FACTOID # 6: Michigan is ranked 22nd in land area, but since 41.27% of the state is composed of water, it jumps to 11th place in total area.
 
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Encyclopedia > U.S. Southern States
The U.S. South

Location in the U.S. Download high resolution version (904x593, 26 KB) Map of United States created by Wapcaplet File links The following pages link to this file: U.S. Southern states Wikipedia talk:WikiProject U.S. Regions/Official Region Template and Infobox Wikipedia:U.S. Southern Wikipedians notice board Template:USSCOTW Wikipedia:U.S... Download high resolution version (904x593, 26 KB) Map of United States created by Wapcaplet File links The following pages link to this file: U.S. Southern states Wikipedia talk:WikiProject U.S. Regions/Official Region Template and Infobox Wikipedia:U.S. Southern Wikipedians notice board Template:USSCOTW Wikipedia:U.S... The United States of America — also referred to as the United States, the U.S.A., the U.S., America, the States, or (archaically) Columbia—is a federal republic of 50 states located primarily in central North America (with the exception of two states: Alaska and Hawaii). ...

Population: 99,664,761
Total Area: 2,384,143 km²
Largest City (proper): Houston, Texas 2,009,834
Highest Elevation: Guadalupe Peak 2,667 m
Lowest Elevation: New Orleans -2.5 m
Largest State: Texas 696,241 km²
Smallest State: Delaware 6,452 km²
Census Bureau Divisions

The U.S. Southern states or the South, also known colloquially as Dixie, constitute a distinctive region covering a large portion of the United States, with its own unique heritage, historical perspective, customs, musical styles, and cuisine. There are some overlaps with the Southwest, Midwest, and the Mid-Atlantic States. Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... Skyline of Downtown Houston from Eleanor Tinsley Park Located in southeast Texas, Houston is the fourth largest city in the United States and one of the two largest economic areas in Texas. ... Guadalupe Peak Categories: Stub | Mountains of the United States | Texas geography ... metre or meter, see meter (disambiguation) The metre is the basic unit of length in the International System of Units. ... New Orleans (French: Nouvelle-Orléans) is the largest city in the state of Louisiana, United States of America. ... metre or meter, see meter (disambiguation) The metre is the basic unit of length in the International System of Units. ... State nickname: Lone Star State Other U.S. States Capital Austin Largest city Houston Governor Rick Perry Official languages None Area 696,241 km² (2nd)  - Land 678,907 km²  - Water 17,333 km² (2. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... State nickname: The First State Other U.S. States Capital Dover Largest city Wilmington Governor Ruth Ann Minner Official languages None Area 6,452 km² (49th)  - Land 5,068 km²  - Water 1,387 km² (21. ... Square kilometre (US spelling: Square kilometer), symbol km², is an SI unit of surface area. ... The East South Central States constitute one of the nine geographic divisions within the United States that are officially recognized by that countrys census bureau. ... For other uses, see Atlantic (disambiguation) The Atlantic Ocean is Earths second-largest ocean, covering approximately one-fifth of its surface. ... The West South Central States form one of the nine geographic divisions within the United States that are officially recognized by the United States Census Bureau. ... Dixie is a nickname for the Southern region of the United States. ... A region can be any area that has some unifying feature. ... The United States of America — also referred to as the United States, the U.S.A., the U.S., America, the States, or (archaically) Columbia—is a federal republic of 50 states located primarily in central North America (with the exception of two states: Alaska and Hawaii). ... The Southern United States has a distinct cuisine that draws heavily on influences of the various groups that have inhabited the area. ... The Southwest region of the United States is drier than the adjoining Midwest in weather; the population is less dense and, with strong Spanish-American and Native American components, more ethnically varied than neighboring areas. ... Midwest States (United States of America, ND to OH) The Midwest is a common name for a region of the United States of America. ... The Mid-Atlantic States The Mid-Atlantic region of the United States of America, located in the northeastern section of the country, includes the following states and district: Delaware Maryland New Jersey New York Pennsylvania Washington, D.C. Virginia These areas provided the young United States with heavy industry and...

Contents

Geography

As defined by the Census Bureau, the Southern region of the United States includes 16 states, and is split into three smaller units, or divisions: The South Atlantic States, which are Delaware, Florida, Georgia, Maryland, North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia and West Virginia (plus the District of Columbia); the East South Central States of Alabama, Kentucky, Mississippi and Tennessee; and the West South Central States of Arkansas, Louisiana, Oklahoma and Texas. The United States Census Bureau (officially Bureau of the Census) is a part of the United States Department of Commerce. ... A region can be any area that has some unifying feature. ... The United States of America — also referred to as the United States, the U.S.A., the U.S., America, the States, or (archaically) Columbia—is a federal republic of 50 states located primarily in central North America (with the exception of two states: Alaska and Hawaii). ... The South Atlantic States form one of the nine divisions within the United States that are formally recognized by that countrys census bureau. ... State nickname: The First State Other U.S. States Capital Dover Largest city Wilmington Governor Ruth Ann Minner Official languages None Area 6,452 km² (49th)  - Land 5,068 km²  - Water 1,387 km² (21. ... State nickname: Everglade State, Sunshine State Other U.S. States Capital Tallahassee Largest city Jacksonville Governor Jeb Bush Official languages English Area 170,451 km² (22nd)  - Land 137,374 km²  - Water 30,486 km² (17. ... State nickname: Peach State / Empire State of the South Other U.S. States Capital Atlanta Largest city Atlanta Governor Sonny Perdue Official languages English Area 154,077 km² (24th)  - Land 150,132 km²  - Water 3,945 km² (2. ... State nickname: Old Line State; Free State Other U.S. States Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Governor Robert L. Ehrlich Official languages English Area 32,160 km² (42nd)  - Land 25,338 km²  - Water 6,968 km² (21%) Population (2000)  - Population 5,296,486 (19th)  - Density 165 /km² (5th) Admittance into... State nickname: Tar Heel State Other U.S. States Capital Raleigh Largest city Charlotte Governor Michael Easley Official languages English Area 139,509 km² (28th)  - Land 126,256 km²  - Water 13,227 km² (9. ... State nickname: Palmetto State Other U.S. States Capital Columbia Largest city Columbia Governor Mark Sanford Official languages English Area 82,965 km² (40th)  - Land 78,051 km²  - Water 4,915 km² (6%) Population (2000)  - Population 4,012,012 (26th)  - Density 51. ... State nickname: Old Dominion Other U.S. States Capital Richmond Largest city Virginia Beach Governor Mark R. Warner Official languages English Area 110,862 km² (35th)  - Land 102,642 km²  - Water 8,220 km² (7. ... State nickname: Mountain State Other U.S. States Capital Charleston Largest city Charleston Governor Joe Manchin Official languages None Area 62,809 km² (41st)  - Land 62,436 km²  - Water 376 km² (0. ... ... The East South Central States constitute one of the nine geographic divisions within the United States that are officially recognized by that countrys census bureau. ... Alabama is a state located in the southern United States; the population of Alabama is 4,447,100 as of 2000. ... State nickname: Bluegrass State Other U.S. States Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Governor Ernie Fletcher Official languages English Area 104,749 km² (37th)  - Land 102,989 km²  - Water 1,760 km² (1. ... State nickname: Magnolia State Other U.S. States Capital Jackson Largest city Jackson Governor Haley Barbour Official languages English Area 125,546 km² (32nd)  - Land 121,606 km²  - Water 3,940 km² (3%) Population (2000)  - Population 2,697,243 (31st)  - Density 23. ... State nickname: Volunteer State Other U.S. States Capital Nashville Largest city Memphis Governor Phil Bredesen Official languages English Area 109,247 km² (36th)  - Land 106,846 km²  - Water 2,400 km² (2. ... The West South Central States form one of the nine geographic divisions within the United States that are officially recognized by the United States Census Bureau. ... State nickname: The Natural State Other U.S. States Capital Little Rock Largest city Little Rock Governor Mike Huckabee Official languages English Area 137,732 km² (29th)  - Land 134,856 km²  - Water 2,876 km² (2. ... Louisiana is a southern state of the United States of America. ... State nickname: Sooner State Other U.S. States Capital Oklahoma City Largest city Oklahoma City Governor Brad Henry Official languages None Area 181,196 km² (20th)  - Land 178,023 km²  - Water 3,173 km² (1. ... State nickname: Lone Star State Other U.S. States Capital Austin Largest city Houston Governor Rick Perry Official languages None Area 696,241 km² (2nd)  - Land 678,907 km²  - Water 17,333 km² (2. ...


The largest city in the region is Houston, Texas, when measured in terms of population within city limits. The largest metropolitan area is the Washington, D.C. area, which includes Baltimore, Maryland. The Dallas/Fort Worth, Texas metropolitan area is also slightly larger than Houston. Skyline of Downtown Houston from Eleanor Tinsley Park Located in southeast Texas, Houston is the fourth largest city in the United States and one of the two largest economic areas in Texas. ... Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United... City nickname: Charm City Location in the state of Maryland Founded 30 July 1729 County Independent city Mayor Martin OMalley ( Dem) Area  - Total  - Water 1,214. ... The Dallas-Fort Worth Metroplex (also DFW Metroplex, or simply the Metroplex) encompasses the combined metropolitan area of the cities of Dallas and Fort Worth, Texas. ...


Other important cities include Atlanta, Austin, Baltimore, Birmingham, Charleston, Charlotte, Corpus Christi, Dallas, El Paso, Fort Lauderdale, Jackson, Jacksonville, Little Rock, Louisville, Memphis, Miami, Mobile, Montgomery, Nashville, New Orleans, Oklahoma City, Orlando, Raleigh, Richmond, San Antonio, Savannah, Shreveport, Tampa, Tulsa, and Washington. This article is about the state capital of Georgia. ... Skyline from Town Lake Austin is the capital of the state of Texas, within the United States of America. ... City nickname: Charm City Location in the state of Maryland Founded 30 July 1729 County Independent city Mayor Martin OMalley ( Dem) Area  - Total  - Water 1,214. ... Birmingham is the largest city in the U.S. state of Alabama and the county seat of Jefferson County. ... Charleston is an American city located in Charleston County, South Carolina. ... he Civil War largely bypassed Charlotte, though the city was the site of the Confederate Cabinets final meeting. ... Corpus Christi is a coastal city located in Texas. ... Dallas redirects here. ... This article needs cleanup. ... Fort Lauderdale, known as the Venice of America, is a city located in Broward County, Florida. ... Jackson is the capital and largest city in the U.S. state of Mississippi. ... Jacksonville redirects here. ... There is also a Littlerock, California. ... For other places with the same name, see Louisville (disambiguation). ... City nickname: The River City or The Bluff City Location in the state of Tennessee County Shelby County, Tennessee Area  - Total  - Water 763. ... The Miami skyline, as it is seen from the northeast. ... Mobile and Mobile Bay from space, June 1991 Mobile is a city located in Mobile County, Alabama. ... Montgomery is a city located in Montgomery County, Alabama. ... For other cities named Nashville, see Nashville (disambiguation). ... New Orleans is the largest city in the state of Louisiana, United States of America. ... The State Capitol of Oklahoma Looking at Downtown Oklahoma City The Flag of Oklahoma City Oklahoma City (sometimes abbreviated as OKC) is the capitol and largest city of the state of Oklahoma in the United States of America. ... The Seal of the City of Orlando The city of Orlando is the county seat of Orange County, Florida. ... Downtown Raleigh as seen from the Boylan St. ... Richmond is the capital of Virginia, a state (officially the Commonwealth of Virginia) of the United States of America. ... Downtown San Antonio as viewed from the Tower of the Americas San Antonio is a city in the U.S. state of Texas. ... Savannah Savannah is a city located in Chatham County, Georgia. ... Shreveport, Louisiana is the third largest metropolitan city in the state of Louisiana, USA. It is located in Caddo Parish, and as of the 2000 census, the city had a total population of 200,145. ... Tampas skyline For alternate meanings, see Tampa (disambiguation) Tampa is a city located in Hillsborough County on the west coast of Florida. ... Downtown Tulsa Tulsa is the second-largest city in Oklahoma. ... Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United...


The region has numerous climatic zones ranging from temperate, to sub-tropical, to tropical, to arid. Many crops grow easily in its soils and can be grown without frost for at least six months of the year. Some parts of the South, particularly the Southeast, have landscape characterized by the presence live oaks, magnolia trees, jessamine vines, and flowering dogwoods. Southern live oaks on Skidaway Island, Savannah, Georgia Live oak is a general term for a number of unrelated oaks in several different sections of the genus Quercus, that happen to share the character of evergreen foliage. ... This article refers to the plant. ... Species See text Jasmine is a shrub of the genus Jasminum, with about 300 species, (Family: Oleaceae. ... Subgenus Cornus Benthamidia Swida Dogwoods are one to three genera (depending on botanical interpretation) of deciduous shrubs and trees in the family Cornaceae. ...


History

For main article, see History of the U.S. South The history of the United States southern states reaches back to the very earliest days of the exploration and colonization of North America. ...


Settled predominately by British colonists in the early 17th century; the South, as it came to be known, developed as a culturally separate region of the United States. Early in its history, tobacco became one of the prime cash crops, while after the 1790s, cotton cultivation predominated. Also, the enslavement of Africans and their descendents as farm labor brought new sectional differences to the South. Integral in the political history of the United States, the South supplied many of the United States' early military and political leaders, including four of its first five presidents. The word British has several different uses. ... (16th century - 17th century - 18th century - more centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700. ... The United States of America — also referred to as the United States, the U.S.A., the U.S., America, the States, or (archaically) Columbia—is a federal republic of 50 states located primarily in central North America (with the exception of two states: Alaska and Hawaii). ... Species N. alata N. bigelovil N. debneyi N. excelsior N. exigua N. glauca N. glutinosa N. kawakamii N. knightiana N. longiflora N. sylvestris N. tabacum Ref: ITIS 30562 as of 2002-08-28 Tobacco () is a broad-leafed plant of the nightshade family, indigenous to North and South America, whose... In agriculture, a cash crop is a crop which is sold for money. ... Events and Trends French Revolution ( 1789 - 1799). ... Cotton is a soft fibre that grows around the seeds of the cotton plant, a shrub native to the tropical and subtropical regions of both the Old World and the New World. ... Slavery is any of a number of related conditions involving control of a person against his or her will, enforced by violence or other clear forms of coercion. ... World map showing location of Africa A satellite composite image of Africa Africa is the worlds second_largest continent in both area and population, after Asia. ... For the pop band, see Presidents of the United States of America. ...


Sectional differences surrounding the issues of taxation, tariffs, slavery, and states' rights led to the secession of most of the Southern states after the election of Abraham Lincoln in 1860. The Southern states that seceded formed the Confederate States of America, which was subsequently defeated by the Union during the American Civil War (1861-1865). A tax is an involuntary fee paid by individuals or businesses to a state, or to functional equivalents of a state, including tribes, secessionist movements or revolutionary movements. ... A tariff is a tax placed on imported and/or exported goods, sometimes called a customs duty. ... A monument celebrating the emancipation of slaves in the British Empire in 1834, erected in Victoria Tower Gardens, Millbank, Westminster, London Wiktionary has a definition of: Slavery Slavery can mean one or more related conditions which involve control of a person against his or her will, enforced by violence or... In American politics and constitutional law, states rights are guaranteed by the Tenth Amendment to the United States Constitution, (i. ... Secession is the act of withdrawing from an organization, union, or political entity. ... Abraham Lincoln (February 12, 1809 – April 15, 1865), sometimes called Abe Lincoln and nicknamed Honest Abe, the Rail Splitter, and the Great Emancipator, was the 16th (1861–1865) President of the United States, and the first president from the Republican Party. ... 1860 is the leap year starting on Sunday. ... National Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God our Vindicator) Official language English de facto nationwide Various European and Native American languages regionally Capital Montgomery, Alabama February 4, 1861–May 29, 1861 Richmond, Virginia May 29, 1861–April 9, 1865 Danville, Virginia April 3–April 10, 1865 Largest city New Orleans... The Union was a name used by many to refer to the Northern states during the American Civil War. ... The American Civil War was fought in the United States from 1861 until 1865 between the United States – forces coming mostly from the 23 northern states of the Union – and the newly-formed Confederate States of America, which consisted of 11 southern states that had declared their secession. ... 1861 is a common year starting on Tuesday. ... 1865 is a common year starting on Sunday. ...


Devastated by its loss, and destruction of civil infrastructure, much of the South was generally unable to recover economically until World War II. Noted by President Franklin Roosevelt as the "number one priority" in terms of need of assistance during the Great Depression (1929-1939), the lack of capital investment also contributed to its economic hardship. Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... Franklin Delano Roosevelt (January 30, 1882–April 12, 1945), 32nd President of the United States, the longest-serving holder of the office and the only man to be elected President more than twice, was one of the central figures of 20th century history. ... --209. ... 1929 was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will take you to calendar). ... 1939 was a common year starting on Sunday (link will take you to calendar). ...


Politics, populism and conservatism

While after the American Civil War and Reconstruction, Southerners often identified with the populist Democratic Party, this has changed in recent years (especially after the rise of special interests in the Democratic Party in the 1970s and the conservative realignment of the Reagan presidency) in the 1980s. As a result, the Republican Party has benefitted from Southern support, in large measure due to the evangelical Christian vote. The American Civil War was fought in the United States from 1861 until 1865 between the United States – forces coming mostly from the 23 northern states of the Union – and the newly-formed Confederate States of America, which consisted of 11 southern states that had declared their secession. ... In the history of the United States, Reconstruction was the period after the American Civil War when the southern states of the defeated Confederacy, which had seceded from the United States, were reintegrated into the Union. ... The Democratic Party is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ... Order: 40th President Vice President: George H.W. Bush Term of office: January 20, 1981 – January 20, 1989 Preceded by: Jimmy Carter Succeeded by: George H.W. Bush Date of birth: February 6, 1911 Place of birth: Tampico, Illinois Date of death: June 5, 2004 Place of death: Los Angeles... The Republican Party, often called the GOP (for Grand Old Party, although one early citation described it as the Gallant Old Party) [1], is one of the two major political parties in the United States. ...


Although the South as a whole defies stereotyping, it is nonetheless known for entrenched political populism and conservatism. Additionally, support for traditional causes is often found in the South, including in resistance to same-sex marriage and abortion. In modern usage, a stereotype is a simplified mental picture of an individual or group of people who share a certain characteristic (or stereotypical) qualities. ... Populism is a political ideology or rhetorical style that holds that the common person is oppressed by the elite in society, which exists only to serve its own interests, and therefore, the instruments of the State need to be grasped from this self-serving elite and instead used for the... Conservatism or political conservatism is any of several historically related political philosophies or political ideologies. ... Same-sex marriage (also called gay marriage, marriage equality, and often just marriage by its proponents, and—usually by its opponents—homosexual marriage) refers to a marriage between individuals of the same gender (for other forms of same-sex unions that are different from marriages, see the articles linked in... Abortion, in its most common usage, refers to the voluntary or induced termination of a pregnancy, generally through the use of surgical procedures or drugs. ...


Culture

Race relations

As the effects of slavery and racism fade, a new regional identity has developed through such events as the annual Spoleto Music Festival in Charleston, South Carolina, and the 1996 Summer Olympic Games in Atlanta, Georgia. Race relations continue to mark a heavily contested issue in the South, however, seen in debates over the inclusion of the Confederate flag in many state flags of the region. A monument celebrating the emancipation of slaves in the British Empire in 1834, erected in Victoria Tower Gardens, Millbank, Westminster, London Wiktionary has a definition of: Slavery Slavery can mean one or more related conditions which involve control of a person against his or her will, enforced by violence or... An African-American drinks out of a water cooler designated for use by colored patrons in 1939 at a streetcar terminal in Oklahoma City. ... Charleston is an American city located in Charleston County, South Carolina. ... (Redirected from 1996 Summer Olympic Games) Categories: 1996 Summer Olympics ... Downtown Atlanta skyline Atlanta is the capital and largest city of Georgia, a state of the United States of America. ... The following are the flags used by the short-lived Confederate States of America. ...


Religion

The South, perhaps more so than any other industrial culture in the world, is highly religious, resulting in the reference to the South as the "Bible Belt", from its prevalence of evangelical Protestantism, conservative Catholicism, and other Christian faiths. Religion, a term sometimes used interchangeably with faith, is commonly defined as belief concerning the supernatural, sacred, or divine, and the moral codes, practices and institutions associated with such belief. ... The Bible Belt, highlighted in red The Bible Belt is an area including a number of southern and midwestern states in the USA in which fervent Protestantism is a pervasive part of the culture. ... Evangelical has several distinct meanings: In its original sense, it means belonging or related to the Gospel (Greek: euangelion - good news) of the New Testament. ... Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... Conservatism or political conservatism is any of several historically related political philosophies or political ideologies. ... This article considers Catholicism in the broadest ecclesiastical sense. ... Christianity is an Abrahamic religion based on the life, teachings, death by crucifixion, and resurrection of Jesus of Nazareth as described in the New Testament. ...


Cuisine

For main article, see Southern U.S. cuisine The Southern United States has a distinct cuisine that draws heavily on influences of the various groups that have inhabited the area. ...


As an important feature of Southern culture, the cuisine of the South is often described as one of its most distinctive traits. The variety of cuisines range from Tex-Mex, Cajun and Creole, traditional antebellum fare, all types of seafood, and Texas, Carolina & Memphis styles of Barbeque. Non-alcoholic beverages of choice include "iced tea", and various soft drinks, many of which had their origins in the South (e.g. Coca-Cola, Pepsi-Cola, and Dr Pepper). Lagers and Pilsners are generally preferred to heavier/darker beers due to the predominance of hot climate. Texas is also the center of a burgeoning wine boom, due to its climate and well drained limestone based soils, particularly in the Texas Hill Country. Mexican cuisine is a style of food that originated in Mexico. ... Antebellum is a Latin word meaning before the war. In United States history and historiography Antebellum is sometimes used instead of the term pre_Civil War, especially in the South. ... A member of the Airpork Crew barbecue team prepares pork shoulder at the Memphis in May World Championship Barbecue Cooking Contest. ... This article is about the beverage. ... The wave shape (known as the dynamic ribbon device) present on all Coca-Cola cans throughout the world derives from the contour of the original Coca-Cola bottles. ... Pepsi or Pepsi-Cola, is a carbonated cola soft drink manufactured by PepsiCo, and principal rival of Coca-Cola. ... A can of Dr Pepper Dr Pepper is a popular caramel-colored, carbonated soft drink marketed in the United States by Dr Pepper/Seven Up, Inc. ... Lager beers are alcoholic beverages of German and Czech origin, taking their name from the German lagern (to store). Lagers are brewed principally from malted barley (without cane sugar, an adjunct), hops and water at low temperatures (usually between 5°C and 15°C) that cause bottom-fermentation. ... Pilsener or pilsner is a type of lager beer. ... The Texas Hill Country is a region of central Texas, USA, that features rolling, somewhat rugged, hills that consist primarily of limestone. ...


Traditional African-American Southern food is often called "soul food"; in reality there is little difference in the traditional diet of Southerners. Of course, most Southern cities and even some smaller towns now offer a wide variety of cuisines of other origins such as Chinese, Italian, French, Middle Eastern, as well as restaurants still serving primarily Southern specialites. For the movie, see Soul Food Soul food is an ethnic cuisine, food traditionally eaten by African Americans of the Southern United States. ... China has one of the richest culinary heritages on Earth. ... Italian cuisine is characterized by its flexibility, its range of ingredients and its many regional variations. ... French cuisine is characterized by its extreme diversity. ... The term Middle Eastern cuisine refers to the cuisines of the Middle East. ...


Symbolism, Disagreements, and the Future of the South

Fights over the old "Rebel Flag" of the defunct Confederacy still occur from time to time, and it and other reminders of the Old South can sometimes be found on automobile bumper-stickers, on t-shirts, and flown from homes.


Cultural Variations

  • In many ways Texas has one foot in the South, and one in the Southwest. Its major cities have a very culturally diverse population, including Hispanic and Asian-Americans. Also, prior to its statehood in 1907, Oklahoma was "Indian Territory." The majority of the Native American tribes in Oklahoma sided with the Confederacy during the Civil War. Similar to Texas in that it has a Southwestern influence, Oklahoma holds strong ties to Southern culture, evidenced by dialect, religion, politics, cuisine, etc. It is geographically often grouped with the Midwest, but culturally is truly more Southern, especially in the eastern part of the state.
  • Florida has had rapid population growth due to retirees from the North and immigrants from Latin America. Miami, Florida has become more a part of the culture of the Caribbean, with a large influx of immigrants from Cuba, and also Puerto Rico, Haiti and other parts of Latin America. Often, non-Hispanic whites and native-born African-Americans have migrated north to find higher wages, lower costs of living, and cultures where they feel more comfortable. While southern and central Florida are seen by many as not truly part of the South in terms of culture, the Florida Panhandle and northeastern areas of Florida remain culturally tied to the South. An unofficial "Southern line" can be drawn at or just south of Ocala, Florida; below this line, the culture of the areas can be described as much more "Northern."
  • Portions of southern Ohio are advocated as "Southern", evidenced by the state's civil rights law that includes "persons of Appalachian ancestry" among the categories against which discrimination is prohibited. This group of Ohioans are generally concentrated in the southeastern part of the state, with "Appalachians" being viewed as separate from "Southerners" by many observers. Many Southerners do not recognize Kentucky, West Virginia, Delaware, and Maryland as "Southern" due to their allegiance to the Union during the Civil War.
  • The culture of Northern Kentucky is more Midwestern than Southern, as this region is culturally and economically attached to Cincinnati. It should also be noted that many in Kentucky (generally, those in western and northern areas) do not believe themselves to be Southerners, historically or culturally. Conversely, Southern Indiana is more Southern than it is Midwestern, as it is culturally and—particularly in southwestern Indiana—economically attached to Louisville, Kentucky.
  • Many do not consider Maryland and Delaware to be culturally Southern states; their cultural designation is disputed due to their proximity to both North and South. Those who view them as Southern cite the fact that although neither state joined the Confederacy, slavery remained legal in them until ratification of the Thirteenth Amendment, and that the Mason-Dixon line, long considered to be the border between North and South, is in fact the Maryland-Pennsylvania border. Today, they are sometimes grouped with Southern states for corporate and governmental administrative regions. However, Baltimore, Maryland, Wilmington, Delaware, and Newark, Delaware lie along the Northeast Corridor, which further separates them from the South, and ties them to a culture that has little in common with Southern culture. In addition, they are much more liberal than any other region in the defined South, sharing political trends with the Northeastern states.
  • Northern Virginia has been largely settled by Northerners attracted to job opportunities resulting from expansion of the federal government during and after World War II. Still more expansion resulted from the Internet boom around the turn of the 21st century. Economically linked to Washington, D.C., residents of the region tend to consider it part of the North, as do Southerners. However, it remains politically somewhat conservative, as opposed to Washington's suburbs across the Potomac River in Maryland, which are generally politically quite liberal.

The Southwest region of the United States is drier than the adjoining Midwest in weather; the population is less dense and, with strong Spanish-American and Native American components, more ethnically varied than neighboring areas. ... 1907 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... State nickname: Sooner State Other U.S. States Capital Oklahoma City Largest city Oklahoma City Governor Brad Henry Official languages None Area 181,196 km² (20th)  - Land 178,023 km²  - Water 3,173 km² (1. ... Indian Territory in 1836 Indian Territory in 1891 Indian Territory, also known as Indian Country, Indian territory or the Indian territories, was the land set aside within the United States for the use of Native Americans (Indians). The general borders were set by the Indian Intercourse Act of 1834. ... Native Americans (also Indians, Aboriginal Peoples, American Indians, First Nations, Alaskan Natives, Amerindians, or Indigenous Peoples of America) are the indigenous inhabitants of The Americas prior to the European colonization, and their modern descendants. ... National Motto Deo Vindice (Latin: Under God our Vindicator) Official language English de facto nationwide Various European and Native American languages regionally Capital Montgomery, Alabama February 4, 1861–May 29, 1861 Richmond, Virginia May 29, 1861–April 9, 1865 Danville, Virginia April 3–April 10, 1865 Largest city New Orleans... The American Civil War was fought in the United States from 1861 until 1865 between the United States – forces coming mostly from the 23 northern states of the Union – and the newly-formed Confederate States of America, which consisted of 11 southern states that had declared their secession. ... Midwest States (United States of America, ND to OH) The Midwest is a common name for a region of the United States of America. ... Louisiana is a southern state of the United States of America. ... The French Republic or France (French: République française or France) is a country whose metropolitan territory is located in western Europe, and which is further made up of a collection of overseas islands and territories located in other continents. ... The Kingdom of Spain or Spain (Spanish and Galician: Reino de España or España; Catalan: Regne dEspanya; Basque: Espainiako Erresuma) is a country located in the southwest of Europe. ... Cajuns are an ethnic group consisting essentially of the descendants of Acadians who came from Nova Scotia to Louisiana as a result of their refusal to swear allegiance to the British Crown. ... The term Creole is used with different meanings in different contexts, which can generate confusion. ... Latin America consists of the countries of South America and some of North America (including Central America and some the islands of the Caribbean) whose inhabitants mostly speak Romance languages, although Native American languages are also spoken. ... The Caribbean or the West Indies is a group of islands in the Caribbean Sea. ... The Gulf of Mexico is a major body of water bordered and nearly landlocked by North America. ... State nickname: Lone Star State Other U.S. States Capital Austin Largest city Houston Governor Rick Perry Official languages None Area 696,241 km² (2nd)  - Land 678,907 km²  - Water 17,333 km² (2. ... State nickname: Magnolia State Other U.S. States Capital Jackson Largest city Jackson Governor Haley Barbour Official languages English Area 125,546 km² (32nd)  - Land 121,606 km²  - Water 3,940 km² (3%) Population (2000)  - Population 2,697,243 (31st)  - Density 23. ... Alabama is a state located in the southern United States; the population of Alabama is 4,447,100 as of 2000. ... State nickname: Everglade State, Sunshine State Other U.S. States Capital Tallahassee Largest city Jacksonville Governor Jeb Bush Official languages English Area 170,451 km² (22nd)  - Land 137,374 km²  - Water 30,486 km² (17. ... State nickname: Everglade State, Sunshine State Other U.S. States Capital Tallahassee Largest city Jacksonville Governor Jeb Bush Official languages English Area 170,451 km² (22nd)  - Land 137,374 km²  - Water 30,486 km² (17. ... Retirement is the status of a worker who has stopped working. ... Latin America consists of the countries of South America and some of North America (including Central America and some the islands of the Caribbean) whose inhabitants mostly speak Romance languages, although Native American languages are also spoken. ... The Miami skyline, as it is seen from the northeast. ... Central America and the Caribbean The Caribbean Sea is a body of water adjacent to the Atlantic Ocean, south of the Gulf of Mexico. ... The Republic of Cuba is an archipelago in the northern Caribbean that lies at the confluence of the Caribbean Sea, the Gulf of Mexico and the Atlantic Ocean. ... The Commonwealth of Puerto Rico (Spanish: Estado Libre Asociado de Puerto Rico) is a self-governing unincorporated organized territory of the United States located east of the Dominican Republic in the northeastern Caribbean. ... Haiti is a country situated on the western third of the island of Hispaniola and the smaller islands of La Gonâve, La Tortue (Tortuga), Grande Caye, and Ile a Vache in the Caribbean Sea, east of Cuba; the Dominican Republic shares Hispaniola with Haiti. ... Latin America consists of the countries of South America and some of North America (including Central America and some the islands of the Caribbean) whose inhabitants mostly speak Romance languages, although Native American languages are also spoken. ... Categories: US geography stubs | Florida geography ... Ocala is a city located in Marion County, Florida. ... Civil rights or positive rights are those legal rights retained by citizens and protected by the government. ... The Appalachian Mountains are a system of North American mountains running from Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada to Alabama in the United States, although the northernmost mainland portion ends at the Gaspe Peninsula of Quebec. ... To discriminate is to make a distinction. ... Northern Kentucky is generally agreed to consist of Kentuckys three northernmost counties: Boone, Kenton and Campbell. ... Midwest States (United States of America, ND to OH) The Midwest is a common name for a region of the United States of America. ... This article is about the city of Ohio. ... Southern Indiana, in the United States, is notable because it is culturally and geographically more similar to the South than it is to the rest of the state of Indiana. ... Midwest States (United States of America, ND to OH) The Midwest is a common name for a region of the United States of America. ... For other places with the same name, see Louisville (disambiguation). ... Little Egypt can mean: Little Egypt, a belly dancer. ... Little Egypt is an area in southern Illinois. ... Buda is the western part of Budapest on the bank of the Danube. ... This article is about the southeastern corner of the U.S. state of Missouri; the term Bootheel is also used to refer to the southwestern part of Hidalgo County, New Mexico. ... State nickname: The Natural State Other U.S. States Capital Little Rock Largest city Little Rock Governor Mike Huckabee Official languages English Area 137,732 km² (29th)  - Land 134,856 km²  - Water 2,876 km² (2. ... State nickname: Bluegrass State Other U.S. States Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Governor Ernie Fletcher Official languages English Area 104,749 km² (37th)  - Land 102,989 km²  - Water 1,760 km² (1. ... The Jackson Purchase is a region in the state of Kentucky bounded by the Mississippi, Ohio, and Tennessee Rivers. ... West Tennessee is one of the three traditional regions in the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... State nickname: Old Line State; Free State Other U.S. States Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Governor Robert L. Ehrlich Official languages English Area 32,160 km² (42nd)  - Land 25,338 km²  - Water 6,968 km² (21%) Population (2000)  - Population 5,296,486 (19th)  - Density 165 /km² (5th) Admittance into... State nickname: The First State Other U.S. States Capital Dover Largest city Wilmington Governor Ruth Ann Minner Official languages None Area 6,452 km² (49th)  - Land 5,068 km²  - Water 1,387 km² (21. ... Amendment XIII (the Thirteenth Amendment) of the United States Constitution states: Section 1 Section 2 Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation. ... The Mason-Dixon Line Literally, the Mason-Dixon Line (or Mason and Dixons Line) demarcated state boundaries between the Province of Pennsylvania, the Province of Maryland, Delaware Colony and parts of Virginia Colony in colonial North America and between their successor-state members of the United States. ... State nickname: The Keystone State Other U.S. States Capital Harrisburg Largest city Philadelphia Governor Ed Rendell Official languages None Area 119,283 km² (33rd)  - Land 116,074 km²  - Water 3,208 km² (2. ... City nickname: Charm City Location in the state of Maryland Founded 30 July 1729 County Independent city Mayor Martin OMalley ( Dem) Area  - Total  - Water 1,214. ... City nickname: Location in the state of Delaware Founded County New Castle County Mayor James M. Baker (Dem) Area  - Total  - Water 44. ... Main Street is the commercial heart of Newark. ... For the agglomeration of metropolitan areas, see article on BosWash megalopolis The Northeast Corridor (NEC) is an electrified railway line with overhead wires running from Washington, DC to Boston, Massachusetts, passing through Baltimore, Maryland, Wilmington, Delaware, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, New York, New York, New Haven, Connecticut and Providence, Rhode Island. ... In politics, the term liberal refers to: an adherent of the ideology of liberalism —an ideology espousing liberty. ... Northern Virginia is an area is the northern part of the Commonwealth of Virginia. ... Mushroom cloud from the nuclear explosion over Nagasaki rising 18 km into the air. ... The Internet, or simply the Net, is the publicly available worldwide system of interconnected computer networks that transmit data by packet switching using a standardized Internet Protocol (IP) and many other protocols. ... (20th century - 21st century - 22nd century - other centuries) Definition In calendars based on the Christian Era or Common Era, such as the Gregorian calendar, the 21st century is the current century, as of this writing, lasting from 2000-2099. ... Aerial photo (looking NW) of the Washington Monument and the White House in Washington, DC. Washington, D.C., officially the District of Columbia (also known as D.C.; Washington; the Nations Capital; the District; and, historically, the Federal City) is the capital city and administrative district of the United... Conservatism or political conservatism is any of several historically related political philosophies or political ideologies. ... Upper part of the Potomac River The Potomac River flows into Chesapeake Bay, located along the mid-Atlantic coast of the United States (USA). ... State nickname: Old Line State; Free State Other U.S. States Capital Annapolis Largest city Baltimore Governor Robert L. Ehrlich Official languages English Area 32,160 km² (42nd)  - Land 25,338 km²  - Water 6,968 km² (21%) Population (2000)  - Population 5,296,486 (19th)  - Density 165 /km² (5th) Admittance into...

See also

Red shows states most commonly considered a part of the Deep South. ... In histories of the American Civil War, the border states were those whose laws condoned slavery but that did not secede. ...

References

  • Thomas G. Paterson, ed. (1999). Major Problems in the History of the American South. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company. ISBN 0-395-87139-5.
  • Bertram Wyatt-Brown (1990). Honor and Violence in the Old South. New York: Oxford Univ. Press. ISBN 0-19-504242-5.
  • Peter Kolchin (1993). American Slavery: 1619-1877. New York: Hill and Wang. ISBN 0-8090-1630-3.
  • William C. Davis (2003). Look Away! A History of the Confederate States of America. New York: Free Press. ISBN 0-684-86585-8.

External links

  • DocSouth: Documenting the American South (http://docsouth.unc.edu/index.html) - numerous online text, image, and audio collections.
  • http://research.unc.edu/endeavors/spr97/south.html
  • http://www.columbia.edu/~hah15/H_2004_Poetics.pdf
Regions of the United States
Census Bureau Regions
U.S. Midwest | U.S. Northeast | U.S. South | U.S. West
Non-Census Bureau Regions
Coastal states | Deep South | Delmarva | East | Eastern Coast | Great Lakes | Great Plains | Gulf Coast | International Border states | Mid-Atlantic | Mississippi Delta | Mountain states | New England | North | Pacific Northwest | South Central States | Southeast | Southwest | Upper Midwest | West | West Coast

  Results from FactBites:
 
Southern United States - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (4925 words)
Southern American English is a dialect of the English language spoken throughout the South.
Characteristics of southern literature including a focus on a common southern history, the significance of family, a sense of community and one’s role within it, the community's dominating religion and the burden religion often brings, issues of racial tension, land and the promise it brings, and the use of southern dialect.
The easternmost tip of the state is close enough to Baltimore and Washington, DC that it too has started to become an exurb of these areas with a unique North-South "hybrid" culture (in fact, the two easternmost counties, Berkeley and Jefferson, are considered part of the Baltimore-Washington Metropolitan Area by the Census Bureau).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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