% 0 Other(b) 0
Total 61,733,888 100% 531 Total 531
Needed to win 266 Needed to win 266

(a) Alabama elector W. F. Turner, who was pledged to Adlai Stevenson and Estes Kefauver, instead cast his votes for Walter Burgwyn Jones, who was a circuit court judge in Turner's home town, and Herman Talmadge, governor of the neighboring state of Georgia.
(b) Includes unpledged electors Order: 34th President Vice President: Richard Nixon Term of office: January 20, 1953 – January 20, 1961 Preceded by: Harry S. Truman Succeeded by: John F. Kennedy Date of birth: October 14, 1890 Place of birth: Denison, Texas Date of death: March 28, 1969 Place of death: Washington, D.C. First... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... State nickname: The Keystone State Other U.S. States Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Governor Ed Rendell Official languages None Area 119,283 km² (33rd)  - Land 116,074 km²  - Water 3,208 km² (2. ... Richard Milhous Nixon (January 9, 1913 - April 22, 1994) was the thirty-sixth (1953–1961) Vice President, and the thirty-seventh (1969–1974) President of the United States. ... State nickname: The Golden State Other U.S. States Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger Official languages English Area 410,000 km² (3rd)  - Land 404,298 km²  - Water 20,047 km² (4. ... Portrait of Adlai Stevenson Adlai Ewing Stevenson II (February 5, 1900 – July 14, 1965) was an American politician and statesman, noted for his skill in debate and oratory. ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... State nickname: Land of Lincoln, The Prairie State Other U.S. States Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Governor Rod Blagojevich Official languages English Area 149,998 km² (25th)  - Land 143,968 km²  - Water 6,030 km² (4. ... Estes Kefauver Carey Estes Kefauver (July 26, 1903 - August 10, 1963) was an American politician from Tennessee. ... State nickname: Volunteer State Other U.S. States Capital Nashville Largest city Memphis Governor Phil Bredesen Official languages English Area 109,247 km² (36th)  - Land 106,846 km²  - Water 2,400 km² (2. ... Walter Burgwyn Jones (October 16, 1888 - August 1, 1963) was a judge from Alabama. ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... Alabama is a state located in the southern United States; the population of Alabama is 4,447,100 as of 2000. ... Herman Eugene Talmadge (August 9, 1913 - March 21, 2002) was an American politician who served as Governor of the U.S. state of Georgia briefly in 1947 and again from 1948 to 1955, and as a U.S. Senator from 1957 until 1981. ... Thomas Coleman Andrews (February 19, 1899 - October 15, 1983) was an accountant and a candidate for President of the United States. ... State nickname: Old Dominion Other U.S. States Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Governor Mark R. Warner Official languages English Area 110,862 km² (35th)  - Land 102,642 km²  - Water 8,220 km² (7. ... Portrait of Adlai Stevenson Adlai Ewing Stevenson II (February 5, 1900 – July 14, 1965) was an American politician and statesman, noted for his skill in debate and oratory. ... Estes Kefauver Carey Estes Kefauver (July 26, 1903 - August 10, 1963) was an American politician from Tennessee. ... Walter Burgwyn Jones (October 16, 1888 - August 1, 1963) was a judge from Alabama. ... Herman Eugene Talmadge (August 9, 1913 - March 21, 2002) was an American politician who served as Governor of the U.S. state of Georgia briefly in 1947 and again from 1948 to 1955, and as a U.S. Senator from 1957 until 1981. ... The Unpledged Elector is an option used for Presidential elections in the United States of America. ...


Source: U.S. Office of the Federal Register (http://www.archives.gov/federal_register/electoral_college/scores.html#1956)


See also


President of the United States - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... Results -- Republican holds in light red, pickups in dark red, Democratic holds in light blue, pickups in dark blue The U.S. Senate election, 1956 was an election for the United States Senate which coincided with Dwight D. Eisenhower re-election. ... The breakdown of postwar peace For more than a decade after the end of World War II, few American historians saw any reason to challenge the official U.S. interpretation of the beginning of the Cold War: that the breakdown of relations was a direct result of Joseph Stalins...

U.S. presidential elections

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1950–1999: 1952 | 1956 | 1960 | 1964 | 1968 | 1972 | 1976 | 1980 | 1984 | 1988 | 1992 | 1996
2000–2049: 2000 | 2004 | 2008
The United States presidential elections determine who becomes the President of the United States for the next four years. ... The election of 1789 was the first presidential election in the United States of America. ... The election of 1792 was the second presidential election in the United States, and the first in which each of the original 13 states appointed electors. ... The presidential election of 1796 was the first to expose potential flaws in the U.S. Electoral College system. ... Summary The election of 1800 is often considered a realigning election. ... The election of 1804 was the first presidential election conducted following the ratification of the Twelfth Amendment to the United States Constitution. ... The election of 1808 was the first of only two cases where a new President would be elected, but the Vice Presidency remained in the same hands. ... Summary Taking place in the shadow of the War of 1812, the election of 1812 featured an intriguing competition between incumbent President James Madison and the nephew of his former Vice President, DeWitt Clinton (uncle George Clinton had died in office). ... Summary As Secretary of State under James Madison, James Monroe was seen by many as pre-ordained to succeed him into the presidency. ... The U.S. presidential election of 1820 was the third and last presidential election in U.S. history in which a candidate ran effectively unopposed. ... Summary The election of 1824 is often considered a realigning election. ... Summary Held on December 2, the election of 1828 featured a rematch between incumbent President John Quincy Adams and chief rival Andrew Jackson, who was now a candidate under the banner of the new Democratic Party. ... Summary Despite opposition from the universally respected Henry Clay of Kentucky, the election of 1832 served as little more than a coronation for President Andrew Jackson. ... Summary The election of 1836 is predominately remembered for three reasons: it was the last election until 1988 to result in the elevation of an incumbent Vice President to the nations highest office, it was also the only race in which a major political party (the Whigs) intentionally ran... Summary Facing bad economic times and a Whig Party unified behind war hero William Henry Harrison, President Martin Van Buren was easily defeated for re-election in 1840 by Tippecanoe and Tyler, too. ... Summary President John Tyler, abandoned by his native Democratic party and despised by his adopted Whigs, failed to be nominated for re-election. ... Summary President James Polk, having achieved virtually all of his objectives in one term and suffering from declining health that would take his life less than four months after leaving office, chose not to seek re-election. ... Summary President Millard Fillmore, who succeeded to the office after the death of Zachary Taylor, was defeated in his effort to be nominated by the Whig Party in 1852. ... Summary President Franklin Pierce was defeated in his effort to be renominated by the Democrats, who instead selected James Buchanan of Pennsylvania. ... Summary The election of 1860 is widely considered to be a realigning election. ... Summary The election of 1864 was conducted in the middle of the Civil War, and as such the Confederate states did not participate. ... Summary The Civil War over, partisan politics immediately returned as U.S. Congress wrangled with the issue of reconstruction - the radical Republicans even going so far as to impeach President Andrew Johnson. ... Summary Incumbent President Ulysses S. Grant was easily elected to a second term in office despite a split within the Republican Party that resulted in a defection of many key Republicans to opponent Horace Greeley. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Summary Keeping a promise made during the 1876 campaign, incumbent President Rutherford Hayes did not seek re-election. ... Summary In a campaign that featured mudslinging and personal acrimony on a level never before seen, on November 4, 1884 Democrat Grover Cleveland became the first Democrat elected to the Presidency since the Civil War, narrowly defeating Republican James Blaine. ... Summary Held on November 6, 1888, incumbent President Grover Cleveland received the greatest number of popular votes, but Republican challenger Benjamin Harrisons 233 electoral votes topped Clevelands 168 to win the election. ... Summary Held on November 8, 1892, New Yorks Grover Cleveland returned to defeat incumbent President Benjamin Harrison to become the first person to be elected to non-consecutive Presidential terms. ... Summary The election of 1896 is often considered a realigning election. ... Summary The election was held on November 6, 1900. ... Summary The election was held on November 8, 1904. ... Major party conventions The 1908 Republican Convention was held in Chicago from 16 June to 19 June. ... Introduction The 1912 election was marked by hostility and division between the establishment and Progressive factions of the Republican Party. ... Electoral College results In 1916, Europe was embroiled in World War I. American sentiment leaned towards the Allied Powers due to the occupation of parts of France and Belgium by the German Empire, but most American voters wanted to avoid involvement in the war, and preferred a policy of strict... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... 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Democratic nomination Democratic Candidates Shirley Chisholm, U.S. representative from New York Fred Harris, U.S. senator from Oklahoma Hubert Humphrey, U.S. senator from Minnesota, former vice president, and 1968 presidential nominee Henry Scoop Jackson, U.S. senator from Washington John Lindsay, mayor of New York City Eugene McCarthy... Red states supported Carter; blue states supported Ford. ... Background Through the 1970s, the United States was experiencing a long period of low economic growth, high inflation, and intermittent energy crises. ... Republican Party nomination Ronald Reagan was unopposed as the nominee for the Republican Party. ... The election was held on November 8, 1988. ... Notes: Introduction As the 1992 presidential election approached, Americans found themselves in a world transformed in ways almost unimaginable four years earlier. ... Introduction This election took place on November 5, 1996. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state The U.S. presidential election of 2008 is scheduled to occur on November 4, 2008. ...


 
 

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