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Encyclopedia > U.S. Third Army
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Shoulder Sleeve Insignia of the U.S. Third Army.
Shoulder Sleeve Insignia of the U.S. Third Army.

Contents

Jump to: navigation, search Image File history File links US_Third_Army. ... Jump to: navigation, search Image File history File links US_Third_Army. ...


Activation and World War I

The Third U.S. Army was first activated as a formation during the First World War. However, since it was formed only four days before the armistice of 11 November 1918, it saw no fighting. Instead of wartime operations, occupation duties called for the men of the Third Army. They moved into central Germany, and began to enforce the terms of the armistice. A crisis ensued when there was a question as to whether the German Government would sign the Treaty of Versailles. In May 1919, General Ferdinand Foch went as far as to circulate plans for offensive operations to begin again against Germany. However this was not needed. Third Army was disbanded in July 1919, as the need for a headquarters of that level to control the American occupation forces in Germany was not evident.

Jump to: navigation, search World War I was primarily a European conflict with many facets: immense human sacrifice, stalemate trench warfare, and the use of new, devastating weapons - tanks, aircraft, machineguns, and poison gas. ... Jump to: navigation, search November 11 is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 50 days remaining. ... Jump to: navigation, search 1918 was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... Jump to: navigation, search Ferdinand Foch A monument to Ferdinand Foch in Paris. ...


Reactivation, Inter-War Period

Third Army did not see the light of day again until 1932. On 9 August of that year, in a reorganisation of field forces in the United States, four field armies, Third Army amongst them, were activated, to control the formations of the US Army stationed on home soil. Until the buildup of American forces prior to its entry into World War II, Third Army remained largely a paper formation. It held training exercises periodically, but these were almost never adequate. Jump to: navigation, search August 9 is the 221st day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (222nd in leap years), with 144 days remaining. ... Jump to: navigation, search World War II was a truly global conflict with many facets: immense human suffering, fierce indoctrinations, and the use of new, extremely devastating weapons such as the atom bomb World War II, also known as the Second World War, was a mid-20th-century conflict that...


World War II

Mobilisation saw Third Army take on the role of training some of the huge numbers of recruits that the draft was bringing into the Armed Forces. Lieutenant General Walter Krueger, later to gain fame for his command of Sixth Army during operations in the Pacific commanded Third Army from May 1941 until February 1943. Under his leadership, the basis of the Army's later success as a combat formation was laid. Krueger was succeeded by Lieutenant General Courtney Hodges who led the Army for the rest of 1943. The news that many had expected came in December 1943. Third Army was shipped from the US to the United Kingdom. Walter Krueger (1881-1967) was a German-American soldier and general in the first half of the 20th century. ... The US Sixth Army was activated in January 1943, commanded by Lieutenant General Walter Krueger. ... For other meanings of Pacific, see Pacific (disambiguation). ... Courtney Hicks Hodges (January 5, 1887 – January 16, 1966) was an American military officer, most prominent for his role in World War II, in which he commanded the U.S. First Army in Northwest Europe. ...


Third Army did not take part in the initial stages of Operation Overlord. However, when it did take the field, its field of combat suited the style of its commander far more. Lieutenant General George Patton was one of the US Army's greatest exponents of armoured warfare. When Third Army was moved to France, it was just after Bradley's formations had achieved the breakout from Normandy. Third Army followed up on that success and began a great dash across France. It was only the inevitability of logistics problems that halted Patton's force near the borders of Germany. The Battle of Normandy was fought in 1944 between the German forces occupying Western Europe and the invading Allies. ... General George Smith Patton Jr. ... Jump to: navigation, search US Army Seal HHC, US Army Distinctive Unit Insignia The Army is the branch of the United States armed forces which has primary responsibility for land-based military operations. ... Jump to: navigation, search Mont Saint Michel is a historic pilgrimage site and a symbol of Normandy Normandy is a geographical region in northern France. ...


After a period of consolidation, Third Army was ready to on the offensive again. However, the Germans then launched their last great attack of WWII. The Battle of the Bulge saw an attempt to repeat the decisive breakthrough of 1940. However, in 1944, the Germans were doomed to failure. Their own logistical problems surfaced, and they ground to a halt. Nevertheless, they had broken the US front, and it took a great effort to reduce the resulting salient. In one of the great moves of the war, Patton turned Third Army's axis of advance through ninety degrees and set it upon the south of the German forces. The German salient was reduced by the end of January 1945, and the remainder of the process of closing up to the Rhine could be completed. Some vicious fighting took place, but by April there was but one great natural barrier between Third Army and the heart of Germany. Unlike in 1918, the crossing of the Rhine was opposed. However, the bridgehead was won, and Third Army embarked on another great eastward dash. It reached Austria and in May liberated the Mauthausen-Gusen concentration camps complex. Its forces ended up in Czechoslovakia, the furthest east of any American units. Jump to: navigation, search The Ardennes Offensive, also known as Second Battle of the Ardennes and popularly known as the Battle of the Bulge, started in late December 1944 and was the last major German offensive on the Western Front during World War II. The German army had intended to... Mauthausen (from summer 1940, Mauthausen-Gusen) was a group of 49 Nazi concentration camps situated around the small town of Mauthausen in Upper Austria, about 20 kilometers east of the city of Linz. ...


German Occupation

Occupation beckoned again, and Third Army took up the challenge of starting to rebuild postwar Germany. Third Army remained in Germany until recalled to the United States again 1947. When back in the US, its duties were much the same as those of the 1930s, acting as a command and training force for units in the United States. The Korean War saw a repeat of the earlier WWII training duties. Third Army remained responsible for this aspect of US Armed Forces operations until 1974, when a new major headquarters, that of Forces Command, or FORSCOM was activated to replace Third Army. Third Army was thus inactivated, and remained so for the best part of a decade. Jump to: navigation, search The Korean War (Korean: 한국전쟁/韓國戰爭), from June 25, 1950 to July 27, 1953, was a conflict between North Korea and South Korea. ...


ARCENT

1982 saw the rebirth of Third Army as the ground forces component of the newly formed US Central Command (CENTCOM). ==Operation Desert Shield and Operation Desert Storm It was not until 1990 that Third Army returned to combat, but it was a very notable return. Saddam Hussein invaded Kuwait in August 1990, and American forces were immediately despatched to Saudi Arabia to protect that kingdom. Since Saudi Arabia came within the CENTCOM area, Third Army was sent to command the Army units in theatre. At first, XVIII Corps made up the forces assigned to Third Army; only enough men to ensure that the Iraqis could not invade Saudi Arabia. However, in November 1990, massive reinforcements were announced in the form of VII Corps from Germany. This deployment marked the largest use of armoured formations by the US since WWII, and thus it was fitting that Patton's old command, Third Army, should have control of the battle. By the opening of hostilities, XVIII Corps had three American and one French division and VII Corps four American and one British divisions under command, thus giving Third Army a total of nine divisions under its command, plus the armored cavalry regiments attached to both corps. Emblem of the United States Central Command. ... See also: 2003 invasion of Iraq and Gulf War (disambiguation) C Company, 1st Battalion, The Staffordshire Regiment, 1st UK Armoured Division The Persian Gulf War was a conflict between Iraq and a coalition force of 34 nations led by the United States. ... See also: 2003 invasion of Iraq and Gulf War (disambiguation) C Company, 1st Battalion, The Staffordshire Regiment, 1st UK Armoured Division The Persian Gulf War was a conflict between Iraq and a coalition force of 34 nations led by the United States. ... Jump to: navigation, search Saddam Hussein Wikinews has news related to this article: Saddam Hussein Saddām Hussein ʻAbd al-Majīd al-Tikrīti, sometimes spelled Husayn or Hussain; (Arabic صدام حسين عبد المجيد التكريتي; born April 28, 1937 ) was President of Iraq from 1979 until his removal and capture during the 2003 invasion... Patch of the XVIII Airborne Corps. ... The VII Army Corps of the United States Army was one of the two principal corps of the army in Europe during the Cold War, along with V Corps. ...


Third Army was the main striking force in Operation Desert Storm. Its units were on the left flank of the attacking force and swept into southern Iraq. They then turned east and engaged the Iraqi Republican Guard in fierce combat. Much of that force was destroyed. In terms of its immediate aims, The Gulf War was a stunning success. The Iraqis were ejected from Kuwait and their forces were thoroughly mauled. However, over the longer term, it became clear that more operations would eventually be necessary. Throughout the 1990s, there was indecision on the part of the American Government over whether those operations should take place or not. See also: 2003 invasion of Iraq and Gulf War (disambiguation) C Company, 1st Battalion, The Staffordshire Regiment, 1st UK Armoured Division The Persian Gulf War was a conflict between Iraq and a coalition force of 34 nations led by the United States. ... Two United States Air Force explosive ordnance technicians search for weapons and ordnance through a former Republican Guard facility near Kirkuk. ...


Operation Iraqi Freedom

After several months of diplomatic maneouvre, Third Army was deployed in early 2003. The forces it had under its command for Operation Iraqi Freedom were much smaller in numbers than those it had commanded twelve years before. It had V Corps as its main striking force, with only two complete divisions and an airborne brigade under that command. There was also I MEF, controlling a further two divisions and a brigade. However, numbers were made up for by the advances in technology which rendered this force one of incredible power. It took six weeks to complete the conquest of Iraq, with 3rd Infantry Division, the heavy armour component of V Corps moving faster than even Patton had managed during his great dash across France. Jump to: navigation, search This article covers invasion specifics. ... Unit crest of the United States Army V Corps, the Victory Corps. ... Shoulder sleeve patch of the United States Army 3rd Infantry Division (Mechanized). ...


The aftermath of the campaign saw Third Army headquartered in Baghdad, directing its third occupation within one hundred years. Jump to: navigation, search Average temperature (red) and precipitations (blue) in Baghdad Baghdad (Arabic: ) is the capital of Iraq and the Baghdad Province. ...


Current Roles

As of July 2005, Third U.S. Army is headquartered at Fort Mcpherson, Georgia with a forward element at Camp Arifjan, Kuwait. It continues to serve as the Army Component Command for CENTCOM, and the forward element is serving as the Coalition Forces Land Component Command (CFLCC). July is the seventh month of the year in the Gregorian Calendar and one of seven Gregorian months with the length of 31 days. ... Jump to: navigation, search 2005 (MMV) is a common year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Jump to: navigation, search Camp Arifjan is a United States Army base with elements of the US Air Force, US Marine Corps, US Navy and US Coast Guard stationed there as well. ... Emblem of the United States Central Command. ... Coalition Forces Land Component Command As of July 2005, Headquarters, Third U.S. Army, is acting as the Coalition Forces Land Component Command under the U.S. CENTCOM. ...


Commanding Generals

LTG R. Steven Whitcomb October 2004 to present


LTG David McKeirnan --- to October 2004


  Results from FactBites:
 
U.S. Third Army - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1375 words)
Third Army was disbanded in July 1919, as the need for a headquarters of that level to control the American occupation forces in Germany was not evident.
Lieutenant General George Patton was one of the US Army's greatest exponents of armoured warfare.
Third Army remained responsible for this aspect of US Armed Forces operations until 1974, when a new major headquarters, that of Forces Command, or FORSCOM was activated to replace Third Army.
Camp As Sayliyah (1538 words)
The facility falls under the forward command of Army Forces Central Command-Qatar, which is one of three forward commands in the region maintained by the Third US Army and Army Forces Central Command, based in Atlanta, Georgia.
This is the US Army Central Command's largest pre-positioning facility outside the continental US.
U.S. Navy Seabees as well as Army engineers were reportedly working on preparing the facility for the arrival for as many as 1,000 personnel.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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