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Encyclopedia > Turner Prize
Tate Britain: the venue for the Turner Prize.
Tate Britain: the venue for the Turner Prize.

The Turner Prize, named after the painter J.M.W. Turner, is an annual prize presented to a British visual artist under 50. It is organized by the Tate Gallery, and since its beginnings in 1984 it has become the United Kingdom's most publicised art award. It has become associated with conceptual art, although it represents all media and painters have also won the prize. Download high resolution version (750x601, 99 KB) Tate Britain, London. ... Download high resolution version (750x601, 99 KB) Tate Britain, London. ... J. M. W. Turner, English landscape painter The fighting Temeraire tugged to her last berth to be broken up, painted 1839. ... The definition of an artist is wide-ranging and covers a broad spectrum of activities to do with creating art, practicing the arts and/or demonstrating an art. ... The Tate Gallery in the United Kingdom is a network of four galleries: Tate Britain (opened 1897), Tate Liverpool (1988), Tate St Ives (1993), Tate Modern (2000), with a complementary website Tate Online (1998). ... This article is about the year. ... This article is about the philosophical concept of Art. ... Joseph Kosuth, One and Three Chairs (1965) Conceptual art is art in which the concept(s) or idea(s) involved in the work take precedence over traditional aesthetic and material concerns. ...


The prize fund from 2004 onwards was £40,000. There have been different sponsors, including Channel 4 television and Gordon's gin. The prize is awarded by a distinguished celebrity: in 2006 this was Yoko Ono. This article is about the British television station. ... Gordons is a popular brand of gin produced in the United Kingdom and under license in New Zealand and several other former British territories. ... Yoko Ono Lennon (小野 洋子 Ono Yōko), born February 18, 1933) is a Japanese-American artist and musician. ...


It is a controversial event, mainly for its exhibits, such as a shark in formaldehyde by Damien Hirst and a dishevelled bed by Tracey Emin. Controversy has also ensued from other directions, including a Culture Minister (Kim Howells criticising exhibits), a guest of honour (Madonna swearing), a prize judge (Lynn Barber writing in the press) and a speech by Sir Nicholas Serota (about the purchase of a trustee's work). The Physical Impossibility of Death in the Mind of Someone Living by Damien Hirst (1991) Damien Hirst (born June 7, 1965) is an English artist and the most prominent of the group that has been dubbed Young British Artists (or YBAs). ... Tracey Emin RA (born 3 July 1963) is an English artist of Turkish Cypriot origin, one of the group known as Britartists or YBAs (Young British Artists). ... Kim Scott Howells (born November 27, 1946 in Merthyr Tydfil) is a Labour politician in Wales, and member of Parliament for Pontypridd. ... This article is about the American entertainer. ... Lynn Barber is a British journalist, currently writing for The Observer. ... Nicholas Serota Sir Nicholas Serota (born 1946) is a curator, and is currently Director of the Tate Gallery, the United Kingdoms national gallery of modern and British art. ... The Upper Room by Chris Ofili The Upper Room is an installation of 13 paintings of rhesus macaque monkeys by English artist Chris Ofili in a specially-designed room. ...


The event has also regularly attracted demonstrations, notably the K Foundation and then the Stuckists, as well as alternative prizes to assert different artistic values. The K Foundation was an arts foundation set up by Bill Drummond and Jimmy Cauty in 1993 following their retirement from the music industry. ... Stuckist artists dressed as clowns demonstrate against the Turner Prize, Tate Britain, in 2000 Stuckist demonstrations since 2000 have been a key part of the Stuckist art groups activities and have succeeded in giving them a high profile both in Britain and abroad. ...

Contents

Introduction

Each year after the announcement of the four nominees and during the build-up to the announcement of the winner, the Prize receives intense attention from the media. Much of this attention is critical and the question is often asked, "is this art?".[1][2] The artists usually work in "innovative" media, including video art, installation art and unconventional sculpture, though painters have also won. Video art is a type of art which relies on moving pictures and is comprised of video and/or audio data. ... Installation art uses sculptural materials and other media to modify the way we experience a particular space. ... Sculptor redirects here. ... Painting by Rembrandt self-portrait Detail from Las Meninas by Diego Velazquez, in which the painter portrayed himself at work For the computer graphics program, see Corel Painter. ...


Artists are chosen for a show they have staged in the preceding year. Nominations for the prize are invited from the public, although this was widely considered to have negligible effect — a suspicion confirmed in 2006 by Lynn Barber, one of the judges.[3] Typically, there is a three-week period in May for public nominations to be received; the short-list (which since 1991 has been of four artists) is announced in July; a show of the nominees' work opens at Tate Britain in late October; and the prize itself is announced at the beginning of December. The show stays open till January. The prize is officially not judged on the show at the Tate, however, but on the earlier show for which the artist was nominated. Lynn Barber is a British journalist, currently writing for The Observer. ... Tate Britain is a part of the Tate gallery network in Britain, along with Tate Modern, Tate Liverpool and Tate St Ives. ...


The exhibition and prize rely on commercial sponsorship. From 1987 this was provided by the company Drexel Burnham Lambert; their withdrawal led to the 1990 prize being cancelled. Channel 4, an independent television channel, stepped in for 1991, doubled the prize money to £20,000, and supported the event with documentaries and live broadcasts of the prize-giving. In 2004 they were replaced as sponsors by Gordon's gin, who also doubled the prize money to £40,000, with £5,000 going to each of the shortlisted artists, and £25,000 to the winner. Sponsorship can refer to several concepts: A sponsors support of an event, activity, person, or organization. ... This article is about the British television station. ... Gordons is a popular brand of gin produced in the United Kingdom and under license in New Zealand and several other former British territories. ...


As much as the shortlist of artists reflects the state of British Art, the composition of the panel of judges, which includes curators and critics, provides some indication of who holds influence institutionally and internationally, as well as rising stars. Tate Director Sir Nicholas Serota has been the Chair of the jury since his tenure at the Tate (with the exception of the current year when Chairman is the Director of Tate Livepool, where the prize is being staged). There are conflicting reports as to how much personal sway he has over the proceedings. Nicholas Serota Sir Nicholas Serota (born 1946) is a curator, and is currently Director of the Tate Gallery, the United Kingdoms national gallery of modern and British art. ...


The media success of the Turner Prize contributed to the success of (and was in turn helped by) the late 1990s phenomena of Young British Artists (several of whom were nominees and winners), Cool Britannia, and exhibitions such as the Charles Saatchi-sponsored Sensation exhibition. For the band, see 1990s (band). ... The Physical Impossibility of Death in the Mind of Someone Living by Damien Hirst (1991). ... Cool Britannia is a media term that was used in the late 1990s to describe the contemporary culture of the United Kingdom. ... Charles Saatchi Charles Saatchi (born June 9, 1943) was the co-founder with his brother Maurice of the global advertising agency Saatchi & Saatchi, which became the worlds biggest before the brothers were forced out of their own company in 1995. ... Sensation was a notorious exhibition of Young British Artists which took place in 1997 (18 September-28 December) at the Royal Academy of Art in London and later toured to Berlin and New York. ...


Most of the artists in the prize become known to the general public for the first time and some have talked of the difficulty of sudden media exposure. Sale prices of the winners have generally increased [4]. Chris Ofili, Anish Kapoor and Jeremy Deller later became trustees of the Tate. Some artists, notably Sarah Lucas, have declined the invitation to be nominated. Sarah Lucas (born Holloway, London, 1962) is a contemporary British artist. ...


The criteria of the Turner Prize have been challenged by alternative prizes, firstly in 1993 by the K Foundation's "Anti-Turner Prize", followed by the satirical Turnip Prize, the Stuckists "Real Turner Prize", the Daily Mail's "Not the Turner Prize" and a BBC "Mock Turner".[5] The K Foundation was an arts foundation set up by Bill Drummond and Jimmy Cauty in 1993 following their retirement from the music industry. ... The 1994 K Foundation award was an award given by the K Foundation to the worst artist of the year. ... The Turnip Prize is a spoof UK prize that satirises the Tate Gallerys Turner Prize by exhibiting deliberately badly made art created with minimal effort. ... The logo on the Stuckism International web site Stuckism is an art movement that was founded in 1999 in Britain by Billy Childish and Charles Thomson to promote figurative painting in opposition to conceptual art. ... The Daily Mail is a British newspaper and the oldest tabloid, first published in 1896. ...


Winners and shortlisted artists

Main article: List of Turner Prize winners and nominees

Tate Britain: the venue for the Turner Prize. ...

History

1985

Howard Hodgkin was the winner. Sir Gordon Howard Eliot Hodgkin (born August 6, 1932) is a British painter and printmaker. ...


1986

Gilbert and George were the winners. Gilbert Prousch (or Proesch) (born in San Martin (San Martino), Italy, September 11, 1943) and George Passmore (born in Devon, England January 8, 1942), better known as Gilbert & George, are artists. ...


1987

Richard Deacon was the winner. Richard Deacon (born August 15, 1949) is a British sculptor. ...


1988

Tony Cragg was the winner - he had been previously shortlisted in 1985. Ferryman. ...


1989

Richard Long was the winner, after previously being shortlisted in 1984, 1987 and 1988. [6] Detail of Riverlines installed in the lobby of the Hearst Tower (New York City) Richard Long (born June 2, 1945) is an English sculptor, photographer and painter, one of the best known British land artists. ...


1990

There was no prize that year because of lack of sponsorship.


1997

The winner, Gillian Wearing, showed a video 60 minutes of Silence (1996), where a group of actors were dressed in police uniforms and had to stand still for an hour (occasional surreptitious scratching could be observed). Gillian Wearing (born 1963) is an English artist. ...


1998

The talking point was winner Chris Ofili's use of balls of elephant dung attached to his mixed media images on canvas, as well as being used as supports on the floor to prop them up. Chris Ofili (born 1968) is an English born painter noted for artworks referencing aspects of his Nigerian heritage. ...


1999

Greatest attention was given to Tracey Emin's exhibit My Bed, which was literally her double bed in a dishevelled state with stained sheets, surrounded detritus such as soiled underwear, condoms, slippers and empty drink bottles. She also displayed 2-d artwork and videos. She was commonly thought to have been the winner (and is still sometimes referred to as such), although in fact the Prize was given to Steve McQueen. Tracey Emin RA (born 3 July 1963) is an English artist of Turkish Cypriot origin, one of the group known as Britartists or YBAs (Young British Artists). ... My Bed is a work by the British artist Tracey Emin. ... Steve McQueen (born 1969) is an English artist. ...


2000

The prize was won by Wolfgang Tillmans. It was discovered that a large painting by Glenn Brown was based very closely on a science fiction illustration of some years previously.[7] Wolfgang Tillmans (born 1968) is a photographer. ... Glenn Brown is a British artist and painter who was nominated for the Turner Prize in 2000. ... Science fiction is a form of speculative fiction principally dealing with the impact of imagined science and technology, or both, upon society and persons as individuals. ...


2001

Controversy (including an egg-throwing protester) was caused by the eventual winner, Martin Creed's work, which was an empty room with the lights going on and off, but this was upstaged at the ceremony, when Madonna gave him the prize and said, "At a time when political correctness is valued over honesty I would also like to say right on motherfuckers!"[8] This was on live TV before the 9 p.m. "watershed", and an attempt to "bleep" it out was too late. Channel 4 were subsequently given an official rebuke by the Independent Television Commission.[9] Martin Creed (born 1968) is a British artist noted for his works which hark back to the conceptual art of the 1960s and 1970s. ... This article is about the American entertainer. ... This article is about the British television station. ...


2002

The media focused on a large display by Fiona Banner whose wall-size text piece, Arsewoman in Wonderland, described a pornographic film in detail. The Guardian asked, "It's art. But is it porn?" calling in "Britain's biggest porn star," Ben Dover, to comment.[10] Fiona Banner (born 1966) is an English artist, who was shortlisted for the Turner Prize in 2002, and is seen as one of the Young British Artists (YBAs). ... Porn redirects here. ... For other uses, see Guardian. ... Ben Dover (born Simon Lindsay Honey, also known as Steve Perry) is an English pornographic actor and director/producer of pornographic movies. ...


Culture Minister Kim Howells made a scathing criticism of the exhibits. Kim Scott Howells (born November 27, 1946 in Merthyr Tydfil) is a Labour politician in Wales, and member of Parliament for Pontypridd. ...


2003

The Chapman Brothers (Jake and Dinos Chapman) were given what was generally felt to be a long-overdue nomination, and caused press attention for a sculpture that appeared to be two cheap plastic blow-up sex dolls with a dildo. It was in fact made of bronze, painted to look like plastic. Attention was also given to transvestite Grayson Perry who exhibited pots decorated with sexual imagery. He wore a flouncy skirt to collect the prize, announced by Sir Peter Blake. Jake Chapman (born 1966) and Dinos Chapman (born 1962) are brothers and British artists who work almost exclusively in collaboration with each other. ... A male dressed as a female. ... Grayson Perry (born 24 March 1960), is an award-winning English artist, best known for his ceramics and cross-dressing. ... Blakes album cover Sir Peter Thomas Blake (born June 25, 1932, in Dartford, Kent) is an English pop artist, best known for his design of the sleeve for The Beatles album Sgt. ...


2004

The media focused on a large computer simulation of a former hideout of Osama bin Laden by Ben Langlands and Nikki Bell, as well as the fact that one of their exhibits, a film in a Kabul courtroom was withdrawn as it related to an ongoing trial of a suspected Afghan warlord.[4] Jeremy Deller, the betting favourite, won. The prize money was increased this year with £25,000 to the winner, and, for the first time, other nominees were rewarded (with £5,000 each). Osama bin Muhammad bin Awad bin Laden (Arabic: ‎; born March 10, 1957[1]), most often mentioned as Osama bin Laden or Usama bin Laden, is a Saudi Arabian militant Islamist and is widely believed to be one of the founders of the organization called al-Qaeda. ... Ben Langlands (born 1955) and Nikki Bell (born 1959) are British artists working together as Langlands and Bell. ... For other places with the same name, see Kabul (disambiguation). ... Jeremy Deller (born 1966) is an English conceptual, video and installation artist. ...


2005

A great deal was made in the press about the winning entry by Simon Starling, which was a shed that he had converted into a boat, sailed down the River Rhine and turned back into a shed again. Two newspapers bought sheds and floated them to parody the work. The prize was presented by Culture Minister, David Lammy. Before introducing him, Sir Nicholas Serota, in an "unusual, possibly unprecedented" move, took the opportunity to make "an angry defence" of the Tate's purchase of The Upper Room.[11][12] Simon Starling (born 1967 in Epsom, Surrey) is an English conceptual artist and was the winner of the 2005 Turner Prize. ... The Rhine canyon (Ruinaulta) in Graubünden in Switzerland Length 1. ... David Lindon Lammy (born July 19, 1972) is a British politician who has been tipped as Britains first Black Prime Minister Lammy was born in Tottenham, a working-class area of North London, and brought up by his mother after his father left the family. ... The Upper Room by Chris Ofili The Upper Room is an installation of 13 paintings of rhesus macaque monkeys by English artist Chris Ofili in a specially-designed room. ...


2006

The nominees were announced on May 16, 2006. The exhibition of nominees' work opened at Tate Britain on October 3. Yoko Ono, the celebrity announcer chosen for the year, declared Tomma Abts the winner on December 4 during a live Channel 4 broadcast, although this was part of the evening news broadcast, rather than in a dedicated programme as in recent years. The total prize money was £40,000. £25,000 awarded to the winner and £5,000 to each of the other 3 nominees. The prize was sponsored by the makers of Gordon’s gin. is the 136th day of the year (137th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Tate Britain is a part of the Tate gallery network in Britain, along with Tate Modern, Tate Liverpool and Tate St Ives. ... Yoko Ono Lennon (小野 洋子 Ono Yōko), born February 18, 1933) is a Japanese-American artist and musician. ... Veeke by Tomma Abts (2005). ... This article is about the British television station. ...


Under the Freedom of Information Act, The Sunday Telegraph obtained emails between the Tate and judge Lynn Barber, which revealed that the judges had been sent a list of shows by artists too late to be able to see them and instead were being supplied with catalogues and photographs of work.[13] More controversy ensued when Barber wrote in The Observer about her troubles as a judge, even asking, "Is it all a fix?",[3] a comment subsequently displayed on a Stuckist demonstration placard, much to her chagrin.[14] Freedom of Information logo See Freedom of information in the United Kingdom for a general discussion of freedom of information legislation throughout the United Kingdom. ... This article deals with The Daily Telegraph in Britain, see The Daily Telegraph (Australia) for the Australian publication The Daily Telegraph is a British broadsheet newspaper founded in 1855. ... Lynn Barber is a British journalist, currently writing for The Observer. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ...


The Judges were:

Lynn Barber, journalist, The Observer
Margot Heller, Director, South London Gallery
Matthew Higgs, Director and Chief Curator, White Columns, New York
Andrew Renton, writer and Director of Curating, Goldsmiths College
Nicholas Serota, Director, Tate and Chairman of the Jury

Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... The South London Gallery is a contemporary art gallery in Peckham, south London. ... Matthew Higgs is a British artist, curator, writer and publisher, currently based in New York. ... Goldsmiths College (founded in 1891 by the Worshipful Company of Goldsmiths as Goldsmiths Technical and Recreative Institute) has been a part of the federal University of London since 1904, when it took its current name. ... Nicholas Serota Sir Nicholas Serota (born 1946) is a curator, and is currently Director of the Tate Gallery, the United Kingdoms national gallery of modern and British art. ...

2007

The winner of the £25,000 Prize was Mark Wallinger.[15] The exhibition for which Wallinger was nominated was one organised by Tate Britain. Mark Wallinger (born 1959) is a British artist, best known for his sculpture for the empty fourth plinth in Trafalgar Square, Ecce Homo (1999), and State Britain (2007) a recreation at Tate Britain of Brian Haws protest display outside parliament. ...


For the first time the Turner Prize is held outside of London, in Tate Liverpool (in support of Liverpool's being the European Capital of Culture in 2008). Concurrently there is an exhibition of previous winners at Tate Britain in London. The Tate Liverpool is located in Albert Dock, Liverpool. ... For other uses, see Liverpool (disambiguation). ... The European Capital of Culture is a city designated by the European Union for a period of one year during which it is given a chance to showcase its cultural life and cultural development. ...


Unlike recent years, Sir Nicholas Serota is not the jury chairman; instead, the chairman is Christoph Grunenberg, the Director of Tate Liverpool. The panel is:[16] Nicholas Serota Sir Nicholas Serota (born 1946) is a curator, and is currently Director of the Tate Gallery, the United Kingdoms national gallery of modern and British art. ...

Fiona Bradley, Director of the Fruitmarket Gallery, Edinburgh
Michael Bracewell, critic and writer
Thelma Golden, Director and Chief Curator of the Studio Museum, Harlem
Miranda Sawyer, writer and broadcaster
Christoph Grunenberg, Director of Tate Liverpool (Chairman of the Jury)

The nominees were:[17] The Fruitmarket Gallery in Edinburgh [1] brings artists and audiences together through exhibitions, commissions, interpretation, education and publishing. ... Michael Bracewell (b. ... The Studio Museum in Harlem is an American fine arts museum in the Harlem neighborhood of New York City, New York. ... Miranda Sawyer is an English journalist and broadcaster. ...

Mark Wallinger for his Tate Britain installation, State Britain
Nathan Coley, a Glasgow artist, who makes installations based on buildings
Zarina Bhimji, a Ugandan Asian photographer and filmmaker
Mike Nelson, an installation artist

Nelson and Wallinger have both previously been nominated for the prize. Mark Wallinger (born 1959) is a British artist, best known for his sculpture for the empty fourth plinth in Trafalgar Square, Ecce Homo (1999), and State Britain (2007) a recreation at Tate Britain of Brian Haws protest display outside parliament. ... Tate Britain is a part of the Tate gallery network in Britain, along with Tate Modern, Tate Liverpool and Tate St Ives. ... State Britain is an installation artwork by Mark Wallinger displayed in Tate Britain in January 2007. ... Nathan Coley (born 1967) is a contemporary British installation artist, who was nominated for the Turner Prize in 2007. ... Your Sadness is Drunk by Zarina Bhimji Zarina Bhimji is a Ugandan Asian photographer and film maker, who was nominated for the Turner Prize in 2007. ... Mike Nelson is a contemporary British artist who was nominated for the Turner Prize in 2001 for an installation which replicted a storeroom. ...


The Stuckists announced that they were not demonstrating for the first time since 2000, because of "the lameness of this year's show, which does not merit the accolade of the traditional demo". [18]


Criticism

For

  • Critic Richard Cork said, "there will never be a substitute for approaching new art with an open mind, unencumbered by rancid clichés. As long as the Turner Prize facilitates such engagement, the buzz surrounding it will remain a minor distraction."[19]
  • In 2006 newspaper columnist Janet Street-Porter condemned the Stuckists' "feeble knee-jerk reaction" to the prize and said, "The Turner Prize and Becks Futures both entice thousands of young people into art galleries for the first time every year. They fulfil a valuable role".[20]

Dr Richard Cork is a British art historian, critic, broadcaster and exhibition curator. ... Janet Street-Porter née Bull[1] (born 27 December 1946) is a BAFTA award-winning British editor, journalist, media personality, television presenter and producer. ... The logo on the Stuckism International web site Stuckism is an art movement that was founded in 1999 in Britain by Billy Childish and Charles Thomson to promote figurative painting in opposition to conceptual art. ...

Against

  • The Evening Standard critic Brian Sewell, wrote "The annual farce of the Turner Prize is now as inevitable in November as is the pantomime at Christmas".
  • Critic Jonathan Jones, wrote:"Turner Prize art is based on a formula where something looks startling at first and then turns out to be expressing some kind of banal idea, which somebody will be sure to tell you about. The ideas are never important or even really ideas, more notions, like the notions in advertising. Nobody pursues them anyway, because there's nothing there to pursue." [21]
  • In 2002 Culture Minister Kim Howells pinned the following statement to a board in a room specially-designated for visitors' comments. "If this is the best British artists can produce then British art is lost. It is cold mechanical, conceptual bullshit. Kim Howells. P.S. The attempts at conceptualisation are particularly pathetic and symptomatic of a lack of conviction" His stance was approved by the government, who saw it as a popular one.

Headlines of the Evening Standard on the day of London bombing on July 7, 2005, in Waterloo Station The Evening Standard is a British tabloid newspaper published and sold in London and surrounding areas of southeast England. ... Brian Sewell (born 15 July 1931 in Kensington, London)[1] is an English art critic. ... David Lee was born in 1953. ... The Lisson Gallery is a contemporary art gallery in Bell Street, Lisson Grove, London, founded by Nicholas Logsdail in 1967. ... Charles Saatchi Charles Saatchi (born June 9, 1943) was the co-founder with his brother Maurice of the global advertising agency Saatchi & Saatchi, which became the worlds biggest before the brothers were forced out of their own company in 1995. ... Jay Jopling (born 1963) is a British contemporary art dealer and gallerist. ... Maureen Paley is one of the most prominent contemporary art galleries in London. ... The Victoria Miro Gallery is a contemporary art gallery in London, run by Victoria Miro. ... The Lisson Gallery is a contemporary art gallery in Bell Street, Lisson Grove, London, founded by Nicholas Logsdail in 1967. ... Kim Scott Howells (born November 27, 1946 in Merthyr Tydfil) is a Labour politician in Wales, and member of Parliament for Pontypridd. ...

Demonstrations

The Turner Prize has attracted a number of demonstrations, usually protesting against the type of art selected. The front steps or pavement outside the museum are a favourite spot, though some have occurred inside the prize itself.

  • Before one of the prize ceremonies, graffiti artist Banksy stencilled "Mind the crap" on the steps of the Tate, who called in emergency cleaners to remove it.[22]
  • In 1993, Jimmy Cauty and Bill Drummond of the K Foundation received media coverage for the award of the "Anti-Turner Prize", £40,000 to be given to the "worst artist in Britain", voted from the real Turner Prize's short-list. Rachel Whiteread, who won the real prize, also won the anti-Turner Prize. She refused to accept the money at first, but changed her mind when she heard the cash was to be burned instead, and gave £30,000 of it to artists in financial need and the other £10,000 to the housing charity, Shelter. The K Foundation went on to make a film in which they burned £1 million of their own money (Watch the K Foundation Burn a Million Quid).
  • In 1998 an illustrator deposited dung on the steps in protest against Chris Ofili's work, which included elephant dung.
  • In 1999 two artists, Yuan Chai and Jian Jun Xi , jumped onto Tracey Emin's work, My Bed, stripped to their underwear, and had a pillow fight. Police detained the two, who called their performance Two Naked Men Jump Into Tracey's Bed. They claimed that her work had not gone far enough, and that they were improving it. Charges were not pressed against them.
  • In 1999 a pro-painting group of artists known as the Stuckists was formed. They show particular antipathy towards the Turner Prize, describing it as an "ongoing national joke" and "a state-funded advertising agency for Charles Saatchi", adding "the only artist who wouldn't be in danger of winning the Turner Prize is Turner", and concluding that it "should be re-named The Duchamp Award for the destruction of artistic integrity". They have demonstrated outside the prize, sometimes dressed as clowns, every year since 2000, and gained considerable publicity, with their views regularly quoted in press reports.
  • In 2001 artist Jacqueline Crofton threw eggs at the walls of the empty room containing Martin Creed's work, The Lights Going On and Off .[22]

Banksy is a well-known pseudo-anonymous[1] English graffiti artist. ... James Cauty, Jimmy or Jimi, also known as Rockman Rock, was born in Devon, England in 1956 and not much is known about him until, as a 17-year old artist, he painted a popular Lord of the Rings poster (and later, a counterpart based on The Hobbit) for Athena. ... William Ernest Drummond[1] (Bill Drummond) (born April 29, 1953, Butterworth, South Africa)[2][3] is a Scottish musician, music industry figure, writer and artist. ... The K Foundation was an arts foundation set up by Bill Drummond and Jimmy Cauty in 1993 following their retirement from the music industry. ... The 1994 K Foundation award was an award given by the K Foundation to the worst artist of the year. ... Rachel Whiteread CBE (born 1963) is a British artist, best known for her sculptures, which typically take the form of casts, and first woman to win the Turner Prize. ... -1... Watch the K-Foundation Burn a Million Quid is a 16mm colour documentary film of the K Foundation burning a million pounds in cash. ... Chris Ofili (born 1968) is an English born painter noted for artworks referencing aspects of his Nigerian heritage. ... Yuan Chai and Jian Jun Xi are two Chinese performance artists, based in Britain, who work together and specialise in art intervention. ... Tracey Emin RA (born 3 July 1963) is an English artist of Turkish Cypriot origin, one of the group known as Britartists or YBAs (Young British Artists). ... For other uses , see Painting (disambiguation). ... The logo on the Stuckism International web site Stuckism is an art movement that was founded in 1999 in Britain by Billy Childish and Charles Thomson to promote figurative painting in opposition to conceptual art. ... Charles Saatchi Charles Saatchi (born June 9, 1943) was the co-founder with his brother Maurice of the global advertising agency Saatchi & Saatchi, which became the worlds biggest before the brothers were forced out of their own company in 1995. ... Marcel Duchamp (pronounced ) (July 28, 1887 – October 2, 1968) was a French artist (he became an American citizen in 1955) whose work and ideas had considerable influence on the development of post-World War II Western art, and whose advice to modern art collectors helped shape the tastes of the...

See also

This is a list of topics related to the United Kingdom. ... A list of famous prizes, medals and awards including cups, trophies, bowls, badges, state decorations etc. ... Stuckist artists dressed as clowns demonstrate against the Turner Prize, Tate Britain, in 2000 Stuckist demonstrations since 2000 have been a key part of the Stuckist art groups activities and have succeeded in giving them a high profile both in Britain and abroad. ... The Marcel Duchamp Prize (in french : Prix Marcel Duchamp) is an annual award given to a young artist. ... The Turnip Prize is a spoof UK prize that satirises the Tate Gallerys Turner Prize by exhibiting deliberately badly made art created with minimal effort. ...

Notes and references

  1. ^ "Head to Head: Turner Prize — Is It Art?" BBC, 2 December 1999Retrieved March 22, 2006
  2. ^ "Turner Prize: Is It Art? BBC, 4 November 2002 Retrieved March 22, 2006
  3. ^ a b Barber, Lynn (2006)"How I suffered for art's sake" The Observer, 1 October 2006. Accessed 15 January 2006
  4. ^ a b Kennedy, Maev (2004)"Turner prize shock: out of four serious competitors, the best artist wins" The Guardian, 7 December 2004. Accessed 15 January 2007
  5. ^ "Judge our Mock Turner final" BBC, 29 November 2005. Accessed 15 January 2007
  6. ^ http://news.independent.co.uk/uk/this_britain/article3019128.ece
  7. ^ Copycat row hits Turner Prize (2000-11-28). Retrieved on 2007-11-26.
  8. ^ Gibbons, Fiachra (2001)"Judges switched on as Turner Prize goes to the Creed of nothingness" The Guardian online, 10 December 2001. Accessed 8 January 2007
  9. ^ Innes, John (2002)"Madonna rebuked for Turner Prize outburst" The Scotsman online, 11 February 2002. Accessed 8 January 2007
  10. ^ Brockes, Emma "It's art. But is it porn?", The Guardian online, November 5, 2002. Retrieved May 21, 2007.
  11. ^ Notebook by Andrew Marr (2nd item), The Daily Telegraph, December 7, 2005 Retrieved March 24, 2006
  12. ^ "It's a shed, it's collapsible, it floats and (with help from a bike) it's the winner", The Guardian, December 6, 2005 Retrieved March 24, 2006
  13. ^ Hastings, Chris (2006)"Shows missed by judges, questions over artists… It must be the Turner Prize" The Sunday Telegraph online, April 30, 2006. Accessed May 20, 2006
  14. ^ Barber, Lynn (2006)"My Turner's over. Phew! The Observer, 10 December 2006. Accessed 16 January 2007
  15. ^ Higgins, Charlotte. "Bear man walks away with Turner Prize", The Guardian, 3 December 2007. Retrieved 3 December 2007.
  16. ^ "Turner Prize 07" tate.org. Accessed May 21, 2007
  17. ^ Reynolds, Nigel "Iraq protest camp shortlisted for Turner Prize" The Daily Telegraph online, May 10, 2007. Retrieved May 21, 2207
  18. ^ "Stuckists' Turner Prize Protest Apology", 3:AM Magazine, 2 December 2007. Retrieved 3 December 2007.
  19. ^ "The Turner Prize: Everyone's a winner" Tate Magazine (2002) on the Tate web site. Accessed [15 January]], 2007
  20. ^ Street-Porter, Janet (2006)"Paul is better off without Heather" The Independent online, May 18, 2006 (pay to view). Accessed May 20, 2006.
  21. ^ The Guardian
  22. ^ a b Youngs, Ian (2002)"The art of Turner protests", BBC www.bbc.co.uk, 31 October 2002. Accessed 8 January 2007

is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 81st day of the year (82nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 341st day of the year (342nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 333rd day of the year (334th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2000 (MM) was a leap year starting on Saturday (link will display full 2000 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 332nd day of the year (333rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 330th day of the year (331st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 42nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 309th day of the year (310th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 120th day of the year (121st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 140th day of the year (141st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 16th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... For other uses, see Guardian. ... is the 337th day of the year (338th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 337th day of the year (338th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 130th day of the year (131st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 141st day of the year (142nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The 23rd century (Gregorian Calendar) comprises the years 2201-2300. ... is the 336th day of the year (337th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 337th day of the year (338th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ... is the 138th day of the year (139th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 140th day of the year (141st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 304th day of the year (305th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ... is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era in the 21st century. ...

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  Results from FactBites:
 
Tate Britain | Turner Prize 2005 (431 words)
The £25,000 prize, sponsored by the makers of Gordon’s gin, was presented by Culture Minister David Lammy.
Last year, Gordon's increased the value of the Turner Prize to £40,000, with £25,000 being awarded to the winner and £5,000 each to the other shortlisted artists.
The Prize, established in 1984, is awarded to a British artist under fifty for an outstanding exhibition or other presentation of their work in the twelve months preceding 9 May 2005.
The Turner Prize - Cultural and Artistic Events - London Feature Culture & Arts - England - About The UK - China (0 words)
The Turner Prize is an annual prize given to a British visual artist under 50, named after the painter J.M.W. Turner.
Nominations for the prize are invited from the public, although this is widely considered to have negligible effect.
The prize is not judged on the show, however, but on the artists' contribution to art over the previous year.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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