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Encyclopedia > Twin City Rapid Transit

The Twin City Rapid Transit Company (TCRT), also known as Twin City Lines (TCL), was a business that primarily operated streetcars, and buses in the area of Minneapolis-St. Paul, Minnesota, but also tested out other types of transportation including taxicabs and steamboats, along with operation of some destination sites such as amusement parks. It existed under the TCRT name from a merger in the 1890s until it was purchased in 1962. At its height in the early 20th century, the company operated an intercity streetcar system that was believed to be one of the best in the United States. It is a predecessor of the current Metro Transit bus and light rail system that operates in the area. a historic postcard showing electric trolley-powered streetcars in Richmond, Virginia, where Frank J. Sprague successfully demonstrated his new system on the hills in 1888 A streetcar is a railway vehicle designed to carry passengers on tracks, usually laid in city streets. ... An articulated bus operated by the CTA in Chicago, Illinois, USA. A Go North East Bus parked in a lay-by in Tyne and Wear, England A bus is a large road vehicle intended to carry numerous persons in addition to the driver and sometimes a conductor. ... A map of the Twin Cities metropolitan area. ... Capital Saint Paul Largest city Minneapolis Area  Ranked 12th  - Total 87,014 sq mi (225,365 km²)  - Width 250 miles (400 km)  - Length 400 miles (645 km)  - % water 8. ... Taxicab, short forms taxi or cab, is a type of public transport for a single passenger, or small group of passengers, typically for a non-shared ride. ... Paddle steamers — Lucerne, Switzerland. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Metro Transit logo Metro Transit is the transit division of the Metropolitan Council, a regional governmental agency in the Minneapolis-St. ... This article is about light rail systems in general. ...

Contents

Twin City Rapid Transit logo made in The Gimp by User:Mulad File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ...

Beginnings

The origins of street rail transport in the Twin Cities are a bit murky. Some sources state that it dates back to 1867, when businessman and mayor Dorilus Morrison began building rails in downtown Minneapolis. He quickly joined forces with Colonel William S. King and other Minneapolis businessmen to create the Minneapolis Street Railway. However, the lines didn't go very far, and the railway was pretty much useless for a time. There are some indications that a streetcar was purchased but never used, collecting dust for several years. A businessman (sometimes businesswoman, female; or businessperson, gender neutral) is a generic term for a wide range of people engaged in profit-oriented enterprises, generally the management of a company. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ... Dorilus Morrison (December 27, 1814–June 26, 1898) was a banker, businessman, and politician who lived in the U.S. state of Minnesota. ... Nickname: City of Lakes Motto: En Avant (French: Lets go!) Location in Hennepin County and the state of Minnesota. ... Colonel William Smith King (December 16, 1828–February 24, 1900) was a U.S. Congressman from Minnesota from March 4, 1875 until March 3, 1877. ...


In 1872, St. Paul saw the first successful horse-drawn streetcars by the St. Paul Railway Co. In 1875, the Minneapolis Street Railway made a deal with the Minneapolis City Council where the company would have exclusive access to street rails for 50 years if they could be up and operating in four months. The company recruited real-estate mogul Thomas Lowry, who got the line operating on September 2, 1875 between downtown and the University of Minnesota. State capitol building in Saint Paul Saint Paul is the capital and second-largest city of the state of Minnesota in the United States of America. ... A horsecar was an animal-powered streetcar (or tram). ... Real estate or immovable property is a legal term (in some jurisdictions) that encompasses land along with anything permanently affixed to the land, such as buildings. ... For the chemist named Thomas Martin Lowry, see Martin Lowry. ... September 2 is the 245th day of the year (246th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Washington Avenue Bridge at night The University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, almost always abbreviated U of M, and sometimes referred to as The U by locals, is the oldest and largest part of the University of Minnesota system. ...


The streetcars became popular because they rode on smooth rails, while most of the streets of the era were just dirt or possibly cobblestone. These roads could become treacherous to pedestrians and uncomfortable to ride on in horse-drawn buggies when the weather turned foul. A cobblestone-covered street Cobblestones are stones used in the pavement of early streets. ... Buggy can refer to various types of carts: a dune buggy or swamp buggy; a kite buggy; a shopping cart (Southern American English); a form of baby transport also called a pushchair or perambulator (British English) or stroller (American English); a lightweight carriage, as in horse and buggy; or a... Weather is a term that encompasses phenomena in the atmosphere of a planet. ...

Image of TCRT streetcars at the 1910 Minnesota State Fair
Image of TCRT streetcars at the 1910 Minnesota State Fair

Thomas Lowry envisioned linking together the various railways that were cropping up around Minneapolis. While other systems were popping up with more horse-drawn carriages or cable cars, Lowry pushed forward with electrification of the lines. Starting in the late 1880s, electric streetcars began moving in both Minneapolis and St. Paul. Cable cars quickly lost favor as they struggled through snowy Minnesota winters, and the public quickly grew weary of slow horsecars. 1910 photo of TCRT streetcars at MN State Fair Retrieved from http://www. ... The Minnesota State Fair Grandstand in August 2003 The Minnesota State Fair, marketed for generations as The Great Minnesota Get-Together, is one of the largest state fairs in the United States. ... Cable Car in San Francisco A San Francisco cable car A cable car or cable railway is a mass transit system using rail cars that are propelled by a continuously moving cable running at a constant speed. ... Lightning strikes during a night-time thunderstorm. ... Animation of snowcover changing with the seasons Snow is precipitation in the form of crystalline water ice, consisting of a multitude of snowflakes that fall from clouds. ... Winter is one of the four seasons of temperate zones. ...


Growth

In 1890, the two cities were connected with a railway along University Avenue, the first of four rail lines linking them together. A merger of the two city systems, the St. Paul City Railway Co. and Minneapolis Street Railway, formed the Twin City Rapid Transit Company. It went on a building spree, quickly doubling the amount of electrified track in the system.


The company continued absorbing smaller competitors for the next 40 years. In 1898, the company began a transition to using company-built streetcars and machinery (such as cranes and snowplows) rather than purchasing the cars from other companies. The first such car was built as a personal streetcar for company President Thomas Lowry, although his was a special-order. The car featured one end with large windows, to make the scenery more visible. This car was used on special occasions, such as the opening of new lines and a visit by United States President William McKinley. TCRT built some of the widest streetcars in the country, stretching more than nine feet (2.75 m) from left to right. Tower crane An old crane with incline of pivoted boom controlled by means of chains, sprockets and gears. ... A small sidewalk clearing plow in Ottawa, Canada A snowplow (or snow plow, US Engish; in UK English, snowplough or snow plough) is a vehicle, or a device intended for mounting on a vehicle, for removing snow and sometimes ice from outdoor surfaces, typically those serving transportation purposes. ... The presidential seal was first used in 1880 by President Rutherford B. Hayes and last modified in 1959 by adding the 50th star for Hawaii The President of the United States of America is the head of state and head of government of the United States. ... William McKinley, Jr. ...


Old track was also upgraded. In the early days, a number of lines had been first laid down with narrow-gauge track. These were all upgraded to standard gauge. In addition, the basic construction of the lines improved. The rails of the Twin Cities were upgraded to the most expensive track in the country, running US$60,000 per mile. Tracks featured welded (thermite) joints, and were commonly surrounded by cobblestone or asphalt. By 1909, 95 percent of the rails were of this type of construction, used until the company ended streetcar service. Narrow-gauge railways are railroads (railways) with track spaced at less than the standard gauge of 4 ft 8 in (1. ... As railways developed and expanded one of the key issues to be decided was that of the rail gauge (the distance between the two rails of the track) which should be used. ... ISO 4217 Code USD User(s) the United States, the British Indian Ocean Territory[1], the British Virgin Islands, East Timor, Ecuador, El Salvador, the Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Palau, Panama, Turks and Caicos Islands, and the insular areas of the United States Inflation 2. ... Welding is a fabrication process that joins materials, usually metals or thermoplastics, by causing coalescence. ... A thermite mixture using Iron Oxide A thermite reaction is a type of aluminothermic reaction in which aluminium metal is oxidized by the oxide of another metal, most commonly iron oxide. ... Base layer of asphalt concrete in a road under construction. ...


From 1906 to 1926, TCRT experimented with "streetcar boats." Officially known as Express Boats, they were steam-powered vessels with designs reminiscent of the streetcars of the day. The boats operated between resorts on Lake Minnetonka, but slow times hit hard in the 1920s. Ultimately, seven were built, but most of them were scuttled in the lake in 1926. Lake Minnetonka is a 14,000 acre lake in the U.S. state of Minnesota. ...

"Streetcar boat" Hopkins on Lake Minnetonka
"Streetcar boat" Hopkins on Lake Minnetonka

TCRT also expanded into the region around White Bear Lake, and company-owned attractions were built in that area. The Wildwood Amusement Park in Mahtomedi was a prime destination. Twin City Rapid Transit streetboat Hopkins from early 20th century (1900s to 1920s), believed to be public domain. ... Twin City Rapid Transit streetboat Hopkins from early 20th century (1900s to 1920s), believed to be public domain. ... White Bear Lake is the name of a city and a township in Minnesota White Bear Lake, Minnesota is located in Ramsey County Minnesota; White Bear Lake Township, Minnesota is located in Ramsey County and Washington County, Minnesota; This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the... Mahtomedi is a city in Washington County, Minnesota, United States. ...


The internal combustion engine didn't escape notice, and Twin City Rapid Transit acquired several bus lines that began to pop up around the time of World War I and a taxicab company in the 1920s. When the transportation system peaked in 1931, it had nearly 530 miles (850 km) of track and 1021 streetcars. Rail extended from Stillwater on the bank of the St. Croix River in the east to Lake Minnetonka in the west, a distance of about 50 miles (80 km). For a time, TCRT was the largest employer in the area. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Combatants Allied Powers: Russian Empire France British Empire Italy United States Central Powers: Austria-Hungary German Empire Ottoman Empire Bulgaria Commanders Nikolay II Aleksey Brusilov Georges Clemenceau Joseph Joffre Ferdinand Foch Robert Nivelle Herbert H. Asquith D. Lloyd George Sir Douglas Haig Sir John Jellicoe Victor Emmanuel III Luigi Cadorna... A Stillwater city limit sign Stillwater is a city located in Washington County, Minnesota (coordinates, 45. ... The St. ...


It is said that anyone who lived in Minneapolis was no farther than 400 yards (less than ¼ mile) from the nearest station at that time.


Like any organization, TCRT felt some growing pains along the way. In 1917, a major labor strike took place in the months after the United States entered World War I. It began on October 6, and was influenced by the organization Industrial Workers of the World (IWW, also known as the "Wobblies"), a militant group that had been organizing unions in the region, particularly in the northern Mesabi Iron Range. Horace Lowry, the son of Thomas Lowry, headed the company at this time and absolutely refused to negotiate with the striking workers. This angered workers and others who felt sympathy for them. October 6 is the 279th day of the year (280th in leap years). ... The Industrial Workers of the World (IWW or the Wobblies) is an international union currently headquartered in Cincinnati, Ohio, USA. At its peak in 1923 the organization claimed some 100,000 members in good standing, and could marshal the support of perhaps 300,000 workers. ... A union (labor union in American English; trade union, sometimes trades union, in British English; either labour union or trade union in Canadian English) is a legal entity consisting of employees or workers having a common interest, such as all the assembly workers for one employer, or all the workers... The Mesabi Range, also known as the Mesabi Iron Range, is a vast deposit of iron ore in northern Minnesota, and the chief deposit of iron ore in the United States. ...


An angry mob in St. Paul damaged streetcars and harassed those who had continued to work. The Minnesota Commission of Public Safety ordered the workers back on the job, and they complied for a while. People again left work in late November. On December 2, a crowd energized by speakers from the Nonpartisan League again grew angry after TCRT cut off electricity to the streetcars in downtown St. Paul, making it impossible for many people to return home. Over the following days, many were arrested, and the strike was effectively broken. 800 people were eventually replaced by non-union workers. An ochlocracy from The Simpsons Ochlocracy (Greek: οχλοκρατία or ohlokratía; Latin: ochlocratia) is government by mob or a mass of people, or the intimidation of constitutional authorities. ... December 2 is the 336th day (337th in leap years) of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Non-Partisan League (NPL) was a political organization that was founded in 1915 in the United States by former Socialist party leader A. C. Townley, which adopted as its platform most of the immediate demands put forward by the Socialists. ...


Things turned out differently in the 1930s, although it was not a smooth transition. In 1932, most of the system's streetcars were converted to "one-man operation" where, rather than requiring both a motorman to drive in front and a conductor to take fares in the rear, the motorman took over both operations. The doors on the streetcars were modified to allow easier boarding in front. So-called "gate cars" which had used open grating on the rear of the cars mostly disappeared from the lines. The transition from two-man to one-man operation was taking place on many streetcar lines across the country around this time.


The conversion to single-man operation meant that about half of the company's workforce was suddenly surplus. Many employees found it hard to get work, and were often forced to take strange shifts. One worker recorded having a 19-hour shift from 4:24 p.m. on Sunday to 9:49 a.m. on Monday. There was a company union, although it hadn't done much good. By October 1933, the workers had gained backing from Minnesota Governor Floyd B. Olson, St. Paul Mayor William Maloney, and the National Recovery Administration, among others. The next year, the workers voted to join the Amalgamated Transit Union. Floyd Björnstjerne Olson (November 13, 1891–August 22, 1936) American politician. ... NRA Blue Eagle poster. ... The Amalgamated Transit Union (ATU) is a labor union in the United States and Canada, representing workers in the transit system and other industries. ...


Decline

With the Great Depression and the rise of the automobile, the rail lines began to decline. Buses were frequently used toward the edges of the system as long routes, especially those with low ridership, were cut back. World War II allowed the system to bounce back for a time, since strict fuel rationing and citizens' efforts to conserve resources made automobile use rather un-patriotic. However, the restrictions also hit TCRT itself, meaning that the company could not afford to build many new streetcars. The company was forced to add more buses to shore up the system's various routes. The Great Depression was a time of economic down turn, which started after the Stock Market Crash on October 29, 1929, also known as Black Tuesday. ... Karl Benzs Velo (vélo means bicycle in French) model (1894) - entered into the first automobile race 2005 MINI Cooper S. An automobile (also motor car or simply car) is a wheeled passenger vehicle that carries its own motor. ... Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Rationing is the controlled distribution of resources and scarce goods or services: it restricts how much people are allowed to buy or consume. ... This article or section may contain original research or unverified claims. ...


After the war, trolley riders returned to their automobiles. TCRT's management explored ways to upgrade the line to bring people back. Heavy wartime use meant that the rails needed to be repaired, and competition from other forms of transportation required modernization. In 1945, the company received its first streamlined PCC streetcar. The following years saw dozens of new PCC cars on the streets, although the first one remained unique in the fleet because it was the only one to have air brakes. All of the PCCs were several inches wider than standard, to match the nine-foot (2.75 m) width of the company's older streetcars. Look up Management in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A Twin City Rapid Transit PCC streetcar in museum operation. ... Piping diagram from 1920 of a Westinghouse E-T Air Brake system. ...


The company had a long-standing policy of reinvestment in the rail system. When profits appeared, they were usually used to pay off loans and improve the rails, streetcars, and other hardware the company owned. It was rare for the company to pay out dividends. In 1948, a Wall Street speculator named Charles Green bought 6000 shares of TCRT stock. He expected to quickly gain profit, but found he had purchased stock just as the company decided to set forth on some major construction. Knowing this would demolish his anticipated dividends, Green contacted other shareholders and urged them to vote out the company's president, D.J. Strouse, and put him in charge instead. // This article is about corporate dividends. ... Elaborate marble facade of NYSE as seen from the intersection of Broad and Wall Streets For other uses, see Wall Street (disambiguation). ... Speculation involves the buying, holding, and selling of stocks, bonds, commodities, currencies, collectibles, real estate, derivatives or any valuable financial instrument to profit from fluctuations in its price as opposed to buying it for use or for income via methods such as dividends or interest. ...


Green took control of the company in 1949 and quickly started dismantling the railway system, announcing that the company would completely switch to buses by 1958. Many of the system's trolleys were sold to other cities around the continent. It was soon discovered that Green had connections to organized crime, and his actions were alienating the public. He sold his shares in 1950 to be briefly replaced by Emil B. Anderson before local lawyer Fred Ossanna ascended to head the company the next year. Ossanna held off on the teardown for a short while, but soon announced that the process would be accelerated. Lines would be removed and replaced by buses in two years. Organized crime or criminal organizations are groups or operations run by criminals, most commonly for the purpose of generating a monetary profit. ... English barrister 16th century painting of a civil law notary, by Flemish painter Quentin Massys. ... Fred Albin Ossanna was a Minnesota lawyer who oversaw the dismantling of the Minneapolis-St. ... 1951 (MCMLI) was a common year starting on Monday; see its calendar. ...


On June 19, 1954, four years before Green had envisioned, the very last streetcars ran in Minneapolis. The leftover vehicles were unceremoniously burned in order to recover the scrap metal they contained. The last streetcar was very famously photographed alight behind Fred Ossanna and James Towley as Towley presented Ossanna with a check. June 19 is the 170th day of the year (171st in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 195 days remaining. ... 1954 (MCMLIV) was a common year starting on Friday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The word check has these meanings: In finance, a cheque (spelt check in American English) is an order for transfer of money. ...


Conspiracy?

Many have alleged that the teardown of TCRT's rail system was associated with actions General Motors took in the 1930s, '40s, and '50s, arguably with the express purpose of destroying streetcar systems to promote bus and automobile travel. GM, along with Firestone and Standard Oil, formed National City Lines, a holding company that engaged in hostile takeovers of many streetcar lines. In 45 cities, this resulted in "bustitution," the full conversion from steel-wheel to rubber-tire transit. General Motors Corporation (NYSE: GM), also known as GM, is an American automobile maker with worldwide operations and brands including Buick, Cadillac, Chevrolet, GMC, Holden, Hummer, Opel, Pontiac, Saturn, Saab and Vauxhall. ... The 1940s decade ran from 1940 to 1949. ... // Recovering from World War II and its aftermath, the economic miracle emerged in West Germany and Italy. ... Between 1936 and 1950, National City Lines (NCL), a holding company sponsored and funded by General Motors, Firestone Tire, Standard Oil of California and Phillips Petroleum, bought out more than 100 electric surface-traction (streetcar) systems in 45 cities (including New York, Philadelphia, St. ... A holding company is a company that owns enough voting stock in another firm to control management and operations by influencing or electing its board of directors. ... Hostile takeover can refer to: For the business usage see takeover. ... The term bustitution is a neologism sometimes used to describe the practice of replacing train service, whether street railways (light rail or tram/streetcar systems) or full-size railway systems, with a bus service, either on a temporary or permanent basis. ...


National City Lines did not engage directly with Twin City Rapid Transit, although Fred Ossanna had previously worked for NCL. He came to work at TCRT as a lawyer for Charles Green in the 1949 takeover of the company. However, General Motors did apparently offer some deep discounts on buses. Reportedly, Ossanna once went to ask for 25 buses—and was offered 525. The vast majority of buses in TCRT's eventual bus fleet were built by GM.


Still, most of the activity was geared toward stripping TCRT of its assets to fill the pockets of owners and investors. Ossanna was convicted in 1960 of illegally taking personal profit from the company during the transition period, and was imprisoned along with other accomplices. Carl Pohlad, who became the owner of the Minnesota Twins in 1984, was the eventual successor of Fred Ossanna as head of Twin City Lines in the 1960s. He ultimately sold the company in 1970. In business and accounting an asset is anything owned which can produce future economic benefit, whether in possession or by right to take possession, by a person or a group acting together, e. ... The word investor may refer to: A person who makes investments Investor AB, a Swedish investment company institutional investor corporate investor This is a disambiguation page, a list of pages that otherwise might share the same title. ... Dorchester Penitentiary in New Brunswick, Canada is an institution that is part of Corrections Canada. ... Carl Pohlad (b. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 3, 6, 14, 29, 34, 42 Name Minnesota Twins (1961–present) Washington Nationals/Senators (1901-1960) Ballpark Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome 1982-present Metropolitan Stadium (1961-1981) Griffith Stadium (1903-1960) A.K.A Clark...


Aftermath

Before the dismantling began, TCRT had purchased a significant number of PCC streetcars. These were sold off in 1952 and 1953, still in very good operating condition. The cars ended up in Mexico City (91 cars), Newark, New Jersey (30), and Shaker Heights, Ohio (20). Relatively few places could have taken them because of their extra width, and each of these buyers had significant amounts of dedicated right-of-way. For instance, the Shaker Heights Rapid Transit commuter line to Cleveland was grade-separated in many areas. The vast majority of the older wooden streetcars, mostly built by TCRT itself, were destroyed. Out of 1240 built by the company, only about five have survived to be restored and operated by rail museums. A Twin City Rapid Transit PCC streetcar in museum operation. ... Nickname: Ciudad de los Palacios Location of Mexico City in central Mexico Coordinates: Country Mexico Federal entity Federal District Boroughs The 16 delegaciones Founded (as Tenochtitlan) c. ... Nickname: The Brick City Map of Newark in Essex County Coordinates: County Essex Founded/Incorporated 1666/1836  - Mayor Cory Booker, term of office 2006–2010 Area [1]    - City 67. ... Shaker Heights is a city in Cuyahoga County, Ohio, United States. ... A right-of-way (plural: rights-of-way) is an easement or strip of land granted to a railroad company upon which to build a railroad. ... Waterfront Line of Cleveland Rapid Transit Cleveland Rapid Transit (generally known as The Rapid) is the name of the rail rapid-transit system in Cleveland, Ohio, owned by the Greater Cleveland Regional Transit Authority. ... Cleveland redirects here. ... Trunks A tree trunk as found at the Veluwe, The Netherlands Wood is a solid material derived from woody plants, notably trees but also shrubs. ...


Only two of the wooden streetcars in use in the 1950s had been given away to railfan groups before the rest of the fleet was burned. They are owned by the Minnesota Streetcar Museum (TCRT No. 1300) and the Seashore Trolley Museum (TCRT No. 1267) in Maine. One other steel-sheathed car (TCRT No. 1583) had been sent to a railway to the north in Duluth-Superior, but it was never used. It now resides at the East Troy Electric Railroad Museum in Wisconsin. A few additional cars escaped the burn pits, but they were still subjected to harsh conditions and only one or two are restored. Railfans practicing their hobby at Prairie du Chien, Wisconsin. ... Duluth Street Railway #265 The Minnesota Streetcar Museum (MSM) is a transportation museum that operates two heritage streetcar lines in Minneapolis, Minnesota and the suburb of Excelsior. ... Biddeford & Saco Railroad #31 The Seashore Trolley Museum, located in Kennebunkport, Maine, is the worlds oldest and largest museum of mass transit vehicles. ... Official language(s) None (English de facto; French is also an administrative language) Capital Augusta Largest city Portland Area  Ranked 39th  - Total 33,414 sq mi (86,542 km²)  - Width 210 miles (338 km)  - Length 320 miles (515 km)  - % water 13. ... The steel cable of a colliery winding tower. ... Duluths canal connects Lake Superior to the Duluth-Superior harbor and the St. ... Railyard in the port of Superior Superior is the a city and the county seat of Douglas County, Wisconsin. ... The East Troy Electric Railroad Museum is a railroad museum located in East Troy, Wisconsin. ... Official language(s) None Capital Madison Largest city Milwaukee Area  Ranked 23rd  - Total 65,498 sq mi (169,790 km²)  - Width 260 miles (420 km)  - Length 310 miles (500 km)  - % water 17  - Latitude 42°30N to 47°3N  - Longitude 86°49W to 92°54W Population  Ranked...

TCRT PCC car no. 322 at the Minnesota Streetcar Museum
TCRT PCC car no. 322 at the Minnesota Streetcar Museum

One of the streetcar boats, the Minnehaha, was found by divers and then brought to the surface in 1980. After a long wait, it was restored and has been operating on Lake Minnetonka from 1996 to 2004 by the Minnesota Transportation Museum, and since then by the Museum of Lake Minnetonka. MTM also restored one of TCRT's old PCC cars (TCRT No. 322), operated now by the Minnesota Streetcar Museum. PCC streetcar once owned by Twin City Rapid Transit, now operated by the Minnesota Transportation Museum in Minneapolis, Minnesota. ... PCC streetcar once owned by Twin City Rapid Transit, now operated by the Minnesota Transportation Museum in Minneapolis, Minnesota. ... The Minnesota Transportation Museum (MTM) is an organization that operates several heritage transportation sites in Minnesota and just across the border in Wisconsin. ... The Museum of Lake Minnetonka (MLM) is an organization that was split from the Minnesota Transportation Museum (MTM) in 2004–2005 to operate the steamboat Minnehaha that was part of a small fleet made by the Twin City Rapid Transit Company (TCRT) in 1906. ... Duluth Street Railway #265 The Minnesota Streetcar Museum (MSM) is a transportation museum that operates two heritage streetcar lines in Minneapolis, Minnesota and the suburb of Excelsior. ...


Some of the PCC cars once owned by Twin City Rapid Transit are just beginning their lives as museum pieces. The Newark City Subway finished operation of their 24 remaining cars on August 24, 2001, replacing the cars with new light-rail trainsets. 15 have been sold to the San Francisco Municipal Railway, or Muni, for their collection of classic streetcars on the Market Street Railway. In addition, 12 PCCs that ran on the Shaker Heights line are now owned by the Brooklyn Historic Railway Association. Many of these cars owe their longevity to the fact that the Twin Cities area makes heavy use of salt to de-ice roadways in the winter. In anticipation of this, the cars were largely made of stainless steel to prevent corrosion. PCC streetcar at Newark Penn Station in 2001, signed as 7 City Subway. ... August 24 is the 236th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (237th in leap years), with 129 days remaining. ... 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Two forms of public transport operated by the San Francisco Municipal Railway (Muni): on the left, a bus (the 38 Geary line) and, on the right, the F Market historic streetcar. ... F Market PCC cars at Jones Street terminal. ... The Brooklyn Historic Railway Associations (BHRA) shop, trolley barn and offices are located in Red Hook, Brooklyn, on the historic Beard Street Piers (circa 1870). ... A magnified crystal of a salt (halite/sodium chloride) Salt covering the floor of Bad Water in Death Valley, CA, the lowest point in the US. A salt, in chemistry, is any ionic compound composed of cations (positively charged ions) and anions (negative ions) so that the product is neutral... The 630 foot high, stainless-clad (type 304) Gateway Arch defines St. ... Corrosion is deterioration of essential properties in a material due to reactions with its surroundings. ...


Other vestiges of the company's streetcar history remained in the Twin Cities, and some surviving elements are now listed on the National Register of Historic Places. One of the oldest structures to survive is a building in Minneapolis now known as the Colonial Warehouse. First built in 1885, it housed the headquarters of the Minneapolis Street Railway Co. during the early horsecar era, and also later served as a powerhouse as the system was converted. The lines needed a lot of electricity, so hydroelectric generators were installed at Saint Anthony Falls about a mile away, and the Southeast Steam Plant was also constructed nearby. The old headquarters was sold in 1908, soon after these were constructed. The steam plant was bought by the University of Minnesota, which now uses it for providing heat to the campus downriver. A typical plaque showing entry on the National Register of Historic Places. ... Hydroelectric dam diagram The waters of Llyn Stwlan, the upper reservoir of the Ffestiniog Pumped-Storage Scheme in north Wales, can just be glimpsed on the right. ... Aerial view of Saint Anthony Falls with the upper dam; there is also a lower dam. ... Washington Avenue Bridge at night The University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, almost always abbreviated U of M, and sometimes referred to as The U by locals, is the oldest and largest part of the University of Minnesota system. ...


A large building on Snelling Avenue in St. Paul first served as the main construction and repair shop for the streetcars when it was built in 1907. It was expanded and remodeled over the years, later becoming a major garage for the bus system. However, the complex had become outdated, with poor ventilation, a leaky roof, and other problems. It was finally shut down in September 2001.


Selby Hill in St. Paul was a steep climb and was a place where cable cars were used in the late 19th century before Selby Hill Tunnel was constructed in 1905 to provide a more gradual incline. The tunnel still exists, but the ends have been blocked off. It is near the Cathedral of St. Paul. A disused railway tunnel now converted to pedestrian and bicycle use, near Houyet, Belgium A tunnel is an underground passage. ... Dome of the Cathedral of Saint Paul The Cathedral of Saint Paul is a Roman Catholic cathedral in the city of St Paul, Minnesota. ...


Billboards across the area were originally laid out to target passengers of the rail lines with advertising. Many of these billboards remained for decades afterward, despite the fact that automobile traffic frequently favored different routes. These finally disappeared in large part due to city beautification efforts of the 1990s. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... Commercialism redirects here. ...


New beginnings

Less than twenty years after rails disappeared from Twin Cities streets, politicians began proposing new light rail systems. Congestion was bad enough in 1972 that there were proposals to build new subways or people movers, but excessively high costs prevented any of the projects from getting anywhere until the end of the century. The University of Minnesota did a fair amount of research on personal rapid transit (PRT) systems and has held a number of patents on the idea. This article is about light rail systems in general. ... A rapid transit, underground, subway, tube, elevated, or metro(politan) system is a railway — usually in an urban area — with a high capacity and frequency of service, and grade separation from other traffic. ... A people mover is a fully-automated light rail or tram system. ... Artists rendering of SkyTran, a proposed PRT design. ... A patent is a set of exclusive rights granted by a state to a patentee (the inventor or assignee) for a fixed period of time in exchange for the regulated, public disclosure of certain details of a device, method, process or composition of matter (substance) (known as an invention) which...


In the 1970s, the bus lines (some of which still trace former horse-drawn buggy paths) were shifted to a partially publicly-funded operation overseen by the Metropolitan Council. The Metropolitan Council is the regional governmental agency (also known as a regional planning organization, see Metropolitan planning organization) in Minnesota serving the Twin Cities seven-county metropolitan area (see Minneapolis-St. ...


Politics, frustration, and certainly a little nostalgia combined to finally bring rail transport back to the Twin Cities with the Hiawatha Line. Construction began in 2001, and the line began operations in 2004. At 12 miles long, it is only a faint echo of what was in the past, but many people in the state hope it is a new beginning. Others feel that, at the cost of $715 million, it could become a tremendous failure that the state can't afford. Some are already pushing for extensions to the Hiawatha Line (indeed, the rails had been extended slightly at the ends even as it was being built), and a proposal for a heritage streetcar line running east-west through the city—possibly including PCC cars once owned by TCRT—has been examined. A proposal for PRT service was unveiled in early 2004, and there are also well-developed plans for a new commuter rail service, the Northstar Line, tracing U.S. Route 10 northwest toward St. Cloud, Minnesota. Also other proposals inculded adding light rail west from Minneapolis to the Southwest Suburbs and even by adding both a commuter connection to the compelete North and a light rail alingment to the Southwest & Southeast of the downtown area of Saint Paul, right now a connection between both of the twin cites is correctly beeing studied. Politics is the process by which groups make decisions. ... One may feel nostalgic for the familiar routine of school, conveniently forgetting the painful experiences such as bullying. ... Hiawatha light-rail vehicle #111 near Cedar-Riverside station The Hiawatha Line is a 12 mile (19 kilometer) light rail corridor in Minneapolis, Minnesota that extends to the southern suburb of Bloomington, in Hennepin County connecting downtown Minneapolis to the Minneapolis-St. ... ISO 4217 Code USD User(s) the United States, the British Indian Ocean Territory[1], the British Virgin Islands, East Timor, Ecuador, El Salvador, the Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Palau, Panama, Turks and Caicos Islands, and the insular areas of the United States Inflation 2. ... A scene on a heritage railway. ... A Connex commuter train stands by the platform in Melbourne, Australia Regional rail systems, or commuter rail systems, usually provide a rail service through a central business district area into suburbs or other locations that draw large numbers of people on a daily basis. ... The Northstar Corridor is a proposed commuter rail line that will serve a region which runs to the northwest from Minneapolis, Minnesota toward St. ... United States Highway 10 is an east-west United States highway. ... St. ... The Southwest Corridor is a future transit corridor between Minneapolis and Eden Prairie, going through Hopkins along the way. ... The Rush Line is a proposed mass transit link from downtown Saint Paul to Hinckley, MN via Forest Lake, Pine City and White Bear Lake, MN. The 80-mile route will likely be commuter rail but bus rapid transit is also under consideration. ... The Pilot Knob Corridor is a rumored LRT corridor in southern suburbs of the Twin Cities in Minnesota, it is not yet confirmed if it will receive any attention by the Metropolitan Council. ... The Red Rock Corridor is a proposed commuter rail between Hastings, Minnesota through downtown St. ... The Central Corridor is the 11-mile stretch between the downtown regions of Minneapolis and Saint Paul in Minnesota, which is currently proceeding with engineering work for a future light rail line to stem the growth of traffic congestion. ...

 v  d  e Metro Transit and other mass transit in the Twin Cities
Goverened by the Metropolitan Council
Transit Agencies: Metro Transit  • MVTA  • SW TransitPlymouth MetrolinkMaple Grove TransitShakopee TransitBE LineAnoka County Traveler  • Prior Lake Laker Lines • Northstar Coach • Metro Mobility
Light Rail: Hiawatha Line  • University Central Line  • Southwest Line  • South Knob Line
Bus Rapid Transit: U of M TransitwayBottineau BoulevardCedar  • I-35W 
Commuter Rail: Northstar  • Red Rock  • Rush Line
Other: Bus Routes  • Go-To Card  • U-Pass  • MNDOT
Italics denote proposed lines

Metro Transit logo Metro Transit is the transit division of the Metropolitan Council, a regional governmental agency in the Minneapolis-St. ... The Metropolitan Council is the regional governmental agency (also known as a regional planning organization, see Metropolitan planning organization) in Minnesota serving the Twin Cities seven-county metropolitan area (see Minneapolis-St. ... Metro Transit logo Metro Transit is the transit division of the Metropolitan Council, a regional governmental agency in the Minneapolis-St. ... The Minnesota Valley Transit Authority (MVTA) is a public transportation agency that provides transit services in Apple Valley, Burnsville, Eagan, Rosemount, and Savage. ... Southwest Metro Transit is a public transportation agency that is based in Eden Prairie, Minnesota. ... Plymouth Metrolink is the public transit system that serves Plymouth, Minnesota ... Maple Grove Transit is the public transit system in Maple Grove, Minnesota. ... Shakopee area transit began fixed route service in December 2002. ... The BE Line system is funded by the Metropolitan Council. ... Anoka County Traveler is a system operated for the Met Council by a private company. ... Prior Lake Laker Lines is the public transit service operated by the city of Prior Lake. ... The Northstar Corridor is a proposed commuter rail line that will serve a region which runs to the northwest from Minneapolis, Minnesota toward St. ... Hiawatha light-rail vehicle #111 near Cedar-Riverside station The Hiawatha Line is a 12 mile (19 kilometer) light rail corridor in Minneapolis, Minnesota that extends to the southern suburb of Bloomington, in Hennepin County connecting downtown Minneapolis to the Minneapolis-St. ... The Central Corridor is the 11-mile stretch between the downtown regions of Minneapolis and Saint Paul in Minnesota. ... The Southwest Corridor is a future transit corridor between Minneapolis and Eden Prairie, going through Hopkins along the way. ... The Pilot Knob Corridor is a rumored LRT corridor in southern suburbs of the Twin Cities in Minnesota, it is not yet confirmed if it will receive any attention by the Metropolitan Council. ... The U of M Transitway is a busway that runs between the University of Minnesota Minneapolis and St. ... Bottineau Boulevard BRT is a proposed Bus Rapid Transit line that would operate along County Road 81 from Minneapolis to Osseo/Rogers. ... The South Cedar Transitway (called Cedar Avenue Corridor in devolpment) is a 53 mile future busway planned by Bus Rapid Transit (MVTA) for Cedar Avenue (Minnesota State Highway 77/County Road 23) between Minneapolis/Bloomington and Lakeville. ... Interstate 35W (abbreviated I-35W), an interstate highway, is the western half of Interstate 35 where it splits to serve different cities in Minnesota. ... The Northstar Corridor is a proposed commuter rail line that will serve a region which runs to the northwest from Minneapolis, Minnesota toward St. ... The Red Rock Corridor is a proposed commuter rail between Hastings, Minnesota through downtown St. ... The Rush Line is a proposed mass transit link from downtown Saint Paul to Hinckley, MN via Forest Lake, Pine City and White Bear Lake, MN. The 80-mile route will likely be commuter rail but bus rapid transit is also under consideration. ... The following is a list of Metro Transit Routes or routes operated by partners of Metro Transit in the Twin Cities metropolitan area. ... The Go-To card is a contactless smart card meant to be used to pay fares for bus and light rail lines operated by Metro Transit and other transit agencies in the Twin Cities area of Minnesota. ... The uPass design for the 2005/2006 winter session (actual passes bear the holders photograph). ... The Minnesota Department of Transportation (Mn/DOT, pronounced min-dot) oversees transportation by land, water, and air in the U.S. state of Minnesota. ...

See also

The General Motors streetcar conspiracy refers to a contention that General Motors (GM), acting in conjunction with several other companies and through the National City Lines (NCL) holding company, illegally acquired many streetcar systems in various cities around the United States, dismantled and replaced them with buses for the express... Hiawatha light-rail vehicle #111 near Cedar-Riverside station Light Rail in Minnesota currently consists of the Hiawatha Line operated by Metro Transit, which runs from the Mall of America, under the airport, and along Hiawatha Avenue into downtown Minneapolis. ...

External links

Nickname: The City by the Bay; Fog City; The City; Baghdad by the Bay Location of the City and County of San Francisco, California Coordinates: Country United States of America State California City-County San Francisco Government  - Mayor Gavin Newsom Area  - City  47 sq mi (122 km²)  - Land  46. ...

References


  Results from FactBites:
 
The Shore Line Trolley Museum: Newark PCC 27 arrives at the museum (1395 words)
Twin Cities Rapid Transit, which operated routes in the Minneapolis/St. Paul area, was a late-comer to the PCC game.
Alas, the tenure of the PCC in the Twin Cities was brief.
The primary modifications done by Shaker Heights were the replacement of the window glazing with lexan, repainting, and the addition of a tripper mechanism (Shaker cars share trackage in Cleveland with rapid transit trains and must be equipped with wayside signal trippers similar to those used in the NYC subway system).
Twin City Rapid Transit - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2979 words)
It existed under the TCRT name from a merger in the 1890s until it was purchased in 1962.
TCRT also expanded into the region around White Bear Lake, and company-owned attractions were built in that area.
Carl Pohlad, who became the owner of the Minnesota Twins in 1984, was the eventual successor of Fred Ossanna as head of Twin City Lines in the 1960s.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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