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Encyclopedia > U.S. one dollar bill
Obverse of the $1 bill
Reverse of the $1 bill

The U.S. one dollar bill ($1) is a denomination of U.S. currency. The first U.S. President George Washington, painted by Gilbert Stuart, is currently featured on the obverse, while the Great Seal of the United States is featured on the reverse. The one dollar bill has the oldest design of all U.S. currency currently being produced. The obverse debuted in 1963 when the $1 bill first became a Federal Reserve Note and the reverse debuted in 1935. Series 1995 $1 obverse File links The following pages link to this file: U.S. one dollar bill Categories: Public domain images ... Series 1995 $1 obverse File links The following pages link to this file: U.S. one dollar bill Categories: Public domain images ... Series 1995 $1 reverse File links The following pages link to this file: U.S. one dollar bill Categories: Public domain images ... Series 1995 $1 reverse File links The following pages link to this file: U.S. one dollar bill Categories: Public domain images ... A denomination is a unit of currency. ... This article is about general United States currency. ... The President of the United States (fully, President of the United States of America; unofficially abbreviated POTUS) is the head of state of the United States and the chief executive of the federal government. ... George Washington (February 22, 1732 – December 14, 1799) was the successful Commander-in-Chief of the Continental Army in the American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), and later became the first President of the United States, an office to which he was elected twice (1789-1797). ... Gilbert Charles Stuart (né Stewart) (December 3, 1755 - July 9, 1828) was an American painter. ... In logic (and usually without being paired with reverse), obverse has a meaning close to contrapositive. ... Obverse The Great Seal of the United States is used to authenticate certain documents issued by the United States government. ... In logic (and usually without being paired with reverse), obverse has a meaning close to contrapositive. ... 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... Various Federal Reserve Notes Federal Reserve note is the official name for the kind of banknote used in the United States, more commonly known as dollar bills. ... 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ...


The 1995 Save the Greenback Act prevented the dollar bill from being phased out in favor of the United States dollar coin. 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Save the Greenback Act was legislation passed by the United States Congress circa 1995 forbidding the phaseout of the U.S. one dollar bill. ... Dollar coins have been minted in the United States in both gold and silver versions. ...


The Bureau of Engraving and Printing says the "average life" of a $1 bill in circulation is 22 months before it is replaced due to wear. Approximately 45% of all U.S. currency produced today is one dollar bills. BEP Annual Production Figures Categories: U.S. Dept. ...


All $1 bills produced today are Federal Reserve Notes. One dollar bills are delivered by Federal Reserve Banks in blue straps. Federal Reserve Districts The United States Federal Reserve System consists of twelve Federal Reserve Banks, each responsible for a particular district, and some with branches. ...

Contents


History

Large size notes

First $1 bill issued in 1862 as a Legal Tender Note

(7.375 inches x 3.125 inches) Image File history File linksMetadata US_$1_1862_Legal_Tender. ... Image File history File linksMetadata US_$1_1862_Legal_Tender. ...

  • 1862: The first $1 bill was issued as a Legal Tender Note (United States Note) with a portrait of Salmon P. Chase, the Treasury Secretary under President Lincoln.
  • 1869: The $1 United States Note was redesigned with a portrait of George Washington in the center and a vignette of Christopher Columbus sighting land to the left. The obverse of the note also featured green and blue tinting. Although this note is technically a United States Note, TREASURY NOTE appeared on it instead of UNITED STATES NOTE.
  • 1874: The Series of 1869 United States Note was revised. Changes on the obverse included removing the green and blue tinting, adding a red floral design around the word WASHINGTON D.C., and changing the term TREASURY NOTE to UNITED STATES NOTE. The reverse was completely redesigned. This note was also issued as Series of 1875 and 1878.
  • 1880: The red floral design around the words ONE DOLLAR and WASHINGTON D.C. on the United States Note was removed.
  • 1886: The first and only woman to appear on U.S. currency, Martha Washington, was featured on the $1 Silver Certificate. The reverse of the note featured an ornate design that occupied the entire note, excluding the borders.
Series of 1886 $1 Silver Certificate featuring Martha Washington
  • 1890: One dollar Treasury or "Coin Notes" were issued for government purchases of silver bullion from the silver mining industry. The reverse featured the large word ONE in the center surrounded by an ornate design that occupied almost the entire note.
  • 1891: The reverse of the Series of 1890 Treasury Note was redesigned because the treasury felt that it was too "busy" which would make it too easy to counterfeit. More open space was incorporated into the new design.
  • 1891: The reverse of the $1 Silver Certificate was redesigned. More open space was incorporated into the new design.
  • 1896: The famous "Educational Series" Silver Certificate was issued. The entire obverse was covered with artwork of allegorical figures representing "history instructing youth" in front of Washington D.C. The reverse featured portraits of George and Martha Washing surrounded by an ornate design that occupied almost the entire note.
Famous 1896 "Educational Series" $1 Silver Certificate
  • 1899: The $1 Silver Certificate was again redesigned. The obverse featured a vignette of the U.S. Capitol building behind a Bald Eagle perched on an American Flag. Below that were small portraits of Abraham Lincoln to the left and Ulysses S. Grant to the right.
  • 1917: The obverse of the $1 United States Note was changed slightly with the removal of ornamental frames that surrounded the serial numbers.
  • 1918: The only large-sized, Federal Reserve Note-like $1 bill was issued as a Federal Reserve Bank Note(not to be confused with Federal Reserve Notes). Each note was an obligation of the issuing Federal Reserve Bank and could only be redeemed at that corresponding bank. The obverse of the note featured a borderless portrait of George Washington to left and wording in the entire center. The reverse featured a Bald Eagle in flight clutching an American Flag.
  • 1923: Both the one dollar United States Note and Silver Certificate were redesigned. Both notes featured the same reverse and an almost identical obverse with the same border design and portrait of George Washington. The only difference between the two notes was the color of ink used for the numeral 1 crossed by the word DOLLAR, treasury seal, and serial numbers along with the wording of the obligations. These dollar bills were the first and only large size notes with a standardized design for different types of notes of the same denomination; this same concept would later be used on small size notes.

1862 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... United States Notes (also known as Legal Tender Notes because of their payment obligation stating This Note is a Legal Tender) are banknotes characterized by a red seal and serial number. ... Salmon Portland Chase (January 13, 1808 – May 7, 1873) was an American politician and jurist in the Civil War era who served as Senator from Ohio, as U.S. Treasury Secretary under President Abraham Lincoln, and Chief Justice of the United States. ... 1869 (MDCCCLXIX) is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... The word vignette has several meanings, depending on the context. ... The neutrality of this article is disputed. ... 1874 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1880 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1886 is a common year starting on Friday (click on link to calendar) // Events January 18 - Modern field hockey is born with the formation of The Hockey Association in England. ... Martha Washington Martha Dandridge Custis Washington (June 21, 1731 – May 22, 1802) was the wife of George Washington, the first president of the United States, and therefore is seen as the first First Lady of the United States (although that title was not coined until after her death; she was... A picture of a silver certificate (top image is the obverse of the certificate, bottom image is the reverse of the certificate). ... Image File history File linksMetadata US_$1_1886_Silver_Certificate. ... Image File history File linksMetadata US_$1_1886_Silver_Certificate. ... 1890 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... 1891 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1891 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1896 was a leap year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... An allegory (from Greek αλλος, allos, other, and αγορευειν, agoreuein, to speak in public) is a figurative representation conveying a meaning other than and in addition to the literal. ... Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United... Image File history File linksMetadata US_$1_1896_Silver_Certificate. ... Image File history File linksMetadata US_$1_1896_Silver_Certificate. ... 1899 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... United States Capitol The United States Capitol is the building which serves as home for the legislative branch of the United States government. ... Binomial name Haliaeetus leucocephalus (Linnaeus, 1766) The Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) is a bird of prey indigenous to North America, most recognizable as the national bird of the United States. ... Abraham Lincoln (February 12, 1809 – April 15, 1865), sometimes called Abe Lincoln and nicknamed Honest Abe, the Rail Splitter, and the Great Emancipator, was the 16th President of the United States (1861 to 1865), and the first president from the Republican Party. ... Ulysses S. Grant (April 27, 1822 – July 23, 1885) was the 18th President of the United States (1869–1877). ... 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... Federal Reserve bank notes were United States currency issued by individual Federal Reserve banks. ... Various Federal Reserve Notes Federal Reserve note is the official name for the kind of banknote used in the United States, more commonly known as dollar bills. ... Flag ratio: 7:12; nicknames: Stars and Stripes, Old Glory The flag of the United States of America consists of thirteen equal horizontal stripes of red (top and bottom) alternating with white; there is a blue rectangle in the upper hoist-side corner bearing 50 small, white, five-pointed stars... 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ...

Small size notes

First small-sized $1 bill that was issued as a Silver Certificate
Common reverse of $1 Silver Certificates (Series of 1928-1934) and $1 United States Notes (Series of 1928)

Current size (6.125inches x 2.625 inches) Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1200x510, 277 KB)Obverse of the Series of 1928 $1 Silver Certificate File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1200x510, 277 KB)Obverse of the Series of 1928 $1 Silver Certificate File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1200x507, 197 KB)Common reverse of small size $1 Silver Certificates(Series of 1928-1934) and $1 United States Notes(Series of 1928) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1200x507, 197 KB)Common reverse of small size $1 Silver Certificates(Series of 1928-1934) and $1 United States Notes(Series of 1928) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this...


In 1929, all currency was changed to its current size. Initially, the one dollar bill was issued as Silver Certificate only under Series of 1928. The treasury seal and serial numbers on it were blue. The obverse was nearly identical to the Series of 1923 $1 Silver Certificate, but the treasury seal featured spikes around it and a large gray ONE to the left replaced the blue "1 DOLLAR". The reverse, too, had the same border design as the Series of 1923 $1 bill, but the center featured a large ornate ONE superimposed by ONE DOLLAR. These $1 Silver Certificates were issued until 1934.-1... A picture of a silver certificate (top image is the obverse of the certificate, bottom image is the reverse of the certificate). ...


In 1933, $1 United States Notes were issued to supplement the supply of $1 Silver Certificates. Its treasury seal and serial numbers were red. However, a month after their production, it was realized that there would be no real need for these notes and production was stopped. A small number of these $1 bills entered circulation and the rest were kept in treasury vaults until 1949 when they were issued in Puerto Rico. 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ... United States Notes (also known as Legal Tender Notes because of their payment obligation stating This Note is a Legal Tender) are banknotes characterized by a red seal and serial number. ... 1949 (MCMXLIX) is a common year starting on Saturday. ...


In 1934, the design of the $1 Silver Certificate was changed to reflect the Silver Purchase Act of 1934. Under Washington's portrait, ONE SILVER DOLLAR was changed to ONE DOLLAR due to the fact that Silver Certificates could be redeemed for silver bullion. The treasury seal was moved to the right and superimposed over ONE, and a blue numeral 1 was added to the left. The reverse remained the same. 1934 (MCMXXXIV) was a common year starting on Monday (link will take you to calendar). ...


A year later, in 1935, the design of the one dollar bill was changed again. On the obverse, the blue numeral 1 was changed to gray and made smaller, the gray ONE to the left was removed, the treasury seal was made smaller and superimposed by WASHINGTON D.C., and a stylized ONE DOLLAR was added over the treasury seal. The reverse was also changed to its current design, except for the absence of IN GOD WE TRUST. 1935 (MCMXXXV) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ...

Special issue $1 Silver Certificate for Allied troops in North Africa

World War II brought about special issues of one dollar bills in 1942. Special $1 Silver Certificates were issued for Hawaii incase of a Japanese invasion. HAWAII was printed vertically on the left and right side of the obverse and also horizontally across the reverse. The seal and serial numbers were changed to brown. Special Silver Certificates were also issued as payment for Allied troops in North Africa about to begin their assault into Europe. The only difference on these one dollar bills was a yellow instead of blue seal. Both of these types of notes could be declared worthless if they fell into enemy hands. Image File history File links US_$1_1935A_North_Africa_Silver_Certificate. ... Image File history File links US_$1_1935A_North_Africa_Silver_Certificate. ... Combatants Allied Powers Axis Powers Commanders {{{commander1}}} {{{commander2}}} Strength {{{strength1}}} {{{strength2}}} Casualties 17 million military deaths 7 million military deaths World War II, also known as the Second World War (sometimes WW2 or WWII), was a mid-20th century conflict that engulfed much of the globe and is accepted as... This article is about the year. ... Official language(s) Hawaiian and English Capital Honolulu Largest city Honolulu Area  - Total  - Width  - Length  - % water  - Latitude  - Longitude Ranked 43rd 28,337 km² n/a km 2,450 km 41. ...


The next change came in 1957 when the $1 bill became the first piece of U.S. currency to bear the motto IN GOD WE TRUST; it was added over the word ONE on the reverse. Initially the BEP began printing the motto on notes that were printed with the new 32 note press, but soon Series of 1935G bills printed on a 16 note press featured the motto. 1957 (MCMLVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... BEP Annual Production Figures Categories: U.S. Dept. ...


The final production of $1 Silver Certificates occurred in late 1963. In 1964 the redemption of Silver Certificates for silver coin ended and in 1968 the redemption of Silver Certificates for silver bullion ended. 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... For the Nintendo 64 emulator, see 1964 (Emulator). ... 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1968 calendar). ...


Production of one dollar Federal Reserve Notes was undertaken in late 1963 to replace the soon-to-be obsolete $1 Silver Certificate. The design on the reverse remained the same, but the border design on the obverse was completely redesigned and the serial numbers and treasury seal were printed in green ink. This was the first time the one dollar bill was printed as a Federal Reserve Note. Various Federal Reserve Notes Federal Reserve note is the official name for the kind of banknote used in the United States, more commonly known as dollar bills. ...


In 1969 the $1 bill began using the new treasury seal with wording in English instead of Latin. Excluding the signatures and series date, the design of the one dollar bill has remained the same ever since then. 1969 (MCMLXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday For other uses, see Number 1969. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ...


There are currently no plans to redesign the $1 bill.


Experimental issues

Over numerous years the one dollar bill has served as the exclusive denomination of several experiments.


The first experiment was conducted in January and February of 1933 to test different ratios of cotton and linen used in the paper of dollar bills. Series of 1928A and 1928B $1 Silver Certificates with serial number block letters X-B and Y-B were used as the experimental group; the Z-B block was used as the control group. Test results were inconclusive. 1933 (MCMXXXIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ...


Another test was done in 1937 that was similar in style to the 1933 experiment. Series 1935 one dollar bills were used once again. The particular notes used in this experiment can be identified by their serial numbers. Notes ranging from A00000001B–A06180000B and B00000001B–B03300000B were the experimental group and notes ranging from C00000001B–C03300000B were part of the control group. No conclusive results were found. 1937 (MCMXXXVII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ...


A more well know test was done in 1942 during World War II to test alternatives types of paper; this was a precautionary measure in case the current type of paper supply could not be maintained. Series 1935A notes made of the special paper were printed with a red "S" to the right of the treasury seal and notes of the control group were printed with a red "R". Fake red S's and R's have been applied to regular Series 1935A notes to try and pass them at a higher value; checking a note's serial numbers can prevent this. Serial numbers of the R group range from S70884001C–S7206800C and serial numbers of the S group range from S73884001C–S7506800C. This article is about the year. ...


One dollar bills were again the subject of experimentation in May 1992 when the BEP began to test a web-fed press. Instead of printing one side of a square sheet of 32 notes at a time, a web-fed press used 96 plates to print both sides of notes from a continuous roll of paper. The notes were issued in Series 1988A, 1993, and 1995. Because of mechanical problems as well as the sometimes poor quality of the notes, the test was ended in July 1996. Web notes can be identified by the back plate number next to IN GOD WE TRUST and the removal of face check letters and quadrant numbers. [1] 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday. ... 1996 (MCMXCVI) is a leap year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, and was designated the International Year for the Eradication of Poverty. ...


Reverse of current $1 bill

The reverse of the one dollar bill has an ornate design that incorporates the Great Seal of the United States, and it is of noted interest to historians and numerologists for the symbols contained therein. Obverse The Great Seal of the United States is used to authenticate certain documents issued by the United States government. ... Numerology is the study of the purported mystical or esoteric relationship between numbers and the character or action of physical objects and living things. ...


To the left is the reverse of the seal which portrays an unfinished pyramid. The separated cap of the pyramid, portraying the all-seeing eye, symbolizes that the United States is still far from finished. The Latin phrase Annuit Cœptis (He [God] has favored our undertaking) is located above the pyramid. NOVUS ORDO SECLORUM (New Order of the Ages) is shown on a ribbon below the pyramid. Written at the base of the pyramid in Roman Numerals is MDCCLXXVI or 1776, the year the United States Declaration of Independence was signed. // Geometry See Pyramid (geometry) Geometric shape created by connecting a polygonal base to an apex An n-sided pyramid is a polyhedron formed by connecting an n-sided polygonal base and a point, called the apex, by n triangular faces (n≥3). ... The Eye of Providence floating above an unfinished pyramid on the reverse of the Great Seal of the United States. ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ... Reverse side of the Great Seal of the United States Annuit CÅ“ptis is one of two mottos (the other being Novus Ordo Seclorum) on the reverse side of the Great Seal of the United States. ... The phrase Novus Ordo Seclorum (Latin for New Order of the Ages) appears on the reverse of the Great Seal of the United States, first designed in 1782 and printed on the back of the American dollar bill since 1935. ... The system of Roman numerals is a numeral system originating in ancient Rome, and was adapted from Etruscan numerals. ... This article is about the year 1776. ... U.S. Declaration of Independence The Declaration of Independence is a document in which the Thirteen Colonies declared themselves independent of the Kingdom of Great Britain and explained their justifications for doing so. ...


To the right is the obverse of the Great Seal portraying a heraldic Bald Eagle. In front of the eagle is an unsupported shield which symbolizes the fledgling country's ability to stand on its own, unified by congress; this is symbolized by the blue bar on top of the shield. Above the eagle's head is a glory with 13 stars. Clutched in the eagle's beak is a ribbon that reads E PLURIBUS UNUM (From many, one). It also holds an olive branch and arrows in its claws, symbolizing the desire of peace, but the readiness to fight. Heraldry is the science and art of describing of coats-of-arms, also referred to as achievements or armorial bearings. ... Binomial name Haliaeetus leucocephalus (Linnaeus, 1766) The Bald Eagle (Haliaeetus leucocephalus) is a bird of prey indigenous to North America, most recognizable as the national bird of the United States. ...


The number thirteen, symbolizing the 13 original colonies, shows up numerous times: See also Thirteen, a 2003 movie, 13 an album by British band Blur, Thirteen an album by Teenage Fanclub. ...

  • 13 stars above the eagle
  • 13 steps on the Pyramid
  • 13 letters in ANNUIT COEPTIS
  • 13 letters in E PLURIBUS UNUM
  • 13 bars on the shield
  • 13 leaves on the olive branch
  • 13 fruits
  • 13 arrows

See also

A bill stamped with the Dave Anderson stamp Wheres George? is a website that tracks American paper money. ...

External links

References

  • Official 2006 Blackbook Price Guide to United States Paper Money (38th edition)
  • Standard Catalog of United States Paper Money 17th edition published by Krause Publications
  • The Official RED BOOK A Guide Book of United States Paper Money
  • Standard Guide to Small-Size U.S. Paper Money
United States currency and coinage
Topics: Federal Reserve Note | United States Note | United States coinage | United States dollar
Currency: $1 | $2 | $5 | $10 | $20 | $50 | $100 | Larger denominations
Coinage: Cent | Nickel | Dime | Quarter | Half Dollar | Dollar

 
 

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