FACTOID # 10: The total number of state executions in 2005 was 60: 19 in Texas and 41 elsewhere. The racial split was 19 Black and 41 White.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
RELATED ARTICLES
People who viewed "Tyrol" also viewed:
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Tyrol
Grafschaft Tirol
County of Tyrol
State of the Holy Roman Empire, then
Kronland of Cisleithanian Austria
Bavaria
1140 – 1919
 
Bolzano-Bozen
 

Coat of arms of the Counts of Tyrol of Tyrol This is the main page for the list of states which were part of the Holy Roman Empire, as alphabetized in the adjacent template, at any time within the empires existence between 962 and 1806. ... The extent of the Holy Roman Empire around 1630, superimposed over modern European state borders Capital None Language(s) Latin, German, many others Religion Roman Catholicism Government Monarchy Emperor  - 962–967 Otto I  - 973–983 Otto II  - 996–1002 Otto III  - 1014– 1024 Henry II  - 1027–1039 Conrad II  - 1046... Lanškroun is a town and municipality in the Czech Republic, on the border between former provinces of Bohemia and Moravia. ... Cisleithania (German: Cisleithanien) was the name of the Austrian part of Austria-Hungary, the Dual monarchy created in 1867 and dissolved in 1918. ... The following is a list of rulers of Bavaria: Dukes of Bavaria, 889-1623 Liutpolding Dynasty Liutpold 889-907 Arnulf the Bad 907-937 Eberhard 937 Berthold 938-947 Liudolfing ( Ottonian) Dynasty Henry I 947-955 Henry II the Quarrelsome 955-976 Otto I 976-982 Liutpolding Dynasty Henry III... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Events Henry Jasomirgott was made count palatine of the Rhine. ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... Image File history File links Tirol_Dienstflagge_(Variation). ... Tyrol (German: , Czech: ) is a state or Bundesland, located in the west of Austria. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The Autonomous Province of Bolzano-Bozen[1][2] (Italian: ; German: ; Ladin: Provinzia autonòma de Balsan), also called Alto Adige (Italian: Alto Adige; German: Hochetsch or Oberetsch; Ladin: Adesc Aut[3] ) or South Tyrol (Italian: Sudtirolo; German: Südtirol; Ladin: Sudtirol), is an autonomous province of Italy. ... Image File history File links Escut_Trentino. ... Trento (Italian: Provincia autonoma di Trento, German: Autonome Provinz Trient) is an autonomous province in the autonomous Trentino-South Tyrol region of Italy. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ...


Coat of arms of the Counts of Tyrol

Location of Tyrol
Austria-Hungary in 1914, showing Tirol–Vorarlberg as the left-most province, coloured cream
Capital Meran (Merano), until 1848
Government Principality
Historical era Middle Ages
 - Created County 1140
 - Bequeathed to Habsburgs 1363 or 1369
 - Joined Council of Princes 1582
 - Trent, Tyrol and Vorarlberg
    ceded to Bavaria and Italy
 
1805
 - Restored to Austria 1814
 - Partitioned by
    Treaty of St Germain
 
September 10, 1919

Tyrol, or Tirol, is a historical region in Western Central Europe, which includes the Austrian state of Tyrol (consisting of North Tyrol and East Tyrol) and the Italian region known as Trentino-Alto Adige/Südtirol. Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 570 pixelsFull resolution (1000 × 713 pixel, file size: 84 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Austria-Hungary, also known as the Dual monarchy (or: the k. ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Throughout the world there are many cities that were once national capitals but no longer have that status because the country ceased to exist, the capital was moved, or the capital city was renamed. ... Merano (Italian, now most common in English; German: Meran, also used in English; Ladin: Meran; Archaic (857 AD): Mairania; Latin: Merona; many of the regions Italian languages/dialects use Meran), is a town in the province of Bolzano-Bozen, Italy. ... Year 1848 (MDCCCXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... A principality is a monarchical feudatory or sovereign state, ruled or reigned over by a Monarch with the title of prince or princess (a synonym is princedom) or (in the widest sense) a Monarch with another title within the generic use of the term prince. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... Graf is a German noble title equal in rank to a count (derived from the Latin Comes, with a history of its own) or a British earl (an Anglo-Saxon title derived from the Viking title Jarl). ... Flag of the Habsburg Monarchy; also used as the flag of the Austrian Empire until the Ausgleich of 1867. ... Centuries: 13th century - 14th century - 15th century Decades: 1310s 1320s 1330s 1340s 1350s - 1360s - 1370s 1380s 1390s 1400s 1410s Years: 1358 1359 1360 1361 1362 - 1363 - 1364 1365 1366 1367 1368 See also: 1363 state leaders Events Magnus II, King of Sweden, is deposed by Albert of Mecklenburg. ... Events King Charles V of France renounces the treaty of Brétigny and war is declared between France and England. ... The Reichstag (German for Imperial Diet) was the parliament of the Holy Roman Empire, the North German Confederation, and of Germany until 1945. ... Gregorian Calendar switch: Year 1582 involved conversion to the Gregorian calendar. ... The Bishopric of Trent is a former independent state of Northern Italy which was created in 1027 and existed until 1802, when it was absorbed into Habsburg territory in the Holy Roman Empire. ... Vorarlberg is the westernmost state (Land) of Austria. ... The Peace of Pressburg (also called Peace of Bratislava) is the name of 4 peace agreements concluded in the present-day town of Bratislava. ... The geographic region and Free State of Bavaria (German: Freistaat Bayern), with an area of 70,553 km² (27,241 square miles) and 12. ... 1805 was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... The Congress of Vienna was a conference between ambassadors from the major powers in Europe that was chaired by the Austrian statesman Klemens Wenzel von Metternich and held in Vienna, Austria, from late September, 1814, to June 9, 1815. ... Year 1814 (MDCCCXIV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... The Treaty of Saint-Germain-en-Laye, was signed on 10 September 1919 by the victorious Allies of World War I on the one hand and by the new Republic of Austria on the other. ... is the 253rd day of the year (254th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Tyrol (German: ) can refer to: Tyrol (historical) - a shire; a state of the Holy Roman Empire which came under Austrian Habsburg rule in 1363 and later was part of Austria-Hungary Tyrol - a federal state of the Federal Republic of Austria Bolzano-Bozen (Alto Adige/Südtirol) - a northern Italian... Central Europe The Alpine Countries and the Visegrád Group (Political map, 2004) Central Europe is the region lying between the variously and vaguely defined areas of Eastern and Western Europe. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Tyrol (German: , Czech: ) is a state or Bundesland, located in the west of Austria. ... North Tyrol is the main part of the the Austrian state of Tyrol, located in the western part of the country. ... East Tyrol is an exclave of the Austrian state of Tyrol, sharing no border with North Tyrol, the main part of the state. ... The Regions of Italy were granted a degree of regional autonomy in the 1948 constitution, which states that the constitutions role is: to recognize, protect and promote local autonomy, to ensure that services at the State level are as decentralized as possible, and to adapt the principles and laws... Trentino-Alto Adige/Südtirol[1] (Italian: Trentino-Alto Adige; German: Trentino-Südtirol; Ladin: Trentin-Adesc Aut, also Trentin-Sudtirol [2][3]) is an autonomous region in Northern Italy. ...

Contents

Prehistory

In prehistory the region was home to a series of autoctonous cultures occupying roughly the area of the later county of Tyrol. The most prominent are the late Bronze Age Laugen-Melaun/Luco-Meluno and Iron Age Fritzens-Sanzeno cultures.
The Laugen-Melaun/Luco-Meluno culture, named after two important archaeological sites near the modern-day town of Brixen/Bressanone in South Tyrol, appears in the 14th century BC in the area of todays South Tyrol and Trentino, while the northern part of Tyrol comes under the influence of the Urnfield Culture[1]. It is characterized by a particular type of richly decorated pottery, while the metal-working is strongly influenced by adjacent cultures. The people of the Laugen-Melaun/Luco-Meluno culture cremated the dead and placed their ashes in urns, and worshipped their gods in sanctuaries sometimes placed in remote areas, on mountain-tops or close to water.
Around 500 BC the Fritzens-Sanzeno-culture, also known as culture of the Rhaetics, after the goddess Rhaetia who according to roman authors was the main deity of the people inhabiting the region, succeeds both the Laugen-Melaun/Luco-Meluno culture of the southern and the Urnfield culture of the northern part of Tyrol [2]. As in the preceding culture, the richly ornamented pottery is very characteristic, while many aspects such as the metal-working, burial customs and religion are strongly influenced by its neighbours, mainly the Etruscans and Celts. Nonetheless, the Fritzens-Sanzeno-people possessed important cultural traits which clearly distinguish them from adjacent groups, such as the typical mountain-sanctuaries already in use during the time of the Laugen-Melaun/Luco-Meluno-Culture, certain types of fibulae, bronze armor, and an own alphabet derived from the etruscan. The Bronze Age is a period in a civilizations development when the most advanced metalworking has developed the techniques of smelting copper from natural outcroppings and alloys it to cast bronze. ... Iron Age Axe found on Gotland This article is about the archaeological period known as the Iron Age, for the mythological Iron Age see Iron Age (mythology). ... Brixen am Eisack (German) or Bressanone (Italian) is a town in the autonomous province of South Tyrol (part of the autonomous region Trentino-South Tyrol) in northern Italy. ... The Autonomous Province of Bolzano-Bozen[1][2] (Italian: Provincia autonoma di Bolzano; German: Autonome Provinz Bozen; Ladin: Provinzia autonòma de Balsan), also called Alto Adige/Südtirol (Italian: Alto Adige; German: Südtirol; Ladin: Adesc Aut[3][4] or Sudtirol; English: Alto Adige or South Tyrol), is an... // Overview Events 1344 BCE – 1322 BCE -- Beginning of Hittite empire Rise of the Urnfield culture Significant persons Akhenaten, Pharaoh of Egypt Tutankhamun, Pharaoh of Egypt Suppiliulima, king of the Hittites Moses Inventions, discoveries, introductions Template:DecadesAndYearsBCE Category: ‪14th century BCE‬ ... Trentino-Alto Adige or Trentino-South Tyrol (in German: Trentino-Südtirol, in Italian: Trentino-Alto Adige) is an autonomous region in northern Italy. ... Tyrol (German: , Czech: ) is a state or Bundesland, located in the west of Austria. ... The Urnfield culture of central European culture is dated roughly between 1300 BC and 750 BC. The name describes the custom of cremating the dead and placing them in cemeteries. ... Maya funerary urn For the computing term, see Uniform Resource Name. ... Centuries: 7th century BC - 6th century BC - 5th century BC Decades: 550s BC - 540s BC - 530s BC - 520s BC - 510s BC - 500s BC - 490s BC - 480s BC - 470s BC - 460s BC - 450s BC Events and Trends 509 BC - Foundation of the Roman Republic 508 BC - Office of pontifex maximus created... Raetia as province of the Roman Empire, ca. ... Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... The Etruscan civilization existed in Etruria and the Po valley in the northern part of what is now Italy, prior to the formation of the Roman Republic. ... This article is about the European people. ... Fibulae are ancient brooches. ...


Antiquity

The Roman Empire ca. 120 AD
The Roman Empire ca. 120 AD

In 15 BCE the region was conquered by the romans and its northern and eastern part where incorporated into the Roman Empire as the province of Raetia and Noricum respectively, while the part south of and including the area around the modern day cities of Meran/Merano and Bozen/Bolzano became part of Italia's Regio X. As in the rest of Europe, the Roman era left deep marks in the culture and in the language (see: Rhaeto-Romance languages).
According to a more recent and controversial theory, the Rhaeto-Romance languages are autoctonous and date back to before the roman conquest (see: Paleolithic Continuity Theory). Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1218x730, 331 KB) Summary Karte ist erstellt von mir - Vorlage Demis http://www. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1218x730, 331 KB) Summary Karte ist erstellt von mir - Vorlage Demis http://www. ... For other uses, see 15 (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ... The Roman Empire ca. ... Noricum in ancient geography was a celtic kingdom in Austria and later a province of the Roman Empire. ... Merano (Italian, now most common in English; German: Meran, also used in English; Ladin: Meran; Archaic (857 AD): Mairania; Latin: Merona; many of the regions Italian languages/dialects use Meran), is a town in the province of Bolzano-Bozen, Italy. ... Bolzano (Italian Bolzano; German: Bozen, archaic Botzen; Ladin: Bulsan; Latin: Bauzanum; many of the regions Italian languages/dialects use Bolzan or Bulsan) is a city in the Trentino-Alto Adige/Südtirol region of Italy. ... Romansh (also spelled Rumantsch, Romansch or Romanche) is any of the various Rhaetian languages spoken in Switzerland. ... The Paleolithic Continuity Theory (PCT) suggests that the Indo-European languages originated in or nearby Europe and have existed there since the Paleolithic. ...


Middle Ages and early modern era

From the 6th to the 9th century, the region was settled by the Bavarii and the Langobards. As part of the Frankish Empire and later the Holy Roman Empire the region had a strategic importance as a bridgehead to Italy as the southern part of the duchy of Bavaria.
Tyrol, incorporated into the southern part of the Duchy of Bavaria during the Early Middle Ages, consisted largely of ecclesiastical holdings of the Bishops of Brixen and Trento. Over the centuries, the Counts residing in Castle Tyrol, near Merano, extended their territory over much of the region and came to surpass the power of the bishops, who were nominally their feudal lords. Later counts came to hold much of their territory directly from the Holy Roman Emperor. The Meinhardinger family, originating in Gorizia, held not only Tyrol and Gorizia, but for a time also the Duchy of Carinthia. The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... The early modern period is a term used by historians to refer to the period in Western Europe and its first colonies, between the Middle Ages and modern society. ... The 6th century is the period from 501 - 600 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Christian Era. ... As a means of recording the passage of time the 9th century was the century that lasted from 801 to 900. ... Bavarii was a large and powerful tribe which emerged late in Teutonic tribal times, in what is now the Czech Republic (Bohemia). ... The Lombards (Latin Langobardi, from which the alternative name Longobards found in older English texts), were a Germanic people originally from Scandinavia that entered the late Roman Empire. ... The Frankish Empire was the territory of the Franks, from the 5th to the 10th centuries, from 481 ruled by Clovis I of the Merovingian Dynasty, the first king of all the Franks. ... The extent of the Holy Roman Empire around 1630, superimposed over modern European state borders Capital None Language(s) Latin, German, many others Religion Roman Catholicism Government Monarchy Emperor  - 962–967 Otto I  - 973–983 Otto II  - 996–1002 Otto III  - 1014– 1024 Henry II  - 1027–1039 Conrad II  - 1046... For other uses, see Bavaria (disambiguation). ... It has been suggested that Bavaria#Historical_Buildings be merged into this article or section. ... Justinians wife Theodora and her retinue, in a 6th century mosaic from the Basilica of San Vitale in Ravenna. ... Brixen (Italian: Bressanone; German: Brixen; Ladin: Porsenù or Persenon; Latin: Brixino; also known as Pressena (827 AD), Prichsna, Brixina) is a town in the Province of Bolzano in the Italian region Trentino-Alto Adige/Südtirol. ... Trento (Italian: Trento; German: Trient; Latin: Tridentum; Note that many of the regions Italian languages/dialects use Trent or Trènt) is an Italian city located in the Adige River valley in Trentino-Alto Adige/Südtirol. ... Merano (Italian, now most common in English; German: Meran, also used in English; Ladin: Meran; Archaic (857 AD): Mairania; Latin: Merona; many of the regions Italian languages/dialects use Meran), is a town in the province of Bolzano-Bozen, Italy. ... Feudalism comes from the Late Latin word feudum, itself borrowed from a Germanic root *fehu, a commonly used term in the Middle Ages which means fief, or land held under certain obligations by feodati. ... The Holy Roman Emperor was, with some variation, the ruler of the Holy Roman Empire, the predecessor of modern Germany, during its existence from the 10th century until its collapse in 1806. ... Gorizia (Slovenian: Gorica, German: Görz, Friulian: Gurize) is a small town at the foot of the Alps, in northeastern Italy, on the border with Slovenia. ... Coat of arms of the Dukes of Carinthia, today state coat The Duchy of Carinthia (German language: Kärnten, Slovenian: KoroÅ¡ka) was a duchy of the Holy Roman Empire until its dissolution in 1806, and a crownland of Austria-Hungary until it dissolved in 1918. ...


1363/1369 the Wittelsbach released the country for Habsburg when Margarete Maultasch, lacking any descendants to succeed her, bequeathed Tyrol to Duke Rudolph IV of House of Habsburg. From that time onwards, Tyrol was ruled by various lines of the Habsburg family, who held the title of the Count of Tyrol (see List of rulers of Austria). Centuries: 13th century - 14th century - 15th century Decades: 1310s 1320s 1330s 1340s 1350s - 1360s - 1370s 1380s 1390s 1400s 1410s Years: 1358 1359 1360 1361 1362 - 1363 - 1364 1365 1366 1367 1368 See also: 1363 state leaders Events Magnus II, King of Sweden, is deposed by Albert of Mecklenburg. ... Events King Charles V of France renounces the treaty of Brétigny and war is declared between France and England. ... The Wittelsbach family is an European royal family and a German dynasty from Bavaria. ... Flag of the Habsburg Monarchy; also used as the flag of the Austrian Empire until the Ausgleich of 1867. ... Margarete Maultasch (1318 – October 3, 1369 in Vienna) was the last Countess of Tyrol from the Meinhardiner dynasty. ... Rudolf IV of Austria. ... Flag of the Habsburg Monarchy; also used as the flag of the Austrian Empire until the Ausgleich of 1867. ... This is a list of margraves, dukes, archdukes, and emperors of Austria. ...


The red eagle in Tyrol's coat of arms is derived from the red Brandenburg eagle at the time when Louis V, Duke of Bavaria and Margarete Maultasch governed Brandenburg as well.   (Lower Sorbian: Bramborska; Upper Sorbian: Braniborska) is one of Germanys sixteen Bundesländer (federal states). ... Louis V, Duke of Bavaria, called the Brandenburger (May 1315 – 18 September 1361 in Zorneding near Munich) (German: Ludwig V der Brandenburger, Herzog von Bayern, Markgraf von Brandenburg) was Duke of Bavaria, Margrave of Brandenburg and Count of Tyrol. ... Margarete Maultasch (1318 – October 3, 1369 in Vienna) was the last Countess of Tyrol from the Meinhardiner dynasty. ...


Napoleonic Wars and 19th century

Following defeat by Napoleon in 1805, Austria was forced to cede Tyrol to the Kingdom of Bavaria in the Peace of Pressburg. Tyrol as a part of Bavaria became a member of the Confederation of the Rhine in 1806. The Tyroleans, known to be an obstinate and proud people, rose up against the Bavarian authority and succeeded twice in defeating Bavarian and French troops trying to retake the country. Austria lost the war of the Fifth Coalition against France, and got even harsher terms in the Treaty of Schönbrunn in 1809. Often glorified as Tyrol's national hero, Andreas Hofer, the leader of the uprising, was executed in 1810 in Mantua, having lost a third and final battle against the French and Bavarian forces. Tyrol remained divided under Bavarian and Italian authority for another four years before being reunified and returned to Austria following the decisions at the Congress of Vienna in 1814. Integrated into the Austrian Empire, from 1867 onwards it was a Kronland [Crown Land] of Cisleithania, the western half of Austria-Hungary. Combatants Austria[1] Portugal Prussia[1] Russia[2] Sicily  Spain[3]  Sweden United Kingdom[4] French Empire Holland Italy Naples [5] Duchy of Warsaw Bavaria[6] Saxony[7] Denmark-Norway [8] Commanders Archduke Charles Prince Schwarzenberg Karl Mack von Leiberich Gebhard von Blücher Duke of Brunswick â€  Prince of Hohenlohe... For other uses, see Napoleon (disambiguation). ... The Free State of Bavaria (German: Bayern or Freistaat Bayern), with an area of 70,553 km² (27,241 square miles) and 12. ... The Peace of Pressburg (also called Peace of Bratislava) is the name of 4 peace agreements concluded in the present-day town of Bratislava. ... The Confederation of the Rhine in 1812 Capital Frankfurt Political structure Confederation Protector Napoleon I Primate  - 1806-1813 Karl von Dalberg  - 1813 Eugène de Beauharnais Historical era Napoleonic Wars  - Formation 12 July, 1806  - Collapse 19 October, 1813 The Confederation of the Rhine or Rhine Confederation (German: ; French: ) lasted from... The Fifth Coalition was an alliance between the Austrian Empire and the United Kingdom, formed in 1809 to fight Napoleons French Empire. ... The Treaty of Schönbrunn was signed between France and Austria in 1809, ending the war of the Fifth Coalition during the Napoleonic Wars, at the beautiful castle Schloss Schönbrunn, which can be visited today as a tourist site. ... Andreas Hofer on an Austrian stamp. ... 1810 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Mantua (in Italian Mantova, in the local dialect of Emiliano-Romagnolo language Mantua) is an important city in Lombardy, Italy and capital of the province with the same name. ... The Congress of Vienna was a conference between ambassadors from the major powers in Europe that was chaired by the Austrian statesman Klemens Wenzel von Metternich and held in Vienna, Austria, from late September, 1814, to June 9, 1815. ... Year 1814 (MDCCCXIV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... Anthem Volkshymne (Peoples Anthem) The Austrian Empire Capital Vienna Language(s) German Hungarian Romanian Czech Slovakian Slovenian Croatian Serbian Italian Polish Ruthenian Religion Roman Catholic Government Monarchy History  - Established 1804  - Ausgleich 1867 The Crown of the Austrian Emperor The Austrian Empire (German: ) was a modern era successor empire founded... Cisleithania (German: Cisleithanien) was the name of the Austrian part of Austria-Hungary, the Dual monarchy created in 1867 and dissolved in 1918. ... Austria-Hungary, also known as the Dual monarchy (or: the k. ...


World War I and its aftermath

The County of Tyrol after 1918      State of Tyrol (Austria)      Province of Bolzano-Bozen (Italy)      Province of Trento (Italy)
The County of Tyrol after 1918
     State of Tyrol (Austria)      Province of Bolzano-Bozen (Italy)      Province of Trento (Italy)

The front line during WWI followed mostly the historical border of Tyrol, which ran right through the highest mountains of the Alps. The ensuing front became known as the "War in ice and snow", as troops occupied the highest mountains and glaciers all year long. Twelve metres (40 feet) of snow were a usual occurrence during the winter of 1915–1916 and tens of thousands of soldiers disappeared in avalanches. The remains of these soldiers are still being uncovered today. The Italian Alpini, as well as their Austrian counterparts (Kaiserjäger, Standschützen and Landesschützen) and the German Alpenkorps occupied every hill and mountain top and began to carve extensive fortifications and military quarters, even drilling tunnels inside the mountains and deep into glaciers, like at Marmolada. Guns were dragged by hundreds of troops on mountains up to 3,890 m (12,760 ft). Streets, cable cars, mountain railways and walkways through the steepest of walls were built. “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 575 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1502 × 1565 pixel, file size: 266 KB, MIME type: image/png) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 575 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (1502 × 1565 pixel, file size: 266 KB, MIME type: image/png) File historyClick on a date/time to view the file as it appeared at that time. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Tyrol (German: , Czech: ) is a state or Bundesland, located in the west of Austria. ... In Italy, a province (in Italian: provincia) is an administrative division of intermediate level between municipality (comune) and region (regione). ... The Autonomous Province of Bolzano-Bozen[1][2] (Italian: ; German: ; Ladin: Provinzia autonòma de Balsan), also called Alto Adige (Italian: Alto Adige; German: Hochetsch or Oberetsch; Ladin: Adesc Aut[3] ) or South Tyrol (Italian: Sudtirolo; German: Südtirol; Ladin: Sudtirol), is an autonomous province of Italy. ... In Italy, a province (in Italian: provincia) is an administrative division of intermediate level between municipality (comune) and region (regione). ... Trento (Italian: Provincia autonoma di Trento, German: Autonome Provinz Trient) is an autonomous province in the autonomous Trentino-South Tyrol region of Italy. ... A Himalayan avalanche near Mount Everest. ... The Alpini are a highly decorated elite infantry corps of the Italian Army. ... The Alpenkorps was a provisional mountain unit of division size formed by the Imperial German Army during World War I. It was considered by the Allies to be one of the best units of the German Army. ... Marmolada (the Italian name; also Latin: Marmoleda, German: Marmolata) is a mountain in northeastern Italy (just east of Trento) and the highest mountain of the Dolomites (a section of the Alps). ...


But whoever had occupied the higher ground first was almost impossible to dislodge, so both sides turned to drilling tunnels under mountain peaks, filling them up with explosives and then detonating the whole mountain to pieces, including its defenders: Col di Lana, Monte Pasubio, Lagazuoi, etc. Climbing and skiing became essential skills for the troops of both sides and soon Ski Battalions and Special Climbing units were formed.


In the final days of World War I, the troops of the already disintegrating Austrian-Hungarian Empire were defeated on 29 October 1918 in the Battle of Vittorio Veneto in Italy. The subsequent armistice of Villa Giusti was signed on November 3 but was set into force only a day later on November 4, with the Austrian command having ordered its troops to cease hostilities one day too early. The Italian troops, which had been unable to gain any of the desired Austrian land in the war itself, took 356,000 soldiers of the Austrian army as prisoners, overran the now undefended Austrian positions and advanced into Tyrol up to the main water divide at Resia (Reschen) and Brenner Pass. “The Great War ” redirects here. ... is the 302nd day of the year (303rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ... Combatants Italy United Kingdom France United States Image:Flag of Austria-Hungary. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 308th day of the year (309th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Resia Pass (Italian: Passo di Resia, German: Reschenpass) is an Alpine pass (1504 m) located at the Italian-Austrian border, close to the border with Switzerland. ... The Brenner Pass (Italian Passo del Brennero) is a mountain pass that creates a link through the Tyrolean Alps along the current border between the nations of Austria and Italy, one of the principal passes of the Alps. ...


The Treaty of Saint-Germain then ruled that, according to the London Pact, the southern part of Tyrol had to be ceded to Italy. The region included not only the largely Italian speaking area today known as Trentino (then often called Welschtirol in German), but also the territory now known as Südtirol/Alto Adige which, according to the census of 1910, was inhabited by 92.2% German speakers, and a small part of today's province of Belluno. The Treaty of Saint-Germain, was signed on 10 September 1919 by the victorious Allies of World War I on the one hand and by the new republic of Austria on the other. ... London Pact (Italian Patto di Londra) was a secret pact between Italy and Triple Entente, signed in London on April 26, 1915 by Italy, Great Britain, France and Russia. ... Trento (Italian: Provincia autonoma di Trento, German: Autonome Provinz Trient) is an autonomous province in the autonomous Trentino-South Tyrol region of Italy. ... The Autonomous Province of Bolzano-Bozen[1][2] (Italian: ; German: ; Ladin: Provinzia autonòma de Balsan), also called Alto Adige (Italian: Alto Adige; German: Hochetsch or Oberetsch; Ladin: Adesc Aut[3] ) or South Tyrol (Italian: Sudtirolo; German: Südtirol; Ladin: Sudtirol), is an autonomous province of Italy. ... German (called Deutsch in German; in German the term germanisch is equivalent to English Germanic), is a member of the western group of Germanic languages and is one of the worlds major languages. ... Belluno (It. ...


The Italian annexation thus went against the principle of national self-determination propagated by US-president Woodrow Wilson in his Fourteen Points, specifically against point nine where Wilson explicitly stated that "readjustment of the frontiers of Italy should be effected along clearly recognizable lines of nationality."[3] Thomas Woodrow Wilson (December 28, 1856–February 3, 1924), was the twenty-eighth President of the United States. ... United States President Woodrow Wilson listed the Fourteen Points in a speech that he delivered to the United States Congress on January 8, 1918. ...


The northern part, consisting of the geographically separate regions of Northern Tyrol and Eastern Tyrol, is today one of nine federal states of the Federal Republic of Austria called Tyrol. This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... For other uses, see Austria (disambiguation). ... Tyrol (German: , Czech: ) is a state or Bundesland, located in the west of Austria. ...


Other facts

Tyrol is also known for some of the finest snow skiing in Europe. Some famous resorts in the the Tyrolean Alps include Kitzbühel, Wilder Kaiser, Ischgl, and St. Anton, home of the world's first ski school founded by Hannes Schneider. Kitzbühel is a medieval city in Tyrol, Austria, situated along the river Kitzbühler Ache. ... Ischgl in February Ischgl (1377m) is a small village (population: 1489 in 2001) in the Paznaun Valley in Tyrol (Austria). ... Sankt Anton am Arlberg is a village in Tyrol, western Austria, with a population of c. ...


The Tyrol Gröstl is a traditional food which contains potatoes and pieces of cut pork browned lightly together with hacked onion and butter in a frying pan. It is spiced with abundant marjoram, plus salt, pepper, caraway and parsley. Gröstl is often served with fried egg and herbs, sheet or rohnensalat (beetroot).


References

  1. ^ Gleirscher Paul, Die Laugen-Melaun-Gruppe. In: Die Räter – I Reti. Schriftenreihe der Arge Alp. Hrsg. Kommission III (Kultur), (Bozen 1992) 117-134
  2. ^ Paul Gleirscher: Die Räter. Rätisches Museum, Chur 1991
  3. ^ Sterling J. Kernek, “Woodrow Wilson and National Self-Determination along Italy's Frontier: A Study of the Manipulation of Principles in the Pursuit of Political Interests”, Proceedings of the American Philosophical Society, Vol. 126, No. 4. (Aug., 1982), pp. 243-300 (246)

Weblinks

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Tirol
  • Tyroleans
  • Tyrolean News
  • Tyrolean Government
  • Maps, charts, tables
  • Tyrol Tourist Board
  • Tyrolean History

  Results from FactBites:
 
Galen Tyrol - Battlestar Wiki (3298 words)
Tyrol attempts to diffuse the situation by trying to state that the DRADIS dish is undefended; all that needs to be done is to destroy it, and the turret could not automatically target the incoming SAR operation.
Tyrol is subsequently responsible for exposing Cavil as a Humanoid Cylon when he recognizes him as one of the returnees from the rescue mission to Caprica.
Tyrol, his wife, and a small group of people are camped on an algae planet as they continue their harvest of badly-needed algae to be used as food for the Fleet (The Passage).
Tyrol - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (585 words)
The Tyrol is a historical region in Western Central Europe, which includes the Austrian state of Tyrol (consisting of North Tyrol and East Tyrol) and the Italian regions known as the South Tyrol and Trentino.
The Tyrol, incorporated into the southern part of the Duchy of Bavaria during the Early Middle Ages, consisted largely of ecclesiastical holdings of the Bishops of Brixen and Trento.
Often glorified as the Tyrol's national hero, Andreas Hofer, the leader of the uprising, was executed in 1810 in Mantua, having lost a third and final battle against the French and Bavarian forces.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m