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Encyclopedia > Tusculum College

Coordinates: 36°10′27.53″N, 82°45′34.97″W Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...

Tusculum College

Motto: Sit Lux (Latin)
(Let there be light)
Established 1794
Type: Private
Endowment: US $12.9 million
President: Russell "Rusty" Nichols, Ph.D.
(Interim President)
Faculty: 79
Staff: 206
Undergraduates: 2,053
Postgraduates: 252
Location Tusculum, Tennessee, USA
Campus: Rural, 140 acres
Athletics: 14 sports teams
Colors: Orange and Black            
Mascot: Pioneers
Affiliations: Presbyterian Church (USA)
Website: www.tusculum.edu

Tusculum College is Tennessee’s oldest college, and the 23rd oldest operating college in the United States. It is a coeducational private college affiliated with the Presbyterian Church (USA). Its main campus is located in Tusculum, Tennessee, a suburb of Greeneville. The institution maintains a regional center for Graduate and Professional Studies in Knoxville, with additional satellite campuses across East Tennessee.[1] For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Latin (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... 1794 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... For the film of this title, see Private School (film). ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... USD redirects here. ... Look up million in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... This article is about work. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Tusculum is a city located in Greene County, Tennessee. ... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... Sign in a rural area in Dalarna, Sweden Qichun, a rural town in Hubei province, China Rural areas (also referred to as the country, countryside) are settled places outside towns and cities. ... An acre is the name of a unit of area in a number of different systems, including Imperial units and United States customary units. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... Emblem of the PC(USA) The Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) or PC(USA) is a mainline Protestant Christian denomination in the United States. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... Coeducation is the integrated education of males and females at the same school facilities. ... A private university is a university that is run without the control of any government entity. ... College (Latin collegium) is a term most often used today to denote an educational institution. ... Emblem of the PC(USA) The Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) or PC(USA) is a mainline Protestant Christian denomination in the United States. ... The Universitätscampus Wien, Austria ( details) Campus (plural: campuses) is derived from the (identical) Latin word for field or open space. English gets the words camp and campus from this origin. ... Tusculum is a city located in Greene County, Tennessee. ... “Suburbia” redirects here. ... Greeneville is a town in Greene County, Tennessee, United States. ... Nickname: Location within the U.S. State of Tennessee. ... A satellite campus is the campus of a college or university that is physically detached from the main university or college area. ... East Tennessee is a name given to approximately the eastern third of the state of Tennessee. ...

Contents

History

In 1794, two years before Tennessee became a state, Presbyterian ministers Hezekiah Balch and Samuel Doak, both educated at the College of New Jersey (now Princeton University), were ministering to the pioneers of East Tennessee, which was then the southwestern frontier of the United States.[2] They also desired to meet the educational needs of these Scots-Irish settlers. Doak and Balch were both visionaries who ultimately sought the same goals through their rival colleges. They wanted to educate settlers of the American frontier so that they would become better Presbyterians, and therefore, in their vision, better citizens.[3] 1794 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... This article is about the U.S. state of Tennessee. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Archbishop of Canterbury Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      For other types of... Samuel Doak (1749-1830) was an American Presbyterian clergyman and educator, a pioneer in the movement for the abolition of slavery. ... Princeton University is a private coeducational research university located in Princeton, New Jersey. ... Look up Pioneer in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... East Tennessee is a name given to approximately the eastern third of the state of Tennessee. ... The Southwest Territory, also known as the Territory South of the River Ohio, was an organized territory of the United States formed on May 26, 1790. ... Scots-Irish (formerly Scotch-Irish) is a term used to describe inhabitants of the USA and Canada of Scots-Irish (particularly Ulster-Scots) descent, who formed distinctive communities and had distinctive social characteristics. ... A family of Russian settlers in the Caucasus region, ca. ... Narrowly, a visionary is one who experiences a supernatural vision or apparition. ... A family of Russian settlers in the Caucasus region, ca. ... Presbyterianism is a tradition shared by a large number of Christian denominations which is most prevalent within the Reformed branch of Protestant Western Christianity. ... “Citizen” redirects here. ...


Origin of name

Doak christened the institution Tusculum after the homestead of Princeton University’s then-president Dr. John Witherspoon, a signer of the United States Declaration of Independence. The original Tusculum was a city near Rome, Italy and home to Roman scholar and philosopher Cicero, who, along with others, identified the civic virtues that form the basis of civic republican tradition, which emphasizes citizens working together to form good societies that in turn foster individuals of good character.[4] Broadly defined, homesteading is a lifestyle of simple, agrarian self-sufficiency. ... This article is about the use and history of doctor as a title. ... John Witherspoon Dr. John Witherspoon (February 5, 1723 – November 15, 1794), was a signer of the United States Declaration of Independence as a representative of New Jersey. ... The United States Declaration of Independence was an act of the Second Continental Congress, adopted on July 4, 1776, which declared that the Thirteen Colonies in North America were Free and Independent States and that all political connection between them and the State of Great Britain, is and ought to... Tusculum, an ancient city of Latium, situated in a commanding position on the north edge of the outer crater ring of the Alban volcano, 18 km (11 miles) north-east of the modern Frascati. ... For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). ... Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... For other uses, see Cicero (disambiguation). ... Look up republic in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Society (disambiguation). ...


Key institutional events

  • 1784 Samuel Doak establishes Martin's Academy (renamed Washington College Academy in 1795)[5]
  • 1794 Greeneville College, was chartered in by the General Assembly of the Territory South of the River Ohio, and established by Hezekiah Balch.[6]
  • 1808 Hugh Brown receives first academic degree from Tusculum's predecessor Greeneville College
  • 1816 Samuel Witherspoon Doak (son of Samuel Doak) founds Tusculum Academy, which operated in a log cabin adjacent to the present site of Tusculum College.[7]
  • 1844 Tusculum Academy renamed Tusculum College.[8] Andrew Johnson, who later became the 17th President of the United States, was one of its trustees. Johnson often walked the five miles to and from Greeneville to participate in the debating activities at Tusculum.[9]
  • 1860s During the Civil War, college buildings served as barracks for soldiers.
  • 1868 Greeneville College and Tusculum College merge to become Greeneville & Tusculum College
  • 1878 First female students admitted to Greeneville & Tusculum College. By the turn of the 20th century, more than half of its students were women.
  • 1878 Student editor/printer Landon C. Haynes publishes first student newspaper, The Record, which later became The Pioneer; now known as The Pioneer Frontier
  • 1908 Merger of Washington College Academy & Tusculum College
  • 1912 Washington College Academy breaks away from the current Tusculum College
  • 1913 McCormick Day (a.k.a. “Nettie Day”) established, a day of service on campus and the local community. Through the philanthropy of Nettie Fowler McCormick — widow of Cyrus Hall McCormick, the inventor of a notable mechanized reaper — five major buildings were added on campus.[10]
  • 1917 First yearbook published, known as both Tusculana and Opus
  • 1927 Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS) formally accredits Tusculum for the first time
  • 1950s Lantern festival begins, honoring graduating seniors and soon-to-be seniors
  • 1984 Graduate and Professional Studies Program begins, extending learning opportunities to adult students. Originally titled Tusculum Adult Leaders Learning (TALL), the program opened satellite campuses locations throughout East Tennessee.
  • 1991 Civic Arts core program begins
  • 1991 Focused (block) calendar adopted
  • May 22, 2007 Board of trustees place President Dolphus Henry on paid administrative leave.[11]. Until a new interim president could be appointed, two trustees with notable experience as university presidents (Drs. Edward J. Kormondy and Angelo Volpe) alternately shared leadership responsibilities.[12]
  • July 19, 2007 Dr. Henry’s resignation announced.[13]
  • August 1, 2007 Dr. Russell L. Nichols, president emeritus of Hanover College, assumes the duties of Tusculum College's interim president.[14]

1784 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... Samuel Doak (1749-1830) was an American Presbyterian clergyman and educator, a pioneer in the movement for the abolition of slavery. ... Washington College Academy is a private Presbyterian-affiliated educational instittution located in Limestone, Tennessee. ... 1795 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... 1794 was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar). ... It has been suggested that this article be split into multiple articles accessible from a disambiguation page. ... The Southwest Territory, also known as the Territory South of the River Ohio, was an organized territory of the United States formed on May 26, 1790. ... Year 1808 (MDCCCVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... A degree is any of a wide range of status levels conferred by institutions of higher education, such as universities, normally as the result of successfully completing a program of study. ... Year 1816 (MDCCCXVI) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Samuel Doak (1749-1830) was an American Presbyterian clergyman and educator, a pioneer in the movement for the abolition of slavery. ... For other uses, see Log cabin (disambiguation). ... Jan. ... For other persons of the same name, see Andrew Johnson (disambiguation). ... Federal courts Supreme Court Circuit Courts of Appeal District Courts Elections Presidential elections Midterm elections Political Parties Democratic Republican Third parties State & Local government Governors Legislatures (List) State Courts Local Government Other countries Atlas  US Government Portal      For other uses, see President of the United States (disambiguation). ... The word trustee is a legal term that refers to a holder of property on behalf of a beneficiary. ... Debate (North American English) or debating (British English) is a formal method of interactive and position representational argument. ... // The First Transcontinental Railroad in the USA was built in the six year period between 1863 and 1869. ... Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... A barracks housing conscripts of Norrbottens regemente in Boden, Sweden. ... Year 1868 (MDCCCLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1878 (MDCCCLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999... 1878 (MDCCCLXXVIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1908 (MCMVIII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Washington College Academy is a private Presbyterian-affiliated educational instittution located in Limestone, Tennessee. ... 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Washington College Academy is a private Presbyterian-affiliated educational instittution located in Limestone, Tennessee. ... Year 1913 (MCMXIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Philanthropy is the act of donating money, goods, time, or effort to support a charitable cause, usually over an extended period of time and in regard to a defined objective. ... A widow is a woman whose spouse has died. ... Cyrus McCormick Cyrus Hall McCormick, Sr. ... For other uses, see Inventor (disambiguation). ... Mechanization is the use of machines to replace manual labour or animals and can also refer to the use of powered machinery to help a human operator in some task. ... For other uses, see Reaper (disambiguation). ... 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar (see: 1917 Julian calendar). ... Year 1927 (MCMXXVII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS) is a regional accreditor for over 13,000 public and private educational institutions ranging from preschool to college level in the Southern United States. ... Accreditation is a type of quality assurance process under which a facilitys or institutions services and operations are examined by a third-party accrediting agency to determine if applicable standards are met. ... The 1950s decade refers to the years 1950 to 1959 inclusive. ... This article is about the year. ... A satellite campus is the campus of a college or university that is physically detached from the main university or college area. ... East Tennessee is a name given to approximately the eastern third of the state of Tennessee. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Hanover College is a coeducational liberal arts college, located in Hanover, Indiana, near the banks of the Ohio River. ...

Presidents

The Arch
This landmark marks the entrance to campus buildings, and leads pedestrians toward McCormick Hall.
  • Greeneville College (1794-1860)
    • Hezekiah Balch, D.D. 1794-1810
    • Charles Coffin, D.D. 1810-1827
    • Henry Hoss 1828-1836
    • Alfred Hoss 1836-1838
    • James McLin, B.A. 1838-1840
    • Samuel Matthews 1843-1845
    • Charles Van Vlech 1845-1846
    • John Fleming 1846-1847
    • William B. Rankin, D.D. 1854-1858
    • John Lampson 1859-1860
  • Tusculum Academy (1829-1868)
  • Tusculum College (1844-1868)
    • Samuel Witherspoon Doak, D.D. 1844-1864
    • William Stephenson Doak, D.D. 1865-1868
  • Tusculum and Greeneville College (1868-1912)
    • William Stephenson Doak, D.D. (1868-1882)
    • Alexander M. Doak (acting) 1882-1883
    • Jeremiah Moore, D.D. 1883-1901
    • Samuel A. Coile, D.D. 1901-1907
    • Charles O. Gray, D.D. 1907-1912
  • Tusculum College (1912-present)
    • Charles O. Gray, D.D. 1912-1931
    • Charles A. Anderson, D.D. 1931-1942
    • John McSween, D.D. 1942-1944
    • Jere A. Moore (acting) 1944-1946
    • George K. Davies, Ph.D. 1946-1950
    • Leslie K. Patton (acting) 1950-1951
    • Raymond C. Rankin, D.D. 1951-1965
    • Douglas C. Trout, Ph.D. 1965-1968
    • Charles J. Ping (acting) 1968-1969
    • Andrew N. Cothran, Ph.D. 1969-1972
    • Thomas G. Voss, Ph.D. 1972-1978
    • Earl R. Mezoff, Ed.D. 1978-1988
    • Robert E. Knott, Ph.D. 1989-2000
    • Thomas J. Garland (interim) 2000
    • Dolphus E. Henry III, Ph.D. 2000-2007
    • Russell L. Nichols, Ph.D. (interim) August 2007-present

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Doctor of Divinity (D.D., Divinitatis Doctor in Latin) is an academic degree. ... Doctor of Divinity (D.D., Divinitatis Doctor in Latin) is an academic degree. ... A B.A. issued from the University of Tennessee. ... Doctor of Divinity (D.D., Divinitatis Doctor in Latin) is an academic degree. ... Samuel Doak (1749-1830) was an American Presbyterian clergyman and educator, a pioneer in the movement for the abolition of slavery. ... Doctor of Divinity (D.D., Divinitatis Doctor in Latin) is an academic degree. ... Doctor of Divinity (D.D., Divinitatis Doctor in Latin) is an academic degree. ... Doctor of Divinity (D.D., Divinitatis Doctor in Latin) is an academic degree. ... Doctor of Divinity (D.D., Divinitatis Doctor in Latin) is an academic degree. ... Doctor of Divinity (D.D., Divinitatis Doctor in Latin) is an academic degree. ... In law, when someone is said to be acting in a position it can mean one of three things. ... Doctor of Divinity (D.D., Divinitatis Doctor in Latin) is an academic degree. ... Doctor of Divinity (D.D., Divinitatis Doctor in Latin) is an academic degree. ... Doctor of Divinity (D.D., Divinitatis Doctor in Latin) is an academic degree. ... Doctor of Divinity (D.D., Divinitatis Doctor in Latin) is an academic degree. ... Doctor of Divinity (D.D., Divinitatis Doctor in Latin) is an academic degree. ... Doctor of Divinity (D.D., Divinitatis Doctor in Latin) is an academic degree. ... In law, when someone is said to be acting in a position it can mean one of three things. ... Doctor of Philosophy, abbreviated Ph. ... In law, when someone is said to be acting in a position it can mean one of three things. ... Doctor of Divinity (D.D., Divinitatis Doctor in Latin) is an academic degree. ... Doctor of Philosophy, abbreviated Ph. ... In law, when someone is said to be acting in a position it can mean one of three things. ... Doctor of Philosophy, abbreviated Ph. ... Doctor of Philosophy, abbreviated Ph. ... Doctor of Philosophy, abbreviated Ph. ... Doctor of Philosophy, abbreviated Ph. ... Doctor of Philosophy, abbreviated Ph. ...

Academics

Accreditation

Tusculum is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools to award baccalaureate degrees and the Master of Arts in education and the Master of Arts in organizational management. Accreditation is a type of quality assurance process under which a facilitys or institutions services and operations are examined by a third-party accrediting agency to determine if applicable standards are met. ... The Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS) is a regional accreditor for over 13,000 public and private educational institutions ranging from preschool to college level in the Southern United States. ... A B.A. issued from the University of Tennessee. ... A Master of Arts is a postgraduate academic masters degree awarded by universities in North America and the United Kingdom (excluding the ancient universities of Scotland and Oxbridge. ...


It also maintains institutional memberships with the American Council on Education, the Council of Independent Colleges, the Association of American Colleges and Universities, the Council for Higher Education Accreditation, the Council for Opportunity in Education[1], the Tennessee Independent Colleges and Universities Association[2], the Tennessee State Board of Education, the Appalachian College Association[3], the Association of Presbyterian Colleges and Universities, the American Association of University Women, the American Medical Association, and the New York State Board of Regents. The American Council on Education is a United States organization comprising over 1,800 accredited, degree-granting colleges and universities and higher education-related associations, organizations, and corporations. ... The Council of Independent Colleges (founded 1956) is a service organization for educational institutions in the United States. ... The current version of the article or section reads like an advertisement. ... Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA) is an association of 3,000 degree-granting colleges and universities, which also recognizes 60 institutional and programmatic accrediting organizations. ... Introduction The Association of Presbyterian Colleges and Universities is a private, not-for-profit organization of colleges and universities associated with the Presbyterian Church (USA), a Protestant Christian religious denomination. ... The American Association of University Women (AAUW) is an organization championing womens rights and equity in education in the USA. The AAUW was founded in 1881 as the Association of Collegiate Alumnae, taking its present name in 1921 after merging with the Southern Association of College Women. ... The American Medical Association (AMA) is the largest association of medical doctors in the United States. ... The University of the State of New York (USNY; acronym usually pronounced USE-nee) is the governmental umbrella organization of the US state of New York which is responsible for most institutions and much of the personnel that are in any way connected to formal educational functions (public and private...


Programs of study

Majors. Tusculum College offers these main fields of specialization to its undergraduate students: Athletic Training, Biology (with concentrations in Medical Pre-Professional, Pre-Physical Therapy, Medical Technology, Organismal Biology, and Pre-Pharmacy), Business Administration (with concentrations in General Management, Management Accounting, and Economics), English (with concentrations in Literature and Writing), Environmental science, Field Guide/Naturalist, History, Mass Media, Mathematics (with Computer Science concentration), Museum Studies, Political Science, Psychology, Sports Management, Sports Science, and Visual Arts (with concentrations in Fine Arts and Graphic Design). An academic major, major concentration, concentration, or simply major is a mainly a U.S. and Canadian term for a college or university students main field of specialization during his or her undergraduate studies. ... Athletic Training In 1893 there were atheletic trainers{| class=wikitable |- |}is an allied health care profession recognized by the American Medical Association (AMA) that specializes in the prevention, evaluation, treatment, management and rehabilitation of injuries and illnesses. ... Biology studies the variety of life (clockwise from top-left) E. coli, tree fern, gazelle, Goliath beetle Biology (from Greek: βίος, bio, life; and λόγος, logos, knowledge), also referred to as the biological sciences, is the study of living organisms utilizing the scientific method. ... Medical technology refers to the diagnostic or therapeutic application of science and technology to improve the management of health conditions. ... Look up Administration (business) in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Face-to-face trading interactions on the New York Stock Exchange trading floor. ... English studies is an academic discipline that includes the study of literatures written in the English language (including literatures from the U.K., U.S., Ireland, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Hong Kong, the Philippines, India, South Africa, and the Middle East, among other areas), English linguistics (including English phonetics, phonology... For other uses, see Literature (disambiguation). ... Write redirects here. ... Environmental science is the study of the interactions among the physical, chemical and biological components of the environment; with a focus on pollution and degradation of the environment related to human activities; and the impact on biodiversity and sustainability from local and global development. ... Table of natural history, 1728 Cyclopaedia Natural history is an umbrella term for what are now often viewed as several distinct scientific disciplines of integrative organismal biology. ... This article is about the study of the past in human terms. ... Popular press redirects here; note that the University of Wisconsin Press publishes under the imprint The Popular Press. Mass media is a term used to denote a section of the media specifically envisioned and designed to reach a very large audience such as the population of a nation state. ... For other meanings of mathematics or uses of math and maths, see Mathematics (disambiguation) and Math (disambiguation). ... Computer science, or computing science, is the study of the theoretical foundations of information and computation and their implementation and application in computer systems. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Political Science is the field concerning the theory and practice of politics and the description and analysis of political systems and political behaviour. ... Psychological science redirects here. ... Sport management is a field of education and vocation concerning the business aspect of sport. ... Sports science is a discipline that studies the application of scientific principles and techniques with the aim of improving sporting performance. ... The Mona Lisa is one of the most recognizable artistic paintings in the Western world. ... Fine art is a term used to refer to fields traditionally considered to be artistic. ... Graphics are often utilitarian and anonymous,[1] as these pictographs from the US National Park Service illustrate. ...


Teacher licensure programs. Students seeking baccalaureate degrees in education select one of the following subfields to qualify for a state board granted license: Pre-Secondary Education (Early Childhood Education PreK-3, Elementary Education K-6), Secondary Education (Biology 7-12, English 7-12, History 7-12, Mathematics 7-12, Psychology 9-12), K-12 Education (Physical Education K-12, Visual Arts K-12), and Special Education (Special Education Modified and Comprehensive K-12, Special Education Early Childhood). Licensure refers to the granting of a license (in the US, whilst, elsewhere the term registration is used), usually to work in a particular profession. ... Secondary education - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia /**/ @import /skins-1. ... This article is about educating students with disabilities or behavioral problems. ...


Minors. In addition to their academic majors, students at Tusculum College can also study these secondary specialties: Biology, Chemistry, Coaching, Computer Information Systems, English, Environmental Science, History, Journalism, Mass Media, Mathematics, Management, Museum Studies, Political Science, Psychology, Religion, Visual Arts, and the following minors in Education: English, History, Early Childhood Education, Elementary Education, and Special Education Modified & Comprehensive. Biology studies the variety of life (clockwise from top-left) E. coli, tree fern, gazelle, Goliath beetle Biology (from Greek: βίος, bio, life; and λόγος, logos, knowledge), also referred to as the biological sciences, is the study of living organisms utilizing the scientific method. ... For other uses, see Chemistry (disambiguation). ... A coach is a person who supports people (clients) to achieve their goals, with goal setting, encouragement and questions. ... Management Information Systems (MIS) is a general name for the academic discipline covering the application of people, technologies, and procedures — collectively called information systems — to solve business problems. ... English studies is an academic discipline that includes the study of literatures written in the English language (including literatures from the U.K., U.S., Ireland, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Hong Kong, the Philippines, India, South Africa, and the Middle East, among other areas), English linguistics (including English phonetics, phonology... Environmental science is the study of the interactions among the physical, chemical and biological components of the environment; with a focus on pollution and degradation of the environment related to human activities; and the impact on biodiversity and sustainability from local and global development. ... This article is about the study of the past in human terms. ... Journalism is a discipline of gathering, writing and reporting news, and broadly it includes the process of editing and presenting the news articles. ... Popular press redirects here; note that the University of Wisconsin Press publishes under the imprint The Popular Press. Mass media is a term used to denote a section of the media specifically envisioned and designed to reach a very large audience such as the population of a nation state. ... For other meanings of mathematics or uses of math and maths, see Mathematics (disambiguation) and Math (disambiguation). ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Political Science is the field concerning the theory and practice of politics and the description and analysis of political systems and political behaviour. ... Psychological science redirects here. ... The Mona Lisa is one of the most recognizable artistic paintings in the Western world. ... Infant playing with a book. ...


Other disciplines. Tusculum College also offers additional non-degree conferring courses in Geography, Music, Physics, Sociology, Spanish, and Theater. For other uses, see Music (disambiguation). ... A magnet levitating above a high-temperature superconductor demonstrates the Meissner effect. ... Sociology (from Latin: socius, companion; and the suffix -ology, the study of, from Greek λόγος, lógos, knowledge [1]) is the systematic and scientific study of society, including patterns of social relationships, social action, and culture[2]. Areas studied in sociology can range from the analysis of brief contacts between anonymous... For other usages see Theatre (disambiguation) Theater (American English) or Theatre (British English and widespread usage among theatre professionals in the US) is that branch of the performing arts concerned with acting out stories in front of an audience using combinations of speech, gesture, music, dance, sound and spectacle &#8212...


Focused calendar

A semester at Tusculum College consists of four 18-day "blocks," during which students takes one course per block. Students and faculty concentrate on a single course without the distraction of preparing for other classes. Because daily classes last an average of three hours, students and faculty interact a great deal more than a conventional 50-minute semi-weekly class. These extended periods allow deeper exchanges of ideas and more opportunities for each class member to participate. Faculty emphasize active engagement in their students, much in the tradition of the Socratic method. Socratic Method (or Method of Elenchus or Socratic Debate) is a dialectic method of inquiry, largely applied to the examination of key moral concepts and first described by Plato in the Socratic Dialogues. ...


Since no conflicts exist with other classes, faculty can arrange field trips, laboratory work, and other out-of-classroom experiences that would be impossible with the conventional format. For example, recent courses have included extended trips to Belize, Costa Rica, Europe, Atlanta, Chicago, New York City and Washington, D.C.. Dozens of other courses have included overnight or day trips as an integrated part of their curriculum. For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Atlanta redirects here. ... Nickname: Motto: Urbs in Horto (Latin: City in a Garden), I Will Location in the Chicago metro area and Illinois Coordinates: , Country State Counties Cook, DuPage Settled 1770s Incorporated March 4, 1837 Government  - Mayor Richard M. Daley (D) Area  - City 234. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... For other uses, see Washington, D.C. (disambiguation). ...


The only three other colleges in the nation use this scheduling method are Colorado College, Cornell College, and The University of Montana - Western. The Colorado College is a private four-year, co-educational liberal arts college located in Colorado Springs, Colorado. ... This article is about the liberal arts college in Mount Vernon, Iowa. ... The University of Montana-Western is a public college located in Dillon, Montana. ...


Buildings and facilities

Niswonger Commons
Many activities on campus revolve around this modern multipurpose center.
an asterisk (*) denotes listing on the National Register of Historic Places
  • Byrd Fine Arts Center. Built in 1965 and named for Annie Hogan Byrd. This building also serves as the college chapel. Vicinity 36°10′28.5″N, 82°45′32.2″W.
  • Charles Oliver Gray Complex. Built in 1969, the “COG” was named to honor Dr. Gray, Tusculum College president from 1907 to 1931. Renovated in 2000, it consists of three dormitories units and a classroom/office building. Each three-story dorm houses 35 students. Vicinity 36°10′21.4″N, 82°45′42.7″W.
  • Doak House Museum.* Built in 1818 as the home of Samuel Witherspoon Doak. Vicinity 36°10′28.0″N, 82°45′53.2″W.
  • Haynes Hall.* Built in 1914 and named for Landon C. Haynes, a Tusculum faculty member for 65 years.[15] Vicinity 36°10′24.2″N, 82°45′37.1″W.
  • Katherine Hall. Built in 1962 renovated in 1999. The largest of six dormitories on campus, this three-story dormitory named for Katherine Rankin houses 140 students. Vicinity 36°10′24.6″N, 82°45′31.5″W.
  • Mastrapasqua Hall, et al. Built in 2002, these four three-story, apartment-style dormitories each house 48 students. Called “The Apartments” collectively, unit “A” was renamed Mastrapasqua Hall in 2003 in honor of trustee Frank Mastrapasqua. The remaining three units simply remain Apartments “B,” “C,” and “D.” Vicinity 36°10′20.1″N, 82°45′47.2″W.
  • McCormick Hall.* Built in 1887 and named for Nettie Fowler McCormick. Today it houses administrative offices. Vicinity 36°10′26.5″N, 82°45′38.9″W.
  • Nichols Tennis Complex. Built in 1992 and named to honor Roger M. Nichols. Vicinity 36°10′19.8″N, 82°45′33.4″W.
  • Niswonger Commons. Built in 1999 and named for trustee and benefactor Scott M. Niswonger, this structure replaced the Simerly Union Building, which was erected in 1970. The new facility houses a full-service post office, a cafeteria operated by Sodexho, the bookstore, the Pioneer Perk student coffeehouse, the student radio station WTPL 610 AM, the student TV studio WTCV, a 24-hour computer laboratory, the campus safety office, classrooms, and various offices for faculty and staff. Additionally, the Commons features a gymnasium-swimming pool complex that incorporates the 2,000-seat Alpine Arena and a weight room/fitness center. Vicinity 36°10′20.4″N, 82°45′38.0″W.
  • President Andrew Johnson Museum and Library.* Built in 1841 to accommodate growth in student enrollment. Called the Old College, it is the oldest academic building on campus. Major renovations in 1993 restored the museum and library to its original appearance. It houses the collection of the seventeenth president’s private and family papers, and family artifacts. The museum and library also holds the Charles C. Coffin Rare Book Collection[16] - the original College library, the College’s Archives, and features rotating exhibits. Some recent exhibits have included 19th century furniture handcrafted in East Tennessee, portraits of George Washington, and architecture features of the historic buildings on campus. The building also serves as home to the Museum Studies Program. Vicinity 36°10′24.9″N, 82°45′45.3″W.
  • President's House. Built in 1909 across the street from campus. Vicinity 36°10′33.6″N, 82°45′34.4″W.
  • Rankin Hall.* Built in 1923, it was originally named “Gordon Hall” for a McCormick family member. In 1928, Cyrus McCormick II requested it be renamed to honor senior professor Thomas S. Rankin. Vicinity 36°10′22.2″N, 82°45′40.7″W.
  • Shulman Center. Built in 1971 and named to honor Herbert L. Shulman. Constructed in an attractive circular design, the center primarily functions as studios and offices for the Art and Design program. Vicinity 36°10′27.0″N, 82°45′21.1″W.
  • Tate Library.* Built in 1910, it was originally named "Carnegie Hall" for benefactor Andrew Carnegie to house the library and gymnasium. After the gymnasium was built in 1930, it was renamed the "Carnegie Library." In 1991, it was renamed in honor of Albert Columbus Tate, the 1894 Centennial class valedictorian. Vicinity 36°10′27.9″N, 82°45′41.5″W).
  • The Arch.* Built in 1917 at College's traditional entrance. Vicinity 36°10′30.0″N, 82°45′39.1″W.
  • Tredway Hall.* Built in 1930 as the science building, named in 1989 to honor alumnus and benefactor William L. Tredway. It is the only structure on campus functioning today in its original purpose. Vicinity 36°10′28.4″N, 82°45′45.7″W.
  • Virginia Hall.* Built in 1901 and named for Mary Virginia McCormick. Architect Louis Sullivan designed the building. Vicinity 36°10′28.0″N, 82°45′36.1″W.
  • Welty-Craig Hall.* Built in 1891 and originally named Craig Hall in honor of Reverend Willis G. Craig. In 1998, the institution added the name "Welty" to honor board of trustees chair and benefactor Stanley R. Welty, '51. This dormitory houses 40 students. Vicinity 36°10′24.2″N, 82°45′41.0″W.

Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... A typical plaque showing entry on the National Register of Historic Places. ... Year 1965 (MCMLXV) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1965 Gregorian calendar. ... A chapel is a private church, usually small and often attached to a larger institution such as a college, a hospital, a palace, or a prison. ... Also: 1969 (number) 1969 (movie) 1969 (Stargate SG-1) episode. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... A typical American college dorm room Another typical not-so-clean college dorm room Watterson Towers, Illinois State University Potomac Hall, second-largest dormitory at James Madison University in Harrisonburg, Virginia. ... A university classroom with permanently-installed desk-chairs and green chalkboards. ... This article includes a list of works cited or a list of external links, but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ... Year 1818 (MDCCCXVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... A typical American college dorm room Another typical not-so-clean college dorm room Watterson Towers, Illinois State University Potomac Hall, second-largest dormitory at James Madison University in Harrisonburg, Virginia. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 1887 (MDCCCLXXXVII) is a common year starting on Saturday (click on link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Monday of the Julian calendar. ... Year 1992 (MCMXCII) was a leap year starting on Wednesday (link will display full 1992 Gregorian calendar). ... This article is about the year. ... The word trustee is a legal term that refers to a holder of property on behalf of a beneficiary. ... A benefactor is a person or other entity providing money or other benefits to another; the person receiving them is called a beneficiary. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Small-town post office and town hall in Lockhart, Alabama A post office is a facility (in most countries, a government one) where the public can purchase postage stamps for mailing correspondence or merchandise, and also drop off or pick up packages or other special-delivery items. ... One of a number of cafeterias at Electronic City campus, Infosys Technologies Ltd. ... Sodexho Alliance, or simply Sodexho, (Euronext: SW) is a French multinational corporation and one of the largest food services and facilities management companies in the world. ... A bookstore. ... Discussing the War in a Paris Café, Illustrated London News 17 September 1870 Coffee shop redirects here. ... Radio broadcasting can be done via cable FM, local wire networks, satellite and the Internet. ... Broadcasting is the distribution of audio and video signals (programs) to a number of recipients (listeners or viewers) that belong to a large group. ... This Computer lab, called by Marling School for boys, is laid out in such a way as to reduce cabling clutter, and maximise space for workstations. ... A security officer guards a construction site. ... Modern indoor gymnasium with pull-down basketball hoops. ... For the 2003 film, see Swimming Pool (film). ... This article is about strength training using weight (gravity) to generate resistance to contraction. ... Modern indoor gymnasium with pull-down basketball hoops Gym is a shortened form of gymnasium referring to facilities intended for indoor sports or exercise. ... For other persons of the same name, see Andrew Johnson (disambiguation). ... 1841 is a common year starting on Friday (link will take you to calendar). ... The Universitätscampus Wien, Austria ( details) Campus (plural: campuses) is derived from the (identical) Latin word for field or open space. English gets the words camp and campus from this origin. ... Year 1993 (MCMXCIII) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1993 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 1909 (MCMIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Thursday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The Universitätscampus Wien, Austria ( details) Campus (plural: campuses) is derived from the (identical) Latin word for field or open space. English gets the words camp and campus from this origin. ... Year 1923 (MCMXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1910 (MCMX) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... A benefactor is a person or other entity providing money or other benefits to another; the person receiving them is called a beneficiary. ... Andrew Carnegie (last name pronounced IPA: )[1] (November 25, 1835 – August 11, 1919) was a Scottish industrialist, businessman, a major philanthropist, and the founder of Pittsburghs Carnegie Steel Company which later became U.S. Steel. ... Julio Pérez Ferrero Library - Cúcuta, Colombia A modern-style library in Chambéry A library is a collection of information, sources, resources, and services: it is organized for use and maintained by a public body, an institution, or a private individual. ... Gymnasium can have following meanings: Gymnasium (ancient Greece)—an educational and sporting institution in Ancient Greece Gymnasium—a school of secondary education found in several European countries (approx. ... Year 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display 1930 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1991 (MCMXCI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the 1991 Gregorian calendar). ... 1894 (MDCCCXCIV) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... A centennial is a 100-year anniversary of an event, or the celebrations pertaining thereto. ... In the United States and Canada, the title of valedictorian (an anglicized derivation from the Latin vale dicere, to say farewell) is given to the top graduate of the graduating class (the Australia/New Zealand equivalent being dux, although some Australian universities use the American term) of an educational institution. ... 1917 (MCMXVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar (see link for calendar) or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar (see: 1917 Julian calendar). ... Year 1930 (MCMXXX) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display 1930 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1989 (MCMLXXXIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link displays 1989 Gregorian calendar). ... “Old girl” redirects here. ... A benefactor is a person or other entity providing money or other benefits to another; the person receiving them is called a beneficiary. ... Year 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see Architect (disambiguation). ... Louis Henri Sullivan (September 3, 1856 – April 14, 1924) was an American architect, called the father of modernism. ... Year 1891 (MDCCCXCI) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ...

Athletics

A member of the South Atlantic Conference, Tusculum fields 14 varsity teams in NCAA Division II competition. Across the board, the college places a priority on the academic success of its student-athletes. Tusculum has a tradition of excellence in intercollegiate athletics, with particularly strong programs in baseball, basketball, golf, and men’s and women’s soccer. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The South Atlantic Conference (SAC) is a College Athletic Conference which operates in the southeastern United States. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... Division II (or DII) is an intermediate-level division of competition in the National Collegiate Athletic Association. ...


Key events in athletic program

Ğ: For the film, see: 1900 (film). ... This article is about the sport. ... Year 1902 (MCMII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... 1900 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Friday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... 1900 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Friday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ... 1906 (MCMVI) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... This article is about the sport. ... 1912 (MCMXII) was a leap year starting on Monday in the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Tuesday in the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... For the rap album, see 1924 (album). ... Year 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The 1930s (years from 1930–1939) were described as an abrupt shift to more radical and conservative lifestyles, as countries were struggling to find a solution to the Great Depression, also known as the World Depression. ... The term intramural is most commonly associated with sports teams organized within a school. ... Soft ball is also a sugar stage Softball is a team sport popular around the world but especially in the United States. ... Year 1970 (MCMLXX) was a common year starting on Thursday (link shows full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... A player (wearing the red kit) has penetrated the defence (in the white kit) and is taking a shot at goal. ...

Sports facilities

Through the generous support of business and community leader Scott M. Niswonger, who is a member of Tusculum College’s Board of Trustees, a new, modern athletics complex, which in October 2003 was dedicated in Mr. Niswonger’s honor, enhances Tusculum’s campus. Its major features include a field house located behind the west end zone of Pioneer Field, featuring large locker area facilities that can be divided into four locker rooms. An indoor practice and soccer facility with interior space of about 44,400 square feet features a special high quality, realistic turf of a type also used by the University of Nebraska, University of Washington, and the NFL’s Seattle Seahawks. The Nebraska Cornhuskers (often abbreviated to Huskers) is the name given to several sports teams of the University of Nebraska–Lincoln. ... The term properly applies to any sports team at the school. ... City Seattle, Washington Team colors Pacific Blue, Navy Blue, Neon Green, White Head Coach Mike Holmgren Owner Paul Allen General manager Tim Ruskell Mascot Blitz, and Taima the hawk League/Conference affiliations National Football League (1976–present) American Football Conference (1977-2001) AFC West (1977-2001) National Football Conference (1976...


With improvements made through the athletics complex development project, Pioneer Field’s seating capacity is now at 3,500. New parking facilities were added through the project. New and improved pedestrian ways, fencing, and lighting in the athletics complex area were developed in a style to match that already on the campus. A modern press box facility, built to blend with the architectural style of the campus’s most historic facilities, is also part of the athletics complex project.


A baseball stadium, Pioneer Park, was added to the complex in 2004. The stadium, used by both the Tusculum Pioneers baseball team and the Greeneville Astros, the Minor League Baseball team of the Houston Astros, has a seating capacity of 2,500 and features a covered seating area. The Greeneville Astros are a minor league baseball team in Greeneville, Tennessee, USA. They compete at Rookie League level in the Appalachian League, and have been a farm team of the Houston Astros since 1974. ... For the organization which many minor leagues belong to, see Minor League Baseball Part of the History of baseball series. ... Major league affiliations National League (1962–present) Central Division (1994–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 5, 24, 25, 32, 33, 34, 40, 42, 49 Name Houston Astros (1965–present) Houston Colt . ...


Overall, Tusculum’s sports facilities include lighted football, baseball, soccer and softball fields, an intramural field, and six lighted tennis courts that support a variety of outdoor activities as well as physical education instruction.


External links

  • Tusculum College website

References

  1. ^ Rudolph, Frederick (1990). The American College and University: A history. Athens, GA: University of Georgia Press. (ISBN 0820312843)
  2. ^ Ramsey, J. G. M. (1853). Annals of Tennessee to the end of the eighteenth century (p. 627). Charleston, SC: Walker & James Press.
  3. ^ Patrick, James (2007). The beginning of collegiate education west of the Appalachians, 1795-1833: The achievement of Dr. Charles Coffin of Greeneville College and East Tennessee College. Lewiston, NY: E. Mellen Press. (ISBN 0773454470)
  4. ^ Sexton, Jr., Donal J., & Smith, Jr., Myron J. (1994). Glimpses of Tusculum: A pictorial history of Tusculum College. Marceline, MO: Walsworth Publishing.
  5. ^ Merrium, Lucius S. (1893). Higher education in Tennessee (pp. 226-231). Contributions to American Educational History (vol. 16), Herbert P. Adams (Ed.). Washington, DC: Bureau of Education.
  6. ^ Brown, Leah M. (1988). Rev. Hezekiah Balch, D.D. (1741-1810): A biography. Milwaukie, OR.
  7. ^ Wills, David (1873). In memoriam: Memorial discourse delivered on the occasion of the erection of a monument to the memory of Rev. Samuel Witherspoon Doak, D.D., at Greeneville, Tennessee. Atlanta Journal-Constitution, 2(27), p. G3.
  8. ^ Thirty-ninth annual report of the Board of Education of the Presbyterian Church (1858, May; pp. 42-43). Philadelphia: C. Shermman & Sons.
  9. ^ Fuhrmann, Joseph T. (1986). The life and times of Tusculum College. Westport, CT: Greenwood Press. ASIN B000712RQ2
  10. ^ Wheeler, Frank T. (2000). Tusculum College Tennessee: The college history series. Charleston, SC: Arcadia Publishing. (ISBN 0738506117)
  11. ^ Tusculum College president on leave, Knoxville News Sentinel, May 23, 2007
  12. ^ Trustees Volpe, Kormondy taking on transitional presidential leadership at Tusculum College, Tusculum College press release, May 29, 2007.
  13. ^ Dolphus Henry resigns as president of Tusculum College, Tusculum College press release, July 19, 2007.
  14. ^ Dr. Russell L. Nichols coming as interim president of Tusculum College, Tusculum College press release, July 19, 2007.
  15. ^ Haynes, Grace (1968). The Daddy Haynes story: The life of professor Landon Carter Haynes. Morristown, TN: Carolina Ruling.
  16. ^ Treadway, Cleo C., McDavid, Lee (1983). Catalogue of the Charles Coffin Collection at Tusculum College, the original library of Greeneville College, 1794-1827. Greeneville, TN: Tusculum College Library.

Asin is a Pinoy rock and folk rock band from the Philippines. ... The Knoxville News Sentinel is a newspaper in Knoxville, Tennessee, USA covering general news. ...

Further reading

  • Allen, Ortha B. (1970). The philosophy of the library-college and its applications to Tusculum College (thesis). Johnson City, TN: East Tennessee State University. (OCLC 25212791)
  • Bailey, Gilbert L. (1965). A history of Tusculum College, 1944-1964 (thesis). Johnson City, TN: East Tennessee State University.
  • Hearn, Steven B. (1983). Survival strategies for Tusculum College: An ethnographic evaluation of enrollment, student recruitment, and school image (thesis). Knoxville, TN: University of Tennessee – Knoxville. (OCLC 9939082)
  • Ragan, Allen E. (1945). A history of Tusculum College, 1794-1944. Greeneville, TN: The Tusculum Sesquicentennial Committee. (LCC 46018213)
  • Treadway, Cleo C. (1974). Reclassification: The Tusculum way. Greeneville, TN: Tusculum College Press. (OCLC 6922139)

  Results from FactBites:
 
Tusculum College - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (147 words)
Tusculum College is a private four-year college affiliated with the Presbyterian Church located in Tusculum, Tennessee, a suburb of Greeneville, Tennessee.
The college was founded as Greeneville College in 1794, making it the oldest college in Tennessee and the 28th oldest college in the United States.
The name dates from a 1868 merger with Tusculum Academy, and the school is currently located on the campus previously belonging to Tusculum Academy.
Tusculum College | Doak House Museum (530 words)
Historic Tusculum College is the oldest college in the state of Tennessee, the 23rd oldest in operation in the country and the oldest co-educational college related to the Presbyterian Church(USA).
Tusculum traces its origins to the founding of Greeneville College by the Reverend Hezekiah Balch, a graduate of Princeton and a Presbyterian minister.
The Territorial Legislature chartered the college, and its stated purpose was to provide a liberal arts education for a new generation of civic leaders on the frontier.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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