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Encyclopedia > U.S. one hundred dollar bill
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Obverse of the $100 bill
Reverse of the $100 bill

The U.S. hundred dollar bill ($100) is a denomination of United States currency. U.S. statesman, inventor, and diplomat Benjamin Franklin is currently featured on the obverse of the bill, while Independence Hall is featured on the reverse. It is the largest denomination that has been in circulation since c.1969 when higher denominations were retired. ImageMetadata File history File links US_$100_obverse. ... ImageMetadata File history File links US_$100_obverse. ... Jump to: navigation, search ImageMetadata File history File links US_$100_reverse. ... Jump to: navigation, search ImageMetadata File history File links US_$100_reverse. ... A denomination is a unit of currency. ... Jump to: navigation, search USD redirects here. ... Jump to: navigation, search Benjamin Franklin by Jean-Baptiste Greuze 1777 For the former mayor of Nepean, see Ben Franklin (politician) Dr. Benjamin Franklin (January 17, 1706 – April 17, 1790) was an American publisher, journalist, author, philanthropist, abolitionist, public servant, statesman, scientist, librarian, diplomat and inventor. ... In logic (and usually without being paired with reverse), obverse has a meaning close to contrapositive. ... The belltower atop Independence Hall, formerly home to the Liberty Bell. ... In logic (and usually without being paired with reverse), obverse has a meaning close to contrapositive. ... Jump to: navigation, search 1969 was a common year starting on Wednesday For other uses, see Number 1969. ...


The $100 bill is sometimes nicknamed a C-note, from the Roman numeral C for 100, although this usage is far less common today than it was in the early 20th century. It is also sometimes called a Benjamin because of Franklin's portrait. The system of Roman numerals is a numeral system originating in ancient Rome, and was adapted from Etruscan numerals. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999 in the...


The Bureau of Engraving and Printing says the "average life" of a $100 bill in circulation is 60 months before it is replaced due to wear. Approximately 7% of all notes produced today are $100 bills. BEP Annual Production Figures Categories: U.S. Dept. ...


One-hundred dollar bills are delivered by Federal Reserve Banks in mustard-colored straps. Jump to: navigation, search The Federal Reserve System is headquartered in the Eccles Building on Constitution Avenue in Washington, DC. The Federal Reserve System (also the Federal Reserve; informally The Fed) is the central banking system of the United States. ...

Contents


Large size note history

(7.42 inches x 3.125 inches)

  • 1861: Three-year fifty dollar Interest Bearing Notes were issued that paid 7.3% interest per year. These notes were not primarily designed to circulate, and were payable to the original purchaser of the dollar bill. The obverse of the note featured a portrait of General Winfield Scott.
  • 1862: The first $100 United States Note was issued with a Bald Eagle on the left side of the obverse. Two different variations of this note were issued that resulted in slightly different wording (obligations) on the reverse; the note was issued again in series of 1863.
  • 1863: Both one and two year Interest Bearing Notes were issued that paid 5% interest. The one-year Interest Bearing Notes featured a vignette of George Washington in the center, and allegorical figures representing "The Guardian" to the right and "Justice" to the left . The two-year notes featured a vignette of the U.S. treasury building in the center, a farmer and mechanic to the left, and sailors firing a cannon to the right.
  • 1863: The first $100 Gold Certificates were issued with a Bald Eagle to the left and large green 100 in the middle of the obverse. The reverse was distinctly printed in orange instead of green like all other U.S. federal government issued notes of the time.
  • 1864: Compound Interest Treasury Notes were issued that were intended to circulate for three years and paid 6% interest compounded semi-annually. The obverse is similar to the 1863 one-year Interest Bearing Note.
SERIES OF 1922 Gold Certificate
  • 1869: A new $100 United States Note was issued with a portrait of Abraham Lincoln on the left of the obverse and an allegorical figure representing architecture on the right. Although this note is technically a Unites States Note, TREASURY NOTE appeared on it instead of UNITED STATES NOTE.
  • 1870: A new $100 Gold Certificate with a portrait of Thomas Hart Benton on the left side of the obverse was issued. The note was one-sided.
  • 1870: One hundred dollar National Gold Bank Notes were issued specifically for payment in gold coin by participating national gold banks. The obverse featured vignettes of Perry leaving the USS St. Lawrence and an allegorical figure to the right; the reverse featured a vignette of U.S. gold coins.
  • 1875: The reverse of the series of 1869 United States Note was redesigned. Also, TREASURY NOTE was changed to UNITED STATES NOTE on the obverse. This note was issued again in series of 1878 and 1880.
  • 1878: The first $100 Silver Certificate was issued with a portrait of James Monroe on the left side of the obverse. The reverse was printed in black ink, unlike any other U.S. Federal Government issued dollar bill.
  • 1882: A new and revised $100 Gold Certificate was issued. The obverse was partially the same as the series 1870 gold certificate; the border design, portrait of Thomas H. Benton, and large word GOLD, and gold-colored ink behind the serial numbers were all retained. The reverse featured a perched Bald Eagle and the Roman numeral for 100, C.
  • 1890: One hundred dollar Treasury or "Coin Notes" were issued for government purchases of silver bullion from the silver mining industry. The note featured a portrait of Admiral David G. Farragut. The note was also nicknamed a "watermelon note" because of the watermelon-shaped 0's in the large numeral 100 on the reverse; the large numeral 100 was surrounded by an ornate design that occupied almost the entire note.
  • 1891: The reverse of the series of 1890 Treasury Note was redesigned because the treasury felt that it was too "busy" which would make it too easy to counterfeit. More open space was incorporated into the new design.
  • 1891: The obverse of the $100 Silver Certificate was slightly revised with some aspects of the design changed. The reverse was completely redesigned and also began to be printed in green ink.
  • 1914: The first $100 Federal Reserve Note was issued with a portrait of Benjamin Franklin on the obverse and allegorical figures representing labor, plenty, America, peace, and commerce on the reverse.
  • 1922: The series of 1880 Gold Certificate was re-issued with an obligation to the right of the bottom-left serial number on the obverse.

1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ... Jump to: navigation, search Winfield Scott Winfield Scott (June 13, 1786 – May 29, 1866) was a United States lieutenant general, diplomat, and presidential candidate. ... Jump to: navigation, search 1862 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... United State Notes (also known as Legal Tender Notes because of their payment obligation stating This Note is a Legal Tender) are banknotes characterized by a red seal and serial number. ... Binomial name Haliaeetus leucocephalus (Linnaeus, 1766) The Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) is a bird of prey indigenous to North America, and is the national symbol of the United States. ... 1863 is a common year starting on Thursday. ... The word vignette has several meanings, depending on the context. ... Jump to: navigation, search George Washington (February 22, 1732–December 14, 1799) was an American planter, political figure, the highest ranking military leader in U.S. history and first President of the United States. ... An allegory (from Greek αλλος, allos, other, and αγορευειν, agoreuein, to speak in public) is a figurative representation conveying a meaning other than and in addition to the literal. ... The United States Department of the Treasury is a Cabinet department, a treasury, of the United States government established by an Act of U.S. Congress in 1789 to manage the revenue of the United States government. ... 1863 is a common year starting on Thursday. ... A picture of a gold certificate (top image is the obverse of the certificate, bottom image is the reverse of the certificate). ... Jump to: navigation, search 1864 was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Jump to: navigation, search ImageMetadata File history File links US_$100_GC_1922. ... Jump to: navigation, search ImageMetadata File history File links US_$100_GC_1922. ... Jump to: navigation, search 1869 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... United State Notes (also known as Legal Tender Notes because of their payment obligation stating This Note is a Legal Tender) are banknotes characterized by a red seal and serial number. ... Jump to: navigation, search Abraham Lincoln (February 12, 1809 – April 15, 1865), sometimes called Abe Lincoln and nicknamed Honest Abe, the Rail Splitter, and the Great Emancipator, was the 16th President of the United States (1861 to 1865), and the first president from the Republican Party. ... 1870 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... Jump to: navigation, search Thomas Hart Benton (March 14, 1782–April 10, 1858), nicknamed Old Bullion, was an American Senator from Missouri and a staunch advocate of westward expansion of the United States. ... 1870 was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar). ... National Gold Bank Notes were banknotes first authorized on July 12, 1870 by the United States Government. ... St. ... 1875 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Jump to: navigation, search 1880 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1878 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... A picture of a silver certificate (top image is the obverse of the certificate, bottom image is the reverse of the certificate). ... Jump to: navigation, search James Monroe (April 28, 1758 – July 4, 1831) was the fifth (1817–1825) President of the United States. ... 1882 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... The system of Roman numerals is a numeral system originating in ancient Rome, and was adapted from Etruscan numerals. ... 1890 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... Admiral David Glasgow Farragut David Glasgow Farragut (July 5, 1801 - August 14, 1870) was an admiral of the United States Navy during the American Civil War. ... Jump to: navigation, search 1891 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Jump to: navigation, search 1891 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Jump to: navigation, search 1914 is a common year starting on Thursday. ... Various Federal Reserve Notes Federal Reserve note is the official name for the kind of banknote used in the United States, more commonly known as dollar bills. ... Jump to: navigation, search 1922 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ...

Small size note history

(6.14 inches x 2.61 inches)

  • 1929: Under series of 1928, all U.S. currency was changed to its current size and began to carry a standardized design. All variations of the $100 bill would carry the same portrait of Benjamin Franklin, same border design on the obverse, and the same reverse with a vignette of Independence Hall. The $100 bill was issued as a Federal Reserve Note with a green seal and serial numbers and as a Gold Certificate with a golden seal and serial numbers.
  • 1933: As an emergency response to the Great Depression, additional money was pumped into the American economy through Federal Reserve Bank Notes issued under series of 1929. This was the only small-sized $100 bill that had a slightly different border design on the obverse. The serial numbers and seal on it were brown.
  • 1934: The redeemable in gold clause was removed from Federal Reserve Notes due to the U.S. withdrawing from the gold standard.
  • 1934: Special $100 Gold Certificates were issued for non-public, Federal Reserve bank-to-bank transactions. These notes featured a reverse printed in orange instead of green like all other small-sized notes. The wording on the obverse was also changed to ONE HUNDRED DOLLARS IN GOLD PAYABLE TO THE BEARER ON DEMAND AS AUTHORIZED BY LAW.
  • 1950: Many minor aspects on the obverse of the $100 Federal Reserve Note were changed. Most noticeably, the treasury seal, gray numeral 100, and the Federal Reserve Seal were made smaller; also, the Federal Reserve Seal had spikes added around it.
  • 1966: Because dollars bills were no longer redeemable in silver, WILL PAY TO THE BEARER ON DEMAND was removed from the obverse of the series 1963 A $100 Federal Reserve Note. The obligation was also changed to its current wording,THIS NOTE IS LEGAL TENDER FOR ALL DEBTS PUBLIC AND PRIVATE. IN GOD WE TRUST was added to the reverse.
Reverse of the Series 1934 Gold Certificate
  • 1966: The first and only small-sized $100 United States Note was issued with a red seal and serial numbers. It was the first of all United States currency to use the new U.S. treasury seal with wording in English instead of Latin. Like the series 1963 $2 and $5 United States Notes, it lacked WILL PAY TO THE BEARER ON DEMAND on the obverse and featured the motto IN GOD WE TRUST on the reverse. The $100 United States Note was issued due to legislation that specified a certain dollar amount of United States Notes that were to remain in circulation. Because the $2 and $5 United States Notes were soon to be discontinued, the dollar amount of United States Notes would drop, thus warranting the issuing of this note.
  • 1991: The first new-age anti-counterfeiting measures were introduced under series 1990 with microscopic printing around Franklin's portrait and a metallic security strip on the left side of the bill.
  • March 1996: The first major design change in numerous years took place with the adoption of a contemporary style layout. The main intent of the new design was to deter counterfeiting. New security features included a watermark of Franklin to the right side of the bill, color shifting ink that changed from green to black when viewed at different angles, a higher quality and enlarged portrait of Franklin, and hard to reproduce fine line printing around Franklin's portrait and Independence Hall. Older security features such as interwoven red and blue silk fibers, microprinting, and a metallic security thread were kept. The individual Federal Reserve Bank Seal was changed to a unified Federal Reserve Seal along with an additional prefix letter being added to the serial number.
  • Near future: The $100 bill is expected to receive design changes analogous to the current $20 and $50 bills.

Jump to: navigation, search 1929 was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Jump to: navigation, search 1928 was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... A large-sized note is a bill of any denomination of U.S. currency printed between 1863 and 1929. ... In logic (and usually without being paired with reverse), obverse has a meaning close to contrapositive. ... In logic (and usually without being paired with reverse), obverse has a meaning close to contrapositive. ... Various Federal Reserve Notes Federal Reserve note is the official name for the kind of banknote used in the United States, more commonly known as dollar bills. ... A picture of a gold certificate (top image is the obverse of the certificate, bottom image is the reverse of the certificate). ... Jump to: navigation, search 1933 was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... Jump to: navigation, search This article is about the worldwide economic crisis of the 1930s; for other uses of the term, see The Great Depression (disambiguation). ... Jump to: navigation, search 1934 was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1922 U.S. gold certificate The gold standard is a monetary system in which the standard economic unit of account is a fixed weight of gold and currency issuers guarantee, under specified rules, to redeem notes in that amount of gold. ... Jump to: navigation, search 1934 was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ... Jump to: navigation, search 1950 was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1966 was a common year starting on Saturday (link goes to calendar) // Events January January 1 - In a coup, Colonel Jean-Bédel Bokassa ousts president David Dacko and takes over the Central African Republic. ... Jump to: navigation, search Image File history File links US_$100_Gold_Certificate_1934_reverse. ... Jump to: navigation, search Image File history File links US_$100_Gold_Certificate_1934_reverse. ... 1966 was a common year starting on Saturday (link goes to calendar) // Events January January 1 - In a coup, Colonel Jean-Bédel Bokassa ousts president David Dacko and takes over the Central African Republic. ... United State Notes (also known as Legal Tender Notes because of their payment obligation stating This Note is a Legal Tender) are banknotes characterized by a red seal and serial number. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Jump to: navigation, search Latin is an Indo-European language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ... Jump to: navigation, search 1991 is a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Jump to: navigation, search 1990 is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Jump to: navigation, search 1996 is a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ... A counterfeit is an imitation that is made with the intent to deceptively represent its content or origins. ... This Crown & CA (for Crown Agent) watermark was standard for postage stamps of the British colonies from the 1880s to the 1920s. ...

External links

  • Redesigned Series $100 notes

References

  • Official 2006 Blackbook Price Guide to United States Paper Money (38th edition)
  • Standard Catalog of United States Paper Money 17th edition published by Krause Publications
  • The Official RED BOOK A Guide Book of United States Paper Money
United States currency and coinage
Topics: Federal Reserve Note | United States Note | United States coinage | United States dollar
Currency: $1 | $2 | $5 | $10 | $20 | $50 | $100 | Larger denominations
Coinage: Cent | Nickel | Dime | Quarter | Half Dollar | Dollar

 
 

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