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Encyclopedia > Ty Cobb
Ty Cobb
Outfielder
Born: December 18, 1886(1886-12-18)
Died: July 17, 1961 (aged 74)
Batted: Left Threw: Right
MLB debut
August 30, 1905
for the Detroit Tigers
Final game
September 11, 1928
for the Philadelphia Athletics
Career statistics
AVG     .366
Hits     4,189
RBI     1,937
Teams

As Player Image File history File links TyCobb. ... Austin Kearns, an outfielder, catches a fly ball. ... is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1886 (MDCCCLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 198th day of the year (199th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 242nd day of the year (243rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1905 (disambiguation). ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) Central Division (1998–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 2, 5, 6, 16, 23, 42 Name Detroit Tigers (1901–present) Other nicknames The Bless You Boys Ballpark Comerica Park (2000–present) Tiger Stadium (1912-1999) Briggs Stadium (1938-1960) Navin Field (1912-1938) Bennett... is the 254th day of the year (255th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... There have been three professional baseball teams based in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania known as the Philadelphia Athletics: 1. ... Batting average is a statistic in both cricket and baseball measuring the performance of cricket batsmen and baseball hitters, respectively. ... In Major League Baseball history, Ty Cobb had a record 4,191 hits (later revised to 4,189) by 1928; Pete Rose would surpass it 57 years later, and finish with 4,256 career hits. ... “RBI” redirects here. ...

As Manager Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) Central Division (1998–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 2, 5, 6, 16, 23, 42 Name Detroit Tigers (1901–present) Other nicknames The Bless You Boys Ballpark Comerica Park (2000–present) Tiger Stadium (1912-1999) Briggs Stadium (1938-1960) Navin Field (1912-1938) Bennett... The following are the baseball events of the year 1905 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1926 throughout the world. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 9, 27, 34, 42, 43, (As) Name Oakland Athletics (1968–present) Kansas City Athletics (1955-1967) Philadelphia Athletics (1901-1954) (Referred to as As) Other nicknames The As, The White Elephants, The... April 12 - President Calvin Coolidge throws out the first ball in Washington D.C. as the Washington Senators lost to the Boston Red Sox 6-2. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1928 throughout the world. ...

Career highlights and awards
All-Time Records
  • Career batting average (.366)[1]
  • Career steals of home (54)
  • Career batting titles (11 or 12)[1]
Notable Achievements
  • Batted over .320 for 22 straight seasons
  • Batted over .400 three times (1911, 1912 & 1922)
  • Won the Triple Crown in 1909
  • One of the 5 inaugural members of the Hall of Fame
Member of the National
Baseball Hall of Fame
Elected     1936
Vote     98.2%

Tyrus Raymond "Ty" Cobb (December 18, 1886July 17, 1961), nicknamed "The Georgia Peach," was a Hall of Fame baseball player and is regarded by historians and journalists[2][3] as the best player of the dead-ball era and as one of the greatest players of all time. Cobb received the most votes of any player on the 1936 inaugural Hall of Fame Ballot.[4] Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) Central Division (1998–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 2, 5, 6, 16, 23, 42 Name Detroit Tigers (1901–present) Other nicknames The Bless You Boys Ballpark Comerica Park (2000–present) Tiger Stadium (1912-1999) Briggs Stadium (1938-1960) Navin Field (1912-1938) Bennett... The following are the baseball events of the year 1921 throughout the world. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1926 throughout the world. ... See also: 1910 in sports, 1912 in sports and the list of years in sports. Auto Racing January 21 - The first Monte Carlo motor rally May 30 - At the Indianapolis Motor Speedway, the first Indianapolis 500 ends with Ray Harroun becoming the first winner of the 500-mile auto race. ... See also: 1911 in sports, 1913 in sports and the list of years in sports. Baseball April 20: The Boston Red Sox open in the new Fenway Park with a 7-6, 11-inning win over the New York Highlanders before 27,000. ... See also: 1921 in sports, other events of 1922, 1923 in sports and the list of years in sports. // Football (Australian Rules) Victorian Football League - Fitzroy wins the 26th VFL Premiership (Fitzroy 11. ... In baseball, the Triple Crown refers to: A batter who (at seasons end) leads the league in three major categories -- home runs, runs batted in, and batting average. ... See also: 1908 in sports, 1910 in sports and the list of years in sports. Baseball The Pittsburgh Pirates defeat the Detroit Tigers, four games to three, in the World Series. ... Baseball Hall of Fame redirects here. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Baseball Hall of Fame redirects here. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... is the 352nd day of the year (353rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1886 (MDCCCLXXXVI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... is the 198th day of the year (199th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, located at 62 Main Street in Cooperstown, New York, is a semi-official museum operated by private interests serving as the central point for the study of the history of baseball in the United States and beyond, the display of baseball-related... MLB and Major Leagues redirect here. ... Ebbets Field in 1913 The dead-ball era is a baseball term used to describe the period between 1900 (though some date it to the beginning of baseball) and the emergence of Babe Ruth as a power hitter in 1920. ... The Bitch ass elections to select inductees to the Baseball Hall of Fame were held in 1936. ...


Cobb is widely credited with setting 90 Major League Baseball records during his career.[5][6][7][8] He still holds several records as of 2007, including the highest career batting average .366 and most career batting titles with 12 (or 11, depending on source).[9] He retained many other records for almost a half century or more, including most career hits until 1985 (4,191 or 4,189, depending on source),[10][11] most career runs (2,245 or 2,246 depending on source) until 2001,[12] most career games played (3,035) and at bats (11,429 or 11,434 depending on source) until 1974,[13][14] and the modern record for most career stolen bases (892) until 1977.[15] MLB and Major Leagues redirect here. ... Batting average is a statistic in both cricket and baseball measuring the performance of cricket batsmen and baseball hitters, respectively. ... Batting average is a statistic in both cricket and baseball measuring the performance of cricket batsmen and baseball hitters, respectively. ... The batting championship is awarded to the Major League Baseball player in each the American League and National League who has the highest batting average in a particular season. ... In Major League Baseball history, Ty Cobb had a record 4,191 hits (later revised to 4,189) by 1928; Pete Rose would surpass it 57 years later, and finish with 4,256 career hits. ... Bengie Molina of the Anaheim Angels (in gray and red) scores a run by touching home plate after rounding all the bases. ... In baseball statistics, games played (denoted by G) indicates the total number of games in which a player has participated (in any capacity). ... In baseball statistics, an at bat (AB) is used to calculate other data such as batting average. ... The all-time stolen base leader, Rickey Henderson, swipes third in 1988. ... The all-time stolen base leader, Rickey Henderson, swipes third in 1988. ...


Cobb's legacy as an athlete has sometimes been overshadowed by his surly temperament, allegedly severe racism, and aggressive reputation,[16] which was described by the Detroit Free Press as "daring to the point of dementia."[17] This box:      Racism has many definitions, the most common and widely accepted is that members of one race are intrinsically superior or inferior to members of other races. ... Along with The Detroit News, the Detroit Free Press is one of the two major metro Detroit newspapers. ...

Contents

Early life and baseball career

Ty Cobb was born in Narrows, Georgia, in 1886 as the first of three children to Amanda Chitwood Cobb and William Herschel Cobb. Narrows, Georgia, United States, was the birthplace of Ty Cobb. ...


Ty spent his first years in baseball as a member of the Royston Rompers, the semi-pro Royston Reds, and the Augusta Tourists of the Sally League. However, the Tourists cut Cobb two days into the season.[18] He then went to try out for the Anniston Steelers of the semi-pro Tennessee-Alabama League, with his father's stern admonition still ringing in his ears: "Don't come home a failure."[19][20] After joining the Steelers for a monthly salary of $50,[21] Cobb promoted himself by sending several postcards written under different aliases to Grantland Rice, the sports editor of the Atlanta Journal. Eventually, Rice wrote a small note in the Journal that a "young fellow named Cobb seems to be showing an unusual lot of talent."[22][23] After about three months, Ty returned to the Tourists. He finished the season hitting .237 in 35 games.[24] The South Atlantic League is a minor league baseball league which operates mostly in the southeastern United States, although it now has teams in New Jersey and Ohio. ... Nickname: The Model City Location in Alabama Coordinates: County Calhoun Settled April 1872 Incorporated 3 July 1883 Mayor Hoyt W. “Chip” Howell, Jr. ... Grantland Rice (November 1, 1880–July 13, 1954) was an early 20th century American sportswriter. ... The Atlanta Journal-Constitution is the only major daily newspaper in Atlanta and its suburbs. ...


August 1905 was an eventful month for Ty. The Tourists' management sold Cobb to the American League's Detroit Tigers for US$500 and $750.[25][26][27] Additionally, on August 8, 1905, Ty's father was shot to death by Ty's mother. William Cobb suspected his wife of infidelity, and was sneaking past his own bedroom window to catch her in the act; she only saw the silhouette of what she presumed to be an intruder, and, acting in self-defense, shot and killed her husband.[28] Mrs. Cobb was charged with murder and then released on a $10,000 recognizance bond.[29] She was acquitted on March 31, 1906.[30] Cobb later attributed his ferocious play to the death of his father, saying, "I did it for my father...He never got to see me play... But I knew he was watching me... and I never let him down".[31] The American League (or formally the American League of Professional Baseball Clubs) is one of two leagues that make up Major League Baseball in the United States of America and Canada. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) Central Division (1998–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 2, 5, 6, 16, 23, 42 Name Detroit Tigers (1901–present) Other nicknames The Bless You Boys Ballpark Comerica Park (2000–present) Tiger Stadium (1912-1999) Briggs Stadium (1938-1960) Navin Field (1912-1938) Bennett... USD redirects here. ... is the 220th day of the year (221st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1905 (disambiguation). ... In British and American law, the term recognizance is usually employed to describe an obligation of record, entered into before some court or magistrate duly authorized, whereby the party bound acknowledges (recognizes) that s/he owes a personal debt to the government or Crown, with a defeasance, subject to a... The word bail as a legal term means: Security, usually a sum of money, exchanged for the release of an arrested person as a guarantee of that persons appearance for trial. ... is the 90th day of the year (91st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1906 (MCMVI) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...


Major League career

The early years

Three weeks after his mother killed his father, Cobb played center field for the Detroit Tigers. On August 30, 1905, in his first major league at-bat, Cobb doubled off the New York Highlanders's Jack Chesbro. That season, Cobb managed to bat only .240 in 41 games. Nevertheless, he showed enough promise as a rookie for the Tigers to give him a lucrative $1,500 contract for 1906. is the 242nd day of the year (243rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1905 (disambiguation). ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... Jack Chesbro on a 1909-1911 American Tobacco Company baseball card. ...

Cobb signs a $5000 contract for 1908 after a bitter holdout.

Although rookie hazing was customary, Cobb could not endure it in good humor, and he soon became alienated from his teammates. He later attributed his hostile temperament to this experience: "These old-timers turned me into a snarling wildcat."[17] Image File history File links Ty Cobb signs in 1907 File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Ty Cobb signs in 1907 File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ...


The following year (1906) he became the Tigers' full-time center fielder and hit .316 in 98 games. He would never hit below that mark again. Cobb, firmly entrenched in center field, led the Tigers to three consecutive American League Pennants from 1907-1909. Detroit would lose each World Series, however, with Cobb's post-season numbers being much below his career standard. See also: 1905 in sports, other events of 1906, 1907 in sports and the list of years in sports. // Baseball The Chicago White Sox defeat the Chicago Cubs, four games to two, in the World Series Football (Australian Rules) Victorian Football League Carlton wins the 10th VFL Premiership (Carlton 15. ... The American League (AL) is one of the two leagues of Major League Baseball. ... For other events named World Series, see World Series (disambiguation). ... For other events named World Series, see World Series (disambiguation). ...


In one notable 1907 game, Cobb reached first, stole second, stole third, and then stole home on consecutive attempts.[32] He finished that season with a league high .350 batting average, 212 hits, 49 steals and 119 Runs batted in (RBI).[27] At age 20, Cobb became the youngest player to win a batting championship and held this record until 1955 when fellow Detroit Tiger Al Kaline won the batting title when he was one day younger than Cobb.[33] Despite great success on the field, Cobb was no stranger to controversy off it. At Spring Training in 1907, he fought a black groundskeeper over the condition of the Tigers' field in Augusta, Georgia. Ty also ended up choking the man's wife when she intervened.[8] See also: 1906 in sports, 1908 in sports and the list of years in sports. ... “RBI” redirects here. ... The batting championship is awarded to the Major League Baseball player in each the American League and National League who has the highest batting average in a particular season. ... Albert William Kaline (born December 19, 1934 in Baltimore, Maryland) is a former Major League Baseball player. ... A Grapefruit League game at the LA Dodgers camp in Vero Beach, Florida In Major League Baseball, spring training is a series of exhibition games which precedes the regular season. ... Augusta is a city in the state of Georgia in the United States of America. ...

I always find that a drink of Coca-Cola between the games refreshes me to such an extent that I can start the second game feeling as if I had not been exercising at all, in spite of my exertions in the first.
Ty Cobb,
1907 Coca-Cola newspaper ad [34]

In September 1907, Cobb began a relationship with The Coca-Cola Company that would last the remainder of his life. By the time he died, he owned over 20,000 shares of stock and three bottling plants: one in Santa Maria, California; one in Twin Falls, Idaho; and one in Bend, Oregon. He was also a celebrity spokesman for the product.[34] The wave shape (known as the dynamic ribbon device) present on all Coca-Cola cans throughout the world derives from the contour of the original Coca-Cola bottles. ... The Coca-Cola Company (NYSE: KO) is one of the largest manufacturers, distributors and marketers of nonalcoholic beverage concentrates and syrups in the world. ... A bottling company is a commercial enterprise whose output is the bottling of beverages for distribution and sale. ... Santa Maria is the largest city in Santa Barbara County, California. ... Official language(s) English Capital Sacramento Largest city Los Angeles Largest metro area Greater Los Angeles Area  Ranked 3rd  - Total 158,302 sq mi (410,000 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 770 miles (1,240 km)  - % water 4. ... Motto: People Serving People Nickname: {{{nickname}}} Map Political Statistics Founded 1904 Incorporated 1904 Twin Falls County Mayor Lance W. Clow Geographic Statistics Area  - Total  - Land  - Water 31. ... Official language(s) English [1] Capital Boise Largest city Boise Largest metro area Boise metropolitan area Area  Ranked 14th  - Total 83,642 sq mi (216,632 km²)  - Width 305 miles (491 km)  - Length 479 miles (771 km)  - % water 0. ... Bend is a city in Deschutes County, Oregon, United States. ... Official language(s) (none)[1] Capital Salem Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 9th  - Total 98,466 sq mi (255,026 km²)  - Width 260 miles (420 km)  - Length 360 miles (580 km)  - % water 2. ...


The following season, the Tigers defeated the Chicago White Sox for the pennant. Cobb again won the batting title with a .324 batting average. Despite another loss in the Series, Cobb had something to celebrate. In August 1908, he married Charlotte "Charlie" Marion Lombard, the daughter of prominent Augustan Roswell Lombard.[35] In the offseason, Cobb and his wife lived in his father-in-law's Augusta estate, The Oaks. In November of 1913, the couple moved into their own house on Williams Street.[36] Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 2, 3, 4, 9, 11, 16, 19, 42, 72, Name Chicago White Sox (1904–present) Other nicknames The Sox, The South Siders, The ChiSox, The Pale Hose, The Good Guys, The Go-Go Sox, The... Augusta is a city in the state of Georgia in the United States of America. ...


The Tigers won the American League pennant again in 1909. During the Series, Cobb stole home in the second game, igniting a three-run rally, but that was the high point for Cobb. He ended batting a lowly .231 in his last World Series, as the Tigers lost in seven games. Although he performed poorly in the post-season, Cobb won the Triple Crown by hitting .377 with 107 RBI and nine home runs – all inside-the-park. Cobb thus became the only player of the modern era to lead his league in home runs in a season without hitting a ball over the fence.[37] See also: 1908 in sports, 1910 in sports and the list of years in sports. Baseball The Pittsburgh Pirates defeat the Detroit Tigers, four games to three, in the World Series. ... In baseball, the Triple Crown refers to: A batter who (at seasons end) leads the league in three major categories -- home runs, runs batted in, and batting average. ... In baseball parlance, an inside-the-park home run or leg home run is a play where a hitter scores a home run without hitting the ball out of play. ...

Conlon's famous picture of Cobb stealing third during the 1909 season.
Conlon's famous picture of Cobb stealing third during the 1909 season.

It was also in 1909 that Charles M. Conlon snapped his famous photograph of a grimacing Ty Cobb sliding into third base amid a cloud of dirt, which visually captured the grit and ferocity of Cobb's playing style.[38] Image File history File links Cobb stealing third File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Cobb stealing third File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Charles M. Conlon was an American photographer. ... Charles M. Conlon was an American photographer. ...


1910: Chalmers Award controversy

Main article: 1910 Chalmers Award

Going into the final days of the 1910 season, Cobb had a 4/10s of a percent lead on Nap Lajoie for the American League batting title. The prize for the winner of the title was a Chalmers Automobile. Cobb sat out the final games to preserve his average. Nap Lajoie hit safely eight times in his teams' doubleheader. However, six of those hits were bunt singles, and later came under scrutiny. Regardless, Cobb was credited with a higher batting average. Cobb and Napoleon Nap Lajoie Before the start of the 1910 baseball season, Hugh Chalmers of the Chalmers Automobile Company announced a promotion in which a Chalmers Model 30 automobile would be given to the batting champion for Major League baseballs American League and National League. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1910 throughout the world. ... Nap Lajoie on a 1911 American Tobacco Company baseball card. ... The Chalmers Motor Car Company was a United States based automobile company which flourished in the 1910s and 1920s. ... Doubleheader is the term used to describe two baseball games played between the same two teams on the same day. ...


As a result of the incident, Ban Johnson was forced to arbitrate the situation. He declared Cobb the rightful owner of the title. However, the Chalmers company elected to award a car to both of the players. Byron Bancroft Johnson (January 5, 1864 - March 28, 1931) was an American executive in Major League Baseball who served as the founder and first president of the American League. ... Arbitration, in the law, is a form of alternative dispute resolution — specifically, a legal alternative to litigation whereby the parties to a dispute agree to submit their respective positions (through agreement or hearing) to a neutral third party (the arbitrator(s) or arbiter(s)) for resolution. ...


1911 season and onward

Ty Cobb and Joe Jackson in Cleveland
Ty Cobb and Joe Jackson in Cleveland

Cobb was regarded not just as an athlete, but a psychological competitor. (He regarded baseball as "something like a war," and Charlie Gehringer said, "Every time at bat for him was a crusade."[39]) The baseball historian John Thorn has said, "He is testament to how far you can get simply through will... Cobb was pursued by demons." Image File history File links Download high resolution version (452x640, 55 KB) Summary http://memory. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (452x640, 55 KB) Summary http://memory. ... Charles Leonard Gehringer (May 11, 1903 – January 21, 1993) was an American second baseman in Major League Baseball who played his entire career with the Detroit Tigers (1924-1942). ... John Thorn (born April 17, 1947) is a noted sports historian. ...


Cobb was having a typically fine year in 1911, which included a 40-game hitting streak. Still, ”Shoeless” Joe Jackson had a .009 point lead on him in batting average. What happened next is discussed in Cobb's autobiography. Near the end of the season, Cobb’s Tigers had a long series against Jackson and the Cleveland Naps. Fellow Southerners, Cobb and Jackson were personally friendly both on and off the field. Cobb used that friendship for his advantage. Whenever Jackson said anything to him, he ignored him. When Jackson persisted, Cobb snapped angrily at Jackson, making him wonder what he could have done to enrage Cobb. As soon as the series was over, Cobb unexpectedly greeted Jackson and wished him well. Cobb felt that it was these mind games that caused Jackson to "fall off" to a final average of .408, while Cobb himself finished with a .420 average.[7] The following are the baseball events of the year 1911 throughout the world. ... In baseball, a hitting streak refers to the consecutive number of official games in which a player gets at least one base hit. ... Joseph Jefferson Shoeless Joe Jackson (July 16, 1888 – December 5, 1951) was a left fielder in Major League Baseball who played for the Philadelphia Athletics, Cleveland Indians and Chicago White Sox. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 3, 5, 14, 18, 19, 21, 42, 455 Name Cleveland Indians (1915–present) Cleveland Naps (1905-1914) Cleveland Bronchos (1902-1904) Cleveland Blues (1901) Other nicknames The Tribe, The Wahoos Ballpark Jacobs Field (1994–present...

I often tried plays that looked recklessly daring, maybe even silly. But I never tried anything foolish when a game was at stake, only when we were far ahead or far behind. I did it to study how the other team reacted, filing away in my mind any observations for future use.
Ty Cobb,
The New York Times[40]

Cobb led the AL in numerous categories besides batting average, including 248 hits, 147 runs scored, 127 RBI, 83 stolen bases, 47 doubles, 24 triples, and a .621 slugging average. The only major offensive category in which Cobb did not finish first was home runs, where Frank Baker surpassed him 11-8. He was awarded another Chalmers, this time for being voted the AL MVP by the Baseball Writers Association of America. The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... Two other men named Frank Baker played Major League Baseball: Frank Watts Baker (b. ... official logo The Baseball Writers Association of America (BBWAA) is a professional association for baseball journalists writing for daily newspapers and magazines. ...


The game that may best illustrate Cobb's unique combination of skills and attributes occurred on May 12, 1911. Playing against the New York Yankees, Cobb scored a run from first base on a single to right field, then scored another run from second base on a wild pitch. In the 7th inning, he tied the game with a 2-run double. The Yankee catcher began vociferously arguing the call with the umpire, going on at such length that the other Yankee infielders gathered nearby to watch. Realizing that no one on the Yankees had called time, Cobb strolled unobserved to third base, and then casually walked towards home plate as if to get a better view of the argument. He then suddenly slid into home plate for the game's winning run.[7] It was performances like this that led Branch Rickey to say later that "[Cobb] had brains in his feet."[41] is the 132nd day of the year (133rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1911 (MCMXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8, 8, 9, 10, 15, 16, 23, 32, 37, 44, 49 Name New York Yankees (1913–present) New York Highlanders (1903-1912) Baltimore Orioles (1901-1902) (Also referred to as... Home plate umpire Gary Darling signals that the last pitch was a strike In baseball, the umpire is the person charged with officiating the game, including beginning and ending the game, enforcing the rules of the game and the grounds, making judgment calls on plays, and meting out discipline. ... Wesley Branch Rickey (December 20, 1881 – December 9, 1965) was an innovative Major League Baseball executive best known for two things: breaking baseballs color barrier by signing the African-American player Jackie Robinson, and later drafting the first Hispanic superstar, Roberto Clemente; and creating the framework to the modern...


On May 15, 1912, Cobb assaulted Claude Lueker, a heckler, in the stands in New York. Lueker and Cobb traded insults with each other throughout the first three innings, and the situation climaxed when Lueker called Cobb a "half-nigger". Cobb, in his discussion of the incident (My Life in Baseball: The True Record, Ty Cobb and Al Stump, Doubleday, 1961, pp.131-135), avoided such explicit words, but alluded to it by saying the man was "reflecting on my mother's color and morals". Cobb also states in the book that he warned Highlanders manager Harry Wolverton that if something wasn't done about the man, there would be trouble. No action was taken. Finally, at the end of the sixth inning, and after being challenged by teammates Sam Crawford and Jim Delahanty to do something about it, Cobb climbed into the stands and attacked the handicapped Lueker, who due to an industrial accident had lost all of one hand and three fingers on his other hand. When onlookers shouted at Cobb to stop because the man had no hands, Cobb reportedly replied, "I don't care if he has no feet!"[42] The league suspended him, and his teammates, though not fond of Cobb, went on strike to protest the suspension, and to the lack of protection of players from abusive fans, prior to the May 18 game in Philadelphia.[43] For that one game, Detroit fielded a replacement team made up of college and sandlot ballplayers, plus two Detroit coaches, and lost, 24-2. Some of major league baseball's all-time negative records were established in this game, notably the 26 hits allowed by Allan Travers, who pitched the sport's most unlikely complete game.[44] The strike ended when Cobb urged his teammates to return to the field. According to Cobb, this incident led to the formation of a players' union, the "Ballplayers' Fraternity" (formally the Fraternity of Professional Baseball Players of America), an early version of what is now called the Major League Baseball Players Association, and garnered some concessions from the owners.[45][46] During Cobb's career, he was involved in numerous fights, both on and off the field, and several profanity-laced shouting matches. For example, Cobb and umpire Billy Evans arranged to settle their in-game differences with a fistfight, to be conducted under the grandstand after the game. Members of both teams were spectators, and broke up the scuffle after Cobb had knocked Evans down, pinned him, and began choking him. Cobb once slapped a black elevator operator for being "uppity." When a black night watchman intervened, Cobb pulled out a knife and stabbed him (The matter was later settled out of court).[17] is the 135th day of the year (136th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Harry Sterling Fighting Harry Wolverton (December 6, 1873 - February 4, 1937) was a third baseman who played for the Chicago Orphans, Philadelphia Phillies, Washington Senators, Boston Beaneaters, and New York Highlanders. ... is the 138th day of the year (139th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Aloysius Joseph Allan Travers (May 7, 1892 – April 19, 1968) was a pitcher who played a single game in Major League Baseball. ... In baseball, a complete game (denoted by CG) is the act of a pitcher pitching an entire game himself, without the benefit of a relief pitcher. ... The Major League Baseball Players Association (or MLBPA) is the union of professional major-league baseball players. ... William George Evans (February 10, 1884 - January 23, 1956) was an American umpire in Major League Baseball, working in the American League from 1906 to 1927. ...


"Sure, I fought," said an unrepentant Cobb in a revealing quote. "I had to fight all my life just to survive. They were all against me. Tried every dirty trick to cut me down, but I beat the bastards and left them in the ditch."


1915–1921

Babe Ruth (left) and Ty Cobb
Babe Ruth (left) and Ty Cobb

In 1915, Cobb set the single-season record for stolen bases, with 96. This record stood until Maury Wills broke it in 1962.[47] Cobb’s streak of five batting titles (believed at the time to be nine straight[48]) ended the following year when he finished second with .371 to Tris Speaker’s .386.[27][49] Image File history File links Ty Cobb and Babe Ruth File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... This article is about the pitcher and outfielder. ... Maurice Morning Maury Wills (born October 2, 1932 in Washington, DC) is a former Major League Baseball shortstop and switch-hitting batter who played most prominently with the Los Angeles Dodgers (1959-66, 1969-72), and also with the Pittsburgh Pirates (1967-68) and Montreal Expos (1969). ... Tristram E. Speaker (April 4, 1888 in Hubbard, Texas - December 8, 1958 in Lake Whitney, Texas), nicknamed “Spoke” (a play on his last name) and “Grey Eagle” (for his prematurely graying hair), was an American baseball player known as one of the best offensive and defensive center fielders in history. ...


In 1917, Cobb hit in 35 consecutive games; he remains the only player with two 35-game hitting streaks to his credit (Cobb had a 40-game hitting streak in 1911).[50] Over his career, Cobb had six hitting streaks of at least 20 games, second only to Pete Rose's seven.[51] Peter Edward Pete Rose, Sr. ...


Also in 1917, Cobb starred in the motion picture Somewhere in Georgia for a sum of $25,000 plus expenses.[52] Based on a story by sports columnist Grantland Rice, the film casts Cobb as "himself", a small-town Georgian bank clerk with a talent for baseball.[53] Broadway critic Ward Morehouse called the movie "absolutely the worst flicker I ever saw, pure hokum."[52] Somewhere in Georgia is a 1917 silent film, starring baseball great Ty Cobb. ... Grantland Rice (November 1, 1880–July 13, 1954) was an early 20th century American sportswriter. ... For other uses of Broadway, see Broadway. ... Ward Morehouse (November 24, 1899 - December 8, 1966) was an American theater critic, newspaper columnist, playwright, and author. ...


In October 1918, Cobb enlisted in the Chemical Corps branch of the United States Army and was sent to the Allied Expeditionary Forces headquarters in Chaumont, France.[54] He served approximately 67 days overseas before receiving an honorable discharge and returning to the United States.[54] Cobb served as a captain underneath the command of major Branch Rickey, the president of the St. Louis Cardinals. Other baseball players serving in this unit included captain Christy Mathewson and lieutenant George Sisler.[54] All of these men were assigned to the Gas and Flame Division where they trained soldiers in preparation for chemical attacks by exposing them to gas chambers in a controlled environment.[54] Branch insignia of the Chemical Corps Seal of the Chemical Corps The Chemical Corps is the branch of the United States Army that has the mission to protect the force from Chemical, Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear (CBRN) weapons. ... The United States Army is the largest and oldest branch of the armed forces of the United States. ... Officers of the American Expeditionary Forces and the Baker mission The American Expeditionary Forces or AEF was the United States military force sent to Europe in World War I.(In France, AEF is a news agency specialised in Education and Formation) The AEF fought alongside allied forces against imperial German... Chaumont is the name or part of the name of several communes in France, as well as a town in New York France: Chaumont, Cher, in the Cher département Chaumont, Haute-Marne, in the Haute-Marne département Chaumont, Orne, in the Orne département Chaumont, Haute-Savoie, in... A military discharge is given when a member of the armed forces is released from their obligation to serve. ... Wesley Branch Rickey (December 20, 1881 – December 9, 1965) was an innovative Major League Baseball executive best known for two things: breaking baseballs color barrier by signing the African-American player Jackie Robinson, and later drafting the first Hispanic superstar, Roberto Clemente; and creating the framework to the modern... Major league affiliations National League (1892–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 2, 6, 9, 14, 17, 20, 42, 42, 45, 85 Name St. ... Christopher Christy Mathewson (August 12, 1880 - October 7, 1925), nicknamed Big Six, The Christian Gentleman, or Matty, was a right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball. ... George Sisler Michael Allen Sisler (March 24, 1893 - March 26, 1973), nicknamed Gorgeous George, was an American star in Major League Baseball, and one of the greatest fielding first basemen of all time. ... Chemical warfare is warfare (and associated military operations) using the toxic properties of chemical substances to kill, injure or incapacitate an enemy. ...


By 1920, Babe Ruth had established himself as a power hitter, something Cobb was not considered. When Cobb and the Tigers showed up in New York to play the Yankees for the first time that season, writers billed it as a showdown between two stars of competing styles of play. Ruth hit two homers and a triple during the series, compared to Cobb's one single. The following are the baseball events of the year 1920 throughout the world. ... This article is about the pitcher and outfielder. ...


As Ruth's popularity grew, Cobb became increasingly hostile toward him. Cobb saw Ruth not only as a threat to his style of play, but also to his style of life. While Cobb preached ascetic self-denial, Ruth gorged on hot dogs, beer, and women.[55][56][57] Perhaps what angered him the most about Ruth was that despite Ruth's total disregard for his physical condition and traditional baseball, he was still an overwhelming success and brought fans to the ballparks in record numbers to see him set his own records.


After enduring several years of seeing his fame and notoriety usurped by Ruth, Cobb decided that he was going to show that swinging for the fences was no challenge for a top hitter. On May 5, 1925, Cobb began a two-game hitting spree better than any even Ruth had unleashed. He was sitting in the dugout talking to a reporter and told him that, for the first time in his career, he was going to swing for the fences. That day, Cobb went 6 for 6, with two singles, a double, and three home runs.[58] His 16 total bases set a new AL record. The next day he had three more hits, two of which were home runs. His single his first time up gave him 9 consecutive hits over three games. His five homers in two games tied the record set by Cap Anson of the old Chicago NL team in 1884.[58] Cobb wanted to show that he could hit home runs when he wanted, but simply chose not to do so. At the end of the series, 38-year-old Cobb had gone 12 for 19 with 29 total bases, and then went happily back to bunting and hitting-and-running. For his part, Ruth's attitude was that "I could have had a lifetime .600 average, but I would have had to hit them singles. The people were paying to see me hit home runs."[59] is the 125th day of the year (126th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section cites very few or no references or sources. ... Adrian Constantine Anson (April 17, 1852 – April 14, 1922), known by the nicknames Cap (for Captain) and Pop, was a professional baseball player in the National Association and Major League Baseball. ...


On August 19, 1921, in the second game of a double header against Elmer Myers of the Boston Red Sox, Cobb collected his 3,000th hit. Aged 34 at the time, Cobb is the youngest ballplayer to reach the milestone, and in the fewest at-bats (8,093).[60][61] is the 231st day of the year (232nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1921 (MCMXXI) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar). ... Elmer Glenn Myers (born March 2, 1894 in York Springs, Pennsylvania - July 29, 1976 in Collingswood, New Jersey), is a former professional baseball player who played in the Major Leagues primarily as a pitcher from 1915-1922. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 4, 8, 9, 27, 42 Name Boston Red Sox (1908–present) Boston Americans (1901-1907) Other nicknames The BoSox, The Olde Towne Team, The Sox Ballpark Fenway Park (1912–present) Huntington Avenue Baseball Grounds...


Cobb as player/manager

Frank Navin, the Detroit Tigers owner, signed Cobb to take over for Hughie Jennings as manager for the 1921 season. Cobb signed the deal on his 34th birthday for $32,500. To say the least, the signing caught the baseball world off-guard. Universally disliked (even by the members of his own team) but a legendary player, Cobb's management style left a lot to be desired. He expected as much from his players as he gave, and most of the men did not meet his standard.[11][62] Frank Navin (April 18, 1871 – November 13, 1935) was owner of the Detroit Tigers in Major League Baseball. ... Hughie Jennings on a 1909-1911 American Tobacco Company baseball card (White Borders (T206)). Hugh Ambrose Jennings (April 2, 1869 - February 1, 1928) was an American baseball player and manager in Major League Baseball. ... The following are the baseball events of the year 1921 throughout the world. ...


The closest Cobb came to winning the pennant race was in 1924, when the Tigers finished in third place, six games behind the pennant-winning Washington Senators. The Tigers had finished second in 1922, but were 16 games behind the Yankees. The following are the baseball events of the year 1924 throughout the world. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 3, 6, 14, 29, 34, 42 Name Minnesota Twins (1961–present) Washington Nationals/Senators (1901-1960) Other nicknames The Twinkies Ballpark Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome 1982-present Metropolitan Stadium (1961-1981) Griffith Stadium (1911-1960... The following are the baseball events of the year 1922 throughout the world. ...


Cobb blamed his lackluster managerial record (479 wins-444 losses) on Navin, who was arguably an even more frugal man than Cobb. Navin passed up a number of quality players that Cobb wanted to add to the team. In fact, Navin had saved money by hiring Cobb to manage the team.


Also in 1922, Cobb tied a batting record set by Wee Willie Keeler, with four five-hit games in a season. This has since been matched by Stan Musial, Tony Gwynn and Ichiro Suzuki. Willie Keeler on a 1909-1911 American Tobacco Company baseball card (White Borders (T206)). William Henry Keeler (March 3, 1872 - January 1, 1923), nicknamed Wee Willie, was a right fielder in Major League Baseball who played from 1892 to 1910, primarily for the Baltimore Orioles and Brooklyn Superbas in the... Stan Musials number 6 was retired by the St. ... Anthony Keith Gwynn (born May 9, 1960 in Los Angeles, California) is a former right fielder in Major League Baseball, statistically one of the best and most consistent hitters in baseball history. ... Ichiro Suzuki ), often known simply as Ichiro ), is a Japanese outfielder for the Seattle Mariners Major League Baseball team. ...


At the end of 1925 Cobb was once again embroiled in a batting title race, this time with one of his teammates and players, Harry Heilmann. In a doubleheader against the St. Louis Browns on October 4, 1925, Heilmann got six hits to lead the Tigers to a sweep of the doubleheader and beat Cobb for the batting crown, .393 to .389. Cobb and Browns manager George Sisler each pitched in the final game. Cobb pitched a perfect inning. The following are the baseball events of the year 1925 throughout the world. ... Harry Edwin Heilmann (August 3, 1894 – July 9, 1951), nicknamed “Slug,” was a Major League Baseball player who played 17 season with the Detroit Tigers (1914, 1916-1929) and Cincinnati Reds (1930, 1932). ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 4, 5, 8, 20, 22, 33, 42 Name Baltimore Orioles (1954–present) St. ... is the 277th day of the year (278th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... George Sisler Michael Allen Sisler (March 24, 1893 - March 26, 1973), nicknamed Gorgeous George, was an American star in Major League Baseball, and one of the greatest fielding first basemen of all time. ...


Move to Philadelphia

Ty Cobb baseball card, American Tobacco Company, 1909-11

Cobb finally called it quits from a 22-year career as a Tiger in November 1926. He announced his retirement and headed home to Augusta, Georgia.[7] Shortly thereafter, Tris Speaker also retired as player-manager of the Cleveland team. The retirement of two great players at the same time sparked some interest, and it turned out that the two were coerced into retirement because of allegations of game-fixing brought about by Dutch Leonard, a former pitcher of Cobb's.[63] Ty Cobb baseball card, American Tobacco Company, 1909-11. ... Ty Cobb baseball card, American Tobacco Company, 1909-11. ... See also: 1925 in sports, 1927 in sports and the list of years in sports. Cricket May 31 - India, New Zealand and West Indies are elected as Full Members of the Imperial Cricket Conference thus increasing the number of test playing nations to six. ... Hubert Benjamin Leonard (born April 16, 1892 Birmingham, Ohio - died July 11, 1952 Fresno, California) was a pitcher with an 11 year career from 1913-1921, 1924-1925. ...


Leonard accused Wood and Cobb of betting on a Tiger-Cleveland game played in Detroit on September 25, 1919, in which they allegedly coerced a Detroit victory to win the bet. Leonard claimed proof existed in letters written to him by Cobb and Wood.[63] Judge Kenesaw Mountain Landis held a secret hearing with Cobb and Speaker as well as former pitcher and outfielder Joe Wood.[63] A second secret meeting amongst the AL directors led to Cobb and Speaker resigning with no publicity; however, rumors of the scandal led Judge Landis to hold additional hearings.[63] Leonard subsequently refused to appear at the hearings. Cobb and Wood admitted to writing the letters, but they claimed it was a horse racing bet, and that Leonard's accusations were the result of Cobb's earlier release of Leonard from the Tigers to the minor leagues.[63] Speaker denied any wrongdoing.[63] is the 268th day of the year (269th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1919 (MCMXIX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar). ... Kenesaw Mountain Landis Kenesaw Mountain Landis (November 20, 1866 – November 25, 1944) was an American jurist who served as a federal judge from 1905 to 1922, and subsequently as the first commissioner of Major League Baseball. ... Joe Wood on an American Tobacco Company baseball card, 1912 Joe Smoky Joe Wood (October 25, 1889 - July 27, 1985) was a Major League Baseball player for the Boston Red Sox and Cleveland Indians during the early part of the 20th century. ... For the organization which many minor leagues belong to, see Minor League Baseball Part of the History of baseball series. ...


On January 27, 1927, Judge Landis cleared Cobb and Speaker of any wrongdoing because of Leonard's refusal to appear at the hearings.[63] Landis allowed both Cobb and Speaker to return to their original teams, and both became free agents.[63] Speaker signed with the Washington Senators for 1927; Cobb signed with the Philadelphia Athletics. Speaker then joined Cobb in Philadelphia for the 1928 season. Cobb says he came back only to seek vindication and so that he could say he left baseball on his own terms. is the 27th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1927 (MCMXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... In North American professional sports, particularly baseball, football, and basketball, a free agent is a team player whose contract with a team has expired, and the player is able to sign a contract with another team. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 3, 6, 14, 29, 34, 42 Name Minnesota Twins (1961–present) Washington Nationals/Senators (1901-1960) Other nicknames The Twinkies Ballpark Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome 1982-present Metropolitan Stadium (1961-1981) Griffith Stadium (1911-1960... See also: 1926 in sports, 1928 in sports and the list of years in sports. Football ([cvvvvvvv[American Football|American]]) New York Giants win National Football League title You are a Gay bo! Golf First Ryder Cup held in United States beats Britain 9 1/2 to 2 1/2... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) West Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 9, 27, 34, 42, 43, (As) Name Oakland Athletics (1968–present) Kansas City Athletics (1955-1967) Philadelphia Athletics (1901-1954) (Referred to as As) Other nicknames The As, The White Elephants, The... See also: 1927 in sports, other events of 1928, 1929 in sports and the list of years in sports. // Cricket 23 June-26 June, London - West Indies play their first Test match, against England. ...


Cobb played regularly in 1927 for a young and talented team that finished second to one of the greatest teams of all time, the 1927 Yankees, which won 110 games. He returned to Detroit to a tumultuous welcome on May 11 1927. Cobb doubled in his first at bat, to the cheers of Tiger fans. On July 18, 1927, Cobb became the first player to enter the 4000 hit club when he doubled off former teammate Sam Gibson of the Detroit Tigers at Navin Field.[7] is the 131st day of the year (132nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 199th day of the year (200th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1927 (MCMXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... In Major League Baseball, the exclusive 4000 hit club is an informal term referring to members of an elite group of hitters: those players that have reached 4000 hits on their careers. ... Samuel Braxton Gibson (August 5, 1899 – January 31, 1983) was an American right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball who played five seasons with the Detroit Tigers (1926-28), New York Yankees (1930) and New York Giants (1932). ... Tiger Stadium, often called The Corner (as it is at the corner of Michigan Avenue and Trumbull Street), is a stadium located in the Corktown neighborhood of downtown Detroit, Michigan. ...


1927 was also the final season of Washington Senators pitcher Walter Johnson's career.[64] With their careers largely overlapping, Ty Cobb faced Johnson more times than any other batter-pitcher matchup in baseball history. Cobb also got the first hit allowed in Johnson's career. After Johnson hit Detroit's Ossie Vitt with a pitch in August of 1915, seriously injuring him, Cobb realized that Johnson was fearful of hitting opponents. He used this knowledge to his advantage, by standing closer to the plate.[65] Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 3, 6, 14, 29, 34, 42 Name Minnesota Twins (1961–present) Washington Nationals/Senators (1901-1960) Other nicknames The Twinkies Ballpark Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome 1982-present Metropolitan Stadium (1961-1981) Griffith Stadium (1911-1960... Walter Perry Johnson (November 6, 1887-December 10, 1946), American professional baseball pitcher. ... Oscar Joseph Ossie Vitt (January 4, 1890 – January 31, 1963) was a Major League Baseball infielder. ...


Cobb returned again in 1928. He played less frequently due to his age and the blossoming abilities of the young A's, who were again in a pennant race with the Yankees. On September 3, 1928, Ty Cobb pinch hit in the 9th inning of the first game of a double-header against the Senators and doubled off Bump Hadley for his last career hit. Against the Yankees on September 11, 1928, Cobb had his last at bat popping out against pitcher Hank Johnson, grounding out to shortstop Mark Koenig as a 9th-inning pinch hitter.[7] He then announced his retirement, effective at the end of the season.[7] Cobb ended his career with 23 consecutive seasons batting .300 or better (the only season under .300 being his rookie season), a major league record not likely to be broken.[27] is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... In baseball, a pinch hitter is a common term for a substitute batter. ... is the 254th day of the year (255th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... In baseball, a batted ball can be called one of several various things, depending on how it comes off the bat and where in the field it lands. ... In baseball, an out occurs when the defensive team effects any of a number of different events, and the umpire rules a batter or baserunner out. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


Post professional career

Cobb's plaque in the Baseball Hall of Fame

Cobb retired a very rich and successful man.[66] He toured Europe with his family, went to Scotland for some time then returned to his farm in Georgia.[66] He spent his retirement pursuing his off-season activities of hunting, golfing, polo and fishing.[66] His other pastime was trading stocks and bonds, increasing his immense personal wealth.[67] ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1200x1600, 855 KB) Summary Picture from Baseball Hall of Fame. ... ImageMetadata File history File links Download high resolution version (1200x1600, 855 KB) Summary Picture from Baseball Hall of Fame. ... For alternative meanings, see bond (a disambiguation page). ...


In the winter of 1930, Cobb moved into a Spanish ranch estate on Spencer Lane in the millionaire's community of Atherton outside San Francisco, California. At that same time, his wife Charlie filed the first of several divorce suits;[68] however, she withdrew that suit shortly thereafter.[69] Charlie finally divorced Cobb in 1947,[70] after 39 years of marriage, the last few of which she lived in nearby Menlo Park. The couple had three sons and two daughters: Tyrus Ramond, Jr., Shirley Marion, Herschel Roswell, James Howell, and Beverly.[26][36][71] Atherton is a town in San Mateo County, California, United States. ... San Francisco redirects here. ... Menlo Park is a city in San Mateo County, California in the United States of America. ...


Cobb had never had an easy time being a father and husband. His children had found him to be demanding, yet also capable of kindness and extreme warmth. Cobb had expected his boys to be exceptional athletes, especially baseball players. Cobb, Jr. flunked out of Princeton,[72] where he had played on the varsity tennis team much to the dismay of Cobb, Sr.[73][74] The elder Cobb subsequently traveled to the Princeton campus and beat his son with a whip to insure against future academic failure.[73] Cobb, Jr. then entered Yale University and became captain of the tennis team while improving his academics; however, he was arrested twice in 1930 for drunkenness and left Yale without graduating.[73] Cobb, Sr. helped his son address the pending legal problems and then permanently broke off ties with the younger Cobb.[73] Although Cobb, Jr. eventually earned an M.D. in obstetrics from the Medical College of South Carolina and practiced in Dublin, Georgia, until his death at the age of forty-two on September 9, 1952, from a brain tumor, his father remained distant.[75][76] Princeton University is a private coeducational research university located in Princeton, New Jersey. ... And distinguish from wip and WIP. A type of whip known as a riding crop The word whip describes two basic types of tools: A long stick-like device, usually slightly flexible, with a small bit of leather or cord, called a popper, on the end. ... Yale redirects here. ... Doctor of Medicine (M.D. or MD, from the Latin Medicinae Doctor meaning Teacher of Medicine,) is an academic degree for medical doctors. ... Obstetrics (from the Latin obstare, to stand by) is the surgical specialty dealing with the care of a woman and her offspring during pregnancy, childbirth and the puerperium (the period shortly after birth). ... Dublin is a city in Laurens County, Georgia, United States. ... is the 252nd day of the year (253rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A brain tumor is any intracranial tumor created by abnormal and uncontrolled cell division, normally either in the brain itself (neurons, glial cells (astrocytes, oligodendrocytes, ependymal cells), lymphatic tissue, blood vessels), in the cranial nerves (myelin-producing Schwann cells), in the brain envelopes (meninges), skull, pituitary and pineal gland, or...


A personal achievement came in February 1936, when the first Hall of Fame election results were announced. Cobb had been named on 222 of 226 ballots, outdistancing Babe Ruth, Honus Wagner, Christy Mathewson and Walter Johnson, the only others to earn the necessary 75% of votes to be elected in that first year. His 98.2 percentage stood as the record until Tom Seaver received 98.8% of the vote in 1992 (Nolan Ryan and Cal Ripken have also surpassed Cobb, with 98.79% and 98.53% of the votes, respectively). Those incredible results show that although many people disliked him personally, they respected the way he played and what he accomplished. In 1998, The Sporting News ranked him as third on the list of 100 Greatest Baseball Players. The National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, located at 62 Main Street in Cooperstown, New York, is a semi-official museum operated by private interests serving as the central point for the study of the history of baseball in the United States and beyond, the display of baseball-related... Johannes Peter Honus Wagner (February 24, 1874 - December 6, 1955), nicknamed The Flying Dutchman, was an American baseball player who played during the 1890s until the 1910s. ... Christopher Christy Mathewson (August 12, 1880 - October 7, 1925), nicknamed Big Six, The Christian Gentleman, or Matty, was a right-handed pitcher in Major League Baseball. ... Walter Perry Johnson (November 6, 1887-December 10, 1946), American professional baseball pitcher. ... George Thomas Seaver (born November 17, 1944 in Fresno, California) is a former Major League Baseball pitcher who broke into the major leagues in 1967 and retired in 1986. ... Lynn Nolan Ryan, Jr. ... Cal Ripken redirects here. ... The Sporting News (TSN) is an American-based sports newspaper. ... In 1998, The Sporting News compiled a list of Baseballs Greatest Players. ...


By then, Cobb drank and smoked heavily, and spent a great deal of time complaining about the lack of fundamental skills with modern-day players.[17] Cobb had positive things to say about Stan Musial, Phil Rizzuto, and Jackie Robinson, but few others. However, Cobb was known to help out young players. He was instrumental in helping Joe DiMaggio negotiate his rookie contract with the New York Yankees, but ended his friendship with Ted Williams when the latter suggested to him that Rogers Hornsby was a greater hitter than Cobb. Stan Musials number 6 was retired by the St. ... Philip Francis Rizzuto (September 25, 1917 – August 13, 2007), nicknamed The Scooter, was an American shortstop in Major League Baseball who spent his entire career from 1941 to 1956 with the New York Yankees. ... Jack Roosevelt Jackie Robinson (January 31, 1919 – October 24, 1972) became the first African-American major league baseball player of the modern era in 1947. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Theodore Samuel Williams (August 30, 1918 – July 5, 2002), best known as Ted Williams, nicknamed The Kid, the Splendid Splinter, Teddy Ballgame and The Thumper, was an American left fielder in Major League Baseball. ... Rogers Hornsby (April 27, 1896 in Winters, Texas - January 5, 1963 in Chicago, Illinois), nicknamed The Rajah, was a Major League Baseball second baseman and manager. ...


Cobb's competitive fires continued to burn after retirement. At the 1947 Old Timers Game in Yankee Stadium, Cobb warned catcher Benny Bengough to move back, claiming he was rusty and hadn't swung a bat in almost 20 years. Bengough stepped back, to avoid being struck by Cobb's backswing. Having repositioned the catcher, Cobb cannily laid down a perfect bunt in front of the plate, and easily beat the throw from a surprised Bengough.[7] Old-Timers Day (or Old-Timers Game) generally refers to a tradition in Major League Baseball of a team, especially the New York Yankees, devoting the afternoon preceding a weekend afternoon game to celebrate the baseball-related accomplishments of its former players who have since retired. ... This is about the stadium the New York Yankees currently play in. ... Bernard Benny Oliver Bengough (July 27, 1898 – December 22, 1968) was a major league baseball catcher who played for ten seasons for the New York Yankees and Saint Louis Browns. ...


Another bittersweet moment in Cobb's life reportedly came in the late 1940s when he and sportswriter Grantland Rice were returning from the Masters golf tournament. Stopping at a South Carolina liquor store, Cobb noticed that the man behind the counter was "Shoeless" Joe Jackson, who had been banned from baseball almost 30 years earlier following the Black Sox scandal. But Jackson did not appear to recognize him, and finally Cobb asked, "Don't you know me, Joe?" “Sure I know you, Ty,” replied Jackson, “but I wasn’t sure you wanted to speak to me. A lot of them don’t.”[77] This article is about the golf tournament. ... ...


Later life

At 62, Cobb married a second time in 1949. His new wife was 40-year-old Frances Fairburn Cass, a divorcee from Buffalo, New York.[78][79] This childless marriage also failed, and they divorced in 1956.[80] Look up Divorcee in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Nickname: Location of Buffalo in New York State County Government  - Mayor Byron Brown (D) Area  - City 52. ...


When two of his three sons died young, Cobb was alone, with few friends left. He began to be generous with his wealth, donating $100,000 in his parents' name for his hometown to build a modern 24 bed hospital, Cobb Memorial Hospital, which is now part of the Ty Cobb Healthcare System. He also established the Cobb Educational Fund, which awarded scholarships to needy Georgia students bound for college, by endowing it with a $100,000 donation in 1953.[67] Cobb Memorial Hospital was dedicated in Royston, Georgia, on January 22, 1950, to the glory of God and in loving memory of William Herschel and Amanda Cobb. ... The Ty Cobb Healthcare System began as only a single hospital. ...


Cobb knew that another way he could share his wealth was by having biographies written that would set the record straight and teach young players how to play. John McCallum spent some time with Cobb to write a combination how-to and biography entitled The Tiger Wore Spikes: An Informal Biography of Ty Cobb that was published in 1956.[81][82] John Dennis McCallum (born 1924) was a sportswriter, as well as a writer on strength training topics. ...


After McCallum completed his research for the book, Cobb was again alone and had a longing to return to Georgia. In December of 1959, Cobb was diagnosed with prostate cancer, diabetes, high blood pressure and Bright's disease, a degenerative kidney disorder.[17][83] He did not trust his initial diagnosis, however, so he went to Georgia to seek advice from doctors he knew, and they found his prostate to be cancerous. They removed it at Emory University Hospital in Atlanta, but that did little to help Cobb. From this point until the end of his life, Cobb criss-crossed the country, going from his lodge in Tahoe to the hospital in Georgia. Prostate cancer is a disease in which cancer develops in the prostate, a gland in the male reproductive system. ... For the disease characterized by excretion of large amounts of very dilute urine, see diabetes insipidus. ... For other forms of hypertension, see Hypertension (disambiguation). ... Brights disease is a historical classification of kidney diseases that would be described in modern medicine as acute or chronic nephritis. ... Emory University is a private university located in the metropolitan area of the city of Atlanta and in western unincorporated DeKalb County, Georgia, United States. ...


It was also during his final years that Cobb began work on his autobiography, My Life in Baseball: The True Record, with writer Al Stump. Their collaboration was contentious, and after Cobb's death, Al Stump's side of the story was described in some of his other works, including the film Cobb. Al Stump (October 16, 1920 – December 14, 1995), was an American author and Sports writer. ... Cobb is a 1994 baseball movie starring Tommy Lee Jones as the legendary baseball player Ty Cobb. ...


Death

In his last days, Cobb spent some time with the old movie comedian Joe E. Brown, talking about the choices Cobb had made in his life. He told Brown that he felt that he had made mistakes, and that he would do things differently if he could. He had played hard and lived hard all his life, and had no friends to show for it at the end, and he regretted it. Publicly, however, Cobb claimed not to have any regrets: "I've been lucky. I have no right to be regretful of what I did."[84] Joe E. Brown in the late 1920s. ...


He checked into Emory Hospital for the last time in June 1961, bringing with him a paper bag with over $1 million in negotiable bonds and a Luger pistol.[6][85] His first wife, Charlie, his son Jimmy and other family members came to be with him for his final days. He died a month later, on July 17, 1961, at Emory University Hospital.[17] For alternative meanings, see bond (a disambiguation page). ... The Parabellum-Pistole (Pistol Parabellum), popularly known as the Luger pistol is a semi-automatic self-loading pistol patented by Georg Luger in 1898 and manufactured by Deutsche Waffen- und Munitionsfabriken (DWM) starting in 1900. ... is the 198th day of the year (199th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...

..the most sensational player of all the players I have seen in all my life...'
Casey Stengel, The New York Times, July 18, 1961[86] regarding Ty Cobb shortly after Cobb's death

Approximately 150 friends and relatives attended a brief service in Cornelia, Georgia, and drove to the Cobb Family mausoleum in Royston for the burial. Baseball's only representatives at his funeral were three old players, Ray Schalk, Mickey Cochrane, and Nap Rucker, along with Sid Keener, the director of the Baseball Hall of Fame; however, messages of condolences numbered in the hundreds.[87][88] Family in attendance included Cobb's former wife, Charlie, his two daughters, his surviving son, Jimmy, his two sons-in-law, his daughter-in-law, Mary Dunn Cobb, and her two children. Charles Dillon Casey Stengel (July 30, 1890 - September 29, 1975), nicknamed The Old Professor, was an American baseball player and manager from the early 1910s into the 1960s. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... Cornelia is a city in Habersham County, Georgia, United States. ... Ray Schalk of the Chicago White Sox at Comiskey Park in 1913. ... Gordon Stanley Mickey Cochrane (April 6, 1903-June 28, 1962) was a Scottish-American catcher and manager in Major League Baseball for the Philadelphia Athletics and Detroit Tigers. ... Categories: 1884 births | 1970 deaths | Baseball players | Brooklyn Robins players | Brooklyn Superbas players | Baseball stubs ...


At the time of his death. Cobb's estate was reported to be worth at least US$11,780,000, including $10 million worth of General Electric stock and $1.78 million in Coke stock.[89] Cobb's will left a quarter of his estate to the Cobb Educational Fund, and distributed the rest among his children and grandchildren. Cobb is interred in the Rose Hill Cemetery in Royston, Georgia. As of 2005 the Ty Cobb Educational Foundation has distributed nearly $11 million in scholarships to needy Georgians.[90] “GE” redirects here. ... The Coca-Cola Company (NYSE: KO) is one of the largest manufacturers, distributors and marketers of nonalcoholic beverage concentrates and syrups in the world. ... In the common law, a will or testament is a document by which a person (the testator) regulates the rights of others over his property or family after death. ... This article is about scholarship (noun) and scholarship as a form of financial aid. ...


Legacy

Ty Cobb was honored alongside the retired numbers of the Detroit Tigers in 2000
Ty Cobb was honored alongside the retired numbers of the Detroit Tigers in 2000
The greatness of Ty Cobb was something that had to be seen, and to see him was to remember him forever.
George Sisler[91]

Efforts to create a Ty Cobb Memorial in Royston initially failed, primarily because most of the artifacts from his life were sent to the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, New York, and the Georgia town was viewed as too remote to make a memorial worthwhile. However, on July 17, 1998, the 37th anniversary of Cobb's death, the Ty Cobb Museum and the Franklin County Sports Hall of Fame opened its doors in Royston. On that day, Cobb was one of the first members to be inducted into the Franklin County Sports Hall of Fame. On August 30, 2005, his hometown hosted a 1905 baseball game to commemorate the 100th anniversary of Cobb's first major league game. Players in the game included many of Cobb's descendants as well as many citizens from his hometown of Royston. Another early-1900s baseball game was played in his hometown at Cobb Field on September 30, 2006, with Cobb's descendants and Roystonians again playing. Cobb's personal batboy from his major league years was also in attendance and threw out the first pitch. A third Ty Cobb Vintage Baseball Game was played on October 6, 2007. Many of Cobb's family and other relatives were in attendance for a "family reunion" theme. Appearing at the game again was Cobb's personal batboy who, with his son and grandson, made a large donation and a plaque to the Ty Cobb Museum in honor of their family's relationship with the Cobb family. Image File history File links Detretcobb. ... Image File history File links Detretcobb. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) Central Division (1998–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 2, 5, 6, 16, 23, 42 Name Detroit Tigers (1901–present) Other nicknames The Bless You Boys Ballpark Comerica Park (2000–present) Tiger Stadium (1912-1999) Briggs Stadium (1938-1960) Navin Field (1912-1938) Bennett... George Sisler Michael Allen Sisler (March 24, 1893 - March 26, 1973), nicknamed Gorgeous George, was an American star in Major League Baseball, and one of the greatest fielding first basemen of all time. ... Cooperstown is a village in Otsego County, New York and is the County Seat. ... is the 198th day of the year (199th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... The Ty Cobb Museum was created to foster education and understanding to the broadest possible audience of the greatest baseball hitter of all time, Tyrus Raymond Cobb. ... The Franklin County Sports Hall of Fame is located in Royston, Georgia and is housed within the Ty Cobb Museum. ... is the 242nd day of the year (243rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 273rd day of the year (274th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A Lansing Lugnuts batboy (in white) carrying a baseball bat away from home plate. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... is the 279th day of the year (280th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...

Teach a boy to throw a baseball, and he won't throw a rock.
Ty Cobb

Ty Cobb's legacy also includes legions of collectors of his early tobacco card issues as well as game used memorabilia and autographs. Perhaps the most curious item remains the 1909 Ty Cobb with Ty Cobb Cigarettes back, leaving some to believe Cobb either had or attempted to have his own brand of cigarettes. Very little about the card is known other than its similarity to the 1909 T206 Red Portrait card published by the American Tobacco Company, and until 2005 only a handful were known to exist. That year, a sizable cache of the cards was brought to auction by the family of a Royston, Georgia man who had stored them in a book for almost 100 years.[citation needed].


Crawford-Cobb rivalry

Sam Crawford and Ty Cobb were teammates for parts of thirteen seasons. They played beside each other in right and center field, and Crawford followed Cobb in the batting order year after year. Despite the physical closeness, the two had a complicated relationship. Sam Crawfords 1911 American Tobacco Company baseball card. ... The batting order, in baseball, is the sequence in which the nine members of the offensive lineup take their turns in batting against the pitcher. ...


Initially, they had a student-teacher relationship. Crawford was an established star when Cobb arrived, and Cobb eagerly sought his advice. In interviews with Al Stump, Cobb told of studying Crawford’s base stealing technique and of how Crawford would teach him about pursuing fly balls and throwing out base runners. Cobb told Stump he would always remember Crawford’s kindness.[92] Al Stump (October 16, 1920 – December 14, 1995), was an American author and Sports writer. ...

Sam Crawford and Ty Cobb clown around with a camera, circa 1908
Sam Crawford and Ty Cobb clown around with a camera, circa 1908

The student-teacher relationship gradually changed to one of jealous rivals.[citation needed] Cobb was not popular with his teammates, and as Cobb became the biggest star in baseball, Crawford was unhappy with the preferential treatment given to Cobb.[citation needed] Cobb was allowed to show up late for spring training and was given private quarters on the road – perks not offered to Crawford. The competition between the two was intense. Crawford recalled that, if he went three for four on a day when Cobb went hitless, Cobb would turn red and sometimes walk out of the park with the game still on. When it was initially (and erroneously) reported that Nap Lajoie had won the batting title, Crawford was alleged to have been one of several Tigers who sent a telegram to Lajoie congratulating him on beating Cobb.[93][94] Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Metadata No higher resolution available. ... Napoleon Nap Lajoie [la-ZHOWAY] (September 5, 1874 – February 7, 1959), also known as Larry Lajoie, was an American professional athlete of French Canadian descent. ...


In retirement, Cobb wrote a letter to a writer for The Sporting News accusing Crawford of not helping in the outfield and of intentionally fouling off balls when Cobb was stealing a base. Crawford learned about the letter in 1946 and accused Cobb of being a “cheapskate” who never helped his teammates. He said that Cobb had not been a very good fielder, "so he blamed me." Crawford denied intentionally trying to deprive Cobb of stolen bases, insisting that Cobb had “dreamed that up.”[95] The Sporting News (TSN) is an American-based sports newspaper. ...


When asked about the feud, Cobb attributed it to jealousy. He felt that Crawford was “a hell of a good player,” but he was “second best” on the Tigers and “hated to be an also ran.” Cobb biographer Richard Bak noted that the two “only barely tolerated each other” and agreed with Cobb that Crawford’s attitude was driven by Cobb’s having stolen Crawford’s thunder.[96]


Although they may not have spoken to each other, Cobb and Crawford developed an uncanny ability to communicate nonverbally with looks and nods on the base paths. They became one of the most successful double steal pairings in baseball history.[citation needed] The all-time stolen base leader, Rickey Henderson, swipes third in 1988. ...


After Cobb died, a reporter found hundreds of letters in Cobb’s home that Cobb had written to influential people lobbying for Crawford’s induction into the Hall of Fame. Crawford was reportedly unaware of Cobb’s efforts until after Cobb had died.[97]


Regular season stats

Independent researchers have raised questions from time to time about Cobb's exact career totals. Hits have been re-estimated at between 4,189 and 4,192. At-bats estimates have ranged as high as 11,437. The numbers shown below are the figures officially recognized on MLB.com.[98]

G AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB CS BB SO BA OBP SLG TB SH HBP
3,035 11,429 2,245 4,191 723 297 117 1,938 892 --- 1,249 357 .367 .424 .513 5,859 295 94

The figures on Baseball-Reference.com are as follows.[27] Other private research sites may have different figures. Caught Stealing is not shown comprehensively for Cobb's MLB.com totals, because the stat was not regularly captured until 1920. In baseball statistics, games played (denoted by G) indicates the total number of games in which a player has participated (in any capacity). ... In baseball statistics, an at bat (AB) is used to calculate other data such as batting average. ... Bengie Molina of the Anaheim Angels (in gray and red) scores a run by touching home plate after rounding all the bases. ... In Major League Baseball history, Ty Cobb had a record 4,191 hits (later revised to 4,189) by 1928; Pete Rose would surpass it 57 years later, and finish with 4,256 career hits. ... In baseball, a double is the act of a batter safely reaching second base by striking the ball and getting to second before being made out, without the benefit of a fielders misplay (see error) or another runner being put out on a fielders choice. ... In baseball, a triple is the act of a batter safely reaching third base by striking the ball and getting to third before being made out, without the benefit of a fielders misplay (see error) or another runner being put out on a fielders choice. ... This article is about the baseball concept. ... “RBI” redirects here. ... The all-time stolen base leader, Rickey Henderson, swipes third in 1988. ... In baseball, a player is charged with a caught stealing when, as a runner, the player attempts to advance from one base to another without the ball being struck by a batter, but is put out by a fielder while making the attempt. ... Rashad Eldridge of the Oklahoma Redhawks walks to first base after drawing a base on balls. ... For the typographical mode indicating deleted text, see Strikethrough. ... Batting average is a statistic in both cricket and baseball measuring the performance of cricket batsmen and baseball hitters, respectively. ... In baseball statistics, on base percentage (OBP) (sometimes referred to as on base average (OBA)) is a measure of how often a batter gets to first base for any reason other than a fielding error or a fielders choice. ... Barry Bonds holds the MLB record for highest slugging average in a season (.863). ... In baseball statistics, total bases refers to the number of bases a player has gained with hits, i. ... In baseball, a sacrifice hit (also called a sacrifice bunt) is the act of deliberately bunting the ball in a manner that allows a runner on base to advance to another base, while the batter is himself put out. ... In baseball, being hit by a pitch refers to the batter being hit in some part of the body by a pitch from the pitcher. ...

G AB R H 2B 3B HR RBI SB CS BB SO BA OBP SLG TB SH HBP
3,035 11,434 2,246 4,189 724 295 117 1,937 892 178 1,249 357 .366 .433 .512 5,854 295 94

In baseball statistics, games played (denoted by G) indicates the total number of games in which a player has participated (in any capacity). ... In baseball statistics, an at bat (AB) is used to calculate other data such as batting average. ... Bengie Molina of the Anaheim Angels (in gray and red) scores a run by touching home plate after rounding all the bases. ... In Major League Baseball history, Ty Cobb had a record 4,191 hits (later revised to 4,189) by 1928; Pete Rose would surpass it 57 years later, and finish with 4,256 career hits. ... In baseball, a double is the act of a batter safely reaching second base by striking the ball and getting to second before being made out, without the benefit of a fielders misplay (see error) or another runner being put out on a fielders choice. ... In baseball, a triple is the act of a batter safely reaching third base by striking the ball and getting to third before being made out, without the benefit of a fielders misplay (see error) or another runner being put out on a fielders choice. ... This article is about the baseball concept. ... “RBI” redirects here. ... The all-time stolen base leader, Rickey Henderson, swipes third in 1988. ... In baseball, a player is charged with a caught stealing when, as a runner, the player attempts to advance from one base to another without the ball being struck by a batter, but is put out by a fielder while making the attempt. ... Rashad Eldridge of the Oklahoma Redhawks walks to first base after drawing a base on balls. ... For the typographical mode indicating deleted text, see Strikethrough. ... Batting average is a statistic in both cricket and baseball measuring the performance of cricket batsmen and baseball hitters, respectively. ... In baseball statistics, on base percentage (OBP) (sometimes referred to as on base average (OBA)) is a measure of how often a batter gets to first base for any reason other than a fielding error or a fielders choice. ... Barry Bonds holds the MLB record for highest slugging average in a season (.863). ... In baseball statistics, total bases refers to the number of bases a player has gained with hits, i. ... In baseball, a sacrifice hit (also called a sacrifice bunt) is the act of deliberately bunting the ball in a manner that allows a runner on base to advance to another base, while the batter is himself put out. ... In baseball, being hit by a pitch refers to the batter being hit in some part of the body by a pitch from the pitcher. ...

See also

Al Stump (October 16, 1920 – December 14, 1995), was an American author and Sports writer. ... In Major League Baseball, the 3,000 hit club is an informal term applied to the group of players who have made 3,000 or more career base hits. ... // † – Biggio has announced his retirement, effective at the end of the 2007 season. ... Insert non-formatted text hereThe following is a list of notable individual streaks achieved in Major League Baseball. ... The Ty Cobb Museum was created to foster education and understanding to the broadest possible audience of the greatest baseball hitter of all time, Tyrus Raymond Cobb. ... This is a list of North American Major League Baseball record holders. ... Below is the list of Major League Baseball players who have reached the 2,000 hit milestone. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with List of Major League Baseball all-time leaders in doubles. ... Below is the list of 158 Major League Baseball players who have reached the 100 triple milestone. ... Below is the list of 295 Major League Baseball players who have reached the 1,000 Runs milestone. ... Below is the list of 252 Major League Baseball players who have reached the 1,000 RBI milestone. ... Below is the list of 36 Major League Baseball players who have reached the 500 stolen base milestone. ... In baseball, the Triple Crown refers to: A batter who (at seasons end) leads the league in three major categories -- home runs, runs batted in, and batting average. ... Major League Baseball recognizes runs batted in champions in the American League and National League each season. ... The batting championship is awarded to the Major League Baseball player in each the American League and National League who has the highest batting average in a particular season. ... Major League Baseball recognizes home run champions in the American League and National League each season. ... This is a list of Major League Baseball leaders in career stolen bases. ... Major League Baseball recognizes runs scored champions in the American League and National League each season. ... Major League Baseball recognizes stolen base champions in the American League and National League each season. ... Major League Baseball recognizes doubles champions in the American League and National League each season. ... Listed below are the occurrences of Major League Baseball players who have hit three home runs in a single game. ... Below is the list of 65 Major League Baseball players who have reached the 400 stolen base milestone. ... At the end of each Major League Baseball season, the league leaders of various statistical categories are announced. ...

Notes

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  3. ^ Povich, Shirley, Best Player-Not Best Man, <http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/sports/longterm/general/povich/launch/cobb.htm>. Retrieved on 08-25-2007
  4. ^ Hall of Fame Voting: Baseball Writers Elections 1936. National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, Inc. Retrieved on 2007-10-26.
  5. ^ Peach, James (June 2004). "Thorstein Veblen, Ty Cobb, and the evolution of an institution". Journal of Economic Issues. Retrieved on 2007-01-30. 
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  7. ^ a b c d e f g h Wolpin, Stewart. The Ballplayers - Ty Cobb. BaseballLibrary.com. Retrieved on 2007-06-05.
  8. ^ a b Schwartz, Larry. He was a pain ... but a great pain. ESPN Internet Ventures. Retrieved on 2007-01-30.
  9. ^ Most Times Leading League. Sports Reference, Inc. Retrieved on 2007-03-21.
  10. ^ Career Leaders for Hits (Progressive). Sports Reference, Inc. Retrieved on 2007-03-19.
  11. ^ a b O'Reilly, Charles (October 6, 2001). Hometown Tribute to the Georgia Peach. Retrieved on 2007-01-30.
  12. ^ Career Leaders for Runs (Progressive). Sports Reference, Inc. Retrieved on 2007-03-19.
  13. ^ Career Leaders for Games (Progressive). Sports Reference, Inc. Retrieved on 2007-03-19.
  14. ^ Career Leaders for At Bats (Progressive). Sports Reference, Inc. Retrieved on 2007-03-19.
  15. ^ Career Leaders for Stolen Bases. Sports Reference, Inc. Retrieved on 2007-01-30.
  16. ^ Page 2 mailbag - Readers: Dirtiest pro players. ESPN Internet Ventures. Retrieved on 2007-01-30.
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  19. ^ Kanfer, Stefan (April 18, 2005). Failures Can't Come Home. Time. Retrieved on 2007-02-26.
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  21. ^ Stump (1994). Cobb: A Biography, p.64. 
  22. ^ Kossuth, James. Ty Cobb: The Minors. Retrieved on 2007-01-30.
  23. ^ Cobb, Ty; with Al Stump (1993 (reprint)). My Life in Baseball: The True Record, Bison Book edition, Lincoln and London: University of Nebraska Press, p.48. 
  24. ^ Stump (1994). Cobb: A Biography, p.69. 
  25. ^ "Ty Cobb, Baseball Great, Dies; Still Held 16 Big League Marks", New York Times, July 18, 1961, pp. 1,21. 
  26. ^ a b Woolf, S. J.. "Tyrus Cobb -- Then and Now; Once the scrappiest, wiliest figure in baseball, 'The Georgia Peach' views the game as played today with mellow disdain", New York Times, September 19, 1948, p. SM17 (Magazine section). 
  27. ^ a b c d e Ty Cobb Career Statistics. Sports Reference, Inc. Retrieved on 2007-01-30.
  28. ^ Kossuth, James. William Herschel Cobb. Retrieved on 2007-01-30.
  29. ^ State of Georgia vs. Amanda Cobb (bond hearing),  vol2 1281p.478 9 (Franklin County, Georgia, Superior Court September 29, 1905)
  30. ^ State of Georgia vs. Amanda Cobb (murder trial verdict),  vol2 1282p040 1 (Franklin County, Georgia, Superior Court March 31, 1906)
  31. ^ Stump (1994). Cobb: A Biography, p.27. 
  32. ^ Stoled (sic) Second, Third and Home in the Same Game. thebaseballpage.com. Retrieved on 2007-02-26.
  33. ^ Al Kaline. thebaseballpage.com. Retrieved on 2007-02-27.
  34. ^ a b Holmes, Dan. Ty Cobb Sold Me a Soda Pop: Hall of Fame Outfielder Ty Cobb and Coca-Cola. National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum, Inc. Retrieved on 2007-01-30.
  35. ^ Stump (1994). Cobb: A Biography, pp.158-160. 
  36. ^ a b Price, Ed (June 21, 1996). Aggressive play defined Ty Cobb. The Augusta Chronicle. Retrieved on 2007-02-07.
  37. ^ Year in Review: 1909 American League. Baseball Almanac. Retrieved on 2007-05-28.
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  39. ^ Honig, Donald (1975). Baseball When the Grass Was Real. University of Nebraska Press, pp. 42. ISBN 0803272677. 
  40. ^ Daley, Arthur. "Sports of The Times: In Belated Tribute", The New York Times, August 15, 1961, p. 32 (food fashions family furnishings section). 
  41. ^ Holmes, Dan. First Five: The Original Members of the Hall of Fame. National Baseball Hall of Fame and Museum. Retrieved on 2007-06-15.
  42. ^ ESPN.com's 10 infamous moments, <http://espn.go.com/endofcentury/s/other/infamous.html>. Retrieved on 08-26-2007
  43. ^ Stump (1994). Cobb: A Biography, pp.208-209. 
  44. ^ Charlton, James. Al Travers from the Chronology. BaseballLibrary.com. Retrieved on 2007-06-15.
  45. ^ Kossuth, James. How Cobb Got Along With Others: Part 3: Ty and Those Outside Baseball. Retrieved on 2007-01-30.
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  51. ^ Player Pages: Pete Rose. Retrieved on 2007-02-07.
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Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 299th day of the year (300th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Detroit News is one of the two major newspapers in Detroit, Michigan, the other being the Detroit Free Press. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 156th day of the year (157th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 80th day of the year (81st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 78th day of the year (79th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 279th day of the year (280th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 78th day of the year (79th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 78th day of the year (79th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 78th day of the year (79th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... The New Georgia Encyclopedia (NGE) is a free-content, web-based encyclopedia about the state of Georgia (U.S. state). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 108th day of the year (109th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... is the 199th day of the year (200th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... is the 262nd day of the year (263rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1948 (MCMXLVIII) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display the 1948 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 272nd day of the year (273rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see 1905 (disambiguation). ... is the 90th day of the year (91st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1906 (MCMVI) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1996 (MCMXCVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full 1996 Gregorian calendar). ... The Augusta Chronicle is the major daily newspaper of Augusta, Georgia and is one of the oldest newspapers in the United States. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 38th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... May 28 is the 148th day of the year (149th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 56th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... University of Nebraska Press at the University of Nebraska in Lincoln, Nebraska, is a major publisher of original and reprint editions of significant works about the West. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... is the 227th day of the year (228th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Baseball Hall of Fame redirects here. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 166th day of the year (167th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 166th day of the year (167th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 38th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 157th day of the year (158th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 38th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 38th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... March 10 is the 69th day of the year (70th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 128th day of the year (129th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Nation (ISSN 0027-8378) is a weekly [1] U.S. periodical devoted to politics and culture, self-described as the flagship of the left. [2] Founded on July 6, 1865 as an Abolitionist publication, it is the oldest continuously published weekly magazine in the United States. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 60th day of the year (61st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Mens Fitness is a monthly mens magazine that focuses on fitness. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 60th day of the year (61st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 83rd day of the year (84th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Logo of the St. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 60th day of the year (61st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 194th day of the year (195th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 41st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 41st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Sporting News (TSN) is an American-based sports newspaper, currently affiliated with the Fox network. ... is the 218th day of the year (219th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 41st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 60th day of the year (61st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 41st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 58th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 41st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 336th day of the year (337th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1994 (MCMXCIV) The year 1994 was designated as the International Year of the Family and the International Year of the Sport and the Olympic Ideal by the United Nations. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 37th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... is the 253rd day of the year (254th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1952 (MCMLII) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Look up time in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... is the 269th day of the year (270th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1949 (MCMXLIX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 41st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Look up time in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 41st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Honourable John McCallum, PC, MP, MA, PhD (born April 9, 1950) is a Canadian politician, economist and university professor. ... is the 168th day of the year (169th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1956 (MCMLVI) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Newsweek logo Newsweek is a weekly news magazine published in New York City and distributed throughout the United States and internationally. ... The New York Times is a daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed internationally. ... is the 199th day of the year (200th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... is the 201st day of the year (202nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1961 (MCMLXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The New York Times is an internationally known daily newspaper published in New York City and distributed in the United States and many other nations worldwide. ... is the 246th day of the year (247th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 30th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... MLB and Major Leagues redirect here. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 166th day of the year (167th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

References

  • Alexander, Charles (1984). Ty Cobb. New York: Oxford University Press. 
  • Bak, Richard (2005). Peach: Ty Cobb In His Time And Ours. Sports Media Group. 
  • Bak, Richard (1994). Ty Cobb: His Tumultuous Life and Times. Dallas, Texas: Taylor. 
  • Pietrusza, David; Matthew Silverman & Michael Gershman (2000). Baseball: The Biographical Encyclopedia. Total/Sports Illustrated. Taylor. 
  • Stump, Al (1994). Cobb: A Biography. Chapel Hill, North Carolina: Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill. ISBN 0-945575-64-5. 
  • Ty Cobb at the Internet Movie Database
  • play: "Jabberwock", one line reference relating a young baseball player to Cobb.

The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) is an online database of information about movies, actors, television shows, production crew personnel, and video games. ...

External links

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  Results from FactBites:
 
New Georgia Encyclopedia: Ty Cobb (1886-1961) (1303 words)
Cobb was born in The Narrows in Banks County, on December 18, 1886, the first of three children.
Cobb still holds the record for most steals of home, with more than fifty (the exact total is in dispute).
In 1963 Cobb was one of the first three professional athletes to be inducted into the Georgia Sports Hall of Fame, and in 1998 the citizens of Royston opened a museum in his honor.
Ty Cobb Biography (1893 words)
Cobb threw with his right hand, but trained himself to bat from the left side of the plate (it was a step closer to first).
Cobb was disliked widely by the press and opponents, and today is remembered for his violent behavior off the field and for his racist attitudes.
Ty Cobb died in 1961, in Atlanta, Georgia and was interred in the Royston, Georgia town cemetery.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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