FACTOID # 10: The total number of state executions in 2005 was 60: 19 in Texas and 41 elsewhere. The racial split was 19 Black and 41 White.
 
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Encyclopedia > U.S. presidential election, 1832
Presidential electoral votes by state.
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Presidential electoral votes by state.

Despite opposition from the universally respected Henry Clay of Kentucky, the U.S. presidential election of 1832 served as little more than a coronation for President Andrew Jackson. A split within the National Republicans resulted in the nomination of two presidential candidates (Clay and John Floyd of Virginia), and three different Vice Presidential candidates. Had the party been unified however it would not have impacted the election as Jackson won 219 of the 286 electoral votes cast, easily defeating Clay, Floyd and Anti-Masonic Party candidate William Wirt. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (868x635, 81 KB)Image from http://nationalatlas. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (868x635, 81 KB)Image from http://nationalatlas. ... Henry Clay Henry Clay (April 12, 1777 in Hanover County, Virginia – June 29, 1852 in Washington, D.C.) was an American statesman and orator who served in both the House of Representatives and Senate. ... State nickname: Bluegrass State Other U.S. States Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Governor Ernie Fletcher (R) Official languages English Area 104,749 km² (37th)  - Land 102,989 km²  - Water 1,760 km² (1. ... The President of the United States is the head of state of the United States. ... Andrew Jackson (March 15, 1767 – June 8, 1845), one of the founders of the Democratic Party, was the seventh President of the United States, serving from 1829 to 1837. ... The National Republican Party was a United States political party that existed in the first half of the 19th century. ... John Floyd (1572 - September 15, 1649), English Jesuit, was born in Cambridgeshire . ... State nickname: Old Dominion Other U.S. States Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Governor Mark R. Warner (D) Official languages English Area 110,862 km² (35th)  - Land 102,642 km²  - Water 8,220 km² (7. ... The Anti-Masonic Party (also known as the Anti-Masonic Movement) was a 19th century minor political party in the United States. ... William Wirt (November 8, 1772–February 18, 1834) was a U.S. statesman and is credited with turning the position of United States Attorney General into one of influence. ...


This was also the first national election for "The Magician," Vice President-elect Martin Van Buren of New York, who was put on the Democratic ticket to succeed John Caldwell Calhoun and four years later would succeed Jackson. Van Buren faced opposition for the Vice Presidency within his own party however, and as a result 30 electors cast ballots for Pennsylvania's William Wilkins, in hopes of throwing the Vice Presidential election into the Senate. The Vice President of the United States is the second-highest executive official of the United States government, the person who is, in the words of Adlai Stevenson, a heartbeat from the presidency. ... Order: 8th President Vice President: Richard M. Johnson Term of office: March 4, 1837 – March 4, 1841 Preceded by: Andrew Jackson Succeeded by: William Henry Harrison Date of birth: December 5, 1782 Place of birth: Kinderhook, New York Date of death: July 24, 1862 Place of death: Kinderhook, New York... State nickname: Empire State Other U.S. States Capital Albany Largest city New York Governor George Pataki (R) Official languages None (English is de facto) Area 141,205 km² (27th)  - Land 122,409 km²  - Water 18,795 km² (13. ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... John Caldwell Calhoun (March 18, 1782–March 31, 1850), was a prominent United States politician in the first half of the 19th century. ... State nickname: The Keystone State Other U.S. States Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Governor Ed Rendell (D) Official languages None Area 119,283 km² (33rd)  - Land 116,074 km²  - Water 3,208 km² (2. ... For the 19th century English architect, see William Wilkins (architect) William Wilkins (1779–1865) was an American politician from Pennsylvania. ... Seal of the Senate The United States Senate is one of the two houses of the Congress of the United States, the other being the House of Representatives. ...

Contents


General election

Results

Presidential Candidate Party Home State Popular Vote(a) Electoral Vote Running Mate Running Mate's
Home State
Running Mate's
Electoral Vote
Count Percentage
Andrew Jackson Democratic Tennessee 701,780 54.2% 219 Martin Van Buren New York 189
William Wilkins Pennsylvania 30
Henry Clay National Republican Kentucky (b)484,205 37.4% 49 John Sergeant Pennsylvania 49
John Floyd National Republican Virginia (c) 11 Henry Lee Massachusetts 11
William Wirt Anti-Masonic Virginia (c)100,715 7.8% 7 Amos Ellmaker Pennsylvania 7
Other 7,273 0.6% 0 Other 0
Total 1,293,973 100% 286 Total 286
Needed to win 144 Needed to win 144

Source (Popular Vote): Leip, David. 1832 Presidential Election Results. Dave Leip's Atlas of U.S. Presidential Elections (July 27, 2005). Andrew Jackson (March 15, 1767 – June 8, 1845), one of the founders of the Democratic Party, was the seventh President of the United States, serving from 1829 to 1837. ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... State nickname: Volunteer State Other U.S. States Capital Nashville Largest city Memphis Governor Phil Bredesen (D) Official languages English Area 109,247 km² (36th)  - Land 106,846 km²  - Water 2,400 km² (2. ... Order: 8th President Vice President: Richard M. Johnson Term of office: March 4, 1837 – March 4, 1841 Preceded by: Andrew Jackson Succeeded by: William Henry Harrison Date of birth: December 5, 1782 Place of birth: Kinderhook, New York Date of death: July 24, 1862 Place of death: Kinderhook, New York... State nickname: Empire State Other U.S. States Capital Albany Largest city New York Governor George Pataki (R) Official languages None (English is de facto) Area 141,205 km² (27th)  - Land 122,409 km²  - Water 18,795 km² (13. ... For the 19th century English architect, see William Wilkins (architect) William Wilkins (1779–1865) was an American politician from Pennsylvania. ... State nickname: The Keystone State Other U.S. States Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Governor Ed Rendell (D) Official languages None Area 119,283 km² (33rd)  - Land 116,074 km²  - Water 3,208 km² (2. ... Henry Clay Henry Clay (April 12, 1777 in Hanover County, Virginia – June 29, 1852 in Washington, D.C.) was an American statesman and orator who served in both the House of Representatives and Senate. ... The National Republican Party was a United States political party that existed in the first half of the 19th century. ... State nickname: Bluegrass State Other U.S. States Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Governor Ernie Fletcher (R) Official languages English Area 104,749 km² (37th)  - Land 102,989 km²  - Water 1,760 km² (1. ... John Sergeant was a Pennsylvania politican from a family of American politicans, including his father, Jonathan Dickinson Sergeant, his grandsons, John Sergeant Wise and Richard Alsop Wise, and his great-grandson, John Crain Kunkel. ... State nickname: The Keystone State Other U.S. States Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Governor Ed Rendell (D) Official languages None Area 119,283 km² (33rd)  - Land 116,074 km²  - Water 3,208 km² (2. ... John Floyd (1572 - September 15, 1649), English Jesuit, was born in Cambridgeshire . ... The National Republican Party was a United States political party that existed in the first half of the 19th century. ... State nickname: Old Dominion Other U.S. States Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Governor Mark R. Warner (D) Official languages English Area 110,862 km² (35th)  - Land 102,642 km²  - Water 8,220 km² (7. ... Henry Lee III (January 29, 1756 - March 25, 1818), American general, called Light Horse Harry, was born near Dumfries, Virginia. ... State nickname: Bay State Other U.S. States Capital Boston Largest city Boston Governor Mitt Romney (R) Official languages English Area 27,360 km² (44th)  - Land 20,317 km²  - Water 7,043 km² (25. ... William Wirt (November 8, 1772–February 18, 1834) was a U.S. statesman and is credited with turning the position of United States Attorney General into one of influence. ... The Anti-Masonic Party (also known as the Anti-Masonic Movement) was a 19th century minor political party in the United States. ... State nickname: Old Dominion Other U.S. States Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Governor Mark R. Warner (D) Official languages English Area 110,862 km² (35th)  - Land 102,642 km²  - Water 8,220 km² (7. ... Amos Ellmaker (1787 - 1851) was a U.S. political figure. ... State nickname: The Keystone State Other U.S. States Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Governor Ed Rendell (D) Official languages None Area 119,283 km² (33rd)  - Land 116,074 km²  - Water 3,208 km² (2. ... July 27 is the 208th day (209th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 157 days remaining. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ...


Source (Electoral Vote): Electoral College Box Scores 1789–1996. Official website of the National Archives. (July 31, 2005). July 31 is the 212th day (213th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian Calendar, with 153 days remaining, as the final day of July. ... 2005 is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar and is the current year. ...


(a) The popular vote figures exclude South Carolina where the Electors were chosen by the state legislature rather than by popular vote.
(b) 66,706 Pennsylvanians voted for the Union slate, which represented both Clay and Wirt. These voters have been assigned to Wirt and not Clay.
(c) All of John Floyd's electoral votes came from South Carolina where the Electors were chosen by the state legislatures rather than by popular vote. State nickname: Palmetto State Other U.S. States Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Governor Mark Sanford (R) Official languages English Area 82,965 km² (40th)  - Land 78,051 km²  - Water 4,915 km² (6%) Population (2000)  - Population {{{2000Pop}}} (26th)  - Density 51. ...


Electoral college selection

Method of choosing Electors State(s)
state is divided into electoral districts, with one Elector chosen per district by the voters of that district Maryland
each Elector appointed by state legislature South Carolina
each Elector chosen by voters statewide (all other states)

State nickname: Old Line State; Free State Other U.S. States Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Governor Robert L. Ehrlich (R) Official languages English Area 32,160 km² (42nd)  - Land 25,338 km²  - Water 6,968 km² (21%) Population (2000)  - Population 5,296,486 (19th)  - Density 165 /km² (5th) Admission... State nickname: Palmetto State Other U.S. States Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Governor Mark Sanford (R) Official languages English Area 82,965 km² (40th)  - Land 78,051 km²  - Water 4,915 km² (6%) Population (2000)  - Population {{{2000Pop}}} (26th)  - Density 51. ...

See also

  • History of the United States (1789-1849)


After the election of George Washington as the first President of the United States in 1789, Congress passed the first of many laws organizing the government, and adopted a bill of rights in the form of ten amendments to the new Constitution—the United States Bill of Rights. ...

U.S. presidential elections

1789–1799: 1789 | 1792 | 1796
1800–1849: 1800 | 1804 | 1808 | 1812 | 1816 | 1820 | 1824 | 1828 | 1832 | 1836 | 1840 | 1844 | 1848
1850–1899: 1852 | 1856 | 1860 | 1864 | 1868 | 1872 | 1876 | 1880 | 1884 | 1888 | 1892 | 1896
1900–1949: 1900 | 1904 | 1908 | 1912 | 1916 | 1920 | 1924 | 1928 | 1932 | 1936 | 1940 | 1944 | 1948
1950–1999: 1952 | 1956 | 1960 | 1964 | 1968 | 1972 | 1976 | 1980 | 1984 | 1988 | 1992 | 1996
2000–2049: 2000 | 2004 | 2008
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