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Encyclopedia > Tyson Foods
Tyson Foods, Inc.
Type Public (NYSETSN)
Founded 1931
Headquarters Flag of the United States Springdale, Arkansas, USA
Key people John Tyson, Chairman
Richard Bond, CEO
Industry Food processing
Products Meat
Revenue US$26 billion
Employees 107,000
Website www.tyson.com

Tyson Foods, Inc. (NYSETSN) is an American multinational corporation based in Springdale, Arkansas, that operates in the food industry. The company is the world's largest processor and marketer of chicken, beef, and pork, and annually exports the largest percentage of beef out of the United States. With 2005 sales of US$26 billion, Tyson Foods is the second-largest food production tyler company in the Fortune 500, the largest meat producer in the world, and according to Forbes one of the 100 largest companies in the United States. Tyson logo, deeming fair use This work is copyrighted. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The New York Stock Exchange (NYSE), nicknamed the Big Board, is a New York City-based stock exchange. ... Year 1931 (MCMXXXI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1931 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Springdale is a city in Washington and Benton counties in Arkansas. ... The phrase Chairman of the Board has several meanings: Chairman of the Board is the term used to denote the leader of a corporations board of directors. ... “Chief executive” redirects here. ... Food processing is the set of methods and techniques used to transform raw ingredients into food for consumption by humans or animals. ... This article is about the food. ... For the tax agency in Ireland of the same name, see Revenue Commissioners. ... This article is about work. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... The New York Stock Exchange (NYSE), nicknamed the Big Board, is a New York City-based stock exchange. ... A multinational corporation (or transnational corporation) (MNC/TNC) is a corporation or enterprise that manages production establishments or delivers services in at least two countries. ... Springdale is the name of several places in the United States of America: Springdale, Arkansas Springdale, Maryland Springdale, Pennsylvania Springdale, South Carolina This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Official language(s) English Capital Little Rock Largest city Little Rock Largest metro area Little Rock Metropolitan Area Area  Ranked 29th  - Total 53,179 sq mi (137,002 km²)  - Width 239 miles (385 km)  - Length 261 miles (420 km)  - % water 2. ... For other uses, see Corporation (disambiguation). ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... For other uses, see Beef (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Pork (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Beef (disambiguation). ... USD redirects here. ... The Fortune 500 is a ranking of the top 500 United States corporations as measured by gross revenue. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...


The company makes a wide variety of protein-based and prepared food products at its 123 food processing plants. Tyson Foods has approximately 107,000 employees, who work at more than 300 facilities in the United States and throughout the world. Tyson works with 6,729 contract chicken growers. A representation of the 3D structure of myoglobin, showing coloured alpha helices. ... Food processing is the set of methods and techniques used to transform raw ingredients into food for consumption by humans or animals. ... Employment is a contract between two parties, one being the employer and the other being the employee. ...


Tyson Foods is one of largest U.S. marketers of value-added chicken, beef and pork to retail grocers, broad line foodservice distributors and national fast food and full service restaurant chains; fresh beef and pork; frozen and fully-cooked chicken, beef and pork products; case-ready beef and pork; supermarket deli chicken products; meat toppings for the pizza industry and retail frozen pizza; club store chicken, beef and pork; ground beef and flour tortillas. Value added refers to the additional value created at a particular stage of production or through image and marketing. ...


Tyson Foods is a supplier of all Yum! Brands chains that use chicken (including Kentucky Fried Chicken and Taco Bell), as well as McDonald's, Burger King, Wendy's, Wal-Mart, Kroger, Costco, IGA, Beef O'Brady's, small restaurant businesses and prisons. Yum! Brands, Inc. ... KFC (full name Kentucky Fried Chicken) is a division of Yum! Brands, Inc. ... Taco Bell Corp. ... McDonalds Corporation (NYSE: MCD) is the worlds largest chain of fast-food restaurants, primarily selling hamburgers, chicken, french fries, milkshakes and soft drinks. ... Burger King (NYSE: BKC), often abbreviated to BK, is a global chain of hamburger fast food restaurants. ... Wendys is an international chain of fast food restaurants founded by Dave Thomas in 1969 in Columbus, Ohio. ... Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. ... Kroger headquarters in Cincinnati, Ohio. ... Costco Wholesale Corporation (NASDAQ: COST) is the largest membership warehouse club chain in the world based on sales volume, headquartered in Issaquah, Washington, United States,[1] with its flagship warehouse in nearby Seattle. ... IGA is a name used by many independent grocery stores throughout the world. ... Beef OBradys Family Sports Pubs is a Florida-based restaurant franchise established in 1985 by Jim Mellody. ...

Contents

History

Agriculture

General
Agribusiness · Agriculture
Agricultural science · Agronomy
Animal husbandry
Extensive farming
Factory farming · Free range
Industrial agriculture
Intensive farming
Organic farming · Permaculture
Sustainable agriculture
Urban agriculture
Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 644 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (900 × 838 pixel, file size: 187 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... In agriculture, agribusiness is a generic term that refers to the various businesses involved in the food production chain, including farming, seed, agrichemicals, farm machinery, wholesaling, processing, distribution, and retail sales. ... Agricultural science is a broad multidisciplinary field that encompasses the parts of exact, natural, economic, and social sciences that are used in the practice and understanding of agriculture. ... Agronomy is a branch of agricultural science that deals with the study of crops and the soils in which they grow. ... Shepherd with his sheep in Făgăraş Mountains, Romania. ... The small pig farm in Swiss mountains. ... The factual accuracy of part of this article is disputed. ... Free range is a method of farming husbandry where the animals are permitted to roam freely instead of being contained in small sheds. ... These female brood sows are confined most of their lives in gestation crates too small to enable them to turn around. ... Intensive farming or intensive agriculture is an agricultural production system characterized by the high inputs of capital or labour relative to land area. ... Organic farming is a psuedoscientific form of agriculture which avoids or largely excludes the use of synthetic fertilizers and pesticides, plant growth regulators, and livestock feed additives. ... Permaculture Mandala summarising the ethics and principles of permaculture design. ... It has been suggested that Small-scale agriculture be merged into this article or section. ... Urban (or peri-urban) agriculture is the practice of agriculture (including crops, livestock, fisheries, and forestry activities) within or surrounding the boundaries of cities. ...

History
History of agriculture
Neolithic Revolution
Muslim Agricultural Revolution
British Agricultural Revolution
Green Revolution
This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The Neolithic Revolution is the term for the first agricultural revolution, describing the transition from nomadic hunting and gathering communities and bands, to agriculture and settlement, as first adopted by various independent prehistoric human societies, in numerous locations on most continents between 10-12 thousand years ago. ... The Islamic Golden Age from the 8th century to the 13th century witnessed a fundamental transformation in agriculture known as the Muslim Agricultural Revolution,[1] Arab Agricultural Revolution,[2] or Green Revolution. ... The British Agricultural Revolution describes a period of agricultural development in Britain between the 16th century and the mid-19th century, which saw a massive increase in agricultural productivity and net output. ... The Green Revolution was the worldwide transformation of agriculture that led to significant increases in agricultural production between the 1940s and 1960s. ...

Particular
Aquaculture · Christmas trees · Dairy farming
Grazing · Hydroponics · IMTA
Intensive pig farming · Lumber
Maize · Orchard
Poultry farming · Ranching · Rice
Sheep husbandry · Soybean
System of Rice Intensification
Wheat
Workers harvest catfish from the Delta Pride Catfish farms in Mississippi Aquaculture is the cultivation of aquatic organisms. ... A Christmas tree farmer in the U.S. state of Florida explains the pruning and shearing process of cultivation to a government employee. ... Dairy farming is a class of agricultural, or more properly, an animal husbandry enterprise, raising female cattle, goats, or other lactating animals for long-term production of milk, which may be either processed on-site or transported to a dairy factory for processing and eventual retail sale. ... Grazing To feed on growing herbage, attached algae, or phytoplankton. ... Hydroponics is a method of growing plants using mineral nutrient solutions instead of soil. ... Harvesting of kelp (Saccharina latissima, previously known as Laminaria saccharina) cultivated in proximity to Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar) at Charlie Cove, Bay of Fundy, Canada. ... Intensively farmed pigs in batch pens Intensive piggeries (or hog lots) are a type of factory farm specialized for the raising of domestic pigs up to slaughter weight. ... Timber in storage for later processing at a sawmill Lumber or timber is a term used to describe wood, either standing or that has been processed for use — from the time trees are felled, to its end product as a material suitable for industrial use — as structural material for construction... This article is about the maize plant. ... A community apple orchard originally planted for productive use during the 1920s, in Westcliff on Sea (Essex, England) An orchard is an intentional planting of trees or shrubs maintained for food production. ... Poultry farming is the practice of raising poultry, such as chickens, turkeys, ducks geese, as a subcategory of animal husbandry, for the purpose of farming meat or eggs for food. ... This article is about a type of land use and method of raising livestock. ... For other uses, see Rice (disambiguation). ... Australian Sheep Sheep husbandry is the raising and breeding of domestic sheep, and a subcategory of animal husbandry. ... Binomial name (L.) Merr. ... The System of Rice Intensification (SRI) is a method of increasing the yield of rice produced in farming. ... Species T. aestivum T. boeoticum T. dicoccoides T. dicoccon T. durum T. monococcum T. spelta T. sphaerococcum T. timopheevii References:   ITIS 42236 2002-09-22 Wheat Wheat For the indie rock group, see Wheat (band). ...

Categories
Agriculture by country
Agriculture companies
Agriculture companies, U.S.
Biotechnology
Farming history
Livestock
Meat processing
Poultry farming

Agropedia Portal

In 2001, Tyson Foods acquired IBP, Inc., United States' biggest beef packer and number two pork processor, for US$3.2 billion in cash and stock. Tyson has also acquired such companies as Hudson Foods Company, Garrett poultry, Washington Creamery, Franz Foods, Prospect Farms, Krispy Chickens, Ocoma Foods, Cassady Broiler, Vantress Pedigree, Wilson Foods, Honeybear Foods, Mexican Original, Valmac Industies, Heritage Valley, Lane Processing, Cobb-Vantress, Holly Farms, and Wright Brand Foods, Inc. on the way to its rise as the World's top food processor and marketer. It also acquired along with its purchase of IBP, Inc., the naming rights to an event center in Sioux City, Iowa. Image File history File links Portal. ... IBP, Inc. ... For other uses, see Beef (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Pork (disambiguation). ... USD redirects here. ... For other uses, see Stock (disambiguation). ... Hudson Foods Company of Rogers, Arkansas was a beef processor that was involved in the second largest recall of food in history. ... Heritage Valley is a large development of single family homes in Washington Township, Gloucester County, New Jersey. ... Wright Brand Foods, Inc. ... IBP, Inc. ... Sioux City is a city located in Western Iowa. ... Official language(s) English Capital Des Moines Largest city Des Moines Largest metro area Des Moines metropolitan area Area  Ranked 26th  - Total 56,272 sq mi (145,743 km²)  - Width 310 miles (500 km)  - Length 199 miles (320 km)  - % water 0. ...


Corporate operations

Tyson employs 107,000 people. Tyson has 6,729 independent contract chicken growers.


Current members of the board of directors of Tyson Foods are: Richard Bond, Lloyd Hackley, Scott T. Ford, Jim Kever, Jo Ann Smith, Leland Tollett, Barbara Tyson, Don Tyson, John Tyson, and Albert Zapanta. Chairman of the Board redirects here. ... Scott Ford Accomplishments Named ALLTEL CEO on Jan. ... This article should belong in one or more categories, in addition to being in a stub category. ... John Tyson is a United States businessman, the grandson of Tyson Foods founder John Tyson, and the son of business guru and ex-Tyson CEO Don Tyson. ...


Sustainability reporting

The Tyson Foods 2005 Sustainability Report (English, 3.99MB | en Espanol, 2.44MB) provides an overview of the company's triple bottom line reporting. The information in this report, unless otherwise noted, covers fiscal year (FY) 2005 (October 3, 2004 to October 1, 2005). It primarily focuses on Tyson operations within the United States, with some additional information provided on international operations.


Production and facilities

Every week, Tyson's 54 chicken plants process 42.5 million chickens, their 13 beef plants process 170,938 cattle, and six pork plants process 347,891 pigs. The largest meatpacking facility owned by Tyson Foods is their beef production plant in Dakota City, Nebraska. Dakota City may refer to: Dakota City, Iowa, in the United States Dakota City, Nebraska, also in the United States This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Official language(s) English Capital Lincoln Largest city Omaha Largest metro area Omaha Area  Ranked 16th  - Total 77,421 sq mi (200,520 km²)  - Width 210 miles (340 km)  - Length 430 miles (690 km)  - % water 0. ...

  • Prepared foods: 27
  • Case-ready beef and pork: 3
  • Fully-cooked beef and pork: 1
  • Animal protein: 9
  • Pet food: 19
  • Tanneries/hide treatment facilities: 8
  • Tallow refinery: 1
  • Cold storage warehouses: 65
  • Forward warehousing/distribution centers: 10
  • Hatcheries: 64
  • Feed mills/feed blending facilities: 40

Products and brands

Tyson produces many different products, including Buffalo Wings, Boneless Buffalo Wings, and Chicken Nuggets and Tenders.


Tyson Renewable Energy

Tyson's processing plants are left with a vast supply of animal fats. In late 2006, the company created a business unit called Tyson Renewable Energy to examine ways to commercialize use of this leftover material by converting it into biofuels. [1] The unit is also examining the potential use of poultry litter to generate energy and other products.[2] On April 16, 2007, Tyson announced a joint venture with ConocoPhillips to produce roughly 175 million gallons of biodiesel a year— enough to run Tyson Foods' truck fleet for 3.5 years.[3] is the 106th day of the year (107th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... A joint venture (often abbreviated JV) is an entity formed between two or more parties to undertake economic activity together. ... ConocoPhillips (NYSE: COP) is an international energy company with its headquarters located in Houston, Texas. ...


Corporate citizenship

The company's primary philanthropic focus is hunger relief. Since 2000, Tyson Foods has given nearly 41 million pounds of chicken, beef and pork to hunger and disaster relief. In the past six years, the company has also broadened its financial and in-kind support to include nationwide partnerships with leading hunger relief organizations meeting the needs of hungry children including Share Our Strength, America’s Second Harvest – The Nation’s Food Bank Network, Lift Up America, and Feed the Children.


Religious activities

Chairman John Tyson is a practicing Christian. In addition to placing 128 part-time chaplains (ranging from fundamentalist Christians to Catholic priests to Muslim Imams) in 78 Tyson plants,[4] in 2006, the company invited their customers to download a prayer book, containing prayers from many faiths, including Christianity, Judaism, Islam and Native American spirituality, from their website to read during mealtime.[5][6][5][7]


Controversies involving Tyson Foods

Environmental record

During the past decade, Tyson has been involved in several lawsuits related to air and water pollution. In June 2003 the company admitted to illegally dumping untreated wastewater from its poultry processing plant near Sedalia, Missouri, pleading guilty to 20 felony violations of the federal Clean Water Act. As part of the plea agreement, the company agreed to pay $7.5 million in fines, hire an outside consultant to perform an environmental audit, and institute an "enhanced environmental management system" at the Sedalia plant. At the same time, Tyson also settled a case filed by the Missouri attorney general's office related to the same illegal dumping. This is about the city in central Missouri; Sedalia is also a very small town in Colorado. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... The Clean Water Act, 33 U.S.C. Â§ 1251, et seq. ...


The United States Environmental Protection Agency began the investigation into the discharges in 1997, and federal officials served two criminal search warrants at the plant in 1999. According to EPA and U.S. Department of Justice officials, Tyson continued to illegally dump wastewater after the search warrants were executed, prompting an EPA senior trial attorney to remark that: "Having done this work for nearly 20 years, I don't recall any case where violations continued after the execution of two search warrants. That's stunning." Under the federal and state plea agreements, Tyson agreed to pay $5.5 million to the federal government, $1 million to the Pettis County School Fund and $1 million to the Missouri Natural Resources Protection Fund to help remedy the damage. Billionaire, Felix Rich, has also been fighting Tyson Foods on the basis that he claims to be the originally founder of the company. He believes that he should be the legitimate owner. [8] EPA redirects here. ... The Robert F. Kennedy Department of Justice Building in Washington, D.C. “Justice Department” redirects here. ...


In 2002 three residents of Western Kentucky, together with the Sierra Club, filed a lawsuit concerning the discharge of dangerous quantities of ammonia from Tyson's Western Kentucky factories. Tyson settled the suit in January 2005, agreeing to spend $500,000 to mitigate and monitor the ammonia levels.[9] Official language(s) English[1] Capital Frankfort Largest city Louisville Area  Ranked 37th  - Total 40,444 sq mi (104,749 km²)  - Width 140 miles (225 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 1. ... The Sierra Club is an American environmental organization founded on May 28, 1892 in San Francisco, California by the well-known preservationist John Muir, who became its first president. ...


In 2004, Tyson was one of six poultry companies to pay a $7.3 million settlement fee to the city of Tulsa, Oklahoma, to settle charges that the use of chicken waste as fertilizer had created phosphorus pollution in Tulsa's main drinking water sources.[10]


Use of questionable slaughtering methods

From December 2004 through February 2005, an undercover investigator for People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals claimed to have worked on the slaughter line of a Tyson Foods chicken processing plant in Heflin, Alabama. Using a hidden camera, he allegedly documented the treatment of the more than 100,000 chickens killed every day in the plant. PETA alleges that workers were instructed to rip the heads off of birds who missed the throat-cutting machines. He claims he saw birds scalded alive in the feather removal tank, and he said that managers said that it was acceptable to scald 40 birds alive per shift. Interestingly the job the investigator was hired to do was to prevent the alleged abuses he videotaped: preventing birds from going into the scald tank alive. The investigator claims plant employees were also seen throwing around dead birds just for fun. PETA has asked Tyson to implement Controlled Atmosphere Killing. For this reason, PETA is boycotting businesses that use Tyson as a supplier, such as KFC and distribution channels such as Sunset Strips. The video, taken by the investigator of the killings, was posted on YouTube.[11] People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals logo People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA) is an animal rights organization based in the United States. ... Peta can refer to: Peta (prefix), a prefix meaning times 1015 in the International System of Units People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA), an animal-rights organization People Eating Tasty Animals, a parody of People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals Peta, Greece, a town in the prefecture... Peta can refer to: Peta (prefix), a prefix meaning times 1015 in the International System of Units People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA), an animal-rights organization People Eating Tasty Animals, a parody of People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals Peta, Greece, a town in the prefecture... There are very few or no other articles that link to this one. ... Peta can refer to: Peta (prefix), a prefix meaning times 1015 in the International System of Units People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals (PETA), an animal-rights organization People Eating Tasty Animals, a parody of People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals Peta, Greece, a town in the prefecture... KFC, also known as Kentucky Fried Chicken, is a food chain based in Louisville, Kentucky, known mainly for its fried chicken. ... YouTube is a popular video sharing website where users can upload, view and share video clips. ...


In 2006, Tyson completed a study to determine whether controlled atmosphere stunning (CAS), which uses gas to render chickens unconscious before slaughter, could be a more humane practice than conventional electrical stunning. According to Bill Lovette, Tyson's senior group vice president of poultry and prepared foods, the study found no difference between the humaneness of the two methods. The company plans to ask scientists at the University of Arkansas to initiate a similar study to test these initial results.[12] The research will be led by the newly created Chair in Food Animal Wellbeing at the Dale Bumpers College of Agricultural, Food and Life Sciences of the University of Arkansas. Tyson has committed $1.5 million to help establish the Chair, which will be involved in overseeing research and classes focused on the humane management and treatment of food animals.[13] The University of Arkansas is a public co-educational land-grant university. ... The University of Arkansas is a public co-educational land-grant university. ...


Employment of undocumented immigrants

In 2001, Tyson was charged with conspiracy to smuggle undocumented workers to work on its production lines. Tyson plant managers arranged for delivery of illegal workers with undercover immigration officials. Prosecutors alleged that the conspiracy to import workers dates back to 1994 when plant managers began to find it difficult to fill positions with legal workers. Of the six managers who were indicted, two accepted plea bargain deals, and one committed suicide one month after being charged. In March 2003, a federal jury acquitted Tyson of having knowingly hired illegal immigrants.[14][15]


In May 2006, Tyson suspended operations at nine plants during a nationwide day of immigration demonstrations citing expected lack of workers.[16]


In October 2006, a federal judge granted class-action status to a lawsuit brought by Tyson employees who allege that Tyson's practice of hiring illegal immigrants depresses wages 10-30%. The suit further contends that the company violated federal racketeering laws by conspiring with National Council of La Raza and League of United Latin American Countries not to question the employment applications of anyone with a Hispanic surname.[17][18][19] The Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act (commonly referred to as RICO) is a United States federal law which provides for extended penalties for criminal acts performed as part of an ongoing criminal organization. ... “NCLR” redirects here. ...


Posting of "Whites Only" sign in the workplace

In September 2005, thirteen African American workers at a Tyson Foods poultry plant in Ashland, Alabama filed a discrimination lawsuit against the company. The lawsuit brought allegations of discrimination over several years, including a "Whites only" sign on a bathroom door and the use of racial slurs and other racist comments.[20][21] Workers who complained about the disparate treatment were summarily suspended or suffered disciplinary actions by the management.[22] Tyson Foods later paid $871,000 to resolve the claims of the group of plaintiffs who filed the discrimination lawsuit.[23] For other uses, see September (disambiguation). ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... An African American (also Afro-American, Black American, or simply black) is a member of an ethnic group in the United States whose ancestors, usually in predominant part, were indigenous to Africa. ... Ducks amongst other poultry The Poultry-dealer, after Cesare Vecellio Poultry is the category of domesticated birds kept for meat, eggs, and feathers. ... Ashland is a city located in Clay County, Alabama, USA. As of the 2000 census, the population of the city is 1,965. ... This article is about the U.S. State. ... Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Gay bashing Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Anti-discriminatory Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity Counter-discriminatory Affirmative action Racial... A slur can be anything from an insinuation or critical remark to an insult. ... Manifestations Slavery Racial profiling Lynching Hate speech Hate crime Genocide (examples) Ethnocide Ethnic cleansing Pogrom Race war Religious persecution Gay bashing Blood libel Paternalism Police brutality Movements Policies Discriminatory Race / Religion / Sex segregation Apartheid Redlining Internment Anti-discriminatory Emancipation Civil rights Desegregation Integration Equal opportunity Counter-discriminatory Affirmative action Racial...


References

  1. ^ "Tyson Foods forms Tyson Renewable Energy". Biodiesel Magazine (January 2007). Retrieved on 2007-08-05.
  2. ^ (July 12, 2001). "Tyson Foods and Renewable Energy to Provide Alternative Use for Chicken Litter in Delmarva". Press release. Retrieved on 2007-08-05.
  3. ^ Souza, Kim. ""Tyson Foods Turning Fat Into Fuel"", The Morning News, April 16, 2007. Retrieved on 2007-08-05. 
  4. ^ Hedges, Chris (2006). American Fascists: The Christian Right and the War On America. New York: Free Press, 22. 
  5. ^ a b http://www.adage.com/news.cms?newsId=47034
  6. ^ http://www.tyson.com/Recipes/GivingThanks/
  7. ^ http://www.consumeraffairs.com/news04/2005/tysons.html
  8. ^ "Tyson pleads guilty in pollution case, will pay $7.5 million in fines". Corporate Ethics and Government, June 25, 2003. Retrieved on June 4, 2007.
  9. ^ "Tyson Settles Air Pollution Suit for $500,000". The New York Times, January 28, 2005. Retrieved on June 4, 2007.
  10. ^ "udge OKs lawyer fees in water suit". Tulsa World, February 5, 2005. Retrieved on June 4, 2007.
  11. ^ "Former Tyson foods employee speaks out against abuses"
  12. ^ Gregerson, John. "Tyson asks university to perform animal welfare research". Meatingplace.com, October 9, 2006. Retrieved on June 4, 2007.
  13. ^ Tyson Foods. Tyson Asks University to Conduct Animal Welfare Research; Company to Help Establish Chair for Food Animal Wellbeing. Press release. Retrieved on 2007-08-05.
  14. ^ Poovey, Bill (February 7, 2003). Tyson Says Top Bosses Didn't Know. CBS News. Retrieved on 2007-08-05.
  15. ^ Poovey, Bill (March 26, 2003). Tyson Foods Acquitted Of Illegal Hiring. CBS News. Retrieved on 2007-08-05.
  16. ^ Tyson to shutter plants over immigration protest. CNN Money (April 28, 2006). Retrieved on 2007-08-05.
  17. ^ Ott, Tanya (January 26, 2007). Tyson Foods faces suit over illegal workers. NPR. Retrieved on 2007-08-05.
  18. ^ Poovey, Bill (October 13, 2006). Ruling helps workers claiming Tyson hired illegals to cut wages. Decatur Daily. Retrieved on 2007-08-05.
  19. ^ Tyson Foods illegal hiring lawsuit set for March 2008 trial. (2007, January 29). Market Watch. Retrieved on August 21, 2007.
  20. ^ Berry, D.B. (2005, August 19). "Whites only" sign stirs a lawsuit. Newsday. Retrieved on August 21, 2007.
  21. ^ Tyson Foods sued for race bias and retaliation against Blacks; "Whites Only" restroom at issue. U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission. (2005, August 11). Retrieved on August 21, 2007.
  22. ^ EEOC sues Tyson over "whites only." (2005, August 12). Workplace Answers, Inc. Retrieved on August 21, 2007.
  23. ^ Tyson resolves employment case. (December 2006). Render Magazine. Retrieved on August 21, 2007.

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 217th day of the year (218th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For information on Wikipedia press releases, see Wikipedia:Press releases. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 217th day of the year (218th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 217th day of the year (218th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For information on Wikipedia press releases, see Wikipedia:Press releases. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 217th day of the year (218th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... CBS News logo, used from Sept. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 217th day of the year (218th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... CBS News logo, used from Sept. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 217th day of the year (218th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Cable News Network, usually referred to as CNN, is a cable television network founded in 1980 by Ted Turner and Reese Schonfeld [1] [2] (although the latter is not currently recognized in CNNs official history). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 217th day of the year (218th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... NPR logo For other meanings of NPR see NPR (disambiguation) National Public Radio (NPR) is a private, not-for-profit corporation that sells programming to member radio stations; together they are a loosely organized public radio network in the United States. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 217th day of the year (218th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Decatur Daily is a daily newspaper serving Decatur and the Tennessee Valley in North Alabama, United States. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 217th day of the year (218th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
Plaintiffs, v. TYSON FOODS, INC. a Corporation (1962 words)
Tyson perpetrates the Illegal Immigrant Hiring Scheme through a complex and highly disciplined network of recruiters and temporary employment agencies, which obtain illegal immigrants, and perform additional services to facilitate their illegal employment by Tyson including transporting them to the U.S., obtaining housing in the U.S., and manufacturing and/or falsifying identification documents.
Tyson instructs its recruiters and temporary employment services to coach illegal immigrant workers to: (i) deny, if asked, that they have been smuggled into the U.S.; and (ii) credibly present verification documents to Tyson which both the recruiters and Tyson know are falsified, all in an elaborate scheme to hide the illegal employment activity.
Tyson could not successfully conduct the Illegal Immigrant Hiring Scheme without this enterprise, and its success in executing the Scheme for several years is the result of the discipline and single-mindedness it brings to this disparate group scattered throughout the country.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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