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Encyclopedia > U.S. presidential election, 1912
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Presidential electoral votes by state.

The U.S. presidential election of 1912 was fought among three major candidates, two of whom had served as President of the United States. Incumbent President William Howard Taft was nominated by the Republican party with the support of the establishment wing of the party, despite the fact that former President Theodore Roosevelt had won all but one of the Republican primaries; at the convention, the Republicans' progressive wing split off as the Bull Moose Party and nominated Roosevelt. Democrat Woodrow Wilson, nominated by his own Party on the 46th ballot of a contentious convention, defeated both in the general election, winning a vast majority in the Electoral College with only 42% of the popular vote, and initiating the only period between 1897 and 1933 when a Democrat would be elected President. Download high resolution version (1182x635, 104 KB)Image from http://nationalatlas. ... Download high resolution version (1182x635, 104 KB)Image from http://nationalatlas. ... The President of the United States (unofficially abbreviated POTUS) is the head of state of the United States. ... William Howard Taft (September 15, 1857 – March 8, 1930) was an American politician, the 27th President of the United States, and the 10th Chief Justice of the United States. ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... Theodore Roosevelt (October 27, 1858 – January 6, 1919) was the 26th (1901–09) President of the United States. ... Progressivism in the United States // Overview Progressivism refers to two political phenomena: Populist Political Progressivism Historically, this represents distrust of concentrations of power in the hands ofpoliticians and corporations, as represented by the candidacies of Henry George and the Single Tax movement, Theodore Roosevelt and the Bull-Moose Republicans, the... The United States Progressive Party refers to three distinct political parties in 20th-century United States politics. ... The Democratic Party, founded in 1792, is the longest-standing political party in the world. ... Thomas Woodrow Wilson (December 28, 1856 – February 3, 1924) was the 28th President of the United States (1913–1921). ... An electoral college is a set of electors who are empowered as a deliberative body to elect someone to a particular office. ... 1897 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ...

Contents


Nominations

Republican Party nomination

The Republican Convention was held in Chicago, Illinois 8 June to 22 June. Even though Roosevelt had won all but one of the primaries, Republicans renominated incumbents William Howard Taft and James S. Sherman, incidentally making Sherman the first vice president since Richard M. Johnson to be nominated for reelection. ... June 8 is the 159th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (160th in leap years), with 206 days remaining. ... June 22 is the 173rd day of the year (174th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 192 days remaining. ... William Howard Taft (September 15, 1857 – March 8, 1930) was an American politician, the 27th President of the United States, and the 10th Chief Justice of the United States. ... James Schoolcraft Sherman (October 24, 1855 – October 30, 1912) was a Representative from New York and the 27th Vice President of the United States. ... Richard Mentor Johnson (October 17, 1780 – November 19, 1850) was a Representative and a Senator from Kentucky and the ninth Vice President of the United States. ...


On the evening of June 22, 1912, former President Theodore Roosevelt asked his supporters to leave the floor of the Republican National Convention in Chicago. Roosevelt maintained that President Taft had allowed fraudulent seating of delegates in order to capture the presidential nomination from progressive forces within the Party. Taft's poor showing against Roosevelt in the primaries, the latter contended, evidenced popular support for a more progressive Republican agenda.


The rift between progressive and conservative wings of the Republican Party had been apparent even before Roosevelt left office in 1908. Roosevelt's support of government regulation, his groundbreaking efforts in conservation and consumer protection, and his willingness to work with organized labor alienated pro-business party members. When Roosevelt tapped William Howard Taft as his successor, he had assumed Taft would continue to support this agenda. Taft's record suggested a leader sympathetic to reform, but the former jurist's attention to the letter of the law irritated Roosevelt and disappointed Republican progressives. 1908 (MCMVIII) is a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Conservation can be confused with conversation and vice versa. ... A union (labor union in American English; trade union, sometimes trades union, in British English; either labour union or trade union in Canadian English) is a group of workers who act collectively to address common issues. ...


Progressive Party nomination

Republican progressives reconvened in Chicago's Orchestra Hall and endorsed the formation of a national progressive party. When formally launched later that summer, the new Progressive Party chose Roosevelt as its presidential nominee. Questioned by reporters, Roosevelt said he felt as strong as a "bull moose." Thenceforth known as the "Bull Moose Party," the Progressives promised to increase federal regulation and protect the welfare of ordinary people. There are several buildings named Orchestra Hall: Theodore Thomas Orchestra Hall in Chicago, Illinois Orchestra Hall in Detroit, Michigan Orchestra Hall in Minneapolis, Minnesota This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The United States Progressive Party refers to three distinct political parties in 20th-century United States politics. ...


Democratic Party nomination

The Democratic Convention was held in Baltimore, Maryland from 25 June to 2 July. After a long deadlock, former Democratic (and Populist) presidential candidate William Jennings Bryan threw his support to Woodrow Wilson in order to defeat Missouri Representative Champ Clark. Wilson received the nomination on the 46th ballot. Baltimore skyline at dusk Motto: The Greatest City in America (formerly The City That Reads; BELIEVE is not the official motto but rather a specific campaign) Nickname: Charm City Mob Town B-more Location in Maryland Founded Incorporated 30 July 1729 1797  County Independent city Borough Parrish Mayor Martin J... June 25 is the 176th day of the year (177th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 189 days remaining. ... July 2 is the 183rd day of the year (184th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 182 days remaining. ... William Jennings Bryan, 1907 William Jennings Bryan, (March 19, 1860–July 26, 1925) born in Salem, Illinois, was a gifted orator and three-time United States Democratic nominee for President. ... Thomas Woodrow Wilson (December 28, 1856 – February 3, 1924) was the 28th President of the United States (1913–1921). ... State nickname: The Show Me State Official languages English Capital Jefferson City Largest city Kansas City (largest metropolitan area is Saint Louis) Governor Matt Blunt (R) Senators Kit Bond (R) Jim Talent (R) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 21st 69,709 mi²; 180,693 km² 1. ... James Beauchamp Clark, known as Champ Clark (March 7, 1850 - March 2, 1921), was a prominent American politician in the Democratic Party from the 1890s until his death, and was an unsuccessful candidate for the Democratic nomination for President in 1912. ...


General election

Campaign

The 1912 presidential campaign was bitterly contested. Vice President James S. Sherman died in office on October 30, 1912, less than a week before the election, leaving Taft without a running mate. With the Republican Party divided, Wilson captured the presidency handily on November 5. Richard B. Cheney, 46th and current Vice President of the United States The Vice President of the United States is the second-highest executive official of the United States government, the person who, in the words of Adlai Stevenson, is a heartbeat from the presidency. ... James Schoolcraft Sherman (October 24, 1855 – October 30, 1912) was a Representative from New York and the 27th Vice President of the United States. ... October 30 is the 303rd day of the year (304th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 62 days remaining. ... 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday. ... November 5 is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 56 days remaining. ...


Theodore Roosevelt's strong third-party candidacy resulted in the only instance in the 20th century of a third party candidate receiving more votes than one of the major party candidates: although he failed to become chief executive again, Roosevelt succeeded in his vendetta against Taft, who received just twenty-three percent of the popular vote compared to Roosevelt's twenty-seven percent. Theodore Roosevelt (October 27, 1858 – January 6, 1919) was the 26th (1901–09) President of the United States. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999 in the...


Nicholas Butler was selected to receive the electoral votes from Utah and Vermont that would have gone to Sherman. Nicholas Murray Butler (April 2, 1862 - December 7, 1947) was the co-winner with Jane Addams of the 1931 Nobel Peace Prize. ...


Source: Library of Congress


Results

Presidential Candidate Party Home State Popular Vote Electoral Vote Running Mate Running Mate's
Home State
Running Mate's
Electoral Vote
Count Percentage
Thomas Woodrow Wilson Democratic New Jersey 6,296,184 41.8% 435 Thomas Riley Marshall Indiana 435
Theodore Roosevelt Progressive New York 4,122,721 27.4% 88 Hiram Warren Johnson California 88
William Howard Taft Republican Ohio 3,486,242 23.2% 8 Nicholas Murray Butler New York 8
Eugene Victor Debs Socialist Indiana 901,551 6.0% 0 Emil Seidel Wisconsin 0
Eugene Wilder Chafin Prohibition Illinois 208,157 1.4% 0 Aaron Sherman Watkins Ohio 0
Arthur Elmer Reimer Socialist Labor Massachusetts 29,324 0.2% 0 August Gilhaus New York 0
Other 4,556 0.0% 0 Other 0
Total 15,036,407 100.0% 531 Total 531
Needed to win 266 Needed to win 266

Source (Popular Vote): Leip, David. 1912 Presidential Election Results. Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections (July 28, 2005). Thomas Woodrow Wilson (December 28, 1856 – February 3, 1924) was the 28th President of the United States (1913–1921). ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... State nickname: The Garden State Official languages None defined Capital Trenton Largest city Newark Governor Richard Codey (D) Acting, Outgoing Jon Corzine (D) (Governor-Elect) Senators Jon Corzine (D) (Outgoing) Bob Menendez (D) (named as Corzines replacement) Frank Lautenberg (D) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 47th 22,608 km² 14. ... Thomas R. Marshall Thomas Riley Marshall (March 14, 1854 – June 1, 1925) was an American politician who served as the twenty-eighth Vice President of the United States of America under Woodrow Wilson from 1913 to 1921. ... State nickname: The Hoosier State Official languages English Capital Indianapolis Largest city Indianapolis Governor Mitch Daniels (R) Senators Richard Lugar (R) Evan Bayh (D) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 38th 94,321 km² 1. ... Theodore Roosevelt (October 27, 1858 – January 6, 1919) was the 26th (1901–09) President of the United States. ... The United States Progressive Party refers to three distinct political parties in 20th-century United States politics. ... State nickname: The Empire State Official languages None. ... Hiram Warren Johnson (September 2, 1866–August 6, 1945) was a leading American Progressive politician from California; he served as Governor from 1911-1917, and as a United States Senator from 1917-1945. ... State nickname: The Golden State Official languages English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger (R) Senators Dianne Feinstein (D) Barbara Boxer (D) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 3rd 410,000 km² 4. ... William Howard Taft (September 15, 1857 – March 8, 1930) was an American politician, the 27th President of the United States, and the 10th Chief Justice of the United States. ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... State nickname: The Buckeye State Official languages None Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus (largest metropolitan area is Cleveland) Governor Bob Taft (R) Senators Mike DeWine (R) George V. Voinovich (R) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 34th 116,096 km² 8. ... Nicholas M. Butler Nicholas Murray Butler (April 2, 1862 – December 7, 1947) was the co-winner with Jane Addams of the 1931 Nobel Peace Prize. ... State nickname: The Empire State Official languages None. ... May refer to the politcal leader Eugene_V._Debs May also be in reference to a a debutante ball, a formal party undertaken by the leaving members of second-level schools in Ireland, most often in the month of August or September. ... The Socialist Party of America is a socialist political party in the United States. ... State nickname: The Hoosier State Official languages English Capital Indianapolis Largest city Indianapolis Governor Mitch Daniels (R) Senators Richard Lugar (R) Evan Bayh (D) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 38th 94,321 km² 1. ... Emil Seidel (December 13, 1864-June 24, 1947) was born in Ashland, Pennsylvania. ... State nickname: Badger State Official languages None Capital Madison Largest city Milwaukee Governor Jim Doyle (D) Senators Herb Kohl (D) Russ Feingold (D) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 23rd 169,790 km² 17 Population  - Total (2000)  - Density Ranked 18th 5,453,896 38. ... Eugene Wilder Chafin (November 1, 1852 - November 30, 1920) was an United States politician from the Prohibition Party. ... The Prohibition Party is a political party in the United States. ... State nickname: Land of Lincoln, The Prairie State Other U.S. States Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Governor Rod Blagojevich (D) Senators Richard Durbin (D) Barack Obama (D) Official language(s) English Area 149,998 km² (25th)  - Land 143,968 km²  - Water 6,030 km² (4. ... Aaron S. Watkins (1863-1941) was president of Absury College in Wilmore, Kentucky. ... State nickname: The Buckeye State Official languages None Capital Columbus Largest city Columbus (largest metropolitan area is Cleveland) Governor Bob Taft (R) Senators Mike DeWine (R) George V. Voinovich (R) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 34th 116,096 km² 8. ... Arthur Elmers Reimer was a United States Socialist, member of the Socialist Labor Party of America. ... The Socialist Labor Party of America (SLP) is the oldest socialist political party in the United States and the second oldest socialist party in the world. ... State nickname: Bay State Official languages English Capital Boston Largest city Boston Governor Mitt Romney (R) Senators Edward Kennedy (D) John Kerry (D) Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 44th 27,360 km² 25. ... August Gilhaus, American Socialist. ... State nickname: The Empire State Official languages None. ... July 28 is the 209th day (210th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 156 days remaining. ... 2005 (MMV) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Source (Electoral Vote): Electoral College Box Scores 1789–1996. Official website of the National Archives. (July 31, 2005). July 31 is the 212th day (213th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 153 days remaining, as the final day of July. ... 2005 (MMV) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...




State by state results



Woodrow Wilson Theodore Roosevelt William Taft Eugene V. Debs
electoral
votes
State count % electoral
votes
count % electoral
votes
count % electoral
votes
count % electoral
votes
12 Alabama 82,438 69.9 12 22,680 19.2 9,807 8.3 3,029 2.6
3 Arizona 10,324 44.0 3 6,949 29.6 3,021 12.9 3,163 13.5
9 Arkansas 68,814 55.4 9 21,644 17.4 25,585 20.6 8,153 6.6
13 California 283,436 43.6 *2 283,610 43.6 *11 3,914 0.6 79,201 12.2
6 Colorado 114,232 43.7 6 72,306 27.7 58,386 22.3 16,418 6.3
7 Connecticut 74,561 39.9 7 34,129 18.2 68,324 36.5 10,056 5.4
3 Delaware 22,631 47.1 3 8,886 18.5 15,998 33.3 556 1.2
6 Florida 35,343 72.2 6 4,555 9.3 4,279 8.7 4,806 9.8
14 Georgia 93,087 76.7 14 21,985 18.1 5,191 4.3 1,058 0.9
4 Idaho 33,921 32.5 4 25,527 24.5 32,810 31.5 11,960 11.5
29 Illinois 405,048 36.0 29 386,478 34.3 253,593 22.5 81,278 7.2
15 Indiana 281,890 44.6 15 162,007 25.6 151,267 23.9 36,931 5.8
13 Iowa 185,325 38.3 13 161,819 33.4 119,805 24.8 16,967 3.5
10 Kansas 143,663 39.3 10 120,210 32.9 74,845 20.5 26,779 7.3
13 Kentucky 219,484 48.9 13 101,766 22.7 115,510 25.8 11,646 2.6
10 Louisiana 60,871 76.8 10 9,283 11.7 3,833 4.8 5,261 6.6
6 Maine 51,113 39.7 6 48,495 37.7 26,545 20.6 2,541 2.0
8 Maryland 112,674 49.1 8 57,789 25.2 54,956 24.0 3,996 1.7
18 Massachusetts 173,408 35.8 18 142,228 29.4 155,948 32.2 12,616 2.6
15 Michigan 150,751 27.9 214,584 39.7 15 152,244 28.2 23,211 4.3
12 Minnesota 106,426 32.8 125,856 38.8 12 64,334 19.8 27,505 8.5
10 Mississippi 57,324 88.9 10 3,549 5.5 1,560 2.4 2,050 3.2
18 Missouri 330,746 47.8 18 124,375 18.0 207,821 30.1 28,466 4.1
4 Montana 27,941 35.0 4 22,456 28.1 18,512 23.2 10,885 13.6
8 Nebraska 109,008 44.3 8 72,681 29.5 54,226 22.0 10,185 4.1
3 Nevada 7,986 39.7 3 5,620 27.9 3,196 15.9 3,313 16.5
4 New Hampshire 34,724 39.7 4 17,794 20.4 32,927 37.7 1,981 2.3
14 New Jersey 178,289 41.6 14 145,410 33.9 88,835 20.7 15,948 3.7
3 New Mexico 20,437 41.3 3 8,347 16.9 17,733 35.9 2,859 5.8
45 New York 655,573 41.9 45 390,093 24.9 455,487 29.1 63,434 4.1
12 North Carolina 144,407 59.3 12 69,135 28.4 29,129 12.0 987 0.4
5 North Dakota 29,555 34.6 5 25,726 30.1 23,090 27.1 6,966 8.2
24 Ohio 424,834 41.5 24 229,807 22.5 278,168 27.2 90,144 8.8
10 Oklahoma 119,156 47.4 10 not on ballot 90,786 36.1 41,674 16.6
5 Oregon 47,064 35.5 5 37,600 28.3 34,673 26.1 13,343 10.1
38 Pennsylvania 395,637 33.0 444,894 37.2 38 273,360 22.8 83,614 7.0
5 Rhode Island 30,412 39.5 5 16,878 21.9 27,703 36.0 2,049 2.7
9 South Carolina 48,357 96.0 9 1,293 2.6 536 1.1 164 0.3
5 South Dakota 48,942 43.5 58,811 52.3 5 not on ballot 4,662 4.1
12 Tennessee 133,021 53.0 12 54,041 21.5 60,475 24.1 3,564 1.4
20 Texas 221,589 73.1 20 28,853 9.5 26,755 8.8 25,743 8.5
4 Utah 36,579 32.7 24,174 21.6 42,100 37.6 4 9,023 8.1
4 Vermont 15,354 24.9 22,132 35.8 23,332 37.8 4 928 1.5
12 Virginia 90,332 66.3 12 21,776 16.0 23,288 17.1 820 0.6
7 Washington 86,840 27.9 113,698 36.5 7 70,445 22.6 40,134 12.9
8 West Virginia 113,097 42.8 8 79,112 29.9 56,754 21.5 15,248 5.8
13 Wisconsin 164,230 42.0 13 62,448 16.0 130,596 33.4 33,476 8.6
3 Wyoming 15,310 36.6 3 9,232 22.1 14,560 34.8 2,760 6.6

count % electoral
votes
count % electoral
votes
count % electoral
votes
count % electoral
votes
531 Totals: 6,296,184 42.5 435 4,122,721 27.8 88 3,486,242 23.5 8 901,551 6.1 0
percentages in this table do not take into account other candidates

Source: Leip, David. 1912 Presidential Election Data by State. Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections (July 31, 2005). July 31 is the 212th day (213th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 153 days remaining, as the final day of July. ... 2005 (MMV) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ...




Legacy

Despite an impressive showing in 1912, the Bull Moose Party failed to establish itself as a viable third party, especially after Roosevelt's death in 1919. Still active on the state level, Progressives did not field another Presidential candidate until the run of Wisconsin Senator Robert M. La Follette, Sr. in the election of 1924. 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Robert Marion La Follette, Sr. ... Introduction Incumbent President Coolidge was relatively popular, and the economy was booming. ...


See also


The President of the United States (unofficially abbreviated POTUS) is the head of state of the United States. ... At the end of the Civil War, the country was still bitterly divided. ...

U.S. presidential elections

1789–1799: 1789 | 1792 | 1796
1800–1849: 1800 | 1804 | 1808 | 1812 | 1816 | 1820 | 1824 | 1828 | 1832 | 1836 | 1840 | 1844 | 1848
1850–1899: 1852 | 1856 | 1860 | 1864 | 1868 | 1872 | 1876 | 1880 | 1884 | 1888 | 1892 | 1896
1900–1949: 1900 | 1904 | 1908 | 1912 | 1916 | 1920 | 1924 | 1928 | 1932 | 1936 | 1940 | 1944 | 1948
1950–1999: 1952 | 1956 | 1960 | 1964 | 1968 | 1972 | 1976 | 1980 | 1984 | 1988 | 1992 | 1996
2000–2049: 2000 | 2004 | 2008
United States presidential elections determine who serves as President and Vice President of the United States for four-year terms, starting on Inauguration Day (January 20th of the year after the election). ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state The U.S. presidential election of 1792 was the second presidential election in the United States, and the first in which each of the original 13 states appointed electors (in addition to newly added states Kentucky and Vermont). ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state The U.S. presidential election of 1804 was the first presidential election conducted following the ratification of the Twelfth Amendment to the United States Constitution. ... The election of 1808 was the first of only two cases where a new President would be elected, but the Vice Presidency remained in the same hands. ... Summary Taking place in the shadow of the War of 1812, the election of 1812 featured an intriguing competition between incumbent President James Madison and the nephew of his former Vice President, DeWitt Clinton (uncle George Clinton had died in office). ... Summary As Secretary of State under James Madison, James Monroe was seen by many as pre-ordained to succeed him into the presidency. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Summary President James Polk, having achieved virtually all of his objectives in one term and suffering from declining health that would take his life less than four months after leaving office, chose not to seek re-election. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Summary Keeping a promise made during the 1876 campaign, incumbent President Rutherford Hayes did not seek re-election. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Summary The election was held on November 6, 1900. ... Summary The election was held on November 8, 1904. ... Major party conventions The 1908 Republican Convention was held in Chicago from 16 June to 19 June. ... Electoral College results In 1916, Europe was embroiled in World War I. American sentiment leaned towards the Allied Powers due to the occupation of parts of France and Belgium by the German Empire, but most American voters wanted to avoid involvement in the war, and preferred a policy of strict... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Introduction Incumbent President Coolidge was relatively popular, and the economy was booming. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... The election was held on November 8, 1988. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential electoral votes by state. ... Presidential election results map. ... Presidential electoral votes by state The U.S. presidential election of 2008 is scheduled to occur on November 4, 2008. ...

References

  • James Chace, 1912: Wilson, Roosevelt, Taft, and Debs--The Election That Changed the Country, Simon and Schuster, May, 2004, hardcover, 448 pages, ISBN 0743203941

External links

  • 1912 popular vote by counties
  • 1912 State-by-state Popular vote

 
 

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