FACTOID # 14: North Carolina has a larger Native American population than North Dakota, South Dakota and Montana combined.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Turks and Caicos Islands

The Turks and Caicos Islands (TCI) (IPA: [ˈtɜːks ænd ˈkeɪkəs]) are a British Overseas Territory consisting of two groups of tropical islands in the West Indies at 21°53′N, 71°47′W. Articles with similar titles include the NATO phonetic alphabet, which has also informally been called the “International Phonetic Alphabet”. For information on how to read IPA transcriptions of English words, see IPA chart for English. ... A United Kingdom overseas territory (formerly known as a dependent territory or earlier as a crown colony) is a territory that is under the sovereignty and formal control of the United Kingdom but is not part of the United Kingdom proper (almost exclusively Great Britain and Northern Ireland). ...

Turks and Caicos Islands
Flag of the Turks and Caicos Islands Coat of arms of the Turks and Caicos Islands
Flag Coat of arms
Motto
One people, one nation, one destiny
Anthem
"God Save the Queen"
Capital Cockburn Town
Official languages English
Government Non-sovereign, Overseas territory of Britain
 -  Queen Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom
 -  Governor Richard Tauwhare
 -  Premier Michael Misick
Area
 -  Total 417 km² (199th)
161 sq mi 
 -  Water (%) negligible
Population
 -  2006 estimate 32,000 (156th)
 -  Density 61 /km² (n/a)
98 /sq mi
HDI (n/a) n/a (n/a) (n/a)
Currency U.S. dollar (USD)
Time zone UTC-5
Internet TLD .tc
Calling code +1-649

Contents

Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Turks_and_Caicos_Islands. ... Image File history File links Coa_Turks_Caicos. ... Flag ratio: 1:2 The flag of the Turks and Caicos Islands is similar to the flags of other British dependencies and colonies as it has the Union Flag in the upper hoist-side corner. ... Coat of Arms of the Turks and Caicos Islands The Coat of Arms of the Turks and Caicos Islands were granted in 1965. ... A motto (from Italian) is a phrase or a short list of words meant formally to describe the general motivation or intention of an entity, social group, or organization. ... A national anthem is a generally patriotic musical composition that is evoking and eulogizing the history, traditions and struggles of its people, recognized either by a nations government as the official national song, or by convention through use by the people. ... Publication of an early version in The Gentlemans Magazine, 15 October 1745. ... Image File history File links Turksandcaicos. ... This article is about a city that serves as a center of government and politics. ... Cockburn Town is the capital city of the Turks and Caicos Islands, located on the largest island in that archipelago, Grand Turk Island. ... An official language is a language that is given a unique legal status in the countries, states, and other territories. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Look up sovereign in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... A United Kingdom overseas territory (formerly known as a dependent territory or earlier as a crown colony) is a territory that is under the sovereignty and formal control of the United Kingdom but is not part of the United Kingdom proper ( Great Britain and Northern Ireland). ... Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of sixteen sovereign states, holding each crown and title equally. ... Flag of the Governor of the Turks and Caicos Islands The Governor of the Turks and Caicos Islands is the representative of the British monarch in the United Kingdoms overseas territory of Turks and Caicos Islands. ... Richard Tauwhare (born 1959) has been Governor of the Turks and Caicos Islands since 11 July 2005. ... This is a list of Chief Ministers and Premiers of the Turks and Caicos Islands [edit] Chief Ministers of the Turks and Caicos Islands [edit] Premiers of the Turks and Caicos Islands A new constitution after being laid in the Turks and Caicos parliament and receiving Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth... Michael Eugene Misick (born February 2, 1966) has been the chief minister of the Turks and Caicos Islands between August 15, 2003-August 9, 2006 and the first Premier of the Turks and Caicos Islands from August 9th, 2006-present. ... Area is a physical quantity expressing the size of a part of a surface. ... To help compare different orders of magnitude and geographical regions, we list here areas between 100 km² and 1000 km². See also areas of other orders of magnitude. ... This is a list of the countries of the world sorted by area. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Impact from a water drop causes an upward rebound jet surrounded by circular capillary waves. ... A percentage is a way of expressing a proportion, a ratio or a fraction as a whole number, by using 100 as the denominator. ... This is a list of countries ordered according to population. ... Population density by country, 2006 Population density is a measurement of population per unit area or unit volume. ... Population density by country, 2006 List of countries and dependencies by population density in inhabitants/km². The list includes sovereign states and self-governing dependent territories that are recognized by the United Nations. ... World map indicating Human Development Index (2004). ... Coloured world map indicating Human Development Index (2004) (colour-blind compliant map) This is a list of countries by Human Development Index as included in the United Nations Development Programmes Human Development Report 2006, compiled on the basis of 2004 data. ... ISO 4217 Code USD User(s) the United States, the British Indian Ocean Territory,[1] the British Virgin Islands, Cambodia, East Timor, Ecuador, El Salvador, the Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Palau, Panama, Turks and Caicos Islands, and the insular areas of the United States Inflation 2. ... ISO 4217 is the international standard describing three letter codes (also known as the currency code) to define the names of currencies established by the International Organization for Standardization (ISO). ... A time zone is a region of the Earth that has adopted the same standard time, usually referred to as the local time. ... Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) is a high-precision atomic time standard. ... A country code top-level domain (ccTLD) is a top-level domain used and reserved for a country or a dependent territory. ... .tc is the Internet country code top-level domain (ccTLD) for Turks and Caicos Islands. ... A telephone number is a sequence of decimal digits (0-9) that is used for identifying a destination telephone line in a telephone network. ... The area code (649) is the local telephone area code of the Turks and Caicos Islands. ...

History

Main article: History of the Turks and Caicos Islands

The islands of the Turks and Caicos were first populated by Carib Amerindians but, shortly after the islands' discovery – depending on the source, on 12 October 1492 by Christopher Columbus, who would have claimed them for Spain, or by Juan Ponce de León in 1512 – Spanish explorers began raiding the archipelago for slaves. The first inhabitants of the Turks and Caicos Islands were Amerindians, first the Arawak people, who were, over the centuries, gradually replaced by the warlike Carib. ... Christopher Columbus (1451 – May 20, 1506) was a navigator and maritime explorer credited as the discoverer of the Americas. ... Juan Ponce de León Juan Ponce de León (c. ... Wiktionary has related dictionary definitions, such as: slave Slave may refer to: Slavery, where people are owned by others, and live to serve their owners without pay Slave (BDSM), a form of sexual and consenual submission Slave clock, in technology, a clock or timer that synchrnonizes to a master clock...


Though many nations controlled the islands, official settlement did not occur right away. For several decades around the turn of the 18th century they became popular pirate hideouts. Bermudian salt collectors were the first to settle the Turk Islands in 1678 or 1681. In 1764-1783 they were under French occupation. After the American Revolution (1763-1783) many loyalists fled to British Caribbean colonies, including (in 1783) the first settlers on the Caicos Islands; cotton became an important crop briefly. In 1799 both island groups were annexed by Britain as part of the Bahamas. Look up pirate and piracy in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... John Trumbulls Declaration of Independence, showing the five-man committee in charge of drafting the Declaration in 1776 as it presents its work to the Second Continental Congress The American Revolution refers to the period during the last half of the 18th century in which the Thirteen Colonies that... “West Indian” redirects here. ... Cotton ready for harvest. ...


There was a great deal of political turmoil surrounding the ownership of the Turks and Caicos even within the British empire: Bermuda had been in effective possession of them for a century, though, under British law they were the common wealth of all British citizens. Spanish and French forces seized the Turks in 1706, but Bermudian forces expelled them four years later in what was probably Bermuda's only independent military operation. For many years, the Bahamas (itself originally settled by Bermudian puritans in 1647) and Bermuda fought for control of the archipelago. The struggle began in 1766, when the King's representative in the Bahamas, Mr Symmer, on his own authority, wrote a constitution which legislated for and taxed the Bermudians on the Turks. The Secretary of State, Lord Hillsborough, for the Crown, issued orders that the Bermudian activities on the Turks should not be obstructed or restrained in any way. As a result of this order, Symmer's constitution was dissolved. The Bermudians on the Turks appointed commissioners to govern themselves, with the assent of the King's local agent. They drew up regulations for good government, but the Bahamian governor Shirley drew up his own regulations for the Turks and ordered that no one might work at salt raking who had not signed assent to his regulations. Following this, a raker was arrested and the salt pans were seized and divided by force. The Bahamas government attempted to appoint judicial authorities for the Turks in 1768, but these were refused by the Bermudians.


In 1773 the Bahamian government passed an act attempting to tax the salt produced in the Turks, but the Bermudians refused to pay it. In 1774, the Bahamians passed another, similar act, and this they submitted for the Crown's assent. The Crown passed this act on to the Bermudian government which objected to it, and which rejected Bahamian jurisdiction over the Turks. The Crown, as a consequence, refused assent of the Act as applied to include the Turks, and, in the form in which it finally passed, the Bahamas, but not the Turks, were included. The Bermudians on the Turks continued to be governed under their own regulations, with the assent of the royal agent, until 1780, when a more formal version of those regulations was submitted for the assent of the Crown, which was given. Those regulations, issued as a royal order, stated that all British subjects had the right ("free liberty") to rake and gather salt on the Turks, providing that they conformed to the regulations, which expressly rejected Bahamian jurisdiction over the Turks. Despite this refutation by a higher authority of their right to impinge upon Bermudian activities on the Turks, the Bahamian government continued to harass the Bermudians (unsurprisingly, given the lucrativeness of the Turks salt trade). Although the salt industry on the Turks had largely been a Bermudian preserve, it had been seen throughout the 17th century as the right of all British subjects to rake there, and small numbers of Bahamians had been involved. In 1783, the French had landed a force on Grand Turk which a British force of 100 men, under then-Captain Horatio Nelson, had been unable to dislodge, but which was soon withdrawn. Following this, the Bahamians were slow to return to the Turks, while the Bermudians quickly resumed salt production, sending sixty to seventy-five ships to the Turks each year, during the six months that salt could be raked. Nearly a thousand Bermudians spent part of the year on the Turks engaged in salt production, and the industry became more productive. The Bahamas, meanwhile, was incurring considerable expense in aborbing loyalist refugees from the now-independent American colonies, and returned to the idea of taxing Turks salt for the needed funds. The Bahamian government ordered that all ships bound for the Turk Islands obtain a license at Nassau first. The Bermudians refused to do this. Following this, Bahamian authorities seized the Bermuda sloops Friendship and Fanny in 1786. Shortly after, three Bermudian vessels were seized at Grand Caicos, with $35,000 worth of goods salvaged from a French ship. French privateers were becoming a menace to Bermudian operations in the area, at the time, but the Bahamians were their primary concern. The Bahamian government re-introduced a tax on salt from the Turks, annexed them to to the Bahamas, and created a seat in the Bahamian parliament to represent them. The Bermudians refused these efforts also, but the continual pressure from the Bahamaians had a degrative effect on the salt industry. Lord Nelson Horatio Nelson, 1st Viscount Nelson (September 29, 1758 – October 21, 1805) was a British admiral who won fame as a leading naval commander. ... The Bermuda sloop is a type of sailing vessel developed on the island of Bermuda in the 17th century. ...

Sunset viewed from Turtle Bay
Sunset viewed from Turtle Bay

In 1806, the Bermudian customs authorities went some way toward acknowledging the Bahamian annexation when it ceased to allow free exchange between the Turks and Bermuda (this affected many enslaved Bermudians, who, like the free ones, had occupied the Turks only seasonally, returning to their homes in Bermuda after the year's raking had finished). That same year, French privateers attacked the Turks, burning ships and absconding with a large sloop. The Bahamians refused to help, and the Admiralty in Jamaica claimed the Turks were beyond his jurisdiction. Two hurricanes, the first in August, 1813, the second in October, 1815, destroyed more than two-hundred buildings, significant salt stores, and sank many vessels. By 1815, the United States, the primary client for Turks salt, had been at war with Britain (and hence Bermuda) for three years, and had established other sources of salt. With the destruction wrought by the storm, and the loss of market, many Bermudians abandoned the Turks, and those remaining were so distraught that they welcomed the visit of the Bahamian governor in 1819. The British government eventually assigned political control to the Bahamas, which the Turks and Caicos remained a part of until the 1840s. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2560 × 1920 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2560 × 1920 pixel, file size: 1. ...


In 1848 they were declared a separate colony under a Council President. The last incumbent was maintained in 1873 when the islands were made part of Jamaica colony; in 1794 the chief colonial official was restyled Commissioner. Commissioner is a designation that may be used for a variety of official positions, especially referring to a high-ranking public (administrative or police) official, or an analogous official in the private sector (e. ...


On 4 July 1959 they were again a separate colony (Turks and Caicos), the last Commissioner being restyled Administrator, but till 31 May 1962 they were one of the constitutive parts of the Federation of the West Indies (see Trinidad and Tobago). By 1973 they had gained independence and their own governor (the last Administrator was restyled). They have their own government head by a Chief minister since August 1976. In 1979 independence was agreed upon in principle for 1982, but a change in government caused a policy reversal. Their political troubles in recent years have resulted in a rewritten constitution. National motto: Official language English Capital Chaguaramas Capitals coordinates Largest city {{{largestcity}}} {{{head_of_state}}} {{{current_head_of_state}}} {{{head_of_government}}} {{{current_head_of_government}}} Political system Constitutional monarchy Area  - Total   - % water Ranked % Population   - Total (1960)   - Density Ranked approx. ... A Chief Minister is the elected Head of Government of a state of India, a territory of Australia or a British overseas territory that has attained self-government. ...


Administrative Division

The Turks and Caicos Islands are divided into six administrative districts (two in the Turks Islands and four in the Caicos Islands), headed by District Commissioners: For the legislative council, the Turks and Caicos Islands are divided in to 13 Electoral Districts (four in the Turks Islands and nine in...

Geography

The two island groups are in the North Atlantic Ocean, southeast of the Bahamas, north of Hispaniola, and 914 km from Miami, at 21°45′N, 71°35′W. The territory is geographically part of the Bahamas, but is politically a separate entity. The Caicos Islands are separated by the Caicos Passage from the closest Bahaman islands, Mayaguana and Great Inagua. from [1] File links The following pages link to this file: Turks and Caicos Islands Categories: CIA World Factbook images ... Early map of Hispaniola The island of Hispaniola (from Spanish, La Española) is the second-largest island of the Antilles, lying between the islands of Cuba to the west, and Puerto Rico to the east. ... This article is about the city in Florida. ... True-color image of the Earths surface and atmosphere Physical geography (also know as geosystems or physiography) is a subfield of geography that focuses on the systematic study of patterns and processes within the hydrosphere, biosphere, atmosphere, and lithosphere. ... Political geography is a field of human geography that is concerned with politics. ... Mayaguana is the most easterly island and district of the Bahamas, and one of only two which retain their Arawak names. ... Inagua is the southernmost district of the Bahamas comprising the islands of Great Inagua and Little Inagua. ...


The eight main islands and more than 20 smaller islands have a total land area of 616.3 km², primarily of low, flat limestone with extensive marshes and mangrove swamps and 230 miles of beach front. The weather is usually sunny and relatively dry, but suffers frequent hurricanes. The islands have limited natural fresh water resources; private cisterns collect rainwater for drinking. The primary natural resources are spiny lobster, conch and other shellfish. The United Nations Committee on Decolonisation includes the Turks and Caicos Islands on the United Nations list of Non-Self-Governing Territories.-1... Freshwater marsh in Florida In geography, a marsh is a type of wetland, featuring grasses, rushes, reeds, typhas, sedges, cat tails, and other herbaceous plants (possibly with low-growing woody plants) in a context of shallow water. ... Above and below water view at the edge of the mangal. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about weather phenomena. ... For the village on the Isle of Wight, see Freshwater, Isle of Wight. ... Genera Jasus Linuparus Palinurus Panulirus Spiny lobsters, also known as rock lobsters are a family (Palinuridae) of about 45 species of achelate crustaceans, in the Decapoda Reptantia. ... Species Strombus gigas Strombus luhuanus Strombus pugilis A conch (pronounced konch or konk(IPA: ) [1] is a sea-dwelling mollusk, and more specifically, a marine gastropod. ... The foundation of the U.N. The United Nations (UN) is an international organization whose stated aims are to facilitate co-operation in international law, international security, economic development, social progress and human rights issues. ... Map of the countries in the UN list:  current  former The United Nations maintains a list of territories that do not govern themselves. ...


The two distinct island groups are separated by the Turks Passage.


Caicos Islands

The Caicos Islands, separated from the closest Bahaman islands, Mayaguana and Great Inagua, by the Caicos Passage, are the larger group, with almost 96 percent of the land area (589.5 km²) and 82 percent of the population (26,584 out of a total of 33,302 in 2006). The spatial arrangement of the islands around the large Caicos Bank (roughly 3700 km²) resembles an Atoll, with the six large islands in the west, north and east, and a few tiny reefs and cays in the south. The unofficial capital of the Caicos Islands is the village of Kew on North Caicos. There is no official capital because the island group is not an administrative unit. The Caicos Islands encompass four of the six administrative districts of the territory. Four of the six main islands are inhabited, plus two of the smaller islands: Mayaguana is the most easterly island and district of the Bahamas, and one of only two which retain their Arawak names. ... Inagua is the southernmost district of the Bahamas comprising the islands of Great Inagua and Little Inagua. ... Portion of a Pacific atoll showing two islets on the ribbon or barrier reef separated by a deep pass between the ocean and the lagoon. ... The Turks and Caicos Islands are divided into six administrative districts (two in the Turks Islands and four in the Caicos Islands), headed by District Commissioners: For the legislative council, the Turks and Caicos Islands are divided in to 13 Electoral Districts (four in the Turks Islands and nine in...


Main islands, from West to East, with population estimates of 2006:

Inhabited smaller islands, in the Caicos Cays between Providenciales and North Caicos: West Caicos is an island in the Turks and Caicos Islands. ... Providenciales, nicknamed Provo, is an island in the Turks and Caicos Islands. ... North Caicos is one of the largest island in the Turks and Caicos chain. ... Middle Caicos, also Grand Caicos, is the largest island in the Turks and Caicos Islands. ... East Caicos is the fourth largest island in the Turks and Caicos Islands. ... South Caicos is one of the smallest inhabited islands in the Turks and Caicos islands archipelago, with only 1200 residents. ...

The Caicos Islands make up four of the six districts of the territory. Pine Cay is an island of about 30 people population in the Turks and Caicos Islands. ... Parrot Cay is a tiny island, part of Turks and Caicos Islands and is dominated by a large hotel beach resort, which over the years has seen many visits by celebrities such as Bruce Willis and Michael J Fox. ... The Turks and Caicos Islands are divided into six administrative districts (two in the Turks Islands and four in the Caicos Islands), headed by District Commissioners: For the legislative council, the Turks and Caicos Islands are divided in to 13 Electoral Districts (four in the Turks Islands and nine in...


Turks Islands

The Turks Islands, separated from the Caicos Islands by Turks Island Passage, are a chain that stretches north-south. The total area is 26.7 km², with an estimated population of 5 753. There are two main islands, which are the only inhabited ones of the group:

  • Grand Turk (with the capital of the territory, population 5 567)
  • Salt Cay (population 186)

Together with nearby islands, those two main islands form the two of the six administrative districts of the territory that fall within the Turks Islands. The Turks and Caicos Islands is an overseas territory of the United Kingdom consisting of two groups of tropical islands in the Caribbean, southeast of the Bahamas, at 21°45N, 71°35W. The thirty islands total 166 sq. ... Salt Cay is one of the Turks Islands, a constitutive gropup of the Caribbean state Turks and Caicos Islands. ... The Turks and Caicos Islands are divided into six administrative districts (two in the Turks Islands and four in the Caicos Islands), headed by District Commissioners: For the legislative council, the Turks and Caicos Islands are divided in to 13 Electoral Districts (four in the Turks Islands and nine in...


Mouchoir Bank

25 km east of the Turks Islands and separated from them by Mouchoir Passage, is Mouchoir Bank. Although it is submerged with a least depth of 1.8 m, and has no emergent cays or islets, it is part of the Turks and Caicos Islands and falls within its EEZ. Two banks further east, Silver Bank and Navidad Bank, are geographically a continuation, but belong politically to the Dominican Republic. Mouchoir Bank, in Spanish also called Banco de Pañuelo Blanco islocated southeast of the Turks islands at , and geographically a continuation of the Bahamas. ... Silver Bank This is an area in the Atlantic Ocean north of the Dominican Republic and southeast of the Territory of Turks & Caicos. ... Navidad Bank This is an area in the Atlantic Ocean north of the Dominican Republic and southeast of the Territory of Turks & Caicos. ...


Politics

Grand Turk is the administrative and political capital of the Turks & Caicos Islands and Cockburn Town has been the seat of government since 1766. The islands were under Jamaican jurisdiction until 1962, when they assumed the status of a British crown colony. The governor of the Bahamas oversaw affairs from 1965 to 1973. With Bahamian independence, the islands received a separate governor in 1973. Although independence was agreed upon for 1982, the policy was reversed and the islands are presently a British overseas territory. The islands adopted a constitution on August 30, 1976, which is Constitution Day, the national holiday. The constitution was suspended in 1986, but restored and revised March 5, 1988. The territory's legal system is based on English common law, with a small number of laws adopted from Jamaica and the Bahamas. Suffrage is universal for those over 18 years of age. English is the official language. Politics of the Turks and Caicos Islands takes place in a framework of a parliamentary representative democratic dependency, whereby as of August 9, 2006 the Premier is the head of government, and of a pluriform multi-party system. ... A United Kingdom overseas territory (formerly known as a dependent territory or earlier as a crown colony) is a territory that is under the sovereignty and formal control of the United Kingdom but is not part of the United Kingdom proper (Great Britain and Northern Ireland). ... August 30 is the 242nd day of the year (243rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1976 (MCMLXXVI) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display full calendar) of the 1976 Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the day. ... Year 1988 (MCMLXXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link displays 1988 Gregorian calendar). ... England and Wales (red), with the rest of the United Kingdom (pink). ... This article concerns the common-law legal system, as contrasted with the civil law legal system; for other meanings of the term, within the field of law, see common law (disambiguation). ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ...


As a British territory, Queen Elizabeth II of the United Kingdom is the sovereign, represented by a governor. The head of government is the premier. The Executive Council consists of three ex officio members and five appointed by the governor from among the members of the Legislative Council. No elections are held; the monarch is hereditary, the governor appointed by the monarch, and the premier appointed by the governor. Elizabeth II (Elizabeth Alexandra Mary Windsor; born 21 April 1926) is Queen of sixteen sovereign states, holding each crown and title equally. ...


The unicameral Legislative Council consists of 19 seats, 13 popularly elected; members serve four-year terms. Elections were held March 4, 1999, and again in 2003. The Progressive National Party, led by Hon. Michael Misick holds eight seats, and the People's Democratic Movement, led by Derek H. Taylor, holds five seats. The United Democratic Party, led by Wendal Swann, received a small fraction of the popular vote, but not enough to earn a seat. March 4 is the 63rd day of the year (64th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1999 (MCMXCIX) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full 1999 Gregorian calendar). ...


The judicial branch of government is headed by a Supreme Court.


Turks and Caicos participates in the Caribbean Development Bank, is an associate in CARICOM, and maintains an Interpol sub-bureau. Defence is the responsibility of the United Kingdom. In December of 2004 the Turks and Caicos Islands sought to become a new associate member to the Association of Caribbean States article. The Caribbean Development Bank is a financial institution which assists Caribbean nations in financing social and economic programs in its member countries. ... The Caribbean Community and Common Market or CARICOM was established by the Treaty of Chaguaramas which came into effect on August 1, 1973. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... The Association of Caribbean States (ACS) (Also called the Asociacion de Estados del Caribe or Association des Etats de la Caraibe) was formed with the aim of promoting consultation, cooperation, and concerted action among all the countries of the Caribbean, comprising of 25 member states and 3 associate members. ...


Demographics

Eight of the thirty islands in the territory are inhabited, with a total population in mid-2006 of about 32,000. One-third of the population is under 15 years old, and only 4% are 65 or older. In 2000 the population was growing at a rate of 3.55% per year, with 14.46 migrants per 1,000 population and 25.65 births per 1,000 population, offset by 4.57 deaths per 1,000 population. The infant mortality rate was 18.66 deaths per 1,000 live births and the life expectancy at birth was 73.28 years (71.15 years for males, 75.51 years for females). The total fertility rate was 3.25 children born per woman. The annual population growth rate is 2.82%. is the death of infants in the first year of life. ... World map of human life expectancy, 2005 Life expectancy is a statistical measure of the average length of survival of a living thing. ...


Ethnically, the vast majority of inhabitants are black and Protestant Christian. Two-fifths are Baptist, one-fifth Methodist, one-fifth Anglican, and less than 2% Seventh-day Adventist. Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Wycliffe Tyndale · Luther · Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Pope · Patriarch of Constantinople Christianity Portal This box:      Baptist is a term describing individuals belonging... The Methodist movement is a group of denominations of Protestant Christianity. ... The term Anglican describes those people and churches following the religious traditions of the Church of England, especially following the Reformation. ... The Seventh-day Adventist (abbreviated Adventist[1]) Church is a Christian denomination which is distinguished by its observance of Saturday, the seventh day of the week, as the Sabbath. ...


Economy

The economy of the Turks and Caicos Islands is based on tourism, fishing, and offshore financial services. Most capital goods and food for domestic consumption are imported. The United States was the leading source of tourists in 1996, accounting for more than half of the 87,000 visitors; another major source of tourists is Canada. Tourist arrivals had risen to approximately 200,000 in 2006.


Apparently the government is pursuing a two-prong strategy to get money from tourists. Upscale resorts are aimed at the wealthy, while a large new cruise ship port and recreation centre has been built for the masses visiting Grand Turk. Pacific Sky sails under Sydney Harbour Bridge A cruise ship or a cruise liner is a passenger ship used for pleasure voyages, where the voyage itself and the ships amenities are considered an essential part of the experience. ...


Major sources of government revenue include fees from offshore financial activities and customs receipts. The territory's gross domestic product as of late 2006 is approximately $400 million (per capita $12 500), with a real growth rate of about 4,9% (2000) and an inflation rate of about 4%. The labour force totalled 12000 workers in 2006. The labour force distribution is as follows: Nominal GDP per person (capita) in 2006. ...

Skill Level Percentage
Unskilled/Manual 53%
Skilled 20%
Semi-Skilled 12%
Professional 15%

The unemployment rate is about 10%. The territory takes in revenues of $47 million against expenditures of $33.6 million and receives economic aid, $5.7 million in 1995. The territory's currency is the United States dollar, with a few government fines (such as airport infractions) being payable in British Pounds. This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... ISO 4217 Code USD User(s) the United States, the British Indian Ocean Territory,[1] the British Virgin Islands, Cambodia, East Timor, Ecuador, El Salvador, the Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Palau, Panama, Turks and Caicos Islands, and the insular areas of the United States Inflation 2. ... GBP may be: short for Game Boy Player the ISO currency code for the British Pound Sterling. ...


The primary agricultural products include limited amounts of maize, beans, cassava (tapioca) and citrus fruits. Fish and conch are the only significant export, with some $169.2 million of lobster, dried and fresh conch, and conch shells exported in 2000, primarily to the United States and the United Kingdom. In recent years, however, the catch has been declining. The territory used to be an important trans-shipment point for South American narcotics destined for the United States, but due to the ongoing pressure of a combined American, Bahamian and Turks and Caicos effort has this trade been greatly reduced. “Corn” redirects here. ... Green beans Bean is a common name for large plant seeds of several genera of Fabaceae (formerly Leguminosae) used for food or feed. ... Binomial name Manihot esculenta Crantz The cassava, casava, or manioc (Manihot esculenta) is a woody shrub of the Euphorbiaceae (spurge family) native to South America that is extensively cultivated as an annual crop in tropical and subtropical regions for its edible starchy tuberous root, a major source of carbohydrate. ... Tapioca is an essentially flavourless starchy ingredient, or fecula, produced from treated and dried cassava (manioc) root and used in cooking. ... Subfamilies and Genera Neophoberinae Acanthacaris Thymopinae Nephropsis Nephropides Thymops Thymopsis Nephropinae Homarus Nephrops Homarinus Metanephrops Eunephrops Thymopides Clawed lobsters comprise a family (Nephropidae, sometimes also Homaridae) of large marine crustaceans. ... Species Strombus gigas Strombus luhuanus Strombus pugilis A conch (pronounced konch or konk(IPA: ) [1] is a sea-dwelling mollusk, and more specifically, a marine gastropod. ...


The islands import food and beverages, tobacco, clothing, manufactures and construction materials, primarily from the United States and the United Kingdom. Imports totalled $175.6 million in 2000. Shredded tobacco leaf for pipe smoking Tobacco can also be pressed into plugs and sliced into flakes Tobacco is an agricultural product processed from the fresh leaves of plants in genus Nicotiana. ...


The islands produce and consume about 5 GWh of electricity, all from fossil fuel.


Communications

The territory had about 3000 telephone lines in use in 1994. Currently, mobile phone service is provided by Cable & Wireless, using GSM 850 and TDMA and Digicel using GSM 900 & 1900. The system is connected to the mainland by two submarine cables and an Intelsat earth station. There were three AM radio stations (one inactive) and six FM stations (no shortwave) in 1998. Over 8000 radios are owned across the territory. There is one television broadcast station, namely WIV TV; broadcasts from the Bahamas can also be received and cable television is available. The territory has two Internet service providers and its country code top level domain (ccTLD) is ".TC". Amateur radio callsigns begin with "VP5" and visiting operators frequently work from the islands. It has been suggested that Cable & Wireless (Caribbean) be merged into this article or section. ... Not to be confused with Get Some Mates The Global System for Mobile Communications (GSM) is the most popular standard for mobile phones in the world. ... Time division multiple access (TDMA) is a channel access method for shared medium (usually radio) networks. ... Digicel is the leading mobile phone network provider in the Caribbean region. ... An Internet Service Provider (ISP) is a business or organization that offers users access to the Internet and related services. ... Amateur radio station with modern solid-state transceiver featuring LCD display and DSP capabilities Amateur radio, often called Ham radio, is a hobby enjoyed by about six million people[1] throughout the world. ... In broadcasting and radio communication, a callsign or call sign (also call letters) is a unique designation for a transmitting station. ...


From 1950 to 1981 the United States had a missile tracking site on Grand Turk. In the early days of the space program NASA used it. After his three earth orbits in 1962, American astronaut John Glenn successfully landed in the nearby ocean and was brought back to land at this island. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is an agency of the United States federal government, responsible for the nations public space program. ... Astronaut Bruce McCandless II using a manned maneuvering unit outside the U.S. Space Shuttle Challenger in 1984. ... For other persons named John Glenn, see John Glenn (disambiguation). ...


Transport

The islands have no significant railways, and 121 kilometres of highway, 24 km paved and 97 km unpaved. The territory's main international ports and harbours are on Grand Turk and Providenciales. The islands have seven airports, located on each of the inhabited islands. Five have paved runways, three of which are around 2000 metres long and one around 1000 metres long. Two have unpaved runways, two of which are around 1000 metres long and one significantly shorter. The Turks and Caicos Islands is an overseas territory of the United Kingdom consisting of two groups of tropical islands in the Caribbean, southeast of the Bahamas, at 21°45N, 71°35W. The thirty islands total 166 sq. ... Providenciales, nicknamed Provo, is an island in the Turks and Caicos Islands. ...

Providenciales International Airport (IATA: PLS, ICAO: MBPV) is the main international airport serving the Turks and Caicos Islands (the other main airport is Grand Turk Airport), an overseas territory of the United Kingdom. ...

Proposed union with Canada

A great many of the tourists who visit the islands are Canadian. Owing to this, the islands' status as a British colony, and historic trade links, some politicians in Canada and the Turks and Caicos have suggested some form of union between Canada (a Commonwealth realm, so they already share the British Monarch as Head of state) and the British territory. Since Canadian Confederation in 1867, there have been several proposals for new Canadian provinces and territories. ... The Commonwealth Realms, shown in pink A Commonwealth Realm is any one of the sixteen sovereign states within the Commonwealth of Nations that recognise Elizabeth II as their respective monarch. ...


In 1973, Canadian New Democratic Party Member of Parliament Max Saltsman introduced the first failed attempt at consolidating the islands. The New Democratic Party (NPD; Nouveau Parti démocratique in French) is a political party in Canada with a progressive social democratic philosophy that contests elections at both the federal and provincial levels. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ... Samuel Mayer Max Saltsman (May 29, 1921 – November 28, 1985) was a Canadian New Democratic Party member of parliament for Waterloo South and Waterloo from 1964-1979. ...


The idea was brought up again in 1986 by Progressive Conservative MP Dan McKenzie, but it was rejected by his party's caucus committee on external affairs in 1987. The committee, chaired by MP David Daubney, looked at immigration, banking, health care and tourism issues in making its decision. This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... David Daubney, a former MP, is currently head of the Ottawa Public Library Foundation Board of Directors, elected at the Annual General Meeting on May 24, 2005. ...


In 2004, Conservative MP Peter Goldring visited the Turks and Caicos to explore the possibility once more. The Conservative Party of Canada (French: Parti conservateur du Canada), colloquially known as the Tories, is a conservative political party in Canada, formed by the merger of the Canadian Alliance and the Progressive Conservative Party of Canada in December 2003. ... Peter Goldring (born December 12, 1944 in Toronto, Ontario) is a Canadian politician. ...


For the islands to join Canada as a full province would require amending the Canadian constitution, unlikely because it could provoke provinces to reopen debate on other aspects of Canada's constitution. On the other hand, small changes to the Constitution, such as renaming Newfoundland to Newfoundland and Labrador, have passed intact since 1949. The last new province, Newfoundland and Labrador, was brought into the country in 1949 by an act of the British Parliament. Joining as a territory would be easier, as territories can be created by an act of federal law. In addition, its population of 32,000 people is considered insufficient for provincial status. However, this attitude might change should the territories of Yukon or Nunavut, with about 30,000 people each, ever become provinces. The Constitution of Canada is the supreme law in Canada. ... Motto: Quaerite Prime Regnum Dei (Latin: Seek ye first the kingdom of God) Capital St. ... Motto: Quaerite Prime Regnum Dei (Latin: Seek ye first the kingdom of God) Capital St. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... Motto: Nunavut Sannginivut (Inuktitut: Nunavut our strength or Our land our strength) Capital Iqaluit Largest city Iqaluit Official languages Inuktitut, Inuinnaqtun, English, French Government - Commissioner Ann Meekitjuk Hanson - Premier Paul Okalik (Consensus government) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 1 (Nancy Karetak-Lindell) - Senate seats 1 (Willie Adams) Confederation...


In 2004, the province of Nova Scotia voted to invite Turks and Caicos to join the province, should the islands ever become part of Canada. This would bypass the problems with admitting Turks and Caicos as a separate province.[1] Motto: Munit Haec et Altera Vincit(Latin) One defends and the other conquers Capital Halifax Largest city Halifax Regional Municipality Official languages English Government - Lieutenant-Governor Mayann E. Francis - Premier Rodney MacDonald (PC) Federal representation in Canadian Parliament - House seats 11 - Senate seats 10 Confederation July 1, 1867 (1st) Area...


Sinking of Haitian Refugee Boat

During the early morning hours of May 4, 2007, a Haitian refugee boat sank off the coast of the Turks & Caicos Islands. Almost immediately, conflicting versions of events began to emerge. At least 61 on board the Haitian vessel died. Turks & Caicos officials initially claimed they arrived on the scene after the sinking. However, after U.S. Coast Guard officials reported that Turks & Caicos first told them that the sinking occurred during towing operations, Turks & Caicos acknowledged that the boat sank during towing. On May 8, reports that the Haitian vessel was repeatedly rammed by a Turks & Caicos Coast Guard vessel sent shock waves though the international maritime community. If the accusations are true, then officials from Turks & Caicos will almost certainly face prosecution under maritime & international law. The sailors aboard the coast guard vessel could face multiple homicide charges. From a diplomatic perspective, the incident has already widened the rift between Turks & Caicos and Haiti, and damaged the worldwide reputation of the Turks & Caicos Islands.


In popular culture

  • "Bahama Passage" (1941) Starring Sterling Hayden and Madeleine Carroll was filmed on Grand Turk and Salt Cay. It was based on the book 'Dildo Cay' by Nelson Hayes.
  • In the TV movie Long Lost Son, Captain John/Quinn tries to escape to an island called Salt Cay, which may or may not be the one in this island group.
  • The first season of the here! original series Dante's Cove was shot on the islands.

Several Hollywood stars have built homes in the Turks and Caicos, including Dick Clark and Bruce Willis. Sterling Hayden (March 26, 1916 - May 23, 1986) was an American actor. ... Madeleine Carroll (February 26, 1906 - October 2, 1987) was a British actress, who was popular in the 1930s and 1940s. ... Lorenzo Lamas (born Lorenzo Lamas y de Santos Lamas on January 20, 1958 in Santa Monica, California) is an American television and film actor, primarily on soap operas, movies and television. ... Melody Thomas Scott as Nikki Newman Melody Thomas Scott (born April 18, 1956 in Los Angeles, California) is an American actress. ... The Island is a novel by Peter Benchley, published in 1979 by Doubleday & Co. ... Peter Bradford Benchley (May 8, 1940 – February 11, 2006) was an American author best known for writing the novel Jaws and co-writing the screenplay for its highly successful film adaptation. ... Look up pirate and piracy in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... This article or section is not written in the formal tone expected of an encyclopedia article. ... Dantes Cove is the first LGBT horror television show produced. ... Thank God Youre Here is a Logie Award winning partially improvised comedy television program created by Working Dog Productions, which premiered on Australian Network Ten on the 5 April 2006, and has currently aired for two seasons. ... Cal Wilson is one of New Zealands most successful comedians. ... Miss Canada Universe 2005, Natalie Glebova reacts after being crowned Miss Universe 2005 by former Miss Universe 2004, Jennifer Hawkins of Australia in Bangkok, Thailand. ... Jennifer Coolidge (b. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Walter Bruce Willis (born March 19, 1955) is an American actor and singer. ...


Ben Affleck and Jennifer Garner were married on Parrot Cay. Benjamin Géza Affleck (born August 15, 1972) is a Golden Globe Award-nominated American film actor, director, and Academy Award-winning and Golden Globe Award-winning screenwriter. ... Jennifer Anne Garner [1] (born April 17, 1972) is a Golden Globe Award- and SAG Award-winning and Emmy Award-nominated American film and television actress, and producer. ...


Astronaut John Glenn landed off the coast of Grand Turk on his return from orbit in 1962. For other persons named John Glenn, see John Glenn (disambiguation). ... Year 1962 (MCMLXII) was a common year starting on Monday (the link is to a full 1962 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


See also

The Turks and Caicos Islands lie in the North Atlantic Ocean, southeast of the Bahamas and north of Haiti. ... Timeline and Samples Pop genres Calypso - Chutney - Dancehall - Dub - Junkanoo - Ragga - Rapso - Reggae - Ripsaw - Rocksteady - Scratch - Ska - Soca - Spouge - Steelpan Other islands Aruba and the Dutch Antilles - Cuba - Dominica - Dominican Republic - Haiti - Martinique and Guadeloupe - Puerto Rico - Saint Lucia The Turks and Caicos Islands are an overseas dependency of the... The majority of the population of the Turks and Caicos Islands are Christian. ... This article identifies popular recreational snorkeling sites around the world and describes the features of those sites. ...

Note

  1. ^ "N.S. votes to invite Turks and Caicos to join it", CBC, 2004-04-22. Retrieved on 2007-01-28. 

The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation (CBC), a Canadian crown corporation, is the country’s national public radio and television broadcaster. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... January 28 is the 28th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Sources and external links

History

Relationship with Canada


  Results from FactBites:
 
Turks and Caicos Islands Map and Information (1285 words)
The Caicos Islands are comprised of West Caicos, Providenciales, North Caicos, Middle Caicos, East Caicos and South Caicos.
The Turks Islands are Grand Turk (the capital) and Salt Cay.
The easternmost and smallest Caicos island, South Caicos, 22 miles (35km) west of Grand Turk, is an arid wasteland of scrub and sand-blasted streets roamed by wild horses and donkeys.
Turks and Caicos Islands - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1511 words)
The Turks and Caicos Islands are an overseas territory of the United Kingdom consisting of two groups of tropical island located in the Caribbean.
Grand Turk is the administrative and political capital of the Turks and Caicos Islands and Cockburn Town has been the seat of government since 1766.
Turks and Caicos participates in the Caribbean Development Bank, is an associate in Caricom, and maintains an Interpol sub-bureau.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m