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Encyclopedia > Twickenham Stadium
Twickenham Stadium
The Cabbage Patch
Twickers

Location Twickenham, England
Broke ground 1907
Opened October 2, 1909
Owner Rugby Football Union
Surface Grass
Tenants
England national rugby union team
Capacity
82, 000

Twickenham Stadium (usually known as just Twickenham or Twickers[1]) is a stadium located in Twickenham, in the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames. It is the largest Rugby union stadium in the United Kingdom and has recently been enlarged to seat 82,000. This makes it the second largest stadium in the U.K. after Wembley Stadium. The stadium is the home of the Rugby Football Union (RFU), and as such primarily a venue for rugby union and hosts England's home test matches, as well as the Middlesex Sevens, the Guinness Premiership final, as well as Powergen Cup and Heineken Cup matches. The stadium is considered an icon of English rugby. Twickenham rugby stadium, from the North Stand . ... Twickenham is a suburb in the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames, south west London. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... is the 275th day of the year (276th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The Rugby Football Union (RFU) is the rugby union governing body in England. ... A lawn is an area of recreational or amenity land planted with grass, and sometimes clover and other plants, which are maintained at a low, even height. ... First international (also the worlds first)  Scotland 4–1 England  (27 March 1871) Largest win  England 134–0 Romania  (17 November 2001) Worst defeat  Australia 76–0 England  (6 June 1998) World Cup Appearances 6 (First in 1987) Best result Champions, 2003 The England national rugby union team represents... The new Wembley Stadium in London is the most expensive stadium ever built; it has a seating capacity of 90,000 This article is about the building type. ... Twickenham is a suburb in the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames, south west London. ... The London Borough of Richmond upon Thames is a London borough in South West London and part of Outer London. ... For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ... For the old stadium, see Wembley Stadium (1923). ... The Rugby Football Union (RFU) is the rugby union governing body in England. ... For other uses, see Rugby (disambiguation). ... First international (also the worlds first)  Scotland 4–1 England  (27 March 1871) Largest win  England 134–0 Romania  (17 November 2001) Worst defeat  Australia 76–0 England  (6 June 1998) World Cup Appearances 6 (First in 1987) Best result Champions, 2003 The England national rugby union team represents... The Middlesex Sevens is an invitation rugby union sevens tournament held annually during the summer at Twickenham stadium in London, England. ... The Guinness Premiership is a professional league competition for rugby union clubs in the top division of the English rugby system. ... The Powergen Cup (centre) seen in the London Irish clubhouse at Sunbury in 2002. ... The Heineken Cup sponsored by Heineken (known as the H Cup in France due to alcohol advertising laws) is an annual rugby union competition involving leading club, regional and provincial teams from England, France, Ireland, Italy, Scotland and Wales. ...


Although the ground is usually only occupied by rugby union, it has in the past hosted a number of events, such as Eagles, U2, The Rolling Stones and The Police concerts. It has also been the host of rugby league's Challenge Cup final. The Eagles redirects here. ... This article is about the Irish rock band. ... Rolling Stones redirects here. ... This article is about the rock band. ... Wally Lewis passing the ball in Rugby League State of Origin. ... The Challenge Cup (currently known as the Carnegie Challenge Cup for sponsorship reasons) is a knockout cup competition for rugby league clubs across Europe. ...

Contents

Overview

Twickenham is often referred to as the home of English rugby.[2] The stadium is owned and operated by the RFU, so Twickenham is the host of numerous rugby union fixtures year round. Most prominently it is the home of the English rugby union team, who play all their home games at the stadium (as opposed to some of the other rugby nations that may have a home stadium, but use numerous venues, England uses just Twickenham). Twickenham hosts England's Six Nations matches, as well as inbound touring teams from the Southern Hemisphere, usually every year around November. The RBS 6 Nations Championship, (referred to as RBS 6 Nations for sponsorship reasons) known before 2000 as the Five Nations Championship, is an annual international rugby union competition held between six European sides: France, England, Ireland, Italy, Scotland and Wales. ...


Apart from its relationship with the national team, Twickenham is the venue for a number of other domestic and international rugby matches. It hosts the annual London leg of the IRB Sevens World Series as well at the domestic Middlesex Sevens competition. It is also the venue for the final of the Guinness Premiership, and has hosted the Anglo-Welsh Powergen Cup final in the past. Twickenham also hosted the 2006-07 Heineken Cup final. The stadium is also host to The Varsity Match between Oxford and Cambridge, the English school's Daily Mail Cup final and the Army Navy Match which forms the culmination of the annual Inter-Services Competition. An annual rugby union sevens tournament held in London each year. ... The IRB Sevens World Series, known officially as the IRB Sevens before the 2006-07 season and also sometimes called the World Sevens Series, is a series of international rugby union sevens tournaments organised for the first time in the 1999-2000 season. ... The Middlesex Sevens is an invitation rugby union sevens tournament held annually during the summer at Twickenham stadium in London, England. ... The Guinness Premiership is a professional league competition for rugby union clubs in the top division of the English rugby system. ... The Powergen Cup (centre) seen in the London Irish clubhouse at Sunbury in 2002. ... The 2006-07 Heineken Cup is an annual rugby union competition in Europe. ... The Varsity Match usually refers to the annual rugby union fixture played between the universities of Oxford and Cambridge in England. ... The University of Oxford (usually abbreviated as Oxon. ... The University of Cambridge (often Cambridge University), located in Cambridge, England, is the second-oldest university in the English-speaking world and has a reputation as one of the worlds most prestigious universities. ... The Daily Mail Cup is the English schools rugby union cup competition. ... Image:Armynavy14s. ...


History

Sold out Tests against the All Blacks and South Africa at Crystal Palace saw the RFU realise the benefit of owning their own ground. Committee member William Williams leads the way to purchasing a 10 and 1/4 acre market garden in Twickenham in 1907 for £5,572 12s and 6d. The first stands constructed the next year. Before the ground was bought it was actually used to grow cabbages and so Twickenham Stadium is affectionately known as the 'Cabbage Patch'. After further expenditure on roads, the first game, Harlequins v. Richmond, was played on October 2, 1909 and the first international, England v. Wales, on January 15, 1910. At the time of the English-Welsh match, the stadium had a maximum capacity of 20,000 spectators. During World War I the ground was used for cattle, horse and sheep grazing. King George V unveiled a war memorial in 1921. First international  Australia 3 - 22 New Zealand  (15 August 1903) Largest win  New Zealand 145 - 17 Japan  (4 June 1995) Worst defeat  Australia 28 - 7 New Zealand  (28 August 1999) World Cup Appearances 6 (First in 1987) Best result Champions, 1987 The All Blacks are New Zealands national rugby... The National Sports Centre The National Athletics Stadium with the Crystal Palace Transmitter in the background. ... “GBP” redirects here. ... Official website www. ... This article is about the English rugby union club. ... is the 275th day of the year (276th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... First international (also the worlds first)  Scotland 4–1 England  (27 March 1871) Largest win  England 134–0 Romania  (17 November 2001) Worst defeat  Australia 76–0 England  (6 June 1998) World Cup Appearances 6 (First in 1987) Best result Champions, 2003 The England national rugby union team represents... First international  England 30 – 0 Wales  (19 February 1881) Largest win  Japan 0 – 98 Wales  (26 November 2004) Worst defeat  South Africa 96 – 13 Wales  (27 June 1998) World Cup Appearances 6/6 (First in 1987) Best result Third 1987 The Wales national rugby union team (also referred to as... is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... George V (George Frederick Ernest Albert; 3 June 1865 – 20 January 1936) was the first British monarch belonging to the House of Windsor, which he created from the British branch of the German House of Saxe-Coburg-Gotha. ...

Starting An Attack, unusual painting of the England v Wales rugby match at Twickenham in 1931

In 1926, the first Middlesex Sevens took place at the ground. In 1927 the first Varsity Match took place at Twickenham for the first time. In 1959, to mark 50 years of the ground, a combined side of England and Wales beat Ireland and Scotland by 26 points to 17. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Middlesex Sevens is an invitation rugby union sevens tournament held annually during the summer at Twickenham stadium in London, England. ... The Varsity Match usually refers to the annual rugby union fixture played between the universities of Oxford and Cambridge in England. ... First international (also the worlds first)  Scotland 4 - 1 England  (27 March 1871) Largest win  Scotland 100 - 8 Japan  (13 November 2004) Worst defeat  Scotland 10 - 68 South Africa  (6 December 1997) World Cup Appearances 5 (First in 1987) Best result 4th 1991 The Scotland national rugby union team...


Coming into the last match of the 1988 season, against the Irish, England had lost 15 of their previous 23 matches in the Five Nations Championship. The Twickenham crowd had only seen one solitary England try in the previous two years and at half time against Ireland they were 0-3 down. During the second half a remarkable transformation took place and England started playing an expansive game many had doubted they were capable of producing. A 0-3 deficit was turned into a 35-3 win, with England scoring six tries. This day also saw the controversial origins of some supporters' adoption of the negro spiritual Swing Low, Sweet Chariot as a terrace song. Long known among supporters of visiting teams as "The Vacuum" for its lack of atmosphere, Twickenham had always suffered from comparison with other national stadia - particularly Cardiff Arms Park (and later the incredible Millennium Stadium) and Lansdowne Road, in all of which venues the atmosphere is as much a part of the experience of watching the game as the action on the grass itself. In the 35-3 win against Ireland, three of England's tries were scored by Chris Oti, a black player who had made a reputation for himself that season as a speedster on the left wing. The fact that some supporters started singing a negro spiritual whenever Oti had the ball has been interpreted by some commentators on the game as reflective of Twickenham's racist connections. That a small minority of racists gave the Twickenham crowds an undeserved reputation throughout the seventies and eighties is undoubted, but there is also a claim that the adoption of Swing Low, Sweet Chariot was not a jeering comment on Oti's ethnicity but rather a salute to his prowess. This is certainly the opinion of members of the Benedictine school Douai who claim to have started the singing. Others have pointed out that (with lewd accompanying gestures) Swing Low, Sweet Chariot had been sung in rugby clubs around the world for many years prior to that game in 1988. The Douai claim is, of course, unverifiable, but whatever its origins, Swing Low, Sweet Chariot became a song to sing at England home games in the same way that Fields of Athery is sung in Dublin and Cwm Rhondda is sung at Cardiff. Swing Low, Sweet Chariot is a United States African-American Negro spiritual song. ... Swing Low, Sweet Chariot is a United States African-American Negro spiritual song. ... Swing Low, Sweet Chariot is a United States African-American Negro spiritual song. ... Swing Low, Sweet Chariot is a United States African-American Negro spiritual song. ...


The United Kingdom, Ireland and France shared the hosting of the 1991 Rugby World Cup. Twickenham was used during pool A England matches. Twickenham was also the controversial choice as host of the final in which Australia beat England 6-12. For this game, England changed their style of play, opting for the sort of running-game that had brought them victory against Ireland in the March 1988 game referred to above. During this match, with the English facing a 12 to three deficit, David Campese reached one-handed for a ball thrown to England winger, Rory Underwood. He dropped it and the ball rolled forward gifting England a penalty that proved the last score of the game. Some have claimed that Campese's action should have been interpreted as a deliberate professional foul with possible disciplinary action against the Australian player. However, on the same ground in November 1988, Campese had intercepted a similar pass and run the length of the field to score a try, and there is no doubt that of all the players on the field during the 1991 World Cup Final, Campese was the one most likely to attempt and pull off such an intercept. Whether it was deliberate or not, the calls of some England players for a penalty try to be awarded were always unrealistic. No referee would have felt able to give such a dubious decision. This has not prevented the incident from being debated ad nauseam, but rugby differs from many games in the fact that the vast majority of fans, like the players, accept that the referee is the sole arbiter of fact and that as soon as his decision is made, the debate becomes purely academic. Moreover, Australia were the only undefeated team left in the competition (England had lost 12-18 to New Zealand in the pool stages) and scored the game's only try. Few, therefore, would begrudge the Wallabies their victory. [3] This article is about the mens Rugby World Cup held in 1991. ... This article is about the mens Rugby World Cup held in 1991. ... David Ian Campese (born October 21, 1962 in Queanbeyan), also known as Campo, is an Australian former Rugby Union player. ... Rory Underwood (born June 19, 1963) is a former rugby union footballer who played wing for Leicester Tigers and Bedford, who represented England and the British Lions internationally, and a former Royal Air Force pilot. ...


Some of the Welsh-hosted 1999 Rugby World Cup games were taken to Twickenham. These included three of England's pool B matches, the second round playoff where England defeated Fiji 45 points to 24, and both semi-finals, none of which England were involved in, having made their exit in the quarter-finals at the hands of South Africa. Under the reign of Clive Woodward, the stadium became known as 'Fortress Twickenham', as England enjoyed a run of 19 unbeaten home matches from October 1999, ending with defeat against Ireland in 2004. The IRB Rugby Aid Match was played on 5 March 2005 under the auspices of the International Rugby Board (IRB) to raise money for the United Nations World Food Programme to support its work aiding victims of the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami. Representative sides of the Northern and Southern hemispheres played at Twickenham. The final score was Northern Hemisphere 19 – Southern Hemisphere 54. The 1999 Rugby World Cup, the first to be held in rugby unions professional era,[2] was hosted by Wales, with some matches also played in England, France, Scotland and Ireland. ... The 1999 Rugby World Cup, the first to be held in rugby unions professional era,[2] was hosted by Wales, with some matches also played in England, France, Scotland and Ireland. ... Sir Clive Ronald Woodward, CBE (born 6 January 1956 at Ely in Cambridgeshire) is a former English rugby union international who was the coach of the England rugby union team from 1997 to 2004. ... The IRB Rugby Aid Match was a rugby union football match played on 5 March 2005 under the auspices of the International Rugby Board to raise money for the United Nations World Food Programme to support its work aiding victims of the 2004 Indian Ocean tsunami. ... This article is about the day. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The IRB logo. ... UN and U.N. redirect here. ... WFP redirects here. ... The 2004 Indian Ocean earthquake, known by the scientific community as the Sumatra-Andaman earthquake,[1] was a great undersea earthquake that occurred at 00:58:53 UTC (07:58:53 local time) December 26, 2004 with an epicentre off the west coast of Sumatra, Indonesia. ...


Redevelopment

South stand being redeveloped.
South stand being redeveloped.

Since the ground was bought by the RFU in 1907, it has gone through a number of redevelopments. In 1921 a stand was built above the northern terrace, with workshops placed underneath. In 1927, there was an extension to the East Stand, bringing the capacity to 12,000. The south terrace was also extended to allow 20,000 spectators. In 1932 a new West Stand was completed, providing offices for the RFU, who made the ground their home. In 1937, the Middlesex County Council approved a scheme submitted by Twickenham Borough Council to widen Rugby Road due to it being inadequate for traffic. Image File history File linksMetadata Twickenham_stand. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Twickenham_stand. ... The Middlesex Guildhall at Westminster Middlesex is one of the 39 historic counties of England and was the second smallest (after Rutland). ...


In 1965, the South Terrace was closed due to structural failings. It was found to be cheaper to build a new stand as opposed to repairing the existing one, however, planning permission was refused due to objection from local residents. Permission was granted in 1978. A period of extensive rebuilding took place during the early 1980s which continued through to the mid 1990s. In 1981 the South Terrace was rebuilt as the South Stand. After being taken down in 1988, an extended North Stand was opened in 1990. After the 1992 five nations, the stadiums sees the development of the new East Stand and following that the West Stand. In 1995, the stadium was completed to accommodate 75,000 people in an all-seater environment. Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1990 (MCMXC) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 1990 Gregorian calendar). ...


Planning permission was sought in 2002 and received in December of 2004 for a new South Stand to raise capacity to 82,000, together with a hotel and conference centre, with redevelopment commencing in June 2005. The RFU's revised application to build the new south stand at £80 million was unanimously approved by Richmond Council's planning committee on December 2. As well as increasing the stadium's capacity to 82,000, the redevelopment will introduce a four-star Marriott hotel with 156 rooms and six VIP suites with views over the field, a performing arts complex, a health and leisure club, open a new rugby shop and also increase the current function space. In July of 2005 the south stand was demolished to make way for the new development. The new seating was complete by 5 November 2006 for the England vs New Zealand game of the 2006 Autumn internationals series. The roof has now been completed while the facilities are still in construction. is the 336th day of the year (337th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Marriott International, Inc. ... is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... During November of 2006, several rugby union nations will play fixtures that will be contested in the northern hemisphere nations - the Autumn internationals. ...


Other use

A U2 concert in 2005.
A U2 concert in 2005.

Though Twickenham usually only hosts rugby union fixtures, it has in the past been the venue for a number of other events. In 2000 the ground hosted its first game of rugby league, in which Australia defeated England in the opening game of the 2000 Rugby League World Cup. The Rugby League Challenge Cup Final has also been played at Twickenham twice and was won by St Helens on both occasions. Due to the construction delays of Wembley, a number of scheduled events at Wembley were moved to Twickenham. The Challenge Cup and the Rolling Stones' A Bigger Bang Tour concerts were taken to Twickenham.[4] The Stones also played two shows at Twickenham in August and September 2003, the first of which was used as their stadium concert disc for the 2003 DVD Four Flicks. During 2007 Genesis played at Twickenham during their "Turn it on again" World Tour, promoting their best of albums "Platinum Collection" and "The Video Show" (DVD). The Police played at the stadium in September of 2007 and Rod Stewart in June. The usual capacity for concerts is 55,000, as opposed to the 82,000 for rugby.[5] Image File history File links U2_concert. ... Image File history File links U2_concert. ... This article is about the Irish rock band. ... Wally Lewis passing the ball in Rugby League State of Origin. ... First international Other Nationalities 9 - 3 England (Wigan, England; 5 April 1904) Biggest win USA 0 - 110 England (Florida, USA; October 2000 Biggest defeat New Zealand 49 - 6 England (Bolton, England; 18 November 2000) World Cup Appearances 3 (First in 1975) Best result Runners-up, 1975; 1995 In rugby league... the Rugby League Council to support the concept. ... For the old stadium, see Wembley Stadium (1923). ... The Rolling Stones A Bigger Bang Tour was a worldwide concert tour which took place between autumn 2005 and summer 2007, in support of their album A Bigger Bang. ... Four Flicks is a 4 disc DVD released by The Rolling Stones. ... Genesis is an English rock band formed in 1967. ... This article is about the rock band. ... Roderick David Stewart, CBE (born January 10, 1945), is a singer and songwriter born and raised in London, England. ...


Bon Jovi will be playing at Twickenham on the 27th June 2008. Bon Jovi is a hard rock band originating from Sayreville, New Jersey. ...


Museum of Rugby

Main article: Museum of Rugby

The Museum of Rugby is a museum located in Twickenham Stadium. The museum covers the whole of the global game, not just English rugby. It tells the history of the sport, including William Webb Ellis and Richard Lindon , using interactive display techniques. The Museum has a rolling programme of special exhibitions which cover topical issues and offer an opportunity to display some of the obscurer items in the collection. Some unique displays include an English rugby jersey from the first ever rugby international in 1871 between England and Scotland, and (until 2005) the William Webb Ellis Cup which was obtained by England at the 2003 Rugby World Cup. Twickenham Stadium Tours are also available through the Museum and run 4 times per day (Tuesday to Saturday) and twice on Sundays. It is usually open every day of the week except for Mondays. Except match days entry is by combined ticket with the Twickenham Stadium Tour. The Museum of Rugby is a museum concerned with the sport of rugby union (as opposed to the separate sport of rugby league) located at the home of the England national rugby union team, Twickenham stadium in West London, England. ... The Louvre Museum in Paris, one of the largest and most famous museums in the world. ... This only known portrait of William Webb Elllis, circa 1857, from the Illustrated London News. ... Category: ... First international (also the worlds first)  Scotland 4–1 England  (27 March 1871) Largest win  England 134–0 Romania  (17 November 2001) Worst defeat  Australia 76–0 England  (6 June 1998) World Cup Appearances 6 (First in 1987) Best result Champions, 2003 The England national rugby union team represents... The William Webb Ellis Cup. ... The 2003 Rugby World Cup was the fifth rugby union world cup. ...


See also

The rose that appears on the English national jersey. ... London, as the primate and capital city, is generally considered to be the centre of sport for England and the United Kingdom. ... Twickenham Streaker can apply to two people who have streaked at Twickenham Stadium: Micahel OBrien in 1974, famously photographed by Ian Bradshaw Erica Rowe in 1982 This is a disambiguation page: a list of articles associated with the same title. ...

References

  1. ^ Nicky Campbell Twickers learning from us Scots as petty tyranny crosses border, The Guardian February 1, 2007
  2. ^ RFU press office Home of Rugby to host cycling charity challenge 8 September 2006
  3. ^ 1991: Wallabies pip England. BBC. Retrieved on 19 August 2006.
  4. ^ Stadium delay hits Wembley gigs. BBC. Retrieved on 24 September 2006.
  5. ^ RFU apply for two additional concerts at Twickenham Stadium in 2007. The Twickenham Rugby Stadium. Retrieved on 21 March 2007.

For other uses, see Guardian. ... is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 251st day of the year (252nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see BBC (disambiguation). ...

Further reading

  • Harris, Ed, (2005). Twickenham: The History of the Cathedral of Rugby, Sports Books, (ISBN 1899807292 )

External links

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Preceded by
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Coordinates: 51°27′21.58″N, 0°20′29.63″W The London Borough of Richmond upon Thames lies to the south west of the conurbation. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Twickenham Stadium - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1733 words)
Twickenham Stadium (usually known as just Twickenham) is a stadium located in the Twickenham district of the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames.
It is the largest stadium in the United Kingdom with a capacity of 82,000.
Twickenham was also the host of the final in which Australia narrowly beat England, when England famously changed their style of play for the final, opting for a running-game.
Twickenham - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1399 words)
Twickenham is a suburb in the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames, south west London.
Twickenham proper begins in the vicinity of Pope's Grotto, with a large and expensive residential area of (mostly) period houses to the west, and a number of exclusive properties to the east — on or near the river.
In 1965 the boroughs of Twickenham, Richmond and Barnes amalgamated to become the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames and the council offices and chamber are located in Twickenham.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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