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Encyclopedia > Tyneside Irish Brigade

The Tyneside Irish Brigade was a British First World War infantry brigade of Kitchener's Army, raised in 1914. Officially numbered the 103rd (Tyneside Irish) Brigade, it contained four Pals battalions from Newcastle-on-Tyne, largely made up of men of Irish extraction. (Another Newcastle brigade — the 102nd (Tyneside Scottish) — contained Tynesiders with Scottish connections.) Ypres, 1917, in the vicinity of the Battle of Passchendaele. ... Infantry of the 36th Ulster Division, in the First World War Infantry are soldiers who fight primarily on foot, mainly with small arms and operate within organized military units. ... Brigade is a term from military science which refers to a group of several battalions (typically two to four), and directly attached supporting units (normally including at least an artillery battery and additional logistic support). ... WWI recruitment poster for Kitcheners Army. ... 1914 (MCMXIV) is a common year starting on Thursday. ... The Pals battalions of World War I were units of the British Army that consisted of men who had enlisted together at special local recruiting drives, with the promise that they would be able to serve alongside their friends, neighbours and work colleagues (Pals) rather than having to be mixed... This article is about a city in the United Kingdom. ... The Tyneside Scottish Brigade was a British First World War infantry brigade of Kitcheners Army, raised in 1914. ... Travel guide to Scotland from Wikitravel Transport in Scotland Timeline of Scottish history Caledonia List of not fully sovereign nations Subdivisions of Scotland National parks (Scotland) Traditional music of Scotland Flower of Scotland Wars of Scottish Independence National Trust for Scotland Historic houses in Scotland Castles in Scotland Museums in...


The brigade's four battalions were known as the 1st to 4th Tyneside Irish. When taken over by the British Army, these became battalions of the Northumberland Fusiliers. Symbol of the Austrian 14th Armoured Battalion in NATO code In military terminology, a battalion consists of two to six companies typically commanded by a lieutenant colonel. ... The British Army is the land armed forces branch of the British Armed Forces. ... THE ROYAL NORTHUMBERLAND FUSILIERS Nomenclature One of Englands premier county regiments, the Royal Northumberland Fusiliers can trace its ancestory back to the year 1674. ...

  • 1st Tyneside Irish (24th Battalion, Northumberland Fusiliers)
  • 2nd Tyneside Irish (25th Battalion, Northumberland Fusiliers)
  • 3rd Tyneside Irish (26th Battalion, Northumberland Fusiliers)
  • 4th Tyneside Irish (27th Battalion, Northumberland Fusiliers)

Along with the 101st and 102nd Brigades, the Tyneside Irish Brigade made up the British 34th Division which arrived in France in January 1916 and first saw action in the Battle of the Somme. On the first day on the Somme, the 34th Division attacked astride the Albert-Bapaume road at La Boisselle. The task of the Tyneside Irish Brigade was to follow up the main attack by the 101st and 102nd Brigades and advance on a line from Pozières to Contalmaison. The British 34th Division was a New Army division formed in April France on January 1916 and spent the duration of the First World War in action on the Western Front. ... 1916 (MCMXVI) is a leap year starting on Saturday (link will take you to calendar) // Events January-February January 1 -The first successful blood transfusion using blood that had been stored and cooled. ... Combatants United Kingdom, France, Canada, India, Newfoundland, South Africa, New Zealand, Australia Germany Commanders Douglas Haig Ferdinand Foch Max von Gallwitz Fritz von Below Strength 13 British & 6 French divisions (initial) 51 British divisions (final) 10. ... The first day on the Somme, 1 July 1916, was the opening day of the British and French offensive that became the Battle of the Somme. ... Ovillers-la-Boisselle is a commune of the Somme département in northern France. ...

A support company of the Tyneside Irish Brigade advancing on 1 July, 1916.
A support company of the Tyneside Irish Brigade advancing on 1 July, 1916.

Advancing at the same time as the main attack, the brigade started from the reserve trenches on the Tara-Usna Line. The four battalions, marching in extended line (from left to right; the 2nd, 3rd, 1st and 4th Tyneside Irish) advanced down into Avoca Valley and then up the other side to the British front-line trench. From there they had to cross no man's land, pass through the German front-line and advance to their objectives. However, the main attack was an almost complete failure and the Tyneside Irish were utterly exposed to the machine guns of the German defences. The brigade suffered heavy casualties even before its battalions reached the British front-line. Opposite La Boisselle the brigade was halted but on the right, elements of the 1st and 4th Tyneside Irish were able to advance up Sausage Valley and pass through the German front-line. Two small parties met up behind the German support trench and pushed on towards their objective of Contalmaison. Their effort was futile and they were eventually captured or killed. Download high resolution version (1000x730, 76 KB)A support company of the Tyneside Irish Brigade advancing from the Tara-Usna Line opposite La Boisselle on 1 July, 1916, the first day on the Somme. ... Download high resolution version (1000x730, 76 KB)A support company of the Tyneside Irish Brigade advancing from the Tara-Usna Line opposite La Boisselle on 1 July, 1916, the first day on the Somme. ... No Mans Land may refer to the following: No Mans Land is an island in the U.S. state of Massachusetts. ... A machine gun is a fully-automatic firearm that is capable of firing bullets in rapid succession. ... Sausage Valley was the name given by British soldiers during the First World War to a shallow valley south of the village of La Boisselle in the Somme département, France. ...


The 1st Tyneside Irish suffered 620 casualties on 1 July (18 officers and 602 other ranks) while the 4th Tyneside Irish suffered 539 casualties (20 officers and 519 other ranks). The commander of the 1st Tyneside Irish, Lieutenant Colonel L.M. Howard, was killed while the commanders of the 2nd and 3rd Tyneside Irish battalions were wounded as was the 103rd Brigade's commander, Brigadier General N.J.G. Cameron. In the U.S. Army, Air Force and Marine Corps, a lieutenant colonel is a commissioned officer superior to a major and inferior to a colonel. ... A Brigadier General, or one-star general, is the lowest rank of general officer in the United States and some other countries, ranking just above Colonel and just below Major General. ...


The brigade's losses on 1 July were so severe that on 6 July it, along with the 102nd (Tyneside Scottish) Brigade, was transferred to the 37th Division, swapping with the 112th Brigade. The two brigades returned to the 34th Division on 22 August. July 6 is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 178 days remaining. ... August 22 is the 234th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (235th in leap years), with 131 days remaining. ...


rest of history to be completed


In February 1918 the 1st, 3rd and 4th Tyneside Irish battalions were disbanded and the remaining battalion, the 2nd Tyneside Irish, was transferred to the 116th Brigade of the 39th Division. From then on the Tyneside Irish Brigade ceased to exist and the brigade was simply the 103rd Brigade. 1918 (MCMXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Wednesday of the Julian calendar. ...


External links

  • Personal Research on Tyneside Irish, 34th Division, Northumberland Fusiliers:[1]
  • The Royal Northumberland Fusiliers: [2]
  • Tyneside Irish Brigade: [3]
  • The Tyneside Irish 1914-1918: [4]
  • The 34th Division (Tyneside): [5]
  • Regiments.org - The Tyneside Irish 1914-1919: [6]
  • World War I Photos, Northumberland Fusiliers: [7]

  Results from FactBites:
 
Tyneside Irish Brigade at AllExperts (587 words)
The commander of the 1st Tyneside Irish, Lieutenant Colonel L.M. Howard, was killed while the commanders of the 2nd and 3rd Tyneside Irish battalions were wounded as was the 103rd Brigade's commander, Brigadier General N.J.G. Cameron.
The brigade's losses on 1 July were so severe that on 6 July it, along with the 102nd (Tyneside Scottish) Brigade, was transferred to the 37th Division, swapping with the 112th Brigade.
In February 1918 the 1st, 3rd and 4th Tyneside Irish battalions were disbanded and the remaining battalion, the 2nd Tyneside Irish, was transferred to the 116th Brigade of the 39th Division.
Tyneside Scottish Brigade: Information from Answers.com (840 words)
While the Tyneside Irish battalions were indeed largely made up of men of Irish extraction, the Tyneside Scottish battalions contained as little as 25% Scots; the remainder were Geordies attracted to the glamour of a "Scottish" regiment.
The brigade's losses on 1 July were so severe that on 6 July it, along with the Tyneside Irish Brigade, was transferred to the 37th Division, swapping with the 111th Brigade.
The 3rd Tyneside Scottish transferred to the 48th Brigade, 16th (Irish) Division, while the 4th Tyneside Scottish transferred to the 116th Brigade, 39th Division, where it was joined by the 2nd Tyneside Irish, the sole surviving Tyneside Irish battalion.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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