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Encyclopedia > Tycho Brahe
Tycho Ottesen Brahe

Born December 14, 1546
Knutstorp Castle, Denmark
Died October 24, 1601 (aged 54)
Prague
Nationality Danish
Education Private
Occupation Nobleman, Astronomer
Spouse Kirsten Jørgensdatter
Children 8
Parents Otte Brahe and Beate Bille
Monument of Tycho Brahe and Johannes Kepler in Prague
Monument of Tycho Brahe and Johannes Kepler in Prague

Tycho Brahe, born Tyge Ottesen Brahe (December 14, 1546October 24, 1601), was a Danish nobleman famed for his accurate and comprehensive astronomical observations. Hailing from Scania, now part of modern-day Sweden, Brahe was well known in his lifetime as an astrologer and alchemist. This is a list of Penny Arcade characters. ... Image File history File links Tycho_Brahe. ... is the 348th day of the year (349th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events Spanish conquest of Yucatan Peace between England and France Foundation of Trinity College, Cambridge by Henry VIII of England Katharina von Bora flees to Magdeburg Science Architecture Michelangelo Buonarroti is made chief architect of St. ... For other uses, see Castle (disambiguation). ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events February 8 - Robert Devereux, 2nd Earl of Essex, rebels against Elizabeth I of England - revolt is quickly crushed February 25 - Robert Devereux beheaded Jesuit Matteo Ricci arrives in China Bad harvest in Russia due to rainy summer Dutch troops drive Portuguese from Málaga Battle of Kinsale, Ireland Births... For other uses, see Prague (disambiguation). ... Nobility is a traditional hereditary status (see hereditary titles) that exists today in many countries (mainly present or former monarchies). ... For other uses, see Astronomy (disambiguation). ... Otte Brahe (c. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1250x1030, 441 KB) Monument of Tycho Brahe and Johannes Kepler in Prague, Czechia File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Johannes Kepler Tycho Brahe Metadata This file contains... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1250x1030, 441 KB) Monument of Tycho Brahe and Johannes Kepler in Prague, Czechia File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Johannes Kepler Tycho Brahe Metadata This file contains... Kepler redirects here. ... For other uses, see Prague (disambiguation). ... is the 348th day of the year (349th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events Spanish conquest of Yucatan Peace between England and France Foundation of Trinity College, Cambridge by Henry VIII of England Katharina von Bora flees to Magdeburg Science Architecture Michelangelo Buonarroti is made chief architect of St. ... is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events February 8 - Robert Devereux, 2nd Earl of Essex, rebels against Elizabeth I of England - revolt is quickly crushed February 25 - Robert Devereux beheaded Jesuit Matteo Ricci arrives in China Bad harvest in Russia due to rainy summer Dutch troops drive Portuguese from Málaga Battle of Kinsale, Ireland Births... Nobility is a traditional hereditary status (see hereditary titles) that exists today in many countries (mainly present or former monarchies). ... For other uses, see Astronomy (disambiguation). ... Map of ca. ... Hand-coloured version of the anonymous Flammarion woodcut (1888). ... For other uses, see Alchemy (disambiguation). ...


The Latinized name Tycho Brahe is usually pronounced [ˈtaɪ.kəʊ ˈbɹɑː.hi] or [ˈtaɪ.kəʊ ˈbɹɑː.ə] in English. The original Danish name Tyge Ottesen Brahe is pronounced in Modern Standard Danish as [ˈtˢyː.y ˈʌ.d̥ə.sn̩ ˈb̥ʁɑː.ʊ]. Latin was the language originally spoken in the region around Rome called Latium. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ...


Tycho Brahe was granted an estate on the island of Hven and the funding to build the Uraniborg, an early research institute, where he built large astronomical instruments and took many careful measurements. As an astronomer, Tycho worked to combine what he saw as the geometrical benefits of the Copernican system with the philosophical benefits of the Ptolemaic system into his own model of the universe, the Tychonic system. From 1600 until his death in 1601, he was assisted by Johannes Kepler, who would later use Tycho's astronomical information to develop his own theories of astronomy. He is universally referred to as "Tycho" rather than by his surname "Brahe", as was common in Scandinavia. Map of Hven from the Blaeu Atlas 1663 Backafall, the east coast of Hven Hven or Ven (Swedish and Danish usually Ven, but sometimes Hven which is Swedish old spelling) is a small Swedish island in the Öresund strait, between Scania and Zealand (Denmark). ... Uraniborg was the astronomical/astrological observatory of Tycho Brahe; built circa 1576-1580 on Hven (also known as Ven or Hveen), an island in the Öresund; between Zealand and Scania. ... A research institute is a establishment endowed for doing research. ... For other uses, see Geometry (disambiguation). ... Copernicus redirects here. ... Mediaeval drawing of the Ptolemaic system. ... Tychonic system The Tychonic system (or Tychonian system) was an effort by Tycho Brahe to create a model of the solar system which would combine what he saw as the mathematical benefits of the Copernican system with the philosophical and physical benefits of the Ptolemaic system. ... 1600 was a leap year starting on Saturday of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... Events February 8 - Robert Devereux, 2nd Earl of Essex, rebels against Elizabeth I of England - revolt is quickly crushed February 25 - Robert Devereux beheaded Jesuit Matteo Ricci arrives in China Bad harvest in Russia due to rainy summer Dutch troops drive Portuguese from Málaga Battle of Kinsale, Ireland Births... Kepler redirects here. ...


He is credited with the most accurate astronomical observations of his time, and the data were used by his assistant Kepler to derive the laws of planetary motion. No one before Tycho had attempted to make so many redundant observations, and the mathematical tools to take advantage of them had not yet been developed. He did what others before him were unable or unwilling to do — to catalogue the planets and stars with enough accuracy so as to determine whether the Ptolemaic or Copernican system was more valid in describing the heavens. Johannes Keplers primary contributions to astronomy/astrophysics were his three laws of planetary motion. ...

Contents

Life

Early years

Tycho Brahe was born Tyge Ottesen Brahe (de Knutstorp), adopting the Latinised form Tycho around age fifteen (sometimes written Tÿcho). He is often misnamed Tycho de Brahe. He was born at his family's ancestral seat of Knutstorp Castle, Denmark to Otte Brahe and Beate Bille. His twin brother died before being baptized. (Tycho wrote a Latin ode (Wittendorf 1994, p. 68) to his dead twin which was printed as his first publication in 1572.) He also had two sisters, one older (Kirstine Brahe) and one younger (Sophia Brahe). Otte Brahe, Tycho's father, was a nobleman and an important figure in the Danish King's court. His mother, Beate Bille, also came from an important family that had produced leading churchmen and politicians. In his youth he lived at Hvedborg Manor, Funen, Denmark with his uncle and attended Horne Church in nearby Horne. For other uses, see Castle (disambiguation). ... Otte Brahe (c. ... For other uses, see Twin (disambiguation). ... Baptism is a water purification ritual practiced in certain religions such as Christianity, Mandaeanism, Sikhism, and some historic sects of Judaism. ... Sophia Brahe (August 24, 1556 - c. ... The Lords and Barons prove their Nobility by hanging their Banners and exposing their Coats-of-arms at the Windows of the Lodge of the Heralds. ... Funen (Danish: Fyn) is the third largest island of Denmark, it has a population of 445,000 people. ... Horne Church, Funen. ...


Tycho later wrote that when he was around two, his uncle, Danish nobleman Jørgen Brahe, "... without the knowledge of my parents took me away with him while I was in my earliest youth." Apparently this did not lead to any disputes nor did his parents attempt to get him back. Tycho lived with his childless uncle and aunt, Jørgen Brahe and Inger Oxe, in the Tostrup Castle until he was six years old. Around 1552 his uncle was given the command of Vordingborg Castle to which they moved, and where Tycho began a Latin education until he was 12 years old. Events April - War between Henry II of France and Emperor Charles V. Henry invades Lorraine and captures Toul, Metz, and Verdun. ... The castle of Vordingborg in the Danish town of the same name was built in 1175 by King Valdemar I of Denmark (the Great) as a defensive castle. ...


On April 19, 1559, Tycho began his studies at the University of Copenhagen. There, following the wishes of his uncle, he studied law but also studied a variety of other subjects and became interested in astronomy. It was, however, the eclipse which occurred on August 21, 1560, particularly the fact that it had been predicted, that so impressed him that he began to make his own studies of astronomy helped by some of the professors. He purchased an ephemeris and books such as Sacrobosco's Tractatus de Sphaera, Apianus's Cosmographia seu descriptio totius orbis and Regiomontanus's De triangulis omnimodis. is the 109th day of the year (110th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... January 15 - Elizabeth I of England is crowned in Westminster Abbey. ... Main campus on Frue Plads. ... For other uses, see Astronomy (disambiguation). ... This article is about astronomical eclipses. ... is the 233rd day of the year (234th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events February 27 - The Treaty of Berwick, which would expel the French from Scotland, is signed by England and the Congregation of Scotland The first tulip bulb was brought from Turkey to the Netherlands. ... An ephemeris (plural: ephemerides) (from the Greek word ephemeros = daily) is a device giving the positions of astronomical objects in the sky. ... Johannes de Sacrobosco or Sacro Bosco (John of Holywood, c. ... Petrus Apianus (real name Peter Bienewitz) (April 16, 1495 - April 21, 1557) was a German astronomer, cartographer and instrument maker. ... Johannes Müller von Königsberg (June 6, 1436 – July 6, 1476), known by his Latin pseudonym Regiomontanus, was an important German mathematician, astronomer and astrologer. ...

I've studied all available charts of the planets and stars and none of them match the others. There are just as many measurements and methods as there are astronomers and all of them disagree. What's needed is a long term project with the aim of mapping the heavens conducted from a single location over a period of several years. — Tycho Brahe, 1563 (age 17). Events February 1 - Sarsa Dengel succeeds his father Menas as Emperor of Ethiopia February 18 - The Duke of Guise is assassinated while besieging Orléans March - Peace of Amboise. ...

Tycho realized that progress in the science of astronomy could be achieved not by occasional haphazard observations, but only by systematic and rigorous observation, night after night, and by using instruments of the highest accuracy obtainable. He was able to improve and enlarge the existing instruments, and construct entirely new ones. Tycho's naked eye measurements of planetary parallax were accurate to the arcminute. His sister, Sophia, assisted Tycho in many of his measurements. These jealously guarded measurements were "usurped" by Kepler following Tycho's death.[1] Tycho was the last major astronomer to work without the aid of a telescope, soon to be turned toward the sky by Galileo. The naked eye is a figure of speech referring to human visual perception that is unaided by enhancing equipment, such as a telescope or binoculars. ... For other uses, see Parallax (disambiguation). ... A minute of arc, arcminute, or MOA is a unit of angular measurement, equal to one sixtieth (1/60) of one degree. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Galileo redirects here. ...


Tycho's nose

While a student, Tycho lost part of his nose in a duel with rapiers with Manderup Parsbjerg, a fellow Danish nobleman. This occurred in the Christmas season of 1566, after a fair amount of drinking, while the just turned 20-year-old Tycho was studying at the University of Rostock in Germany. Attending a dance at a professor's house, he quarreled with Parsbjerg. A subsequent duel (in the dark) resulted in Tycho losing the bridge of his nose. A consequence of this was that Tycho developed an interest in medicine and alchemy. For the rest of his life, he was said to have worn a replacement made of silver and gold blended into a flesh tone, and used an adhesive balm to keep it attached. However, in 1901 Tycho's tomb was opened and his remains were examined by medical experts. The nasal opening of the skull was rimmed with green, a sign of exposure to copper, not silver or gold. Some historians have speculated that he wore a number of different prosthetics for different occasions, noting that a copper nose would have been more comfortable and less heavy than a precious metal one. For other uses, see Nose (disambiguation). ... A duel is a formalized type of combat. ... For the UK Surface-to-air missile system, see Rapier missile. ... In the Northern Hemisphere, the Christmas season[1][2] or winter holiday season is the designation of a varying number of holidays during late autumn and/or early winter. ... Events January 7 - Pius V becomes Pope Selim II succeeds Suleiman I as Sultan of the Ottoman Empire Religious rioting in the Netherlands signifies the beginning of the Eighty Years War in the Netherlands. ... The University of Rostock (German: Universität Rostock) is a university in northern Germany, located in the city of Rostock in the state of Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania and is the oldest university in Northern continental Europe. ... For the chemical substances known as medicines, see medication. ... For other uses, see Alchemy (disambiguation). ... This article is about the chemical element. ... GOLD refers to one of the following: GOLD (IEEE) is an IEEE program designed to garner more student members at the university level (Graduates of the Last Decade). ... Year 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses of Skull, see Skull (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Copper (disambiguation). ... A United States soldier demonstrates Foosball with two prosthetic limbs In medicine, a prosthesis is an artificial extension that replaces a missing part of the body. ... For other uses, see Copper (disambiguation). ... For the CSI episode of the same name, see Precious Metal (CSI episode). ...


Death of his father

His foster father, uncle Jørgen Brahe, died in 1565 of pneumonia after rescuing Frederick II of Denmark from drowning. In April 1567, Tycho returned home from his travels and his father wanted him to take up law, but Tycho was allowed to make trips to Rostock, then on to Augsburg (where he built a great quadrant), Basel, and Freiburg. At the end of 1570 he was informed about his father's ill health, so he returned to Knudstrup, where his father died on May 9, 1571. Soon after, his other uncle Steen Bille helped him build an observatory and alchemical laboratory at Herrevad Abbey. Frederick II of Denmark and Norway Frederick II (July 1, 1534 - April 4, 1588), King of Denmark and Norway from 1559 until his death. ... is the 129th day of the year (130th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 11 - Austrian nobility is granted Freedom of religion. ...


Family life

In 1572, in Knudstrup, Tycho fell in love with Kirsten Jørgensdatter, a commoner whose father, Pastor Jorgen Hansen, was the Lutheran clergyman of Knudstrup's village church. Under Danish law, when a nobleman and a common woman lived together openly as husband and wife, and she wore the keys to the household at her belt like any true wife, their alliance became a binding morganatic marriage after three years. The husband retained his noble status and privileges; the wife remained a commoner. Their children were legitimate in the eyes of the law, but they were commoners like their mother and could not inherit their father's name, coat of arms, or land property. (Skautrup 1941, pp. 24-5) The Lutheran movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity by the original definition. ... The danish Supreme Court are the highest civil and criminal court responsible for the administration of justice in Denmark. ... Matrimony redirects here. ... A morganatic marriage is a type of marriage which can be contracted in certain countries, usually between persons of unequal social rank (unebenbürtig in German), which prevents the passage of the husbands titles and privileges to the wife and any children born of the marriage. ... A modern coat of arms is derived from the medi val practice of painting designs onto the shield and outer clothing of knights to enable them to be identified in battle, and later in tournaments. ...


Kirsten Jørgensdatter gave birth to their first daughter, Kirstine (named after Tycho's late sister who died at 13) on October 12, 1573. Together they had eight children, six of whom lived to adulthood. In 1574, they moved to Copenhagen where their daughter Magdalene was born. Kirsten and Tycho lived together for almost thirty years until Tycho's death. is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1573 was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ...

Tycho Brahe as depicted in Carl Sagan's Cosmos series

Image File history File links Cosmos_Brahe. ... Image File history File links Cosmos_Brahe. ... Insert non-formatted text here Carl Edward Sagan (November 9, 1934 – December 20, 1996) was an American astronomer and astrobiologist and a highly successful popularizer of astronomy, astrophysics, and other natural sciences. ... Cosmos: A Personal Voyage was the name of a thirteen part television series produced by Carl Sagan and Ann Druyan which was first broadcast by the Public Broadcasting Service in 1980. ...

Tycho's moose

Tycho was said to own one percent of the entire wealth of Denmark at one point in the 1580s and he often held large social gatherings in his castle. He kept a dwarf named Jepp (whom Tycho believed was clairvoyant) as a court jester who sat under the table during dinner. Pierre Gassendi wrote[2] that Tycho also had a tame moose, and that his mentor the Landgraf Wilhelm of Hesse-Kassel asked whether there was an animal faster than a deer. Tycho replied, writing that there were none, but he could send his tame moose. When Wilhelm replied he would accept one in exchange for a horse, Tycho replied with the sad news that the moose had just died on a visit to entertain a nobleman at Landskrona. Apparently during dinner the moose had drunk a lot of beer, fallen down the stairs, and died: why the moose was indoors was not specified.[3] Clairvoyance is defined as a form of radio waves). ... For other uses of Jester, see Jester (disambiguation). ... Pierre Gassendi (January 22, 1592 – October 24, 1655) was a French philosopher, scientist and mathematician, best known for attempting to reconcile Epicurean atomism with Christianity and for publishing the first official observations of the Transit of Mercury in 1631. ... For other uses, see Moose (disambiguation). ... William IV (24 June 1532 – 25 August 1592), also called Willian the Wise, was the first Landgrave of Hesse-Kassel. ... Hesse-Kassel (Hessen-Kassel in German) was a German principality that came into existence when the Landgraviate of Hesse was divided in 1568 upon the death of Landgrave Philip I of Hesse. ... For other uses, see Moose (disambiguation). ... The old water tower in Landskrona is perhaps the local landmark and can be seen from far away Landskrona is a city in southernmost Sweden with some 27,000 inhabitants. ...


Death

Tycho died on October 24, 1601, eleven days after suddenly becoming very ill during a banquet. He was ill for eleven days, and toward the end of his illness he is said to have told Kepler "Ne frustra vixisse videar!", "Let me not seem to have lived in vain”.[4][5] For hundreds of years, the general belief was that he had strained his bladder. It had been said that to leave the banquet before it concluded would be the height of bad manners, and so he remained, and that his bladder, stretched to its limit, developed an infection which he later died of. This theory was supported by Kepler's first-hand account. is the 297th day of the year (298th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events February 8 - Robert Devereux, 2nd Earl of Essex, rebels against Elizabeth I of England - revolt is quickly crushed February 25 - Robert Devereux beheaded Jesuit Matteo Ricci arrives in China Bad harvest in Russia due to rainy summer Dutch troops drive Portuguese from Málaga Battle of Kinsale, Ireland Births... This article is about the urinary bladder. ...


Recent investigations have suggested that Tycho did not die from urinary problems but instead from mercury poisoning: extremely toxic levels of it have been found in his hair and hair-roots. Tycho may have poisoned himself by imbibing some medicine containing unintentional mercuric chloride impurities, or may have been poisoned.[6] According to a 2005 book by Joshua and Anne-Lee Gilder, there is substantial circumstantial evidence that Kepler murdered Brahe; they argue that Kepler had the means, motive, and opportunity, and stole Tycho's data on his death.[7] According to the Gilders, they find it "unlikely"[7] Tycho could have poisoned himself since he was an alchemist known to be familiar with the toxicity of different mercury compounds. This article is about the element. ... Mercury chloride is a white poisonous soluble crystalline sublimate of mercury, used as a pesticide or antiseptic or wood preservative. ...

Tycho Brahe's grave
Tycho Brahe's grave

Tycho Brahe's body is currently interred in a tomb in the Church of Our Lady in front of Týn near Old Town Square near the Astronomical Clock in Prague. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2560 × 1920 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2560 × 1920 pixel, file size: 1. ... Church of Our Lady in front of Týn, Old Town Square, Prague The Church of Our Lady in front of Týn (in Czech Chrám Panny Marie pÅ™ed Týnem, Týnský chrám or just Týn) is a dominant feature of the Old Town district... old town This page is a candidate for speedy deletion. ... Prague astronomical clock Astronomical clock in Lund Cathedral An astronomical clock is a clock with special mechanisms and dials to display the relative positions of the sun, moon, zodiacal constellations, and sometimes major planets. ... For other uses, see Prague (disambiguation). ...


Career: observing the heavens

Supernova

On November 11, 1572, Tycho observed (from Herrevad Abbey) a very bright star which unexpectedly appeared in the constellation Cassiopeia, now named SN 1572. Since it had been maintained since antiquity that the world beyond the orbit of the moon, i.e. that of the fixed stars, was eternal and unchangeable (a fundamental axiom of the Aristotelian world view: celestial immutability), other observers held that the phenomenon was something in the Earth's atmosphere. Tycho, however, observed that the parallax of the object did not change from night to night, suggesting that the object was far away. Tycho argued that a nearby object should appear to shift its position with respect to the background. He published a small book, De Stella Nova (1573), thereby coining the term nova for a "new" star (we now know that Tycho's star in Cassiopeia was a supernova 7500 light years from earth). This discovery was decisive for his choice of astronomy as a profession. Tycho was strongly critical of those who dismissed the implications of the astronomical appearance, writing in the preface to De Stella Nova: "O crassa ingenia. O caecos coeli spectatores" ("Oh thick wits. Oh blind watchers of the sky"). is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... January 16 - Thomas Howard, 4th Duke of Norfolk is tried for treason for his part in the Ridolfi plot to restore Catholicism in England. ... Herrevad Abbey is an abbey near Ljungbyhed, Sweden. ... Cassiopeia (IPA: ) is a northern constellation which Greek mythology considered to represent a vain queen who boasted about her unrivaled beauty. ... X-ray image of the expanding cloud of debris and high energy electrons from Tychos supernova. ... “Ancient” redirects here. ... This article needs cleanup. ... For other uses, see Parallax (disambiguation). ... Year 1573 was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... Artists conception of a white dwarf star accreting hydrogen from a larger companion A nova (pl. ... For other uses, see Supernova (disambiguation). ... A light-year, symbol ly, is the distance light travels in one year: exactly 9. ...


Tycho's discovery was the inspiration for Edgar Allan Poe's poem, "Al Aaraaf."[citation needed] In 1998, Sky & Telescope magazine published an article by Donald W. Olson, Marilynn S. Olson and Russell L. Doescher arguing, in part, that Tycho's supernova was also the same "star that's westward from the pole" in Shakespeare's Hamlet. Edgar Allan Poe (January 19, 1809 – October 7, 1849) was an American poet, short story writer, playwright, editor, literary critic, essayist and one of the leaders of the American Romantic Movement. ... Al Aaraaf was written by Edgar Allan Poe in 1829. ... Sky & Telescope is a monthly magazine providing articles and information on all aspects of astronomy, space exploration, telescope equipment, and amateur telescope making and use. ... For other uses, see Hamlet (disambiguation). ...


Heliocentrism

In this depiction of the Tychonic system, the objects on blue orbits (the moon and the sun) revolve around the earth. The objects on orange orbits (Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn) revolve around the sun. Around all is sphere of fixed stars.
In this depiction of the Tychonic system, the objects on blue orbits (the moon and the sun) revolve around the earth. The objects on orange orbits (Mercury, Venus, Mars, Jupiter, and Saturn) revolve around the sun. Around all is sphere of fixed stars.

Kepler tried, but was unable, to persuade Tycho to adopt the heliocentric model of the solar system. Tycho believed in a modified geocentric model known as the Tychonic system, for the same reasons that he argued that the supernova of 1572 was not near the Earth. He argued that if the Earth were in motion, then nearby stars should appear to shift their positions with respect to background stars. In fact, this effect of parallax does exist; but it could not be observed with the naked eye, or even with the telescopes of the next two hundred years, because even the nearest stars are much more distant than most astronomers of the time believed possible. The Tychonic system is very similar to the Copernican one, except that it has a static earth instead of a static sun. Image File history File links Tychonian_system. ... Image File history File links Tychonian_system. ... Heliocentric Solar System Heliocentrism (lower panel) in comparison to the geocentric model (upper panel) In astronomy, heliocentrism is the theory that the sun is at the center of the Universe and/or the Solar System. ... This article is about the Solar System. ... This article is about the historical term. ... Tychonic system The Tychonic system (or Tychonian system) was an effort by Tycho Brahe to create a model of the solar system which would combine what he saw as the mathematical benefits of the Copernican system with the philosophical and physical benefits of the Ptolemaic system. ... This list of the nearest stars to Earth is ordered by increasing distance out to a maximum of 5 parsecs (16. ... For other uses, see Parallax (disambiguation). ...


In the years following Galileo's observation of the phases of Venus in 1610, which made the Ptolemaic system intractable, the Tychonic system became the major competitor with Copernicanism, and was adopted by the Roman Catholic Church for many years as its official astronomical conception of the universe. Galileo can refer to: Galileo Galilei, astronomer, philosopher, and physicist (1564 - 1642) the Galileo spacecraft, a NASA space probe that visited Jupiter and its moons the Galileo positioning system Life of Galileo, a play by Bertolt Brecht Galileo (1975) - screen adaptation of the play Life of Galileo by Bertolt Brecht... The phases of Venus can be seen without a telescope by those with exeptionally acute eye-sight. ... Mediaeval drawing of the Ptolemaic system. ... Catholic Church redirects here. ...


Uraniborg, Stjerneborg, and Benátky nad Jizerou

Watercolor plan of Uraniborg
Watercolor plan of Uraniborg

King Frederick II of Denmark and Norway, impressed with Tycho's 1572 observations, financed the construction of two observatories for Tycho on the island of Hven in Oresund. These were Uraniborg and Stjerneborg. Uraniborg also had a laboratory for his alchemical experiments. Download high resolution version (1000x821, 319 KB)A painting of Tycho Brahes Uraniborg palace-observatory from his 1598 book - highest resolution This is his plan of the gardens, with the main building in the centre and servants quarters, a printing studio, and other buildings just inside the outer walls. ... Download high resolution version (1000x821, 319 KB)A painting of Tycho Brahes Uraniborg palace-observatory from his 1598 book - highest resolution This is his plan of the gardens, with the main building in the centre and servants quarters, a printing studio, and other buildings just inside the outer walls. ... For other uses, see Monarch (disambiguation). ... Frederick II (July 1, 1534 - April 4, 1588), King of Denmark and Norway from 1559 until his death. ... Map of Hven from the Blaeu Atlas 1663 Backafall, the east coast of Hven Hven or Ven (Swedish and Danish usually Ven, but sometimes Hven which is Swedish old spelling) is a small Swedish island in the Öresund strait, between Scania and Zealand (Denmark). ... Denmark (red) / south Sweden (yellow), connected with the Oresund Bridge. ... Uraniborg was the astronomical/astrological observatory of Tycho Brahe; built circa 1576-1580 on Hven (also known as Ven or Hveen), an island in the Öresund; between Zealand and Scania. ... Stjerneborg was Tycho Brahes underground observatory next to his palace-observatory Uraniborg. ... For other uses, see Alchemy (disambiguation). ...


Because Tycho disagreed with Christian IV, the new king of his country, he left Hven in 1597 and moved to Prague in 1599. Sponsored by Rudolf II, the Holy Roman Emperor, he built a new observatory in a castle in Benátky nad Jizerou, 50 km from Prague, and he worked there for one year. The emperor then had him move back to Prague, where he stayed until his death. Besides the emperor himself, he was also financially supported by several nobles, including Oldrich Desiderius Pruskowsky von Pruskow, to whom he dedicated his famous volume, the "Mechanica." The coronation of King Christian IV, painted by Otto Bache, 1887. ... For other uses, see: 1597 (number). ... For other uses, see Prague (disambiguation). ... Year 1599 was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... Holy Roman Emperor Rudolf II Rudolf II Habsburg was an emperor of the Holy Roman Empire, king of Bohemia, and king of Hungary. ... This article is about the medieval empire. ... Benátky nad Jizerou is a town in the Central Bohemian Region of the Czech Republic, between cities Stará Boleslav and Mladá Boleslav. ...


In return for their support, Tycho's duties included preparing astrological charts and predictions for his patrons on events such as births, weather forecasting, and providing astrological interpretations of significant astronomical events such as the comet of 1577 and the supernova of 1572. Hand-coloured version of the anonymous Flammarion woodcut (1888). ... For the geological process, see Weathering or Erosion. ... Comet Hale-Bopp Comet West For other uses, see Comet (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Supernova (disambiguation). ... January 16 - Thomas Howard, 4th Duke of Norfolk is tried for treason for his part in the Ridolfi plot to restore Catholicism in England. ...


Astronomy

Mural quadrant (Tycho Brahe 1598)
Mural quadrant (Tycho Brahe 1598)
Danish stamp of 1946 featuring Tycho Brahe.

Tycho was the preeminent observational astronomer of the pre-telescopic period, and his observations of stellar and planetary positions achieved unparalleled accuracy for their time. For example, Tycho measured Earth's axial tilt as 23 degrees and 31.5 minutes, which he claimed to be more accurate than Copernicus by 3.5 minutes. After his death, his records of the motion of the planet Mars enabled Kepler to discover the laws of planetary motion, which provided powerful support for the Copernican heliocentric theory of the solar system. Download high resolution version (3134x4600, 4574 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (3134x4600, 4574 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Image File history File links Brahe_stamp. ... Image File history File links Brahe_stamp. ... Year 1946 (MCMXLVI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full 1946 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the astronomical object. ... This article is about the astronomical term. ... In astronomy, axial tilt is the inclination angle of a planets rotational axis in relation to a perpendicular to its orbital plane. ... Mars is the fourth planet from the Sun in the solar system, named after the Roman god of war (the counterpart of the Greek Ares), on account of its blood red color as viewed in the night sky. ... Johannes Keplers primary contributions to astronomy/astrophysics were his three laws of planetary motion. ... // Main article: Heliocentrism Much has been which did not, however, revolve around a central sun. ...


Tycho himself was not a Copernican, but proposed a system in which the Sun orbited the Earth while the other planets orbited the Sun. His system provided a safe position for astronomers who were dissatisfied with older models but were reluctant to accept the Earth's motion. It gained a considerable following after 1616 when Rome decided officially that the heliocentric model was contrary to both philosophy and Scripture, and could be discussed only as a computational convenience that had no connection to fact. His system also offered a major innovation: while both the geocentric model and the heliocentric model as set forth by Copernicus relied on the idea of transparent rotating crystalline spheres to carry the planets in their orbits, Tycho eliminated the spheres entirely. Sol redirects here. ... This article is about Earth as a planet. ... Sol redirects here. ... Year 1616 (MDCXVI) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ...


He was aware that a star observed near the horizon appears with a greater altitude than the real one, due to atmospheric refraction, and he worked out tables for the correction of this source of error. Altitude is the elevation of an object from a known level or datum. ... For the property of metals, see refraction (metallurgy). ...


To perform the huge number of products needed to produce much of his astronomical data, Tycho relied heavily on the then-new technique of prosthaphaeresis, an algorithm for approximating products based on trigonometric identities that predated logarithms. Prosthaphaeresis was an algorithm used in the late 16th century and early 17th century for approximating products using formulas from trigonometry. ... In mathematics, trigonometric identities are equalities that involve trigonometric functions that are true for all values of the occurring variables. ...


Astrology

Like the fifteenth century astronomer Regiomontanus, Tycho Brahe appears to have accepted astrological prognostications on the principle that the heavenly bodies undoubtedly influenced (yet did not determine) terrestrial events, but expressed skepticism about the multiplicity of interpretative schemes, and increasingly preferred to work on establishing a sound mathematical astronomy. Two early tracts, one entitled Against Astrologers for Astrology, and one on a new method of dividing the sky into astrological houses, were never published and are now lost. (14th century - 15th century - 16th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 15th century was that century which lasted from 1401 to 1500. ... An astronomer or astrophysicist is a person whose area of interest is astronomy or astrophysics. ... Johannes Müller von Königsberg (June 6, 1436 – July 6, 1476), known by his Latin pseudonym Regiomontanus, was an important German mathematician, astronomer and astrologer. ... An astrological chart (or horoscope) _ Y2K Chart — This particular chart is calculated for January 1, 2000 at 12:01:00 A.M. Eastern Standard Time in New York City, New York, USA. (Longitude: 074W0023 - Latitude: 40N4251) Astrology (from Greek: αστρολ&#959... A planet (from the Greek πλανήτης, planetes or wanderers) is a body of considerable mass that orbits a star and that produces very little or no energy through nuclear fusion. ... A landform comprises a geomorphological unit, and is largely defined by its surface form and location in the landscape, as part of the terrain, and as such, is typically an element of topography. ... This article is about the psychological term. ... In mathematics, the multiplicity of a member of a multiset is how many memberships in the multiset it has. ... Mathematics is commonly defined as the study of patterns of structure, change, and space; more informally, one might say it is the study of figures and numbers. Mathematical knowledge is constantly growing, through research and application, but mathematics itself is not usually considered a natural science. ... For other uses, see Astronomy (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Sky (disambiguation). ... Most astrological systems divide the astrological chart (or natal chart) into twelve houses, which depend more on the time and place of birth (or initiation) than on the date. ...


Tycho also worked in the area of weather prediction, produced astrological interpretations of the supernova of 1572 and the comet of 1577, and furnished his patrons Frederick II and Rudolph II with nativities and other predictions (thereby strengthening the ties between patron and client by demonstrating value). An astrological world view was fundamental to Tycho's entire philosophy of nature. His interest in alchemy, particularly the medical alchemy associated with Paracelsus, was almost as long-standing as his study of astrology and astronomy simultaneously, and Uraniborg was constructed as both observatory and laboratory. Meteorology is the scientific study of the atmosphere that focuses on weather processes and forecasting. ... An astrological chart (or horoscope) _ Y2K Chart — This particular chart is calculated for January 1, 2000 at 12:01:00 A.M. Eastern Standard Time in New York City, New York, USA. (Longitude: 074W0023 - Latitude: 40N4251) Astrology (from Greek: αστρολ&#959... For other uses, see Supernova (disambiguation). ... January 16 - Thomas Howard, 4th Duke of Norfolk is tried for treason for his part in the Ridolfi plot to restore Catholicism in England. ... Comet Hale-Bopp Comet West For other uses, see Comet (disambiguation). ... Holy Roman Emperor Rudolf II Rudolf II Habsburg was an emperor of the Holy Roman Empire, king of Bohemia, and king of Hungary. ... This natal chart, appearing in Ebenezer Siblys Astrology (1806), was drawn for the speculated birth date of Jesus Christ, midnight, December 25, year 45 in the Julian calendar. ... An astrological chart (or horoscope) _ Y2K Chart — This particular chart is calculated for January 1, 2000 at 12:01:00 A.M. Eastern Standard Time in New York City, New York, USA. (Longitude: 074W0023 - Latitude: 40N4251) Astrology (from Greek: αστρολ&#959... A world view (or worldview) is a term calqued from the German word Weltanschauung (pronounced ) Welt is the German word for world, and Anschauung is the German word for view or outlook. It implies a concept fundamental to German philosophy and epistemology and refers to a wide world perception. ... For other uses, see Philosophy (disambiguation). ... This article is about the physical universe. ... See drugs, medication, and pharmacology for substances that are used to treat patients. ... Presumed portrait of Paracelsus, attributed to the school of Quentin Matsys. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Uraniborg was the astronomical/astrological observatory of Tycho Brahe; built circa 1576-1580 on Hven (also known as Ven or Hveen), an island in the Öresund; between Zealand and Scania. ... This article is about scientific observatories. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


In an introductory oration to the course of lectures he gave in Copenhagen in 1574, Tycho defended astrology on the grounds of correspondences between the heavenly bodies, terrestrial substances (metals, stones etc.) and bodily organs (medical astrology). He was later to emphasise the importance of studying alchemy and astrology together with a pair of emblems bearing the mottoes: Despiciendo suspicio ("By looking down I see upward") and Suspiciendo despicio ("By looking up I see downward"). As several scholars have now argued, Tycho's commitment to a relationship between macrocosm and microcosm even played a role in his rejection of Copernicanism and his construction of a third world-system. Orator is a Latin word for speaker (from the Latin verb oro, meaning I speak or I pray). In ancient Rome, the art of speaking in public (Ars Oratoria) was a professional competence especially cultivated by politicians and lawyers. ... For other uses, see Copenhagen (disambiguation). ... Year 1574 was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... Hand-coloured version of the anonymous Flammarion woodcut (1888). ... This article is about the biological unit. ... This old document shows the anciently-held link between the 12 signs of the Zodiac and the various parts of the body Medical astrology (traditionally known as Iatromathematics) is an ancient medical system that associates various parts of the body, diseases and drugs as under the influence of the Sun... For other uses, see Alchemy (disambiguation). ... Hand-coloured version of the anonymous Flammarion woodcut (1888). ... Macrocosm and microcosm is an ancient Greek schema of seeing the same patterns reproduced in all levels of reality. ... Nicolaus Copernicus (in Latin; Polish Mikołaj Kopernik, German Nikolaus Kopernikus - February 19, 1473 – May 24, 1543) was a Polish astronomer, mathematician and economist who developed a heliocentric (Sun-centered) theory of the solar system in a form detailed enough to make it scientifically useful. ...


Bibliography

References

  1. ^ Stephen Hawking (2004). The Illustrated on the Shoulders of Giants: The Great Works of Physics and Astronomy. Running Press. ISBN 0762418982. 
  2. ^ Tycho Brahe's Nose And The Story Of His Pet Moose. www.nada.kth.se. Retrieved on 31 March, 2005. from a translation from Gassendi
  3. ^ J. L. E. Dreyer (1890). Tycho Brahe: A Picture of Scientific Life and Work in the Sixteenth Century. Adam and Charles Black, Edinburgh. unknown ISBN.  page 210 refers to Tycho's elk as cited by:
  4. ^ Pierre Gassendi, "Tycho Brahe", 1654
  5. ^ David L. Goodstein and Judith R. Goodstein (1999). Feynman's Lost Lecture: The Motion of Planets Around the Sun. W. W. Norton & Co. ISBN 0393039188. 
  6. ^ http://www.tychobrahe.com/eng_tychobrahe/myt.html
  7. ^ a b Joshua Gilder and Anne-Lee Gilder (2005). Heavenly Intrigue: Johannes Kepler, Tycho Brahe, and the Murder Behind One of History's Greatest Scientific Discoveries. Anchor. ISBN 978-1-4000-3176-4. 
  • Brahe, Tycho. Tychonis Brahe Dani Opera Omnia (in Latin). Vol 1-15. 1913-1929. Edited by J.L.E. Dreyer.
  • Skautrup, Peter, 1941 Den jyske lov: Text med oversattelse og ordbog. Aarhus: Universitets-forlag.
  • Wittendorff, Alex. 1994. Tyge Brahe. Copenhagen: G. E. C. Gad.
  • Strange Cases from the Files of Astronomical Sociology. University of Notre Dame. Retrieved on 31 March, 2005.
  • Olson, Donald W.; Olson, Marilynn S.; Doescher, Russell L., "The Stars of Hamlet," Sky & Telescope (November 1998)
  • R. Cowen (1999). "Danish astronomer argues for a changing cosmos" (in English). Science News 156 (25 & 26). Retrieved on 2006-09-25. 
  • Brahe, Tycho. 'Astronomiæ instauratæ mechanica', 1598 European Digital Library Treasure

John Louis Emil Dreyer (February 13, 1852 – September 14, 1926) was a Danish-Irish astronomer. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Further reading

  • John Robert Christianson: On Tycho's Island: Tycho Brahe, science, and culture in the sixteenth century. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2000 ISBN 0-521-65081-X
  • Victor E. Thoren: The Lord of Uraniborg: a biography of Tycho Brahe. Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1990 ISBN 0-521-35158-8
  • Kitty Ferguson: The nobleman and his housedog: Tycho Brahe and Johannes Kepler: the strange partnership that revolutionised science. London: Review, 2002 ISBN 0-7472-7022-8 (published in the US as: Tycho & Kepler: the unlikely partnership that forever changed our understanding of the heavens. New York: Walker, 2002 ISBN 0-8027-1390-4)
  • Joshua Gilder and Anne-Lee Gilder Heavenly intrigue. New York: Doubleday, 2004 ISBN 0-385-50844-1
  • Arthur Koestler: "The Sleepwalkers: A History of Man's Changing Vision of the Universe". Hutchinson, 1959; reprinted in Arkana, 1989

The headquarters of the Cambridge University Press, in Trumpington Street, Cambridge. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Tycho Brahe
  • Brahe, Tycho MacTutor History of Mathematics
  • Tycho Brahe pages by Adam Mosley at Starry Messenger: An Electronic History of Astronomy, University of Cambridge
  • Astronomiae instauratae mechanica, 1602 edition - Full digital facsimile, Lehigh University.
  • Astronomiae instauratae mechanica, 1602 edition - Full digital facsimile, Smithsonian Institution.
  • Astronomiae instauratae mechanica, 1598 edition - Full digital facsimile, the Danish Royal Library. Includes Danish and English translations.
  • Electronic facsimile editions of the rare book collection at the Vienna Institute of Astronomy
  • Brahe Bio at Skyscript
  • The Galileo Project article on Tycho Brahe
  • The Observations of Tycho Brahe
  • Tycho's 1004-Star Catalog: The First Critical Edition, edited and analyzed astronomically and statistically by Dennis Rawlins.

Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Astronomy is the oldest of the natural sciences, dating back to antiquity, with its origins in the religious, mythological, and astrological practices of pre-history: vestiges of these are still found in astrology, a discipline long interwoven with public and governmental astronomy, and not completely disentangled from it until a... The Royal Library in Copenhagen (Danish: Det Kongelige Bibliotek) is the national library of Denmark and the largest and most important library of Scandinavia. ... Dennis Rawlins (1937 Baltimore, Maryland, U.S. –) is an American astronomer, historian, and publisher, known [1] for his intellect and acerbic wit. ...

Named after Tycho

Geography

Tycho is a prominent lunar impact crater located in the southern lunar highlands. ... For other moons in the solar system see natural satellite. ... A crater on Mars has been named after Tycho Brahe. ... Mars is the fourth planet from the Sun in the solar system, named after the Roman god of war (the counterpart of the Greek Ares), on account of its blood red color as viewed in the night sky. ...

Things

  • Tycho Brahe Planetarium in Copenhagen, Denmark.
  • M/F Tycho Brahe, a Scandlines ferry connecting Helsingør in Denmark and Helsingborg in Sweden
  • Tyho Braheskolan, a science college in Helsingborg
  • US Naval Observatory Time Service Department web site tycho.usno.navy.mil

Tycho Brahe Planetarium The Tycho Brahe Planetarium lies in Copenhagen, Denmark, at the southern end of Skt. ... For other uses, see Copenhagen (disambiguation). ... M/F Tycho Brahe is a Danish train and car ferry that operates between Helsingør (Denmark) and Helsingborg (Sweden), on the distance of just 5 km (2,7 miles, MS Ore Sund). ... External links Scandlines - Official site Categories: | | | ... Kronborg Castle Helsingør , also known by its English anglo name Elsinore, is a city in Helsingør municipality on the northeast coast of the island of Zealand (Sjælland) in eastern Denmark. ... Coordinates: , Country Municipality County SkÃ¥ne County Province Scania Charter 1085 Area [1]  - Total 37. ... Coordinates: , Country Municipality County SkÃ¥ne County Province Scania Charter 1085 Area [1]  - Total 37. ...

Literature

  • Tycho Brahes Weg zu Gott (Tycho Brahe's Path to God) by Max Brod, 1916
  • Tycho Brahe, pseudonym of Jerry Holkins and a character from the popular webcomic Penny Arcade
  • Tycho Tithonus, the main character in William Sleator's 1981 book The Green Futures of Tycho
  • Tycho Brahe is mentioned in the book "The Golem's Eye", by Jonathan Stroud, as Bartimaeus' erstwhile master. Bartimaeus claims to have made Tycho's false nose.

Max Brod Max Brod (May 27, 1884 – December 20, 1968) was a German-speaking Jewish author, composer, and journalist. ... Mike Krahulik and Jerry Holkins (right) Keith Gerald Jerry Holkins (born February 6, 1976), is the writer of the popular webcomic Penny Arcade. ... Penny Arcade is a webcomic and blog written by Jerry Holkins and illustrated by Mike Krahulik. ... William Warner Sleator III (born February 13, 1945), known as William Sleator, is an American science fiction author who writes primarily young adult novels but has also written for younger readers. ... The Green Futures of Tycho The Green Futures of Tycho is a 1981 science fiction novel for young audience by William Sleator. ...

Music

  • Tycho (Scott Hansen), an American electronic musician
  • Tycho Brahe, an Australian powersynth band
  • An old name of an Irish synthpop band, now called Tychonaut
  • Tycobrahe Sound Company[1] of Hermosa Beach, California.
  • The name of an album by French electronic duo Lightwave.

An electronic musician is a musician who composes or plays music from synthetic sounds generated with synthesizers, samplers, drum machines or music sequencers. ... Hermosa Beach is a city in Los Angeles County, California, United States. ...

Film

Tycho Celchu (pronounced /sel/choo/) is part of the fictional Star Wars Universe. ... This article is about the series. ...

Gaming


  Results from FactBites:
 
The Galileo Project | Science | Tycho Brahe (1099 words)
Tycho was also the first astronomer to make corrections for atmospheric refraction.
Tycho's observations of the new star of 1572 and comet of 1577, and his publications on these phenomena, were instrumental in establishing the fact that these bodies were above the Moon and that therefore the heavens were not immutable as Aristotle had argued and philosophers still believed.
Tycho gave various reasons for not accepting the heliocentric theory, but it appears that he could not abandon Aristotelian physics which is predicated on an absolute notion of place.
Tycho Brahe - MSN Encarta (421 words)
The data Brahe accumulated was superior to all other astronomical measurements made until the invention of the telescope in the early 17th century.
Brahe accepted the proposal, and in 1576 construction began on the castle of Uranienborg (“fortress of the heavens”), where for 20 years the astronomer pursued his observations.
In 1597 Brahe accepted an invitation to Bohemia from the Holy Roman Emperor Rudolf II, who gave him a pension of 3000 ducats and an estate near Prague, where a new Uranienborg was to be built.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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