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Encyclopedia > U.S. Bureau of Indian Affairs
Bureau of Indian Affairs
Seal of the Bureau of Indian Affairs
Established: March 11, 1824
Activated: March 11, 1824
Assistant Secretary: TBD-Interim Asst. Secretary Jim Cason
Budget: $2.4 billion (2004)
Employees: 9,688 (2004)

The Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) is an agency of the United States Federal Government within the Department of the Interior charged with the responsibility is the administration and management of 55.7 million acres (87,000 sq. miles or 225,000 kmĀ²) of land held in trust by the United States for American Indians, Indian tribes, and Alaska Natives. There are 562 federally recognized tribal governments in the United States. Developing forestlands, leasing assets on these lands, directing agricultural programs, protecting water and land rights, developing and maintaining infrastructure and economic development are all part of the agency's responsibility. In addition, the Bureau of Indian Affairs provides education services to approximately 48,000 Indian students. Bureau of Indian Affairs Seal This is a copyrighted and/or trademarked logo. ... 11 March is the 70th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (71st in Leap year). ... 1824 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 11 March is the 70th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (71st in Leap year). ... 1824 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... The U.S. Constitution, adopted in 1789 by a constitutional convention, sets down the basic framework of American government in its seven articles. ... The United States Department of the Interior (DOI) is a Cabinet department of the United States government that manages and conserves most federally-owned land. ... A Sioux in traditional dress including war bonnet, about 1908 Native Americans â€“ also Indians, American Indians, First Nations, First Peoples, Indigenous Peoples of America, Aboriginal Peoples, Aboriginal Americans, Amerindians, Amerind, Native Canadians (or of other nations) â€“ are those peoples indigenous to the Americas, living there prior to European colonization and... State nickname: The Last Frontier, The Land of the Midnight Sun Other U.S. States Capital Juneau Largest city Anchorage Governor Frank Murkowski (R) Official languages English Area 1,717,854 km² (1st)  - Land 1,481,347 km²  - Water 236,507 km² (13. ...


History

Although the bureau, which was called the Office of Indian Affairs, was formed in 1824, similar agencies had existed in the U.S. government as far back as 1775, when a trio of Indian agencies were created by the Continental Congress. Benjamin Franklin and Patrick Henry were among the early commissioners, who were charged with negotating treaties with Native Americans and obtaining the neutrality during the American Revolutionary War. In 1789, the United States Congress placed Native American relations within the newly-formed War Department. By 1806, the Congress had created a Superintendent of Indian Trade within the War Department who was charged with maintaining the factory trading network of the fur trade. The post was held by Thomas L. McKenney from 1816 until the abolition of the factory system in 1822. In 1832 Congress established the position of Commissioner of Indian Affairs. 1824 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1775 was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... The Continental Congress was the federal legislature of the Thirteen Colonies and later of the United States from 1774 to 1789, a period that included the American Revolutionary War and the Articles of Confederation. ... Benjamin Franklin by Jean-Baptiste Greuze 1777 For the former mayor of Nepean, see Ben Franklin (politician) Dr. Benjamin Franklin (January 17, 1706 – April 17, 1790) was an American printer, journalist, publisher, author, philanthropist, abolitionist, public servant, scientist, librarian, diplomat and inventor. ... Patrick Henry (May 29, 1736 – June 6, 1799) was a prominent figure in the American Revolution, known and remembered primarily for his stirring oratory. ... Neutral means balanced between two or more opposites. ... The American Revolutionary War (1775–1783), also known as the American War of Independence, was a war fought primarily between Great Britain and revolutionaries within thirteen North American colonies. ... 1789 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... The Congress of the United States is the legislative branch of the federal government of the United States of America. ... The United States Department of War was the military department of the United States governments executive branch from 1789 until 1949, when it became part of the United States Department of Defense. ... 1806 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... The fur trade was a huge part in the early economic development of North America. ... 1816 was a leap year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... 1822 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ...


The abolition of the factory system left a vacuum within the U.S. government regarding Native American relations. The current Bureau of Indian Affairs was formed on March 11, 1824 by Secretary of War John C. Calhoun, who created the agency without authorization from the United States Congress. McKenney was appointed the first head of the office, which went by several names at first. McKenney preferred to call it the "Indian Office", whereas the current name was preferred by Calhoun. Like its predecessors, the bureau was originally a division of the Department of War. In 1849 it was transferred to the Department of the Interior. The bureau was renamed to Bureau of Indian Affairs in 1947 (from the original Office of Indian Affairs). 11 March is the 70th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (71st in Leap year). ... 1824 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... The Secretary of War was a member of the Presidents Cabinet, beginning with George Washingtons administration. ... John C. Calhoun John Caldwell Calhoun (March 18, 1782 – March 31, 1850), was a prominent United States politician in the first half of the 19th century. ... The Congress of the United States is the legislative branch of the federal government of the United States of America. ... 1849 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...


External link

  • BIA home page
  • A History of the Bureau of Indian Affairs

 
 

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