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Encyclopedia > U.S. presidential election, 1940
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Presidential electoral votes by state.

The U.S. presidential election of 1940 was fought in the shadow of World War II, which had started the previous September. The continuing crisis in Europe made voters desire a strong and experienced president, so incumbent President Franklin D. Roosevelt broke with tradition and ran for a third term as president. This, in turn, would lead to the passage of the 22nd Amendment, limiting presidents to two terms. Download high resolution version (1182x635, 98 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: U.S. presidential election, 1940 Categories: National Atlas images ... Download high resolution version (1182x635, 98 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: U.S. presidential election, 1940 Categories: National Atlas images ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km (over 11 miles) into the air, August 9, 1945 after the Allied atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki. ... Seal of the President of the United States The President of the United States is the head of state of the United States. ... Order: 32nd President Vice President: John N. Garner Henry A. Wallace Harry S. Truman Term of office: March 4, 1933 – April 12, 1945 Preceded by: Herbert Hoover Succeeded by: Harry S. Truman Date of birth: January 30, 1882 Place of birth: Hyde Park, New York Date of death: April 12... The Twenty-second Amendment of the United States Constitution sets a two-term limit for the President of the United States. ...

Contents


Nominations

Democratic Party nomination

Roosevelt dithered about whether to run for a third term, but there was strong Democratic support for it and he chose to accept the nomination.


At the national convention, he decided against allowing Vice President John Nance Garner to be renominated as his running mate and instead chose Henry A. Wallace, his Secretary of Agriculture, to be the vice-presidential nominee. Wallace, a former Bull Moose Republican, was strenuously opposed by many at the convention, particularly the more conservative Southern Democrats, but Roosevelt threatened to withdraw from the ticket if Wallace was rejected, and opposition quickly faded. Featured at the Democratic National Convention are speeches by prominent party figures. ... John Nance Cactus Jack Garner ( November 22, 1868 – November 7, 1967) was a Representative from Texas and the thirty-second Vice President of the United States. ... A running mate is a person running for a subordinate position on a joint ticket during an election. ... Henry Agard Wallace Henry Agard Wallace (October 7, 1888 – November 18, 1965) served as the 33rd Vice President of the United States. ... The United States Secretary of Agriculture is the head of the United States Department of Agriculture concerned with land and food as well as agriculture and rural development. ... The United States Progressive Party refers to three distinct political parties in 20th-century United States politics. ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party [1]), is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... Southern Democrats are members of the U.S. Democratic Party who reside in the U.S. South. ...


Republican Party nomination

Going into the 1940 Republican National Convention, held in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, the three "main" candidates for the nomination were considered to be Senators Robert Taft of Ohio and Arthur Vandenberg of Michigan and Thomas E. Dewey, the "gangbusting" District Attorney from Manhattan. All three men had campaigned vigorously during the primary season, but only 300 of the 1,000 convention delegates had been pledged to a candidate by the time the convention opened. This left an opening for a dark horse candidate to emerge during the proceedings. The Republican National Convention, the presidential nominating convention of the United States Republican Party, is held every four years to determine the partys candidate for the coming Presidential election and the partys platform. ... Independence Hall Philadelphia (sometimes referred to as Philly or the City of Brotherly Love) is the fifth most populous city in the United States and the most populous city in the state of Pennsylvania, occupying all of Philadelphia County. ... Robert Alphonso Taft I (September 8, 1889 - July 31, 1953), of the Taft family political dynasty of Ohio, was a United States Senator and Presidential candidate in the Republican Party. ... State nickname: The Buckeye State Other U.S. States Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus Governor Bob Taft Official languages None Area 116,096 km² (34th)  - Land 106,154 km²  - Water 10,044 km² (8. ... Arthur Hendrick Vandenberg (March 22, 1884–April 18, 1951) was a Republican Senator from the state of Michigan who participated in the creation of the United Nations. ... State nickname: Wolverine State or Great Lakes State Other U.S. States Capital Lansing Largest city Detroit Governor Jennifer Granholm Official languages English Area 250,941 km² (11th)  - Land 147,255 km²  - Water 103,687 km² (41. ... Thomas Dewey Thomas Edmund Dewey (March 24, 1902 – March 16, 1971) was the Governor of New York (1943-1955) and the Republican candidate for the U.S. Presidency in two elections (1944 and 1948), losing both times. ... United States Attorneys represent the U.S. federal government in United States district court. ... Manhattan is an island bordering the lower Hudson River. ... A primary election is one in which a political party selects a candidate for a later election by all registered voters in that jurisdiction (nominating primary). ... A dark horse candidate is one who is nominated unexpectedly, without previously having been discussed or considered as a likely choice. ...


That was exactly what happened when, at the convention, a Wall Street-based industrialist named Wendell Willkie, who had never before run for public office, emerged as the nominee. Willkie, a former Democrat who had been a Roosevelt delegate at the 1932 Democratic National Convention, had been considered an unlikely choice when he had begun his campaign only a few months before, and his meager showings in various Gallup polls seemed to bear this view out. View up Wall Street from Pearl Street Wall Street is the name of a narrow thoroughfare in lower Manhattan running east from Broadway downhill to the East River. ... Industrialist mainly refers to a person who takes a leading or visionary role in the process of building up an industry over a long time. ... Wendell L. Willkie Wendell Lewis Willkie (February 18, 1892 – October 8, 1944) was a lawyer, born in Elwood, Indiana, the only native of Indiana to be nominated as the presidential candidate for a national party, having never held any sort of high elected office. ... A Gallup Poll is an opinion poll frequently used by the mass media for representing public opinion. ...


As the convention began, however, Willkie quickly emerged as an estimable force. Hundreds of thousands, perhaps as many as one million, telegrams urging support for Willkie arrived in Philadelphia, many of them from "Willkie Clubs" that had sprung up across the country. At the convention itself, keynote speaker Governor Harold Stassen of Minnesota, a popular figure in the party who, many felt, would have been a strong compromise candidate had he been old enough, came out publicly for Willkie and became his official floor manager. As the convention continued, hundreds of Willkie supporters packed the upper galleries of the convention hall. As the Dewey and Taft delegates quickly deadlocked and the delegates belonging to "favorite son" candidates were released, these supporters' loud cries of "We want Willkie" began to swing the balloting in Willkie's favor. Finally, on the sixth ballot, he received the needed majority of delegates and won the nomination. Telegraphy (from the Greek words tele = far away and grapho = write) is the long-distance transmission of written messages without physical transport of letters, originally over wire. ... A keynote in literature, music or public speaking is the principal underlying theme of a larger idea — a literary story, an individual musical piece or event. ... Harold Edward Stassen (April 13, 1907 - March 4, 2001) was the 25th Governor of Minnesota from 1939 to 1943. ... State nickname: North Star State Other U.S. States Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Governor Tim Pawlenty (R) Official languages None Area 225,365 km² (12th)  - Land 206,375 km²  - Water 18,990 km² (8. ... Favorite son is a political term that can refer to two different types of politicians: A politician whose electoral appeal is mostly driven from his regional appeal, rather than his political views. ...


Having given little thought to who he would select as his vice-presidential nominee, Willkie left the decision to convention chairman Joe Martin, who suggested Senate Minority Leader Charles L. McNary of Oregon. Despite the fact that McNary had spearheaded a "Stop Willkie" campaign late in the balloting, the candidate picked him to be his running mate and McNary was nominated by acclamation. The Senate Minority Leader is a member of the United States Senate who is elected by his or her party conference to serve as the chief Senate spokesmen for his or her party and to manage and schedule the legislative and executive business of the Senate. ... Charles L. McNary Charles Linza McNary ( June 12, 1874 - February 25, 1944) was a U.S. Republican politician from Oregon, best known for serving as Minority Leader of the United States Senate from 1933 to 1944. ... State nickname: Beaver State Other U.S. States Capital Salem Largest city Portland Governor Ted Kulongoski Official languages None Area 255,026 km² (9th)  - Land 248,849 km²  - Water 6,177 km² (2. ... Politics An acclamation is a form of election not using a ballot. ...


General election

Campaign

Willkie campaigned against the New Deal and the government's lack of military preparedness. During the election, Roosevelt preempted the military issue by expanding military contracts. Willkie then reversed his approach and accused Roosevelt of warmongering. On election day Roosevelt received 27 million votes to Willkie's 22 million, and in the Electoral College, Roosevelt defeated Willkie 449 to 82.


The election was held on November 5, 1940. November 5 is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 56 days remaining. ...


Results

Presidential Candidate Party Home State Popular Vote(a) Electoral Vote Running Mate Running Mate's
Home State
Running Mate's
Electoral Vote
Count Percentage
Franklin D. Roosevelt Democrat New York 27,244,160 54.8% 449 Henry Agard Wallace Iowa 449
Wendell Lewis Willkie Republican New York 22,305,198 44.8% 82 Charles L. McNary Oregon 82
Norman Thomas Socialist New York 116,410 0.2% 0 Maynard C. Krueger Illinois 0
Total 49,752,978 100% 531 Total 531
Needed to win 266 Needed to win 266

(a) The popular vote total omits votes for candidates besides those listed, which skews the popular percentages up slightly. Order: 32nd President Vice President: John N. Garner Henry A. Wallace Harry S. Truman Term of office: March 4, 1933 – April 12, 1945 Preceded by: Herbert Hoover Succeeded by: Harry S. Truman Date of birth: January 30, 1882 Place of birth: Hyde Park, New York Date of death: April 12... The Democratic Party is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... State nickname: Empire State Other U.S. States Capital Albany Largest city New York Governor George Pataki (R) Official languages None (English is de facto) Area 141,205 km² (27th)  - Land 122,409 km²  - Water 18,795 km² (13. ... Henry Agard Wallace Henry Agard Wallace (October 7, 1888 – November 18, 1965) served as the 33rd Vice President of the United States. ... State nickname: The Hawkeye State Other U.S. States Capital Des Moines Largest city Des Moines Governor Thomas Vilsack (D) Official languages English Area 145,743 km² (26th)  - Land 144,701 km²  - Water 1,042 km² (0. ... Wendell L. Willkie Wendell Lewis Willkie (February 18, 1892 – October 8, 1944) was a lawyer, born in Elwood, Indiana, the only native of Indiana to be nominated as the presidential candidate for a national party, having never held any sort of high elected office. ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... State nickname: Empire State Other U.S. States Capital Albany Largest city New York Governor George Pataki (R) Official languages None (English is de facto) Area 141,205 km² (27th)  - Land 122,409 km²  - Water 18,795 km² (13. ... Charles L. McNary Charles Linza McNary ( June 12, 1874 - February 25, 1944) was a U.S. Republican politician from Oregon, best known for serving as Minority Leader of the United States Senate from 1933 to 1944. ... State nickname: Beaver State Other U.S. States Capital Salem Largest city Portland Governor Ted Kulongoski Official languages None Area 255,026 km² (9th)  - Land 248,849 km²  - Water 6,177 km² (2. ... Norman Mattoon Thomas (November 20, 1884 - December 19, 1968) was a leading American socialist, pacifist, and six-time presidential candidate for the Socialist Party. ... The Socialist Party of America is a socialist political party in the United States. ... State nickname: Empire State Other U.S. States Capital Albany Largest city New York Governor George Pataki (R) Official languages None (English is de facto) Area 141,205 km² (27th)  - Land 122,409 km²  - Water 18,795 km² (13. ... Maynard C Krueger (? - 20 December 1991) was a professor at the University of Chicago. ... State nickname: Land of Lincoln, The Prairie State Other U.S. States Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Governor Rod Blagojevich Official languages English Area 149,998 km² (25th)  - Land 143,968 km²  - Water 6,030 km² (4. ...


Source: U.S. Office of the Federal Register


See also


Seal of the President of the United States The President of the United States is the head of state of the United States. ... Results -- Republican holds in light red, pickups in dark red, Democratic holds in light blue, pickups in dark blue, Progressive hold in green The U.S. Senate election, 1940 was an election for the United States Senate which coincided with the election of Franklin Delano Roosevelt to his third term... // Aftermath of World War I A 1919 sheet music cover A popular Tin Pan Alley song of 1919 asked, concerning the United States troops returning from World War I, How Ya Gonna Keep Em Down On the Farm After Theyve Seen Paree?. In fact, many did not remain down...

U.S. presidential elections

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1950–1999: 1952 | 1956 | 1960 | 1964 | 1968 | 1972 | 1976 | 1980 | 1984 | 1988 | 1992 | 1996
2000–2049: 2000 | 2004 | 2008
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