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Encyclopedia > Tuscany
Tuscany
Image:Italy Regions Tuscany Map.png
Geography
Status Region
Capital Florence
President Claudio Martini
(DS-Union)
Provinces 10
Area 22,990 km²
 - Ranked 5th (7.6 %)
Population (2006 est.)
 - Total 3,619,872
 - Ranked 9th (6.1 %)
 - Density 157/km²

Tuscany (Italian: Toscana) is one of the twenty regions of Italy. It has an area of 22,990 km² and a population of about 3.6 million inhabitants. The regional capital is Florence. Tuscany is one of the 20 Regions of Italy Tuscany, Calgary, a neighbourhood in Calgary, Alberta, Canada Matilda of Tuscany, or the Great Countess, medieval Italian women remembered for her military accomplishments Guy of Tuscany, duke of Lucca and margrave of Tuscany from 915 to 916 Hugh of Tuscany, margrave... Image File history File links Flag_of_Tuscany. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The Regions of Italy were granted a degree of regional autonomy in the 1948 constitution, which states that the constitutions role is: to recognize, protect and promote local autonomy, to ensure that services at the State level are as decentralized as possible, and to adapt the principles and laws... Florence (or Firenze, Florentia and Fiorenza) is the capital city of the Italian region of Tuscany, and of the province of Florence. ... The Democrats of the Left (Democratici di Sinistra, DS) is the main Italian left-wing political party, part of the Olive Tree electoral coalition. ... The Union (Italian: LUnione) is an Italian centre-left political party coalition. ... In Italy, a province (in Italian: provincia) is an administrative division of intermediate level between municipality (comune) and region (regione). ... This article is about the physical quantity. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... These are ranked lists of the regions of Italy. ... These are ranked lists of the regions of Italy. ... Population density per square kilometre by country, 2006 Population density map of the world in 1994. ... The Regions of Italy were granted a degree of regional autonomy in the 1948 constitution, which states that the constitutions role is: to recognize, protect and promote local autonomy, to ensure that services at the State level are as decentralized as possible, and to adapt the principles and laws... Florence (or Firenze, Florentia and Fiorenza) is the capital city of the Italian region of Tuscany, and of the province of Florence. ...


Tuscany is known for its landscapes and its artistic legacy. Six Tuscan localities have been UNESCO protected sites: the historical center of Florence (1982), the historical center of Siena (1995), the square of the Cathedral of Pisa (1987), the historical center of San Gimignano (1990), the historical center of Pienza (1996) and the Val d'Orcia (2004). A UNESCO World Heritage Site is a specific site (such as a forest, mountain, lake, desert, monument, building, complex, or city) that has been nominated and confirmed for inclusion on the list maintained by the international World Heritage Programme administered by the UNESCO World Heritage Committee, composed of 21 State... Florence (or Firenze, Florentia and Fiorenza) is the capital city of the Italian region of Tuscany, and of the province of Florence. ... For the Catholic Liberal Arts College in New York, see Siena College. ... The Campo dei Miracoli (Field of Miracles) is a wide, walled area at the heart of the city of Pisa, Tuscany, Italy (, ), recognized as one of the main centers for Mediaeval art in the world. ... San Gimignano is a small walled medieval hilltop town in Tuscany, Italy, about a 35-minute drive northwest of Siena or southwest of Florence. ... Pienza, a town and commune in the province of Siena, in the Val dOrcia in Tuscany (central Italy), between the towns of Montepulciano and Montalcino, is the touchstone of Renaissance urbanism. ... Val dOrcia with Monte Amiata, view to the west from La Foce Wikimedia Commons has media related to: Val dOrcia The Val d’Orcia, or Valdorcia, is a region of Tuscany, central Italy, which extends from the hills south of Siena to Monte Amiata. ...

Contents

Geography

Tuscany is a region of Central Italy, bordering Emilia-Romagna to the north, Liguria to the north-west, Tyrrhenian Sea to the west, Umbria and Marche to the east, Lazio to the south-east. The territory is two thirds hilly and one fourth mountainous. The remainder is constituted of the plains that form the valley of the Arno River. Emilia-Romagna is one of the 20 Regions of Italy. ... Liguria is a coastal region of north-western Italy, the third smallest of the Italian regions. ... Tyrrhenian Sea. ... Umbria is a region of central Italy, bordered by Tuscany to the west, the Marche to the east and Lazio to the south. ... // The Marche (plural, originally le marche de Ancona = the Marches of Ancona) are a region of Central Italy, bordering Emilia-Romagna north, Tuscany to the north-west, Umbria to west, Abruzzo and Latium to the south and the Adriatic Sea to the east. ... For the football club, see S.S. Lazio Lazio (Latium in Latin) is a regione of central Italy, bordered by Tuscany, Umbria, Abruzzi, Marche, Molise, Campania and the Tyrrhenian Sea. ... Arno River in Florence, Italy The Arno is a river in the Tuscany region of Italy. ...


Tuscany is divided into ten provinces:


Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1000x769, 211 KB) This map shows the provinces of the Italian region of Tuscany. ...

Arezzo (It. ... The Province of Florence (Italian: ) is a province in the Tuscany region of Italy, with an area of 3,514 sq. ... Grosseto (It. ... The Province of Livorno (Italian: Provincia di Livorno) is a province in the Tuscany region of Italy. ... Lucca (Italian: Provincia di Lucca) is a province in the Tuscany region of Italy. ... Massa-Carrara (It. ... Pisa (Italian: ) is a province in the Tuscany region of Italy. ... Pistoia (It. ... Prato (Italian: Provincia di Prato) is a province in the Tuscany region of Italy. ... Siena (Italian: Provincia di Siena) is a province in the Tuscany region of Italy. ...

History

Main article: History of Tuscany
The Chimera of Arezzo, Etruscan bronze, 400 BC.
The Chimera of Arezzo, Etruscan bronze, 400 BC.
Palazzo Vecchio in Florence, .
Palazzo Vecchio in Florence, .
The Florence Cathedral in the evening sun.
The Florence Cathedral in the evening sun.
View of Castiglioncello. An artistic movement of the 19th century, called Macchiaioli, chose this village, because of its beauty, as an inspirational source for their work.
View of Castiglioncello. An artistic movement of the 19th century, called Macchiaioli, chose this village, because of its beauty, as an inspirational source for their work.

Medici Rule and the Fall of the Republic The Medici family, long one of the most important families in Florence, and by extension Tuscany, were able to transform the Republic of Florence into a Ducal State ruled by a hereditary succession in the 16th century. ... The Etruscan Chimera of Arezzo The bronze Chimera of Arezzo is one of the best known examples of the art of the Etruscans. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (960x1280, 486 KB) Summary Palazzo Vecchio, Florence, Italy Own photo - photo made by Georges Jansoone on 12 October 2005 Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Palazzo Vecchio Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (960x1280, 486 KB) Summary Palazzo Vecchio, Florence, Italy Own photo - photo made by Georges Jansoone on 12 October 2005 Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Palazzo Vecchio Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the... Palazzo Vecchio The Palazzo Vecchio is the town hall of Florence, Italy. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (859x521, 108 KB) Santa Maria del Fiore, view, Florence, Italy File from nl. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (859x521, 108 KB) Santa Maria del Fiore, view, Florence, Italy File from nl. ... View of the façade with Giottos Bell Tower. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1024x633, 534 KB) (All user names refer to en. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1024x633, 534 KB) (All user names refer to en. ... Castiglioncello: view from the Castle Pasquini at the seaside, in the very background the isle of Elba. ... Hay stacks by Giovanni Fattori a leading artist in the Macchiaioli movement The Macchiaioli movement was a school of 19th century Tuscan painters originating from the 1850s. ...

Apennine and Villanovan cultures.

The pre-Etruscan history of the area in the late Bronze and Iron Ages parallels that of the early Greeks.[1] The Tuscan area was inhabited by peoples of the so-called Apennine culture in the late second millennium BC (roughly 1350–1150 BC) who had trading relationships with the Minoan and Mycenaean civilisations in the Aegean Sea.[1] Following this the Villanovan culture (1100–700 BC) came about which saw Tuscany, and the rest of Etruria, taken over by chiefdoms (as was also the case at this time in France and the Aegean after the collapse of Mycenae and Troy).[1] City-states developed in the late Villanovan (again paralleling Greece and the Aegean) before "Orientalization" occurred and the Etruscan civilisation rose.[1] The Apennine culture is a late Bronze Age culture in the Apennines of Italy, dating from around 1350 to 1150 BC. It is contemporary to the late Terramare culture and succeeded by the Villanovan culture. ... Villanovan Culture in 900BC The Villanovan culture was the earliest Iron Age culture of central and northern Italy, abruptly following the Bronze Age Terramare culture and giving way in the 7th century BC to an increasingly orientalizing culture influenced by Greek traders, which was followed without a severe break by... The Bronze Age is a period in a civilizations development when the most advanced metalworking has developed the techniques of smelting copper from natural outcroppings and alloys it to cast bronze. ... Iron Age Axe found on Gotland This article is about the archaeological period known as the Iron Age, for the mythological Iron Age see Iron Age (mythology). ... The Apennine culture is a late Bronze Age culture in the Apennines of Italy, dating from around 1350 to 1150 BC. It is contemporary to the late Terramare culture and succeeded by the Villanovan culture. ... (3rd millennium BC – 2nd millennium BC – 1st millennium BC – other millennia) Events Second dynasty of Babylon First Bantu migrations from west Africa The Cushites drive the original inhabitants from Ethiopia, and establish trade relations with Egypt. ... Minoan may refer to the following: The Minoan civilization The (undeciphered) Eteocretan language The (undeciphered) Minoan language The script known as Linear A An old name for the Mycenean language before it was deciphered and discovered to be a form of Greek. ... Mycenaean Greece, the last phase of the Bronze Age in ancient Greece, is the historical setting of the epics of Homer and much other Greek mythology. ... Look up Aegean Sea in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Villanovan Culture in 900BC The Villanovan culture was the earliest Iron Age culture of central and northern Italy, abruptly following the Bronze Age Terramare culture and giving way in the 7th century BC to an increasingly orientalizing culture influenced by Greek traders, which was followed without a severe break by... A chiefdom is any community led by an individual known as a chief. ... A city-state is a region controlled exclusively by a city. ...


Etruscans

Main article: Etruscan civilization

The Etruscans were the first major civilization in this region of Italy; large enough to lay down a transport infrastructure, implement agriculture and mining, and produce vivid art.[2] The people who formed the civilization lived in the area (called Etruria) well into prehistory.[1] The civilisation grew to fill the area between the rivers Arno and Tiber from the eighth century, reaching their peak during the seventh and sixth centuries BC, and finally ceded all power and territory to the Romans by the first century.[3] Throughout their existence, they lost territory to the surrounding civilisations of Magna Graecia, Carthage and Gaul.[2] Despite being described as distinct in its manners and customs by contemporary Greeks,[4] the cultures of Greece, and later Rome, influenced the civilisation to a great extent. One of the reasons for its eventual demise[3] was this increasing lack of cultural distinction, including the adoption of the Etruscan upper class by the Romans.[2] Extent of Etruscan civilization and the twelve Etruscan League cities. ... The Etruscan civilization existed in Etruria and the Po valley in the northern part of what is now Italy, prior to the formation of the Roman Republic. ... Central New York City. ... This article is about mineral extractions. ... The area covered by the Etruscan civilzation. ... Arno River in Florence, Italy The Arno is a river in the Tuscany region of Italy. ... Tiber River in Rome The River Tiber (Italian Tevere), the third longest river in Italy (disputed — see talk page) at 406 km (252 miles) after the Po and the Adige, flows through the Campagna and Rome in its course from Mount Fumaiolo to the Tyrrhenian Sea, which it reaches in... (2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC - 1st millennium) // Overview Events 699 BC - Khallushu succeeds Shuttir-Nakhkhunte as king of the Elamite Empire. ... (7th century BC - 6th century BC - 5th century BC - other centuries) (600s BC - 590s BC - 580s BC - 570s BC - 560s BC - 550s BC - 540s BC - 530s BC - 520s BC - 510s BC - 500s BC - other decades) (2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC - 1st millennium AD) Events Cyrus the Great conquered many... Ancient Rome was a civilization that grew from a small agricultural community founded on the Italian Peninsula circa the 9th century BC to a massive empire straddling the Mediterranean Sea. ... Magna Graecia around 280 b. ... For other uses, see Carthage (disambiguation). ... Gaul (Latin: ) was the name given, in ancient times, to the region of Western Europe comprising present-day northern Italy, France, Belgium, western Switzerland and the parts of the Netherlands and Germany on the west bank of the Rhine river. ... Ancient Greece is the term used to describe the Greek_speaking world in ancient times. ...


Romans

Soon after absorbing Etruria, Rome established the cities of Lucca, Pisa, Siena, and Florence, endowed the area with new technologies and development, and ensured peace.[2] These developments included extensions of existing roads, introduction of aqueducts and sewers, and the construction of many buildings, both public and private.[2] The Roman civilization in the West finally collapsed in the fifth century and the region was left by the Goths, and others. In the sixth century, the Longobards arrived and designated Lucca the capital of their Duchy of Tuscia.[2] For the Chrono Trigger character, see Lucca (Chrono Trigger). ... For other uses, see Pisa (disambiguation). ... For the Catholic Liberal Arts College in New York, see Siena College. ... Florence (or Firenze, Florentia and Fiorenza) is the capital city of the Italian region of Tuscany, and of the province of Florence. ... This article is about the Germanic tribes. ... The Lombards (Latin Langobardi, from which the alternative name Longobards found in older English texts), were a Germanic people originally from Scandinavia that entered the late Roman Empire. ... For the Chrono Trigger character, see Lucca (Chrono Trigger). ...


The medieval period

See also: March of Tuscany

With pilgrims travelling along the Via Francigena between Rome and France came wealth and development during the mediæval period.[2] The food and shelter needed by these travellers fuelled the growth of new communities around churches and taverns.[2] The conflict between the Guelphs and Ghibellines, factions supporting, respectively, the Papacy and the Holy Roman Empire in central and northern Italy during the 12th and 13th centuries, split the Tuscan people.[2] These two factors gave rise to several powerful and rich communes in Tuscany: Arezzo, Florence, Lucca, Pisa, and Siena.[2] The balance between these communes were ensured by the assets they held; Pisa, a port; Siena, banking; and Lucca, banking and silk.[5] By the renaissance, however, Florence succeeded in becoming the cultural capital of Tuscany.[5] The March of Tuscany or Tuscia was a frontier march in central Italy, bordering the Papal States to the south and east, the Ligurian Sea to the west, and the rest of the Kingdom of Italy to the north. ... Monument to pilgrims in Burgos, Spain This article is on religious pilgrims. ... Route of the Via Francigena The Via Francigena is an ancient road to Rome for those coming from France. ... For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). ... An early medieval Frankish king depicted with the Pope, from the Sacramentary of Charles the Bald (about 870). ... The Guelphs and Ghibellines were factions supporting, respectively, the Papacy and the Holy Roman Empire in central and northern Italy during the 12th and 13th centuries. ... The Pope is the Catholic Bishop and patriarch of Rome, and head of the Roman Catholic Church and the Eastern Catholic Churches. ... This article is about the medieval empire. ... Defensive towers at San Gimignano, Tuscany, bear witness to the factional strife within communes. ... Arezzo (Latin Arretium) is an old city in central Italy, capital of the province of the same name, located in Tuscany. ... Florence (or Firenze, Florentia and Fiorenza) is the capital city of the Italian region of Tuscany, and of the province of Florence. ... For the Chrono Trigger character, see Lucca (Chrono Trigger). ... For other uses, see Pisa (disambiguation). ... For the Catholic Liberal Arts College in New York, see Siena College. ... This article is about the European Renaissance of the 14th-17th centuries. ...


The Renaissance

See also: Italian Renaissance

Tuscany is considered the birthplace of the Renaissance movement, and its artistic heritage includes architecture, painting and sculpture, collected in dozens of museums in towns and cities across the region. Perhaps the best-known are the Uffizi, the Accademia and the Bargello in Florence. Tuscany was the birthplace of Dante Alighieri ("the father of the Italian language"), Leonardo da Vinci, Michelangelo and Botticelli. The Italian Renaissance began the opening phase of the Renaissance, a period of great cultural change and achievement in Europe that spanned the period from the end of the 14th century to about 1600, marking the transition between Medieval and Early Modern Europe. ... This article is about building architecture. ... For other uses , see Painting (disambiguation). ... Sculptor redirects here. ... For other uses, see Museum (disambiguation). ... The narrow courtyard between the Uffizis two wings creates the effect of a short, idealized street. ... The Accademia di Belle Arti is Venice’s school of art and is uniformly known throughout Venice as the Accademia. ... the Bargello For the type of embroidery, please visit Bargello (needlework) The Bargello palace was built in 1255 to house first the Capitano del Populo and later, in 1261, the Podestà, the highest magistrate of the Florence City Council, Italy. ... Florence (Italian, Firenze) is a city in the center of Tuscany, in central Italy, on the Arno River, with a population of around 400,000, plus a suburban population in excess of 200,000. ... Dante redirects here. ... Italian ( , or lingua italiana) is a Romance language spoken by about 63 million people,[4] primarily in Italy. ... “Da Vinci” redirects here. ... For other uses, see Michelangelo (disambiguation). ... Alessandro di Mariano Filipepi, better known as Sandro Botticelli (Florence March 1, 1445 - May 17, 1510) was an Italian painter of the Florentine school during the Early Renaissance (Quattrocento). ...


Modern Era

In the 1400s, the rulers of Florence, the Medicis, annexed surrounding lands to create modern-day Tuscany. The War of Polish Succession in the 1730s, however, ended in the transfer of Tuscany from the Medicis to Francis, the Hapsburg Duke of Lorraine, who would become Holy Roman Emperor. With the dissolution of the Holy Roman Empire by Napoleon, Tuscany was inherited by the successor to the Holy Roman Empire, namely, the Austrian Empire. With the Italian Wars of Independence in the 1850s, Tuscany was transferred from Austria to the newly unified nation of Italy. The War of the Polish Succession (1733-1738) was a European war and a Polish civil war, with considerable interference from other countries, to determine the succession to Augustus II, King of Poland, as well as an attempt by the Bourbon powers to check the power of Austria in western... Habsburg (sometimes spelled Hapsburg, but never so in official use) was one of the major ruling houses of Europe. ... The Duchy of Lorraine was an independent state for most of the period of time between 843 to 1739. ... Coats of arms of Maximilian II, Holy Roman Emperor from 1564 to 1576. ... This article is about the medieval empire. ...


Economy

Tuscany is known for its wines (most famous of which are Chianti, Brunello di Montalcino, and Vino Nobile di Montepulciano), and has 120 protected nature reserves. Other agricultural products include Chianina cattle (origin of the famous "Fiorentina" steak) and the production of olive oil, principally in Lucca and the surrounding hills. The industry comprises factories producing Piaggio cars, motorcycles, scooters and aeroplanes, the texile industrial district of Prato, the petrochemical plants of Leghorn and the steel factories of Piombino. For other uses, see Wine (disambiguation). ... Valdelsa (part of Chianti Colli Fiorentini sub-area). ... Brunello di Montalcino is a red wine, produced in the vineyards surrounding the town of Montalcino in Italy. ... Vino Noble di Montepulciano is a red wine produced in the vineyards surrounding the town of Montepulciano, Italy. ... It has been suggested that Reserve design be merged into this article or section. ... Chianina is an Italian beef breed of cattle. ... For the Chrono Trigger character, see Lucca (Chrono Trigger). ... Piaggio is a company based in Italy that produces cars, motorcycles, scooters and aeroplanes. ... Livorno, sometimes in English Leghorn, (population 170,000) is a port city on the Ligurian Sea on the western edge of Tuscany, Italy. ...


Tourism is the economic backbone of the so-called "Cities of Art" (Florence, Lucca, Pisa, Siena, San Gimignano), as well as on the coast and in the isles (Elba). Marble is quarried in the Alpi Apuane (Carrara, Versilia and Massa), in Garfagnana and in Lunigiana. Florence (or Firenze, Florentia and Fiorenza) is the capital city of the Italian region of Tuscany, and of the province of Florence. ... For the Chrono Trigger character, see Lucca (Chrono Trigger). ... For other uses, see Pisa (disambiguation). ... For the Catholic Liberal Arts College in New York, see Siena College. ... San Gimignano is a small walled medieval hilltop town in Tuscany, Italy, about a 35-minute drive northwest of Siena or southwest of Florence. ... Elba (bottom centre) from space, February 1994. ... -1... Carrara is a city in the Massa Carrara province of Tuscany, Italy, famous for the white or blue-gray marble quarried there. ... Versilia is a the name of part of the coast of Tuscany in the province of Lucca. ... Country Italy Region Tuscany Province Massa-Carrara (MS) Mayor Fabrizio Neri (since May 2003) Elevation 65 m Area 94 km² Population  - Total 66,097  - Density 703/km² Time zone CET, UTC+1 Coordinates Gentilic Massesi Dialing code 0585 Postal code 54100 Patron St. ... Garfagnana is an historical region of Italy, today part of the province of Lucca in the Apennines, in northwest Tuscany, but before the unification of Italy it belonged to the Duchy of Modena and Reggio, ruled by the Este family. ... Lunigiana is an historical territory of Italy, which today falls within the provinces of La Spezia and Massa Carrara. ...


Politics

Tuscany is a stronghold of the center-left coalition The Union, forming with Emilia-Romagna, Umbria and Marche the famous Italian political "Red Quadrilateral". At the April 2006 elections, Tuscany gave more than 61% of its votes to Romano Prodi. The Union (Italian: LUnione) is an Italian centre-left political party coalition. ... Emilia-Romagna is one of the 20 Regions of Italy. ... Umbria is a region of central Italy, bordered by Tuscany to the west, the Marche to the east and Lazio to the south. ... // The Marche (plural, originally le marche de Ancona = the Marches of Ancona) are a region of Central Italy, bordering Emilia-Romagna north, Tuscany to the north-west, Umbria to west, Abruzzo and Latium to the south and the Adriatic Sea to the east. ... A general election for the renewal of the two Chambers of the Parliament of Italy was held on April 9 and April 10, 2006. ... Prodi redirects here. ...


Demographics

In the '80s and '90s the region attracted an intense influx of immigrants, in particular from China and Northern Africa. There is also a significant community of British and Americans. As of 2006, the Italian national institute of statistics ISTAT estimated that 215,490 foreign-born immigrants live in Tuscany, equal to 5.9% of the total regional population.


Towns of Tuscany with a population of 50,000 or more:

Comune Population (2006 est.)
Florence 366,901
Prato 183,823
Livorno 160,534
Arezzo 95,229
Pisa 87,737
Pistoia 85,947
Lucca 84,422
Grosseto 76,330
Massa 69,399
Carrara 65,125
Viareggio 63,389
Siena 54,147
Scandicci 50,003

Florence (or Firenze, Florentia and Fiorenza) is the capital city of the Italian region of Tuscany, and of the province of Florence. ... Prato is a city in Tuscany, Italy, the capital of the Province of Prato. ... Livorno (archaic English: ) is a port city on the Tyrrhenian Sea on the western edge of Tuscany, Italy. ... Arezzo (Latin Arretium) is an old city in central Italy, capital of the province of the same name, located in Tuscany. ... For other uses, see Pisa (disambiguation). ... Pistoia (ancient Pistoria) is a city in the Tuscany region of Italy, the capital of a province of the same name, located about 30 km (18 mi) west and north of Florence. ... For the Chrono Trigger character, see Lucca (Chrono Trigger). ... Grosseto is a town and comune in the central Italian region of Tuscany, the capital of the Province of Grosseto. ... Country Italy Region Tuscany Province Massa-Carrara (MS) Mayor Fabrizio Neri (since May 2003) Elevation 65 m Area 94 km² Population  - Total 66,097  - Density 703/km² Time zone CET, UTC+1 Coordinates Gentilic Massesi Dialing code 0585 Postal code 54100 Patron St. ... Carrara is a city in the Massa Carrara province of Tuscany, Italy, famous for the white or blue-gray marble quarried there. ... Viareggio is a town in the province of Lucca, situated on the coast of the Tyrrhenian Sea in the north of Tuscany, Italy. ... For the Catholic Liberal Arts College in New York, see Siena College. ... Scandicci is a comune (municipality) of c. ...

See also

The Tuscan dialect is a dialect spoken in Tuscany, Italy. ...

Citations

  1. ^ a b c d e Barker 2000, p. 5
  2. ^ a b c d e f g h i j Jones 2005, p. 2
  3. ^ a b Barker 2000, p. 1
  4. ^ Barker 2000, p. 4
  5. ^ a b Jones 2005, p. 3

References

  • Barker, Graeme & Tom Rasmussen (2000), written at Malden, MA, The Etruscans, Blackwell, ISBN 0-631-22038-0, <http://books.google.com/books?vid=ISBN0631220380&id=00WT_S6r9OkC>
  • Jones, Emma (2005), written at Edison, NJ, Adventure Guide Tuscany & Umbria, Hunter, ISBN 1-58843-399-4, <http://books.google.com/books?vid=ISBN1588433994&id=8tKUyygkvjsC>

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Coordinates: 43°24′36″N, 11°00′00″E The Regions of Italy were granted a degree of regional autonomy in the 1948 constitution, which states that the constitutions role is: to recognize, protect and promote local autonomy, to ensure that services at the State level are as decentralized as possible, and to adapt the principles and laws... “Abruzzi” redirects here. ... The Aosta Valley (Italian: Valle dAosta, French: Vallée dAoste, Arpitan: Val dOuta) is a mountainous Region in north-western Italy. ... This article is bad because of the Italian region. ... Basilicata is a region in the south of Italy, bordering on Campania to the west, Puglia (Apulia) to the east, Calabria to the south, it has one short coastline on the Tyrrhenian Sea and another of the Gulf of Taranto in the Ionian Sea to the south-east. ... For other uses, see Calabria (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Campania (disambiguation). ... Emilia-Romagna is one of the 20 Regions of Italy. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... For the football club, see S.S. Lazio Lazio (Latium in Latin) is a regione of central Italy, bordered by Tuscany, Umbria, Abruzzi, Marche, Molise, Campania and the Tyrrhenian Sea. ... Liguria is a coastal region of north-western Italy, the third smallest of the Italian regions. ... For the village of the same name in Ontario, Canada, see Lombardy, Ontario. ... // The Marche (plural, originally le marche de Ancona = the Marches of Ancona) are a region of Central Italy, bordering Emilia-Romagna north, Tuscany to the north-west, Umbria to west, Abruzzo and Latium to the south and the Adriatic Sea to the east. ... Molise is a region of Southern Italy, the second smallest of the regions. ... For other uses, see Piedmont (disambiguation). ... Sardinia (pronounced ; Italian: ; Sardinian: or ) is the second-largest island in the Mediterranean Sea (after Sicily). ... Sicily ( in Italian and Sicilian) is an autonomous region of Italy and the largest island in the Mediterranean Sea, with an area of 25,708 km² (9,926 sq. ... Trentino-Alto Adige/Südtirol[1] (Italian: Trentino-Alto Adige; German: Trentino-Südtirol; Ladin: Trentin-Adesc Aut, also Trentin-Sudtirol [2][3]) is an autonomous region in Northern Italy. ... Umbria is a region of central Italy, bordered by Tuscany to the west, the Marche to the east and Lazio to the south. ... Veneto is my fatherland. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


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Tuscany travel guide - Wikitravel (857 words)
Tuscany (Italian: Toscana) [1] is a region on Italy's west coast, on the Tyrrhenian sea.
Tuscany has two very diverse faces - the art cities such as Florence, Siena, Lucca and Pisa on one hand, and the countryside on the other.
Tuscany offers some of the most beautiful colonic houses, with all the modern services, recently restructured with great care preserving the original architecture and the materials.
Tuscany - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (308 words)
Tuscany (Italian Toscana) is a region in central Italy, bordering on Latium to the south, Umbria and Marche to the east, Emilia-Romagna and Liguria to the north, and the Tyrrhenian Sea to the west.
Tuscany was essentially the birthplace of the Italian Renaissance, and its artistic heritage includes architecture, painting and sculpture, collected in dozens of museums, the best-known of which is the Uffizi in Florence and in situ in even quite small cities.
Tuscany is known for its wines (most famous of which are Chianti, Morellino di Scansano and Brunello di Montalcino) and has 120 protected regions (nature reserves).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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