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Encyclopedia > U.S. presidential election, 1936
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Presidential electoral votes by state.

The U.S. presidential election of 1936 took place as the Great Depression entered its eighth year. Incumbent President Franklin D. Roosevelt was still working to push the provisions of his New Deal interventionist economic policy through Congress and the courts. Download high resolution version (1182x635, 96 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: U.S. presidential election, 1936 Categories: National Atlas images ... Download high resolution version (1182x635, 96 KB) File links The following pages link to this file: U.S. presidential election, 1936 Categories: National Atlas images ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... The President of the United States (often abbreviated POTUS) is the head of state of the United States. ... Franklin Delano Roosevelt (January 30, 1882 – April 12, 1945), 32nd President of the United States (1933-1945), the longest-serving holder of the office and the only man to be elected President more than twice, was one of the central figures of 20th century history. ... The New Deal was President Franklin D. Roosevelts legislative agenda for rescuing the United States from the Great Depression. ...

Contents


Nominations

Democratic Party nomination

The Democratic Party Convention was held in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania and overwhelmingly nominated incumbent President Franklin Roosevelt. It has been suggested that Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania be merged into this article or section. ...


Republican Party nomination

The Republican Party Convention in Cleveland, Ohio nominated Alf Landon from Kansas. Landon ran on a moderate platform, accepting the need for some government involvement in the economy and opposed to the power of big business, but felt that the New Deal was corrupt and wasteful. City nickname: The Forest City Location Location in Cuyahoga County, Ohio Government County Cuyahoga Mayor Jane Campbell Physical characteristics Area      Land      Water 213. ... Alfred M. Landon Alfred Mossman Alf Landon (September 9, 1887 – October 12, 1987) was an American Republican politician from Kansas, notable nationally for his 1936 nomination as the Republican opponent of Franklin D. Roosevelt. ... State nickname: The Sunflower State Other U.S. States Capital Topeka Largest city Wichita Governor Kathleen Sebelius (D) Official languages None Area 82,277 mi²; 213,096 km² (15th)  - Land 81,815 mi²; 211,900 km²  - Water 462 mi²; 1,196 km² (0. ...


Other nominations

Although many people expected Huey Long, the colorful Democratic senator from Louisiana, to run as a third-party candidate with his "Share Our Wealth" program as his platform, his bid was cut short when he was assassinated in September of 1935. Huey Pierce Long (August 30, 1893 – September 10, 1935), known as The Kingfish, was an American politician of the Democratic Party; he was governor of Louisiana (1928–1932), Senator (1932–1935) and a presidential hopeful before his assassination. ... State nickname: Pelican State Other U.S. States Capital Baton Rouge Largest city New Orleans, officially (currently Baton Rouge due to the evacuation of New Orleans) Governor Kathleen Blanco (D) Official languages None; English and French de facto Area 134,382 km² (31st)  - Land 112,927 km²  - Water 21,455... Share Our Wealth was a movement begun during the Great Depression by Huey Long, governor and later senator from Louisiana. ... September is the ninth month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of four Gregorian months with 30 days. ... 1935 was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ...


It was later revealed by historian and Long biographer T. Harry Williams that the senator had never, in fact, intended to run for the presidency in 1936. Instead, he had been plotting with Father Charles Coughlin, a Catholic priest and populist talk radio personality, to run someone else on the soon-to-be-formed Share Our Wealth Party ticket. According to Williams, the idea was that this candidate would split the left-wing vote with President Roosevelt, thereby electing a Republican president and proving the electoral appeal of SOW. Long would then wait four years and run for president as a Democrat in 1940. Father Charles Edward Coughlin (October 25, 1891 – October 27, 1979) was a Roman Catholic priest from Royal Oak, Michigan, a priest from Shrine of the Little Flower Catholic Church, and one of the first evangelist to preach to a widespread listening audience over the medium of radio during the Great... Roman Catholic priest LCDR Allen R. Kuss (USN) aboard USS Enterprise A priest or priestess is a holy man or woman who takes an officiating role in worship of any religion, with the distinguishing characteristic of offering sacrifices. ... Populism is a political philosophy or rhetorical style that holds that the common person is oppressed by the elite in society, and that the instruments of the State need to be grasped from this self-serving elite and used for the benefit and advancement of the people as a whole. ... Talk radio is a radio format which features discussion of topical issues. ... In politics, left-wing, political left, leftism, or simply the left, are terms that refer (with no particular precision) to the segment of the political spectrum typically associated with any of several strains of socialism, social democracy, or liberalism (especially but not exclusively in the American sense of the word... 1940 was a leap year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ...


Prior to Long's death, leading contenders for the role of the sacrificial 1936 candidate included Senators Burton K. Wheeler (D-Montana) and William E. Borah (R-Idaho) and Governor Floyd B. Olson (FL-Minnesota). After the assassination, however, the two senators lost interest in the idea and Olson was diagnosed with terminal stomach cancer. Time magazine, June 18, 1923 Burton Kendall Wheeler (February 27, 1882–January 6, 1975) was an American politician. ... State nickname: Treasure State Other U.S. States Capital Helena Largest city Billings Governor Brian Schweitzer (D) Official languages English Area 381,156 km² (4th)  - Land 377,295 km²  - Water 3,862 km² (1%) Population (2000)  - Population 902,195 (44th)  - Density 2. ... William Edgar Borah (NSHC statue) William Edgar Borah (June 29, 1865 – January 19, 1940) was an American politician. ... State nickname: Gem State Other U.S. States Capital Boise Largest city Boise Governor Dirk Kempthorne (R) Official languages none Area 216,632 km² (14th)  - Land 214,499 km²  - Water 2,133 km² (0. ... Floyd Björnstjerne Olson (November 13, 1891–August 22, 1936) was an American politician. ... Farmer-Labor Party was a political party of Minnesota. ... State nickname: North Star State Other U.S. States Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Governor Tim Pawlenty (R) Official languages None Area 225,365 km² (12th)  - Land 206,375 km²  - Water 18,990 km² (8. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...


Father Coughlin, who had allied himself with Dr. Francis Townsend, a left-wing political activist who was pushing for the creation of an old-age pension system, and Rev. Gerald L.K. Smith, a well-known white nationalist and spokesman for the Christian Right, was eventually forced to run Congressman William Lemke (R-North Dakota) as the candidate of the newly-created "Union Party." Lemke, who lacked the charisma and national stature of the other potential candidates, fared poorly in the election, barely managing 2% of the vote, and the party was dissolved the following year. Dr. Francis Everett Townsend (January 13, 1867–September 1, 1960) was an American physician who was best known for his revolving old-age pension proposal during the Great Depression. ... A pension (also known as superannuation) is a retirement plan intended to provide a person with a secure income for life. ... Gerald Lyman Kenneth Smith (February 27, 1898–April 15, 1976) was considered a demagogue by many. ... // White nationalism is a political and social movement to advance the social and economic interests of white or Caucasian people. ... Christian Right is a term collectively referring to a spectrum of conservative Christian political and social movements and organizations characterized by their strong support of traditional social values in the United States and other western countries. ... William Frederick Lemke (August 13, 1878 – May 30, 1950), was a United States politician. ... State nickname: Peace Garden State, Roughrider State, Flickertail State Other U.S. States Capital Bismarck Largest city Fargo Governor John Hoeven (R) Official languages English Area 183 272 km² (19th)  - Land 178 839 km²  - Water 4 432 km² (2. ... The Union Party was a short-lived political party in the United States, formed in 1936 by a coalition of radio priest Father Charles Coughlin, old-age pension advocate Francis Townsend, and Gerald L. K. Smith, who had taken control of Huey Longs Share Our Wealth movement after Long...


General election

Campaign

The election was held on November 3, 1936 (except in Maine, where the election was held earlier). November 3 is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 58 days remaining. ... 1936 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... State nickname: The Pine Tree State Other U.S. States Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Governor John Baldacci (D) Official languages None Area 86,542 km² (39th)  - Land 80,005 km²  - Water 11,724 km² (13. ...


This election is notable for the Literary Digest poll, which was based on 10 million questionnaires mailed to readers and potential readers; over two million were returned. The Literary Digest, which had correctly predicted the winner of the last 5 elections, announced in its October 31 issue that Landon would be the winner with 370 electorial votes. The cause of this mistake is believed to be due to improper sampling: more Republicans subscribed to the Literary Digest than Democrats. The Literary Digest was an influential general-interest magazine in the early 20th century United States. ... October 31 is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 61 days remaining, as the final day of October. ...


That same year, an unknown pollster named George Gallup predicted that Roosevelt would win the election, based on a random sample of 50,000 people. This correct prediction led to Gallup's later fame and respect in predicting the outcome of elections. George Horace Gallup (November 18, 1901 - July 26, 1984), American statistician, invented the Gallup poll, a successful statistical method of survey sampling for measuring public opinion. ...


Roosevelt won reelection by a wide margin; while the country was still suffering from the Great Depression, most voters thought Roosevelt's progressive programs were more likely to improve the situation than a return to a Republican administration. Roosevelt's 60.8% of the popular vote is the second-largest percentage in U.S. history after Lyndon Johnson in 1964, and his 98.5% of the electoral vote is the fourth-largest in U.S. history after George Washington's two unanimous wins in 1789 and 1792 and James Monroe's unopposed race in 1820. (It has also been noted that Roosevelt won the second largest number of electoral votes in history, but that reflects more on the fact that the Electoral College didn't have 523 electoral votes to win until 1912.) This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Lyndon Baines Johnson (August 27, 1908–January 22, 1973), often referred to as LBJ, was an American politician. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... George Washington (February 22, 1732–December 14, 1799) was an American planter, political figure, and military leader. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... The election of 1792 was the second presidential election in the United States, and the first in which each of the original 13 states appointed electors. ... James Monroe (April 28, 1758 – July 4, 1831) was the fifth (1817–1825) President of the United States. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ...


The Electoral College results gave rise to one of the most famous quips in modern political history. Democratic party boss James Farley amended the then-conventional political wisdom of "As Maine goes, so goes the country" into "As goes Maine, so goes Vermont." The United States Electoral College is the electoral college which chooses the President and Vice President of the United States at the conclusion of each Presidential election. ... James (Jim) Aloysius Farley (May 30, 1888 – June 9, 1976) was an American politican who served as head of the Democratic National Committee and Postmaster General. ... As Maine goes, so goes the country was a phrase in wide currency at one time in United States politics. ...


Results

Presidential Candidate Party Home State Popular Vote Electoral Vote Running Mate Running Mate's
Home State
Running Mate's
Electoral Vote
Count Percentage
Franklin D. Roosevelt Democratic New York 27,752,648 60.8% 523 John Nance Garner Texas 523
Alfred Mossman Landon Republican Kansas 16,681,862 36.5% 8 William Franklin Knox Illinois 8
William Lemke Union North Dakota 892,378 2.0% 0 Thomas C. O'Brien Massachusetts 0
Norman Thomas Socialist New York 187,910 0.4% 0 George A. Nelson   0
Earl Browder Communist New York 79,315 0.2% 0 James W. Ford New York 0
Other 53,586 0.1% 0 Other 0
Total 45,647,699 100.0% 531 Total 531
Needed to win 266 Needed to win 266

Source (Popular Vote): Leip, David. 1936 Presidential Election Results. Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections (July 31, 2005). Franklin Delano Roosevelt (January 30, 1882 – April 12, 1945), 32nd President of the United States (1933-1945), the longest-serving holder of the office and the only man to be elected President more than twice, was one of the central figures of 20th century history. ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... State nickname: Empire State Other U.S. States Capital Albany Largest city New York Governor George Pataki (R) Official languages None (English is de facto) Area 141,205 km² (27th)  - Land 122,409 km²  - Water 18,795 km² (13. ... John Nance Cactus Jack Garner (November 22, 1868–November 7, 1967) was a Representative from Texas and the thirty-second Vice President of the United States. ... ... Alfred M. Landon Alfred Mossman Alf Landon (September 9, 1887 – October 12, 1987) was an American Republican politician from Kansas, notable nationally for his 1936 nomination as the Republican opponent of Franklin D. Roosevelt. ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... State nickname: The Sunflower State Other U.S. States Capital Topeka Largest city Wichita Governor Kathleen Sebelius (D) Official languages None Area 82,277 mi²; 213,096 km² (15th)  - Land 81,815 mi²; 211,900 km²  - Water 462 mi²; 1,196 km² (0. ... Frank Knox William Franklin Frank Knox (January 1, 1874–April 28, 1944) was the Secretary of the Navy under Franklin D. Roosevelt during most of World War II. He was also the Republican vice presidential candidate in 1936. ... State nickname: Land of Lincoln, The Prairie State Other U.S. States Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Governor Rod Blagojevich (D) Official languages English Area 149,998 km² (25th)  - Land 143,968 km²  - Water 6,030 km² (4. ... William Frederick Lemke (August 13, 1878 – May 30, 1950), was a United States politician. ... The Union Party was a short-lived political party in the United States, formed in 1936 by a coalition of radio priest Father Charles Coughlin, old-age pension advocate Francis Townsend, and Gerald L. K. Smith, who had taken control of Huey Longs Share Our Wealth movement after Long... State nickname: Peace Garden State, Roughrider State, Flickertail State Other U.S. States Capital Bismarck Largest city Fargo Governor John Hoeven (R) Official languages English Area 183 272 km² (19th)  - Land 178 839 km²  - Water 4 432 km² (2. ... State nickname: Bay State Other U.S. States Capital Boston Largest city Boston Governor Mitt Romney (R) Official languages English Area 27,360 km² (44th)  - Land 20,317 km²  - Water 7,043 km² (25. ... Norman Mattoon Thomas (November 20, 1884 - December 19, 1968) was a leading American socialist, pacifist, and six-time presidential candidate for the Socialist Party. ... The Socialist Party of America is a socialist political party in the United States. ... State nickname: Empire State Other U.S. States Capital Albany Largest city New York Governor George Pataki (R) Official languages None (English is de facto) Area 141,205 km² (27th)  - Land 122,409 km²  - Water 18,795 km² (13. ... Earl Russell Browder (May 20, 1891–June 27, 1973) was an American socialist and leader of the Communist Party USA. // Early years Browder was born in Wichita, Kansas. ... The Communist Party of the United States of America (CPUSA) is one of several Marxist-Leninist groups in the United States. ... State nickname: Empire State Other U.S. States Capital Albany Largest city New York Governor George Pataki (R) Official languages None (English is de facto) Area 141,205 km² (27th)  - Land 122,409 km²  - Water 18,795 km² (13. ... State nickname: Empire State Other U.S. States Capital Albany Largest city New York Governor George Pataki (R) Official languages None (English is de facto) Area 141,205 km² (27th)  - Land 122,409 km²  - Water 18,795 km² (13. ... July 31 is the 212th day (213th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 153 days remaining, as the final day of July. ... 2005(MMV) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Source (Electoral Vote): Electoral College Box Scores 1789–1996. Official website of the National Archives. (July 31, 2005). July 31 is the 212th day (213th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 153 days remaining, as the final day of July. ... 2005(MMV) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


See also


As Maine goes, so goes Vermont is a famous 1936 U.S. political joke by Democratic party leader James Farley. ... // Aftermath of World War I A 1919 sheet music cover A popular Tin Pan Alley song of 1919 asked, concerning the United States troops returning from World War I, How Ya Gonna Keep Em Down On the Farm After Theyve Seen Paree?. In fact, many did not remain down... Results -- Republican holds in light red, pickups in dark red, Democratic holds in light blue, pickups in dark blue, Independent hold in yellow, Farmer-Labor hold in orange The U.S. Senate election, 1936 was an election for the United States Senate which coincided with the re-election of Franklin...

U.S. presidential elections

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