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Encyclopedia > Tyndall

Contents

Origins

The Tyndalls are originally an Anglo-Scots family hailing from Tynedale in Northumberland, and who held estates in the English and Scottish Border Ridings. One Hadrian de Tyndale married Bethoc Canmore, grand-daughter of Duncan I Macdonagh, King of Scots around 1034-1040. By tradition they also claim Norman origins. The name is also sometimes spelt Tyndale, Tindall, Tyndall, or Tindal. Tynedale is a local government district in south-west Northumberland. ... Northumberland is a county in northern England. ... Duncan I Cæn-Mohr MacCrinan (1001 - August 14, 1040) was a son of Crinan the Thane de Mormaer, lay abbot of Dunkeld, and Princess Bethoc of Scotland. ... This is a list of British monarchs, that is, the monarchs on the thrones of some of the various kingdoms that have existed on, or incorporated, the island of Great Britain, namely: England (united with Wales from 1536) up to 1707; Scotland up to 1707; The Kingdom of Great Britain... Norman conquests in red. ...


Titled aristocracy

Tynedale also lends its name famously to a Barony, the title Baron Scott of Tynedale in Northumberland, created in 1663 for the tragic Duke of Monmouth, and 1st Duke of Buccleuch, namely James Scott(Stuart), the alleged illegitimate son of King Charles II, and which titles were forfeited in 1685 upon his execution, but later restored with the Earl of Doncaster in 1743. However, it is also claimed that King James II, did not have him executed, and that he was exiled to France as the Man in the Iron Mask.[citation needed] Another Barony of Tyndale (Radclyffe) was created in 1688, with the Earl of Derwenter, but forfeited in 1716. The title of Duke of Buccleuch (IPA ) was created in the Peerage of Scotland on 20 April 1663 for the Duke of Monmouth, eldest illegitimate son of Charles II of England, who had married Anne Scott, 4th Countess of Buccleuch. ... James Scott, 1st Duke of Monmouth James Crofts, later James Scott, 1st Duke of Monmouth and of Buccleuch (April 9, 1649 – July 15, 1685) was born in Rotterdam in the Netherlands, the illegitimate son of Charles II and his mistress, Lucy Walter, who had followed him into continental exile after... The title of Duke of Buccleuch (IPA ) was created in the Peerage of Scotland on 20 April 1663 for the Duke of Monmouth, eldest illegitimate son of Charles II of England, who had married Anne Scott, 4th Countess of Buccleuch. ... Charles II (29 May 1630 – 6 February 1685) was the King of England, King of Scots, and King of Ireland from 30 January 1649 (de jure) or 29 May 1660 (de facto) until his death. ... The title of Duke of Buccleuch (pronounced Bucloo) was created in the Peerage of Scotland on 20 April 1663 for the Duke of Monmouth, eldest illegitimate son of Charles II of England, who had married Anne Scott, 4th Countess of Buccleuch. ... James II of England/VII of Scotland (14 October 1633 – 16 September 1701) became King of Scots, King of England, and King of Ireland on 6 February 1685, and Duke of Normandy on 31 December 1660. ... The Man in the Iron Mask was a prisoner held in a number of prisons, including the Bastille, during the reign of Louis XIV of France. ...


The earliest feudal records indictate that Robert de Tynedale was the feudal Baron of South Tyne-dale and of Langeley/Langley Castle, both in the county of Northumberland. The Barony was originally held by his predecessor by the service of one knight's fee, in the time of Henry I of England of England. He was succeeded by his son, Adam, Baron de Tynedale and Langeley, who lived during the reign of Richard I of England, and paid 100 pounds for his relief, with livery of his land in 1194. He left two daughters, co-heirs, and the elder Philippa married Adam Nicholas de Bolteby and conveyed to her husband the Barony of South Tyne-dale. The Barony of Langley and its associated manor continue to modern times as an originally-feudal Prescriptive Barony (not a Peerage), and an extensive series of baronial and manorial records are maintained in the National Archives (UK). Baron is a specific title of nobility or a more generic feudal qualification. ... Langley Castle Hotel is a 14th Century castle nestling in the Northumbrian valley of the South Tyne. ... Knights fee is a feudal term used in medieval England to describe the value of land. ... Henry I (circa 1068 – 1 December 1135) was the fourth son of William the Conqueror and the first born in England after the Norman Conquest of 1066. ... ≈68. ... Generic plan of a mediaeval manor; open-field strip farming, some enclosures, triennial crop rotation, demesne and manse, common woodland, pasturage and meadow Manorialism or Seigneurialism is the organization of rural economy and society in medieval western and parts of central Europe, characterised by the vesting of legal and economic... // Scotland Scottish Prescriptive Barony by Tenure was, from 1660 until 2004, the feudal description of the only genuine degree of title of UK nobility capable of being bought and sold, (along with the Caput, or property), rather than merely passing by personal descent. ... For other uses, see Peerage (disambiguation). ... The National Archives is a British Governmental organisation created in April 2003. ...


English branches and distinguished individuals

Robert's other son, also called Robert, settled at Tansover in Northamptonshire in the time of Edward I. In the generations that followed to the present time the names William, John, Thomas, and David recur repeatedly. Northamptonshire (abbreviated Northants or Nhants) is a landlocked county in central England with a population of 629,676 (2001 census). ... Edward I (17 June 1239 – 7 July 1307), popularly known as Longshanks[1] and Hammer of the Scots,[2] achieved fame as the monarch who conquered Wales and who kept Scotland under English domination during his lifetime. ...


A William Tyndall was Lancaster Herald under King Edward IV. A William Tyndall was made Knight Companion of the Most Honourable Order of the Bath on 29 November 1489, on the creation of Prince Arthur as Prince of Wales under the reign of Henry VII. He was also Guisne Poursuivant (herald) extraordinary for Henry VII, and later Rouge Dragon. Another William Tyndale is known to have translated the Bible into English for Henry VIII, but later suffered execution on the Continent in 1536. Humphrey Tyndall was Dean of Ely in 1591, and died in 1614. The Lancaster Herald is an officer of arms of the College of Arms, named after the Duchy of Lancaster and the city of Lancaster. ... Edward IV (April 28, 1442 – April 9, 1483) was King of England from March 4, 1461 to April 9, 1483, with a break of a few months in the period 1470–1471. ... Companion is the word for a close friend, or an associate, who stand by you all the time. ... Military Badge of the Order of the Bath The Most Honourable Order of the Bath is a British order of chivalry founded by George I on 18 May 1725. ... The Prince of Wales Feathers. This Heraldic badge of the Heir Apparent is derived from the ostrich feathers borne by Edward, the Black Prince. ... Henry VII (January 28, 1457 – April 21, 1509), King of England, Lord of Ireland (August 22, 1485 – April 21, 1509), was the founder and first patriarch of the Tudor dynasty. ... It has been suggested that The Tyndale Society be merged into this article or section. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Henry VIII (28 June 1491 – 28 January 1547) was King of England and Lord of Ireland (later King of Ireland) from 22 April 1509 until his death. ... Statistics Population: 15,102 Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: TL535799 Administration District: East Cambridgeshire Shire county: Cambridgeshire Region: East of England Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: Cambridgeshire Historic county: Cambridgeshire Services Police force: Ambulance service: East of England Post office and telephone Post town: ELY...


Tyndalls were also established with a seat at the Manor House, Aylesbury, Buckinghamshire in the 19th century. Ightham Mote For the London district, see Manor House, London. ... Statistics Population: 69,173 Ordnance Survey OS grid reference: SP818138 Administration District: Aylesbury Vale Shire county: Buckinghamshire Region: South East England Constituent country: England Sovereign state: United Kingdom Other Ceremonial county: Buckinghamshire Historic county: Buckinghamshire Services Police force: Thames Valley Police Fire and rescue: {{{Fire}}} Ambulance: South Central Post office... Buckinghamshire (abbreviated Bucks) is one of the home counties in South East England. ...


Irish branch and distinguished individuals

A branch of the family settled in Ireland in the Middle Ages, and manuscript genealogical records of these exist in Trinity College Dublin. A William Tyndall is mentioned in the 1659 census as living in Duganstowne, Catherlagh (County Carlow), co-owned by him and a Richard Andrewes as tituladoes. Similarly, a John Tyndall came from Gloucestershire to Ireland during the Wars of Rebellion and had a grant of land confirmed to him in 1668. He married Isabelle de Rinzy of County Wexford. The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ... The College of the Holy and Undivided Trinity of Queen Elizabeth near Dublin or more commonly Trinity College, Dublin (TCD) was founded in 1592 by Queen Elizabeth I, is the only constituent college of the University of Dublin, Irelands oldest university. ... Statistics Province: Leinster County Town: Carlow Code: CW Area: 896 km² Population (2006) 50,471 Website: www. ... Gloucestershire (pronounced ; GLOSS-ter-sher) is a county in South West England. ... County Wexford (Contae Loch Garman in Irish) is a maritime county in the southeast of Ireland, in the province of Leinster. ...


Amongst the landed gentry in Ireland in the 1800s, Tyndalls appeared established with estates and seats at Ballyanne House, and Berkeley Forest, both in New Ross, County Wexford, and Prospect Hall, County Kilkenny, as well as in County Carlow, and Kildevin, County Westmeath, and Dublin City. Samuel Tyndall served as Lord Mayor of Dublin from 1826 to 1827. Landed gentry is a term traditionally applied in Britain to members of the upper class with country estates often (but not always) farmed on their behalf by others, and who might be without a peerage or other hereditary title. ... County Wexford (Contae Loch Garman in Irish) is a maritime county in the southeast of Ireland, in the province of Leinster. ... County Kilkenny (Contae Chill Chainnigh in Irish) is located in the south east of Ireland in the province of Leinster. ... Statistics Province: Leinster County Town: Carlow Code: CW Area: 896 km² Population (2006) 50,471 Website: www. ... Statistics Province: Leinster County Town: Mullingar Code: WH Area: 1,764 km² Population (2006) 79,403 Website: www. ... This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... The Mansion House The Lord Mayor of Dublin is the symbolic head of the city government in the capital of Ireland. ...


John Tyndall (1820-1893) from Leighlinbridge, County Carlow, Ireland, was a well-known physicist from Ireland, who discovered the Tyndall effect, explaining why the sky is blue. A relative, another John Tyndall of Newcastle ran a forge, and saddlery, in the middle of the 1800s, and his grandson, David P. Tyndall (1890-1970), from Chapelizod, became a prominent Irish businessman in the 20th century, who founded the firm D. Tyndall & Sons, as well as several other companies, and consolidated and modernised the wholesale trade sector, introducing the SPAR chain into Ireland. This article is about the 19th century scientist. ... Leighlinbridge (Leithghlinn an Droichid in Irish) is a village in County Carlow, Ireland. ... Statistics Province: Leinster County Town: Carlow Code: CW Area: 896 km² Population (2006) 50,471 Website: www. ... Shot of sunbeams breaking through nebula bank The term Tyndall effect is usually applied to the effect of light scattering on particles in colloid systems, such as suspensions or emulsions. ... David P. Tyndall (May 17, 1890 - January 6, 1970) was a leading Irish businessman in the 20th century, and played the major role in helping modernize the wholesale and retail grocery trade, consolidate it, and enable the family grocery shop owner adapt to the advent of supermarkets. ... This article is about the convenience store. ...


Other branches of the family have spread to Australia and the USA.


Tyndall-named institutions

In honour of physicist John Tyndall, the Tyndall National Institute was created in Ireland in 2004 at the initiative of the Department of Enterprise Trade and Employment and University College Cork (UCC) to bring together complementary activities in photonics, electronics and networking research at the National Microelectronics Research Centre (NMRC), several UCC academic departments and Cork Institute of Technology (CIT). University College Cork - National University of Ireland, Cork - or more commonly University College Cork (UCC) - is a constituent university of the National University of Ireland located in Cork City. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... This article is about the engineering discipline. ... A telecommunications network is a network of telecommunications links arranged so that messages may be passed from one part of the network to another over multiple links. ... Cork Institute of Technology (CIT), formerly Regional Technical College, Cork, is a college located in Cork, Ireland opened in 1973. ...


In the UK, the Tyndall Centre for Climate Change Research has locations in the University of East Anglia in Norwich, the University of Manchester, the University of Southampton, the University of Sussex in Brighton, Oxford University, and the University of Newcastle upon Tyne. Variations in CO2, temperature and dust from the Vostok ice core over the last 400,000 years For current global climate change, see the main article Global warming. ... The University of East Anglia (UEA) is a campus university located in Norwich, Norfolk, England, founded as part of the British Governments New Universities programme in the 1960s. ... Norwich is a city in East Anglia, in Eastern England. ... The University of Manchester is a large university located in Manchester, England. ... The University of Southampton is a university situated in the city of Southampton, on the south coast of Great Britain. ... The University of Sussex is an English campus university located near the East Sussex village of Falmer, near Brighton and Hove. ... For other places with the same name, see Brighton (disambiguation). ... The University of Oxford, located in the city of Oxford in England, is the oldest university in the English-speaking world. ... Newcastle University is a British university located in Newcastle upon Tyne in the north of England. ...


In New Zealand, the Tyndall name has lent itself to an important investment fund management enterprise. There is a Tyndall Air Force Base in the USA. A small municipality called the City of Tyndall, South Dakota, in the USA is the capital of Bon Homme County. Tyndall Air Force Base is a base of the United States Air Force in Bay County, Florida, United States. ... A municipality is an administrative entity composed of a clearly defined territory and its population and commonly referring to a city, town, or village, or a small grouping of them. ... Tyndall is a city in Bon Homme County, South Dakota, United States. ...


References

  • Manuscript genealogies: see MS. vols. F.3.23, F.3.27, F.4.18 in Trinity College Library, Dublin
  • The Book of Dignities, by Joseph Haydn, 3rd edition, W.H. Allen & Co., London, 1894.
  • Fairbairn's Book of Crests of Families of Great Britain and Ireland, by James Fairbairn, (2 Vols.) T.C. & E.C. Jack, London, 1905.
  • Prerogative Wills of Ireland (1536-1810) - Index, by Sir Arthur Vicars, Dublin, 1897.
  • A Genealogical and Heraldic History of the Commoners of Great Britain and Ireland, by John Burke, London, 1838.
  • Langley Barony Records at the National Archives (UK)(from ADM 74/3/11 of 13 Charles I to QCD/17 of 1954)
  • A Guide to Irish Country Houses, by Mark Bence-Jones, Constable & Co. Ltd., London, 1988. (pages 19 and 41).
  • Life and Work of John Tyndall, by A.S. Eve and C.H. Creasey, Macmillan & Co., London, 1945.
  • John Tyndall – Essays on a Natural Philosopher edited by W.H. Brock, N.D. McMillan and R.C. Mollan, Royal Dublin Society, 1981.
  • Dublin Almanacks, 1830, 1840, & 1860.

The National Archives is a British Governmental organisation created in April 2003. ...

External links

  • Tyndall National Institute (Ireland) [1]
  • Tyndall Center for Climatic Change Research (UK) [2]
  • Tyndall Air Force Base (USA) [3]

  Results from FactBites:
 
Tyndall Air Force Base - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (656 words)
Tyndall Air Force Base is a base of the United States Air Force in Bay County, Florida, United States.
The name of Tyndall Field was in memory of Lt. Frank B. Tyndall, a World War I ace, who was killed in 1930.
Tyndall AFB was struck by a tornado in 2003.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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