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Encyclopedia > Tvrtko I

Tvrtko Kotromanić (1338?-1391) was an important native ruler of medieval Bosnia who transformed the country from an autonomous banate into an independent kingdom. He took on the prefix Stephanus (Stjepan) when he became king.-1... Events August 5 - Anti-Jewish riots erupt in Toledo, Spain and Barcelona. ... Bosnia and Herzegovina (officially Bosna i Hercegovina, shortened to BiH, also in English variously written Bosnia-Herzegovina, Bosnia and Hercegovina, Bosnia-Hercegovina) is a mountainous country in the western Balkans. ... Ban was a title used in some states in central and south-eastern Europe between the 9th century and the 20th century. ... A monarchy, (from the Greek monos, one, and archein, to rule) is a form of government that has a monarch as Head of State. ...


He was the son of Vladislav Kotromanić and Jelena Šubić, and was descended from the founder of Serbia's Nemanjid dynasty. Tvrtko became Ban of Bosnia in 1353 upon the death of his uncle, Ban Stjepan (Stephen) Kotromanić, when Tvrtko was 15 years old. During the first part of his reign as Ban he had to contend with intrigues, revolts, and seizures of Bosnian territory by Hungary. In 1366 he was forced to seek refuge in the Hungarian court when a group of Bosnian nobles placed his brother Vuk on the throne. He was restored as Ban the following year with the assistance of the King Louis I of Hungary. The Šubić family were a noble family of Croatia. ... Serbia and Montenegro  â€“ Serbia    â€“ Kosovo and Metohia        (UN administration)    â€“ Vojvodina  â€“ Montenegro Official language Serbian1 Capital Belgrade Area  â€“ Total  â€“ % water  88,361 km²  n/a Population  â€“ Total (2002)     (without Kosovo)  â€“ Density  7. ... Nemanjić (Serbian Немањић; also Nemanjid) was a medieval Serb ruling dynasty. ... Ban was a title used in some states in central and south-eastern Europe between the 9th century and the 20th century. ... Stephen Kotromanić (died 1353), sometimes referred to as Stephen II, was a Ban (ruler) of Bosnia. ... Events Births Anne of Bohemia, Queen consort of Richard II of England. ... Louis the Great Louis I (the Great), Lajos, Ludwik WÄ™gierski (1326 - 1382) became king of Hungary in 1342 at the death of his father. ...


Tvrtko assisted Knez Lazar Hrebeljanović in neighboring Serbia, in consolidating his control of the Serb territories to the east; in return, Tvrtko was able to expand his own territory to include parts of Zahumlje (Herzegovina), Zeta (Montenegro), and parts of Serbia to the east of the present Bosnian border, including the monastery of Mileševo, an important site to Serbs because it contains the relics of Saint Sava, an central figure in the history of the Serbian Orthodox Church. Tvrtko had himself crowned King of Serbs and Bosnia and Primorje(seaboard) at Mileševo in 1377. He created a Byzantine-style court at his capital at Bobovac. Although he had declared himself King of Serbs after the death of his kinsman Stefan Uros V of Serbia, he only controlled a small part of Serbia, and made no serious attempts to extend his kingdom further east into Serb lands. He maintained his alliance with Prince Lazar, and sent an army, headed by Vlatko Vuković, which fought alongside Prince Lazar at the Battle of Kosovo Polje in June 1389. This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Prince Lazar, Photo courtesy of [http://www. ... Zahumlje Travunia in the 9th century, according to [[De administrando imperio]] Greek map of Serb lands in the 9th century, according to [[De administrando imperio]] The Zahumljani (Zachlumoi) that now live there are en:Serbs, originating from the time of the prince (archont) who fled to emperor en:Heraclius [...] The... Herzegovina (natively Hercegovina/Херцеговина) is a historical region in the Dinaric Alps that composes the southern part of present-day Bosnia and Herzegovina. ... Zeta was one of the first montenegrin states, now in Montenegro. ... Serbia and Montenegro  â€“ Serbia    â€“ Kosovo and Metohia        (UN administration)    â€“ Vojvodina  â€“ Montenegro Official language Serbian Capital Podgorica Former Royal Capital Cetinje President Filip Vujanović Prime Minister Milo Đukanović Area  â€“ Total  â€“ % water  13,812 km²  n/a Population  â€“ Total (2003)  â€“ Density  616,258  48. ... Saint Sava Saint Sava (1175 or 1176 - January 12, 1235 or 1236), originally the prince Rastko Nemanjic (son of the Serbian ruler and founder of the Serbian medieval state Stefan Nemanja and brother of Stefan Prvovencani, first Serbian king), is the first Serb archbishop (1219-1233) and the most important... The Serbian Orthodox Church (Serbian Cyrillic: Српска православна црква; SPC, SOC) is a body of some 11 million Orthodox Christians united under the Serb Patriarch who includes Archbishop of Peć and Metropolitan of Belgrade and Karlovci in his title. ... Events January 17 – Gregory XI enters Rome. ... Stefan Uroš V nejaki (The Weak) (Стефан Урош V нејаки) (1336-1371) was Serb king (1346-1355) as co-ruler of his father Dušan and tzar (1355-1371). ... Serbia and Montenegro  â€“ Serbia    â€“ Kosovo and Metohia        (UN administration)    â€“ Vojvodina  â€“ Montenegro Official language Serbian1 Capital Belgrade Area  â€“ Total  â€“ % water  88,361 km²  n/a Population  â€“ Total (2002)     (without Kosovo)  â€“ Density  7. ... Prince Lazar, Photo courtesy of freesrpska. ... Vlatko Vuković (died 1392) was a Vojvode of Hum (Herzegovina). ... This page is about the Battle of Kosovo of 1389; for other battles, see Battle of Kosovo (disambiguation) The Battle of Kosovo Polje was fought on St. ... Events February 24 - Margaret I seizes Albert, thus becoming ruler of Denmark, Norway and Sweden June 28 - Battle of Kosovo between Serbs and Ottomans. ...


Tvrtko continued to expand his kingdom to the south and west. His predecessor, Ban Stephen Kotromanić, had added part of the Dalmatian coastline between Ragusa and Split to the Bosnian Kingdom, and Tvrtko expanded northwards and southwards along the coast, from south of Zara to the Bay of Kotor, with the exception of Ragusa, which remained independent. He established the port of Novi (modern Herceg Novi on the Bay of Kotor), and in the last few years of his reign called himself King of Croatia and Dalmatia too. Dalmatia (Croatian Dalmacija, Italian Dalmazia, Serbian Далмација) is a region on the eastern coast of the Adriatic Sea, mostly in modern Croatia, spreading between the island of Pag in the northwest and the Bay of Kotor in the southeast. ... A view of Dubrovnik from the south Dubrovnik (Italian Ragusa) is an old city on the Adriatic Sea coast in the extreme south of Croatia, positioned at 42°39′ N 18°04′ E at the terminal end of the Isthmus of Dubrovnik. ... Split Harbour Split (Italian: Spalato) is the largest and most important city in Dalmatia, the administrative center of Croatias Split-Dalmatia county. ... Zadar (Italian Zara) is a city in Croatia on the Adriatic Sea, with a population of 72,718 (2001). ... Boka Kotorska (Bay of Kotor, Bocca di Cattaro) in Montenegro is a winding bay on the Adriatic sea. ... Ragusa can refer to: The city of Ragusa in Sicily, Italy. ... Mayor Area  - city  - municipality km² 235 km² Population  - city  - municipality 14,100 in 2003 Time zone Summer Time CET (UTC +1) CEST (UTC +2) Founded Latitude Longitude ° N ° E Area code +381 88 Car plates HN Official Website Herceg Novi is a town in southwestern Montenegro, population ca. ... Boka Kotorska (Bay of Kotor, Bocca di Cattaro) in Montenegro is a winding bay on the Adriatic sea. ... Dalmatia (Croatian Dalmacija, Italian Dalmazia, Serbian Далмација) is a region on the eastern coast of the Adriatic Sea, mostly in modern Croatia, spreading between the island of Pag in the northwest and the Bay of Kotor in the southeast. ...


Tvrtko died in 1391, and by the end of his reign the Medieval Bosnian state reached its greatest power and territorial extent. He married Dorteja (Dorothy) of Vidin, a Bulgarian princess, and had a daughter, Katarina, and a son, Ostoja Kotromanić, who succeeded him as King upon his death. His illegitimate son was Tvrtko II, who was later King of Bosnia. Events August 5 - Anti-Jewish riots erupt in Toledo, Spain and Barcelona. ...


See also


  Results from FactBites:
 
[Projekat Rastko-Boka] Nenad Serovic: Stefan Tvrtko I Kotromanic (1353–1391) [English, 2002] (1435 words)
Tvrtko I Kotromanić was the Bosnian ban from 1353 until 1377., the king of Serbs, Bosnia, Seaside and the West Sides from 1377 until 1390 and the king of Raška, Bosnia, Dalmatia, Croatia and Seaside from 1390 until 1391.
Tvrtko the First was the son of the duke Vladislav Kotromanić and Jelena Šubić.
The crowning of Tvrtko was accepted by all prominent Serbian rulers as well as by Dubrovnik and Venice and he rising himself to the level of ruler and adopting titles and ceremonial of Serbian Court he tightened his power in Bosnia.
Tvrtko Kale - Goalkeeper (526 words)
Split’s players won the winter championship too; they keep their top position after 18 rounds, so it’s obvious that Kale is the firmest link of their success.
It is easy to confirm my claim that is based on Tvrtko’s play.
Tvrtko Kale has yesterday officially introduced like new player of Hajduk.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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