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Encyclopedia > U.S. presidential election, 1884
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Presidential electoral votes by state.

The U.S. presidential election of 1884 featured mudslinging and personal acrimony on a level never before seen. On November 4, 1884 Democrat Grover Cleveland became the first Democrat elected to the Presidency since the Civil War, narrowly defeating Republican James Blaine. The race was decided in Cleveland's home state of New York, carried by the native son by just 1,100 votes - and awarding its electors, and the election, to Cleveland. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1182x635, 104 KB)Image from http://nationalatlas. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1182x635, 104 KB)Image from http://nationalatlas. ... November 4 is the 308th day of the year (309th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 57 days remaining. ... 1884 is a leap year starting on Tuesday (click on link to calendar). ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... Stephen Grover Cleveland (March 18, 1837 – June 24, 1908) was the 22nd (1885–1889) and 24th (1893–1897) President of the United States, and the only President to serve two non-consecutive terms. ... The American Civil War was fought in the United States from 1861 until 1865 between the United States – forces coming mostly from the 23 northern states of the Union – and the newly-formed Confederate States of America, which consisted of 11 southern states that had declared their secession. ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... James G. Blaine James Gillespie Blaine (January 31, 1830–January 27, 1893) was a U.S. Representative, U.S. Senator from Maine and a two-time United States Secretary of State. ... State nickname: Empire State Other U.S. States Capital Albany Largest city New York Governor George Pataki (R) Official languages None (English is de facto) Area 141,205 km² (27th)  - Land 122,409 km²  - Water 18,795 km² (13. ...

Contents


Nominations

Republican Party

Though it could have been his for the asking, incumbent President Chester Arthur did not actively seek the 1884 nomination. Though not widely known at the time, Arthur was suffering from Bright's disease and would die less than two years later. The GOP turned instead to James Blaine of Maine as their Presidential nominee, and John Logan as its Vice Presid Chester Alan Arthur (October 5, 1829 – November 18, 1886) was an American politician who served as 21st President of the United States. ... 1884 is a leap year starting on Tuesday (click on link to calendar). ... Brights Disease is a historical classification of kidney diseases that would be described in modern medicine as acute or chronic nephritis. ... James G. Blaine James Gillespie Blaine (January 31, 1830–January 27, 1893) was a U.S. Representative, U.S. Senator from Maine and a two-time United States Secretary of State. ... State nickname: The Pine Tree State Other U.S. States Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Governor John Baldacci (D) Official languages None Area 86,542 km² (39th)  - Land 80,005 km²  - Water 11,724 km² (13. ... John Alexander Logan (February 8, 1826 – December 26, 1886), American soldier and political leader, was born in what is now Murphysboro, Jackson County, Illinois. ...


Democratic Party

Grover Cleveland of New York would be chosen as the Presidential nominee by the Democratic Party at its convention, defeating a host of candidates who failed to claim the nomination in years past, including Thomas F. Bayard, Thomas Hendricks (who would be awarded the Vice Presidential nomination), Allen G. Thurman and Samuel J. Randall. Stephen Grover Cleveland (March 18, 1837 – June 24, 1908) was the 22nd (1885–1889) and 24th (1893–1897) President of the United States, and the only President to serve two non-consecutive terms. ... State nickname: Empire State Other U.S. States Capital Albany Largest city New York Governor George Pataki (R) Official languages None (English is de facto) Area 141,205 km² (27th)  - Land 122,409 km²  - Water 18,795 km² (13. ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... Categories: People stubs | 1828 births | 1898 deaths | U.S. Secretaries of State | United States Senators ... Thomas Andrews Hendricks (September 7, 1819–November 25, 1885) was a Representative and a Senator from Indiana and the twenty-first Vice President of the United States. ... The Vice President of the United States is the second-highest executive official of the United States government, the person who is, in the words of Adlai Stevenson, a heartbeat from the presidency. ... Allen Granberry Thurman (November 13, 1813_December 12, 1895) was a Democratic Representative and Senator from Ohio. ... Samuel Jackson Randall (October 10, 1828–April 13, 1890) was a prominent U.S. politician during the late 19th century. ...


Greenback Party

The Greenback Labor Party dropped "Labor" from its name and chose Civil War hero Benjamin Franklin Butler as its Presidential nominee and Absolom West for Vice President. Benjamin Franklin Butler Benjamin Franklin Butler (November 5, 1818 – January 11, 1893) was an American lawyer, soldier and politician. ... The Vice President of the United States is the second-highest executive official of the United States government, the person who is, in the words of Adlai Stevenson, a heartbeat from the presidency. ...


Prohibition Party

What today bills itself as the nation's "oldest third party" nominates its third Presidential ticket, choosing John St. John for President and William Daniel for Vice President. The initial Prohibition Party platform was straight-forward: an advocation for the criminalization of alcohol. John Pierce St. ... The Prohibition Party is a political party in the United States. ... In general usage, alcohol (from Arabic al-khwl الكحول, or al-ghawl الغول) refers almost always to ethanol, also known as grain alcohol, and often to any beverage that contains ethanol (see alcoholic beverage). ...


General election

Campaign

The issue of personal character marked this campaign. Former Speaker of the House James G. Blaine, had been prevented from getting the Republican presidential nomination during the previous two elections because of the stigma of the "Mulligan letters": in 1876, a Boston bookkeeper named James Mulligan had located some letters showing that Blaine had sold his influence in Congress to various businesses. In just one deal, he had received $110,150 from the Little Rock and Fort Smith Railroad for, among other things, securing a federal land grant. New York Governor Grover Cleveland, on the other hand, was known as "Grover the Good" for his personal integrity; in the space of the three previous years he had become, successively the Mayor of Buffalo and then the Governor of the state, cleaning up large amounts of Tammany Hall's graft. Representative Dennis Hastert of Illinois is currently the Speaker of the House of Representatives. ... James G. Blaine James Gillespie Blaine (January 31, 1830–January 27, 1893) was a U.S. Representative, U.S. Senator from Maine and a two-time United States Secretary of State. ... Stephen Grover Cleveland (March 18, 1837 – June 24, 1908) was the 22nd (1885–1889) and 24th (1893–1897) President of the United States, and the only President to serve two non-consecutive terms. ... Aerial view of downtown Buffalo, New York Buffalo, also known as The Queen City, The Nickel City, and the City of Good Neighbors, is an American city in western New York. ... The Tammany Hall on 14th Street, New York City Tammany Hall was the name given to the Democratic Party political machine that dominated New York City politics from the mayoral victory of Fernando Wood in 1854 through the election of Fiorello LaGuardia in 1934. ...


Thus, it was a huge shock when, on July 21st, the Buffalo Evening Telegraph reported that Cleveland had fathered a child out of wedlock, that the child had gone to an orphanage, and that the mother had been driven to an asylum. Cleveland's campaign decided that candor was the best approach to this scandal: they admitted that Cleveland had formed an "illicit connection" with the mother and that a child had been born and given the Cleveland surname. They also noted that there was no proof that Cleveland was the father, and claimed that, by assuming responsibility and finding a home for the child, he was merely doing his duty. Finally, they showed that the mother had not been forced into an asylum; her whereabouts were unknown. The Cleveland campaign's approach worked and the remained close through Election Day. In fact, many Republican reformers, put off by Blaine's scandals, worked for the election of Cleveland; these reformers were known as "Mugwumps". July 21 is the 202nd day (203rd in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 163 days remaining. ...


In the final week of the campaign, Blaine's campaign suffered a catastrophe. A group of New York preachers visited Blaine and made a speech castigating the Mugwumps. Their spokesman, the Rev. Dr. Samuel Burchard, made this fatal statement: "We are Republicans, and don't propose to leve our party and identify ourselves with the party whose antecedents have been rum, Romanism, and rebellion." Blaine did not notice Burchard's anti-Catholic slur, nor did the assembled newspaper reporters, but a Democratic operative did, and Cleveland's campaign managers made sure that it was widely publicized. The statement energized the Catholic vote in New York City heavily against Blaine, costing him New York state and the election.


Results

Presidential Candidate Party Home State Popular Vote Electoral Vote Running Mate Running Mate's
Home State
Running Mate's
Electoral Vote
Count Percentage
Stephen Grover Cleveland Democratic New York 4,874,621 48.5% 219 Thomas Andrews Hendricks Indiana 219
James Gillespie Blaine Republican Maine 4,848,936 48.2% 182 John Alexander Logan Illinois 182
Benjamin Franklin Butler Greenback/Anti-Monopoly Massachusetts 175,096 1.7% 0 Absolom Madden West Mississippi 0
John Pierce St. John Prohibition Kansas 147,482 1.5% 0 William Daniel Maryland 0
Other 3,619 0.0% 0 Other 0
Total 10,049,754 100% 401 Total 401
Needed to win 201 Needed to win 201

Source (Popular Vote): Leip, David. 1884 Presidential Election Results. Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections (July 27, 2005). Stephen Grover Cleveland (March 18, 1837 – June 24, 1908) was the 22nd (1885–1889) and 24th (1893–1897) President of the United States, and the only President to serve two non-consecutive terms. ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... State nickname: Empire State Other U.S. States Capital Albany Largest city New York Governor George Pataki (R) Official languages None (English is de facto) Area 141,205 km² (27th)  - Land 122,409 km²  - Water 18,795 km² (13. ... Thomas Andrews Hendricks (September 7, 1819–November 25, 1885) was a Representative and a Senator from Indiana and the twenty-first Vice President of the United States. ... State nickname: The Hoosier State Other U.S. States Capital Indianapolis Largest city Indianapolis Governor Mitch Daniels (R) Official languages English Area 94,321 km² (38th)  - Land 92,897 km²  - Water 1,424 km² (1. ... James G. Blaine James Gillespie Blaine (January 31, 1830–January 27, 1893) was a U.S. Representative, U.S. Senator from Maine and a two-time United States Secretary of State. ... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... State nickname: The Pine Tree State Other U.S. States Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Governor John Baldacci (D) Official languages None Area 86,542 km² (39th)  - Land 80,005 km²  - Water 11,724 km² (13. ... John Alexander Logan (February 8, 1826 – December 26, 1886), American soldier and political leader, was born in what is now Murphysboro, Jackson County, Illinois. ... State nickname: Land of Lincoln, The Prairie State Other U.S. States Capital Springfield Largest city Chicago Governor Rod Blagojevich (D) Official languages English Area 149,998 km² (25th)  - Land 143,968 km²  - Water 6,030 km² (4. ... Benjamin Franklin Butler Benjamin Franklin Butler (November 5, 1818 – January 11, 1893) was an American lawyer, soldier and politician. ... The Greenback Party was an American political party that was active between 1874 and 1884. ... State nickname: Bay State Other U.S. States Capital Boston Largest city Boston Governor Mitt Romney (R) Official languages English Area 27,360 km² (44th)  - Land 20,317 km²  - Water 7,043 km² (25. ... State nickname: Magnolia State Other U.S. States Capital Jackson Largest city Jackson Governor Haley Barbour (R) Official languages English Area 125,546 km² (32nd)  - Land 121,606 km²  - Water 3,940 km² (3%) Population (2000)  - Population 2,697,243 (31st)  - Density 23. ... John Pierce St. ... The Prohibition Party is a political party in the United States. ... State nickname: The Sunflower State Other U.S. States Capital Topeka Largest city Wichita Governor Kathleen Sebelius (D) Official languages None Area 82,277 mi²; 213,096 km² (15th)  - Land 81,815 mi²; 211,900 km²  - Water 462 mi²; 1,196 km² (0. ... State nickname: Old Line State; Free State Other U.S. States Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Governor Robert L. Ehrlich (R) Official languages English Area 32,160 km² (42nd)  - Land 25,338 km²  - Water 6,968 km² (21%) Population (2000)  - Population 5,296,486 (19th)  - Density 165 /km² (5th) Admission... July 27 is the 208th day (209th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 157 days remaining. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ...


Source (Electoral Vote): Electoral College Box Scores 1789–1996. Official website of the National Archives. (July 31, 2005). July 31 is the 212th day (213th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 153 days remaining, as the final day of July. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ...


See also


The President of the United States is the head of state of the United States. ... At the end of the Civil War, the country was still bitterly divided. ...

U.S. presidential elections

1789–1799: 1789 | 1792 | 1796
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1950–1999: 1952 | 1956 | 1960 | 1964 | 1968 | 1972 | 1976 | 1980 | 1984 | 1988 | 1992 | 1996
2000–2049: 2000 | 2004 | 2008
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