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Encyclopedia > Turin
Comune di Torino
Skyline of Turin
Skyline of Turin
Coat of arms of Comune di Torino
Municipal coat of arms
Location of Turin in Italy
Country Flag of Italy Italy
Region Piedmont
Province Turin (TO)
Mayor Sergio Chiamparino
Elevation 240 m (787 ft)
Area 130.17 km² (50 sq mi)
Population (as of December 2006)
 - Total 921,485 ( 4th)[1]
 - Density [n.a.]
Time zone CET, UTC+1
Coordinates 45°4′N, 7°42′E
Gentilic Torinesi
Dialing code 011
Postal code 10100
Frazioni Villaretto
Patron John the Baptist
 - Day June 24
Website: www.comune.torino.it

Turin (Italian: Torino; Piedmontese: Turin; pronounced [tyɾ'iɲ]) is a major city as well as a business and cultural centre in northern Italy, capital of the Piedmont region, located mainly on the right bank of the Po River. The population of the city of Turin is 908,000 (2004 census); its agglomeration totals about 1.7 million inhabitants, while its metropolitan area has a population of 2.2 million inhabitants.[2] Turin is well-known as the home of the Shroud of Turin and Juventus FC, headquarters of Fiat and Lancia automobile manufacturers and host of the 2006 Winter Olympics. It has been the capital of the Duchy of Savoy since 1563, then of the Kingdom of Savoy and finally the first capital of the unified Italy.[3] Turin may refer to the following: // Places Italy Province of Turin, in Italy Turin, the city in the forementioned Italian province United States Turin, Georgia Turin, Iowa Turin (village), New York Turin (town), New York Turin Township, Michigan Canada Turin is a hamlet near Lethbridge, Alberta People the name of... Torino may refer to: Torino, the Italian name for Turin, a major industrial city in northwestern Italy, capital of the Piedmont region, located mainly on the west bank of the Po River Torino F.C., a football club based in Turin Ford Torino, a car formerly built by Ford Motor... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links Torino-Stemma. ... Image File history File links Red_pog. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Italy. ... The Regions of Italy were granted a degree of regional autonomy in the 1948 constitution, which states that the constitutions role is: to recognize, protect and promote local autonomy, to ensure that services at the State level are as decentralized as possible, and to adapt the principles and laws... For other uses, see Piedmont (disambiguation). ... In Italy, a province (in Italian: provincia) is an administrative division of intermediate level between municipality (comune) and region (regione). ... Eastern part of the province, satellite map The Province of Turin (It. ... Sergio Chiamparino (born September 1, 1948 in Moncalieri) is the current mayor of Turin, Italy. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... Square kilometre (U.S. spelling: square kilometer), symbol km², is a decimal multiple of SI unit of surface area square metre, one of the SI derived units. ... A square mile is an English unit of area equal to that of a square with sides each 1 statute mile (≈1,609 m) in length. ... Time zones of Europe: Light colours indicate countries that do not observe summer time Central European Time (CET) is one of the names of the time zone that is 1 hour ahead of Coordinated Universal Time. ... Central European Time West Africa Time British Summer Time* Irish Summer Time* Western European Summer Time* Category: ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ... A demonym or gentilic is a word that denotes the members of a people or the inhabitants of a place. ... Here are a list of area codes in Italy. ... A frazione, in Italy, is the name given in administrative law to a type of territorial subdivision of a comune; for other subdivisions, see municipio, circoscrizione, quartiere. ... For the hip-hop producer with the same name, see John the Baptist (producer). ... is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Piedmontese (also known as Piemontèis, and Piemontese in Italian) is a language spoken by over 2 million people in Piedmont, northwest Italy. ... This article concerns places that serve as centers of government and politics. ... Piedmont is a region of northwestern Italy. ... The bed of this stream is made up of rocks, some very rounded (having had a longer life in the stream) and some not. ... The Po (Latin: Padus, Italian: Po) is a river that flows 652 kilometers (405 miles) eastward across northern Italy, from Monviso (in the Cottian Alps) to the Adriatic Sea near Venice. ... In the study of human settlements, an agglomeration is an extended city or town area comprising the built-up area of a central place (usually a municipality) and any suburbs or adjacent satellite towns. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The first photo of the Shroud of Turin, taken in 1898. ... Juventus F.C. (Latin for Youth) is one of Italys oldest and most successful football clubs, based in Turin. ... For other uses, see Fiat (disambiguation). ... Lancia (pronounced Lan-cha) is an Italian automobile manufacturer founded in 1906 by Vincenzo Lancia and which became part of the Fiat Group in 1969. ... The 2006 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XX Olympic Winter Games, were celebrated in Turin, Italy from February 10, 2006, through February 26, 2006. ... For the earlier history of Savoy, see County of Savoy. ... Events February 1 - Sarsa Dengel succeeds his father Menas as Emperor of Ethiopia February 18 - The Duke of Guise is assassinated while besieging Orléans March - Peace of Amboise. ... Kingdom of Sardinia, in 1839: Mainland Piedmont with Savoy, Nice, and Sardinia in the inset. ... Italian Unification (Italian: il Risorgimento, or The Resurgence) was the political and social movement that unified different states of the Italian peninsula into the single nation of Italy. ...

Contents

History

Roman times

In the first century BC (probably 28 BC), the Romans created a military camp (Castra Taurinorum), later dedicated to Augustus (Augusta Taurinorum). The typical Roman street grid can still be seen in the modern city. Turin reached about 5,000 inhabitants at the time, all living inside the high walls. (2nd millennium BC - 1st millennium BC - 1st millennium) The 1st century BC started on January 1, 100 BC and ended on December 31, 1 BC. An alternative name for this century is the last century BC. The AD/BC notation does not use a year zero. ... For other persons named Octavian, see Octavian (disambiguation). ...


Middle Ages

After the fall of the Roman empire the city was conquered by the Lombards, then the Franks of Charlemagne (773); in the 940s the Contea di Torino (or countship) was founded, until 1050 held by the Arudinic dynasty and then, after the marriage of Adelaide of Susa with Humbert Biancamano's son Otto, by the family of the Counts of Savoy. While the dignity of count was held by the Bishop as count of Turin (1092-1130 and 1136-1191) it was ruled as a prince-bishopric by the Bishops. In 1230-1235 it was a lordship under the Marquess of Montferrat, styled Lord of Turin. At the end of the thirteenth century, when it was annexed to the Duchy of Savoy, the city already had 20,000 inhabitants. Many of the gardens and palaces were built in the fifteenth century when the city was redesigned. The University was also founded during this period. For other uses, see Roman Empire (disambiguation). ... The Lombards (Latin Langobardi, whence comes the alternative name Longobards found in older English texts), were a Germanic people originally from Northern Europe that entered the late Roman Empire. ... This article is about the Frankish people and society. ... For the American band, see Charlemagne (band). ... Arduin of Ivrea (b. ... Adelaide of Susa (also Adelheid, Adelais, or Adeline; 1016 – 19 December 1091[1]) was the Marchioness of Turin from 1034 to her death. ... Humbert I (Humbert-aux-Blanches-Mains or Hubert de Maurienne in French, Umberto I Biancamano di Moriana in Italian and in official documents), (980 - 1047 or 1048 at Hermillon) became the first count of the House of Savoy, which ruled Savoy throughout its independent existence and furnished the monarchs of... Otto of Savoy Otto or Oddone in Italian, (1010 or 1020 – c. ... The House of Savoy was a dynasty of nobles who traditionally had their domain in Savoy, a region between Piedmont, Italy, France and French-speaking Switzerland. ... A Prince-Bishop is a bishop who is a territorial prince of the church on account of one or more secular principalities, usually pre-existent nobiliary titles held concurrently with their inherent clerical office. ... The Marquess of Montferrat is the title derived from Montferrat (in Italian, Monferrato), a territory in Piedmont south of the Po and east of Turin. ... (12th century - 13th century - 14th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 13th century was that century which lasted from 1201 to 1300. ... For the earlier history of Savoy, see County of Savoy. ... (14th century - 15th century - 16th century - other centuries) As a means of recording the passage of time, the 15th century was that century which lasted from 1401 to 1500. ... The University of Turin (Italian Università degli Studi di Torino, UNITO) is a university in the city of Turin in the Piedmont region of north-western Italy. ...


16-18th century

Emanuele Filiberto (Iron Head) made Turin the capital of the Duchy of Savoy in 1563. Piazza Reale, today named Piazza San Carlo and Via Nuova, today called Via Roma were added with the first enlargement of the walls, in the first half of the XVII century; in the same period the Royal palace (Palazzo Reale) was built. In the second half of that century, a second enlargement of the walls was planned and executed, with the building of the arcaded Via Po, connecting diagonally through the regular street grid Piazza Castello with the bridge on the Po. In 1706, during the Battle of Turin, the French besieged the city for 117 days without conquering it. After the subsequent Treaty of Utrecht, the Kingdom of Sardinia was annexed to the Duchy of Savoy and the architect Filippo Juvarra began a major redesign of the city. Now the capital of a European kingdom, Turin had about 90,000 inhabitants at the time. Emmanuel Filiberto, Duke of Savoy (July 8, 1528, Chambéry - August 30, 1580, Turin) was Duke of Savoy from 1553 to 1580. ... For the earlier history of Savoy, see County of Savoy. ... Events February 1 - Sarsa Dengel succeeds his father Menas as Emperor of Ethiopia February 18 - The Duke of Guise is assassinated while besieging Orléans March - Peace of Amboise. ... As a means of recording the passage of time, the 17th century was that century which lasted from 1601-1700 in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events March 27 - Concluding that Emperor Iyasus I of Ethiopia had abdicated by retiring to a monastery, a council of high officials appoint Tekle Haymanot I Emperor of Ethiopia May 23 - Battle of Ramillies September 7 - The Battle of Turin in the War of Spanish Succession - forces of Austria and... The Battle of Turin took place on 7 September 1706 west of the city of Turin during the War of the Spanish Succession. ... A map depicting the major changes in Western Europes borders as a result of the Treaties of Utrecht and Rastatt. ... Kingdom of Sardinia, in 1839: Mainland Piedmont with Savoy, Nice, and Sardinia in the inset. ... Filippo Juvarra. ...


19th century

In the nineteenth century, after brief occupation by Napoleon, the city began to actively pursue the unification of Italy. In 1871, the Fréjus Tunnel was opened, making Turin an important communication node. The city now had 250,000 inhabitants. The Museo Egizio, the Mole Antonelliana, the Gran Madre church and Vittorio Veneto square were built in this period. Napoléon I, Emperor of the French (born Napoleone di Buonaparte, changed his name to Napoléon Bonaparte)[1] (15 August 1769; Ajaccio, Corsica – 5 May 1821; Saint Helena) was a general during the French Revolution, the ruler of France as First Consul (Premier Consul) of the French Republic from... Italian unification, also known as Risorgimento (resurrection), was a historical process by which the Kingdom of Sardinia (ruled by the Savoy dynasty with Turin as its capital) gradually conquered the Italian peninsula, including the Kingdom of the Two Sicilies, the Duchy of Modena, the Grand Duchy of Tuscany, the Duchy... 1871 (MDCCCLXXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... The Fréjus Rail Tunnel (also called Mont Cenis Tunnel) is a railroad tunnel of 13. ... Egyptian statues in the museum. ... The Mole on the 2 cent Italian euro coin The Mole Antonelliana is a major landmark of the Italian city Turin. ...

View over Turin and Alps.
View over Turin and Alps.

In 1861, Turin became the capital of the newly proclaimed United Italy. In 1864 the capital was moved to Florence. (Since 8 July 1871, the capital has been Rome.) Turin reacted to the loss of importance by beginning a rapid industrialisation: in 1899 Fiat was founded and Lancia in 1906. The Universal Exposition held in Turin in 1902 is often considered the pinnacle of Art Nouveau design, and the city hosted the Exposition again in 1911. By this time, Turin had grown to 430,000 inhabitants. Image File history File links Mg-k_Torino_Alpi. ... Image File history File links Mg-k_Torino_Alpi. ... Year 1861 (MDCCCLXI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1864 (MDCCCLXIV) was a leap year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar. ... Florence (or Firenze, Florentia and Fiorenza) is the capital city of the Italian region of Tuscany, and of the province of Florence. ... is the 189th day of the year (190th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1871 (MDCCCLXXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). ... Year 1899 (MDCCCXCIX) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday [1] of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Lancia (pronounced Lan-cha) is an Italian automobile manufacturer founded in 1906 by Vincenzo Lancia and which became part of the Fiat Group in 1969. ... Year 1906 (MCMVI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1902 (MCMII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Vitebsk Railway Station one of the finest examples of Art Nouveau architecture. ... Year 1911 (MCMXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


20th century

After World War I, conflicts between workers and industrialists began. The first strikes took place and in 1920 the Lingotto factory was occupied. “The Great War ” redirects here. ... Year 1920 (MCMXX) was a leap year starting on Thursday (link will display 1920) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Lingotto is a district of Turin, Italy, but the name is most associated with the Lingotto building on the Via Nizza, which once was a huge car factory, constructed by Fiat. ...


After World War II, Turin was rapidly rebuilt and its industries greatly developed, which caused waves of immigration, largely from the southern regions of Italy. The population reached 1 million in 1960 and peaked at 1.5 million in 1975. In the 1980s, the first industrial crisis hit the city and its population began to decline (and continues to, while the metropolitan area grows). The 2005 population was 908,000. Combatants Allied powers: China France Great Britain Soviet Union United States and others Axis powers: Germany Italy Japan and others Commanders Chiang Kai-shek Charles de Gaulle Winston Churchill Joseph Stalin Franklin Roosevelt Adolf Hitler Benito Mussolini Hideki Tōjō Casualties Military dead: 17,000,000 Civilian dead: 33,000... Year 1960 (MCMLX) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1980 (MCMLXXX) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link displays the 1980 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Law and government

See also: List of mayors of Turin

The mayor of Turin is directly elected every five years. Sergio Chiamparino, the current mayor, belongs to the center-left coalition. This is a list of mayors of Turin, Italy. ... Sergio Chiamparino (born September 1, 1948 in Moncalieri) is the current mayor of Turin, Italy. ...


Districts

Turin is divided into 10 municipal districts. These do not necessarily correspond to historical districts in the city.


The following lists the historical districts (named Circoscrizioni) included in the Municipal districts.

  • Circoscrizione 1 Centro - Crocetta
  • Circoscrizione 2 Santa Rita - Mirafiori Nord
  • Circoscrizione 3 San Paolo - Cenisia - Pozzo Strada - Cit Turin - Borgata Lesna
  • Circoscrizione 4 San Donato - Campidoglio - Parella
  • Circoscrizione 5 Borgo Vittoria - Madonna di Campagna - Lucento - Vallette
  • Circoscrizione 6 Barriera di Milano - Regio Parco - Barca - Bertolla - Falchera - Rebaudengo - Villaretto
  • Circoscrizione 7 Aurora - Vanchiglia - Sassi - Madonna del Pilone
  • Circoscrizione 8 San Salvario - Cavoretto - Borgo Po
  • Circoscrizione 9 Nizza Millefonti - Lingotto - Filadelfia
  • Circoscrizione 10 Mirafiori Sud

Geography and climate

Turin is located in northwest Italy. It is surrounded on the western and northern front by the Alps and on the southern front by the hills of Monferrato. Four major rivers pass through the city: the Po and two of its tributaries, the Dora Riparia (later changed to "Duria Minor" by the Romans, from the Celtic duria meaning "water"), the Stura di Lanzo, and the Sangone. Alp redirects here. ... Montferrat (in Italian, Monferrato) is part of the province of Asti in Italy. ... PO may stand for: Pareto optimality Parole Officer Per os, Latin for by mouth or orally Perfect Orange a third wave ska based in Knoxville, TN from 2002-2005 Petty Officer, a Non-Commissioned Officer Rank in many Navies Pilkington Optronics, now Thales Optronics Pilot Officer, a junior commissioned rank... Dora Riparia is an Italian river, a left-hand tributary of the Po. ... The Celtic languages are the languages descended from Proto-Celtic, or Common Celtic, a branch of the greater Indo-European language family. ... Stura di Lanzo is a 65 km long river in north-western Italy (Piedmont). ... Sangone may refer to: Sangone, the name of a turtle of divine origin featuring in Tongan myths Sangone (torrent), a river in Piedmont, Italy Val Sangone, a valley in Piedmont, Italy Category: ...


Turin has a truly continental climate, with nothing to share with the rest of Italy which is famous for its comfortable Mediterranean climate. Winters are cold and dry, summers are cool in the hills and quite hot in the plains. During the winter and autumn months banks of fog, which are sometimes very thick, form in the plains. [4]  Areas with Mediterranean climate A Mediterranean climate is one that resembles the climate of the lands in the Mediterranean Basin, which includes over half of the area with this climate type world-wide. ...

Weather averages for Turin, Italy
Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year
Average high °F (°C) 43 (6) 47 (8) 55 (12) 61 (16) 69 (20) 76 (24) 82 (27) 80 (26) 74 (23) 63 (17) 51 (10) 45 (7) 62 (16)
Average low °F (°C) 28 (-2) 31 (0) 37 (2) 43 (6) 51 (10) 58 (14) 63 (17) 62 (16) 56 (13) 47 (8) 35 (1) 29 (-1) 45 (7)
Precipitation inches (cm) 1.6 (4) 1.6 (4) 2.6 (6) 3.8 (9) 4.6 (11) 3.6 (9) 2.3 (5) 2.6 (6) 2.8 (7) 3.4 (8) 2.9 (7) 1.9 (4) 33.7 (85)
Source: Weatherbase[5] June 2007

Demographics

The Turin city proper, in 2006, had a population of 900,608, a drop of 0.2% from the previous year.[4] This was due to a low birth rate (which has climbed by 7% in the past 5 years) and movements into suburban Turin. The greater Turin population was 2,242,775, an increase of 0.3 percent. This increase was due to internal migration, and a growing number of migrants from Eastern Europe. Like many northern Italian cities, there is a large proportion of pensioners in comparison to youth. Around 18 percent of the population is under 20 years of age while, 22 percent is over 65.[5] Statistical regions of Europe as delineated by the United Nations (UN definition of Eastern Europe marked red):  Northern Europe  Western Europe  Eastern Europe  Southern Europe Pre-1989 division between the West (grey) and Eastern Bloc (orange) superimposed on current borders: Russia (dark orange), other countries formerly part of the USSR...


Approximately 5.77 percent of the population comprised of foreigners the largest numbers coming from Romania: (44,158), Morocco: (22,511), Albania: (9,165), Peru: (7,044), China: (5,483), and Moldova: (3,417).[6]


Economy

Today the city is a major industrial center, where the headquarters of the car company Fiat are located. The city is home to the Lingotto building, which was at one time the largest car factory in the world, and now houses a convention centre, a concert hall, an art gallery, a shopping centre and a hotel. Other companies founded in Turin are Lancia, Pininfarina, Bertone, Sparco, Italdesign, Ghia, Fioravanti, Stola, Intesa Sanpaolo, Superga, Invicta (1821), Lavazza, Martini & Rossi, Kappa and the chocolate factory Caffarel. Car redirects here. ... The term company may refer to a separate legal entity, as in English law, or may simply refer to a business, as is the common use in the United States. ... For other uses, see Fiat (disambiguation). ... Lingotto is a district of Turin, Italy, but the name is most associated with the Lingotto building on the Via Nizza, which once was a huge car factory, constructed by Fiat. ... A convention center is a large, cavernous public building with enough open space to host public and private business and social events for the surrounding municipal and metropolitan areas. ... A Concert hall is a cultural building, which serves as performance venue, chiefly for classical instrumental music. ... The Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York City. ... For the traditional meaning of the word mall, see mall. ... For other uses, see Hotel (disambiguation). ... Lancia (pronounced Lan-cha) is an Italian automobile manufacturer founded in 1906 by Vincenzo Lancia and which became part of the Fiat Group in 1969. ... Pininfarina logo. ... Gruppo Bertone is an Italian car styling and coachbuilding house, which also manufactures cars. ... Sparco is an Italian car accessory company that specializes in making seats, steering wheels, harnesses, racewear, helmets, and more. ... Italdesign-Giugiaro S.p. ... Ghia (Carrozzeria Ghia SpA) is one of the most famous Italian automobile design and coachbuilding firms, founded in 1921 in Turin by Giacinto Ghia (1887 - 1944). ... Fioravanti is a 125 year old soft drink brand from Ecuador that that was acquired by the Coca-Cola Company in 1991. ... The stola was the traditional garment of Roman women, corresponding to the toga that was worn by men. ... Intesa Sanpaolo is a new banking group resulting from the merger between Banca Intesa and Sanpaolo IMI. It has clear leadership in the Italian market and a strong international presence focussed on Central-Eastern Europe and the Mediterranean basin. ... Invicta (meaning undefeated) is the motto of the county of Kent, England. ... Advertising for Lavazza, Transport of coffee in Indochina, ca 1900 Luigi Lavazza was an Italian businessman (1859 Murisengo - 1949), creator of the company of coffee Lavazza in 1895 in Turin. ... Martini vermouth is a brand of Italian vermouth, named after the Martini & Rossi distillery in Turin which was partly founded by Alessandro Martini. ... Kappa is an Italian clothing company that started as a sock and underwear manufacturer in 1916 in Turin. ... Pierre Paul Caffarel (1801 Turin - 1871 Turin), Italian entrepreneur who created the chocolate company of Caffarel. ...


The city is also well known for its aerospace industry (Alenia). The Multi-Purpose Logistics Modules for the International Space Station were produced in Turin. The future European launcher projects beyond Ariane 5 will also be managed from Turin, by the new NGL company, a subsidiary of EADS (70%) and Finmeccanica (30%). Alenia Aeronautica Italian aeronautic company Alenia Difesa Italian defense products company Alenia Spazio Italian aerospace company [now called Alcatel Alenia Space] Alenia Marconi Systems or AMS Anglo-Italian electronic company Categories: Disambiguation ... March 10, 2001 - The Leonardo Multi Purpose Logistics Module rests in Discoverys payload bay in this view taken from the ISS by a crew member using a digital still camera during STS-102. ... ISS redirects here. ... Ariane 5 is a European expendable launch system designed to deliver payloads into geostationary transfer orbit or low Earth orbit. ... NGL Prime SpA is being created for the purpose of all activities related to future European launchers which are not related to Ariane 5 or Vega or their evolutions, and is a joint venture of EADS SPACE (70%) and Finmeccanica (30%). The corresponding shareholder agreement has been signed on 31... The European Aeronautic Defence and Space Company EADS N.V. (EADS) is a large European aerospace corporation, formed by the merger on July 10, 2000 of Aérospatiale-Matra of France, Construcciones Aeronáuticas SA (CASA) of Spain, and DaimlerChrysler Aerospace AG (DASA) of Germany. ... Finmeccanica S.p. ...


Turin is also the birthplace of some of the country's main companies, such as Telecom Italia (telecommunications), Rai (television), and cinema. Most of these industries have since moved their headquarters to other parts of Italy, but Turin still retains the National Museum of Cinema (in the Mole Antonelliana building). Telecom Italia is formerly a partially state-owned Italian telco. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... The Mole on the 2 cent Italian euro coin The Mole Antonelliana is a major landmark of the Italian city Turin. ...


Transportation infrastructure

See also: Gruppo Torinese Trasporti

The town currently has a large number of rail and road work sites. Although this activity has increased as a result of the 2006 Winter Olympics, parts of it had long been planned. Some of the work sites deal with general roadworks to improve traffic flow, such as underpasses and flyovers, but two projects are of major importance and will change the shape of the town radically. The 2006 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XX Olympic Winter Games, were celebrated in Turin, Italy from February 10, 2006, through February 26, 2006. ...


One is the Spina ("spine") which includes the doubling of a major railroad crossing the town. The railroad previously ran in a trench, which will now be covered by a major boulevard. The town rail station on this line will become the main station of Turin (Porta Susa).


The other major project is the construction of a subway line based on the VAL system, known as Metrotorino. This project is expected to continue for years and to cover a larger part of the city, but its first phase was finished in time for the Olympic Games (inaugurated on 4 February 2006 and opened to the public the day after). The first leg of the subway system linked the nearby town of Collegno with the Porta Susa station in Turin's town centre; a new leg (inaugurated on 4 October 2007) extends now the service to the 'Porta Nuova' railway station. This underground transportation project has historical importance for Turin, as the town has dreamed of an underground line for decades, the first project dating as far back as the twenties. In fact, the main street in the town centre (Via Roma) runs atop a tunnel built during the fascist era (when Via Roma was built). The tunnel was supposed to host the underground line but is now used as an underground car park. A project to build an underground system was ready in the seventies, with government funding for it and for similar projects in Milan and Rome; whilst the other two cities went ahead with the projects, Turin local government led by mayor Diego Novelli shelved the proposal as it believed it to be too costly and unnecessary, but that only meant more funding for Rome and Milan. The city has an international airport known as Caselle International Airport Sandro Pertini (TRN), located few kilometres from downtown and connected to the city by a railway service (from Dora Station) and a bus service (from Porta Nuova and Porta Susa railway stations). Noooooo! Val may refer to: Aichi D3A dive bomber, known by Allied codename Val during World War II Valine, amino acid, abbreviation VAL, a type of unmanned light rubber-tired metro valley girl, short form A first name, on its own or short for Valerie, Valmond, etc. ... The Metrotorino is a VAL subway system in Turin, Italy. ... is the 35th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Country Italy Region Piedmont Province Province of Turin (TO) Mayor  ? Elevation m Area 18. ... is the 277th day of the year (278th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... For other uses, see Milan (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Rome (disambiguation). ... Torino Caselle Airport (IATA: TRN, ICAO: LIMF), also known as Turin International Airport, is an airport in Turin, Italy. ...


Main sights

For a complete list of Turin's landmarks, see: Buildings and structures in Turin
The Palatine Towers nowadays, Archaeological Park.
The Basilica di Superga near Turin.
The Basilica di Superga near Turin.
The Basilica di Superga near Turin.
The Basilica di Superga near Turin.
The façade of Palazzo Carignano.
The façade of Palazzo Carignano.
The Gran Madre Church from the Mole Antonelliana.
The Gran Madre Church from the Mole Antonelliana.
The Gran Madre Church at night.
The Gran Madre Church at night.
Sunset on the Po River in Turin
Sunset on the Po River in Turin

The best known building of the city is the Mole Antonelliana, whose construction began in 1863 and which today houses the National Cinema Museum. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 802 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) http://www. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixel Image in higher resolution (1024 × 768 pixel, file size: 802 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) http://www. ... The Porte Palatine were one of the four Roman entrances of Turin. ... Image File history File links Torino-mole01. ... Image File history File links Torino-mole01. ... The Mole on the 2 cent Italian euro coin The Mole Antonelliana is a major landmark of the Italian city Turin. ... Image File history File links Mg-k_Torino_Mole. ... Image File history File links Mg-k_Torino_Mole. ... The Mole on the 2 cent Italian euro coin The Mole Antonelliana is a major landmark of the Italian city Turin. ... Image File history File links Mg-k_Basilica_Superga1. ... Image File history File links Mg-k_Basilica_Superga1. ... The Basilica of Superga is a church in the vicinity of Turin. ... Image File history File links Mg-k_Basilica_Superga2. ... Image File history File links Mg-k_Basilica_Superga2. ... The Basilica of Superga is a church in the vicinity of Turin. ... Image File history File links Mg-k_Torino_Carignano. ... Image File history File links Mg-k_Torino_Carignano. ... baroque façade rear façade Palazzo Carignano is an historical building in the center of Turin. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2560x1920, 1101 KB) This Photo was taken by me 3/8/05 Gabridelca 12:29, 16 Jun 2005 (UTC) Turins Gran Madre File links The following pages link to this file: Turin ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (2560x1920, 1101 KB) This Photo was taken by me 3/8/05 Gabridelca 12:29, 16 Jun 2005 (UTC) Turins Gran Madre File links The following pages link to this file: Turin ... The Mole on the 2 cent Italian euro coin The Mole Antonelliana is a major landmark of the Italian city Turin. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2592 × 1944 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (2592 × 1944 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 315 KB) Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Turin Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1600x1200, 315 KB) Licensing File links The following pages link to this file: Turin Metadata This file contains additional information, probably added from the digital camera or scanner used to create or digitize it. ... The Po (Latin: Padus, Italian: Po) is a river that flows 652 kilometers (405 miles) eastward across northern Italy, from Monviso (in the Cottian Alps) to the Adriatic Sea near Venice. ... The Mole on the 2 cent Italian euro coin The Mole Antonelliana is a major landmark of the Italian city Turin. ... Year 1863 (MDCCCLXIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


The Palatine Towers are among the best preserved Roman remains in northern Italy. The Porte Palatine were one of the four Roman entrances of Turin. ...


The Cathedral of St John the Baptist houses the Shroud of Turin, an old linen cloth with an imprint of a man, which is believed by many to be the cloth that covered Jesus in his grave. The Cathedral of Saint John the Baptist (Italian Duomo di San Giovanni, Dome of Saint John) was built in Turin during 1491-1498. ... The first photo of the Shroud of Turin, taken in 1898. ... This article is about Jesus of Nazareth. ...


Nearby is the former royal residence: the seventeenth-century Palazzo Reale, built for Madama Reale Christine Marie of France. Palazzo Reale, Turin: the facade (1646–60). ... Christine Marie of France, Regent of Savoy Christine Marie of France, fr. ...


The Museo Egizio has the most important collection of Egyptian antiquities in the world after the Cairo Museum. Egyptian statues in the museum. ... Main entrance of the Egyptian Museum The Museum of Egyptian Antiquities, known commonly as the Egyptian Museum, in Cairo, Egypt, is home to the most extensive collection of pharaonic antiquities in the world. ...


Turin has buildings of great historical and architectural interest: the Savoy Residences. In addition to the Royal Palace (the official residence of the Savoys until 1865) there are many palaces, residences and castles in the city centre and in the surrounding towns. Turin is home to Palazzo Chiablese, the Royal Armoury, the Royal Library, Palazzo Madama, Palazzo Carignano, Villa della Regina, and the Valentino Castle. The Residences of the Royal House of Savoy is a World Heritage Site in the Province of Torino, Italy (1997), which includes the following patrimonies: Palazzo Carignano. ... Façade of Palazzo Madama, Turin. ... baroque façade rear façade Palazzo Carignano is an historical building in the center of Turin. ...


The complex of the Residences of the Royal House of Savoy in Turin and in the nearby cities of Rivoli, Moncalieri, Venaria Reale, Agliè, Racconigi, Stupinigi, Pollenzo and Govone was declared in 1997 a World Heritage Sites by UNESCO. The Residences of the Royal House of Savoy is a group of structures in Turin and its province, in Piedmont (northern Italy). ... This article is about the town near Turin, Italy. ... Moncalieri is a town of approximately 56,000 inhabitants (2001) about nine kilometers south of Turin, Italy. ... Country Italy Region Piedmont Province Province of Turin (TO) Mayor Elevation 262 m Area 20. ... Country Italy Region Piedmont Province Province of Turin (TO) Mayor  ? Elevation 315 m Area 13. ... Country Italy Region Piedmont Province Cuneo (CN) Mayor Adriano Tosello Elevation 260 m Area 48. ... Stupinigi is a suburb of the town of Nichelino, in the province of Turin (Piedmont, northern Italy) It is especially famous for its palazzina di caccia (hunting lodge) built by Filippo Juvarra for the House of Savoy in the 17th century. ... The ancient town of Pollentia on the left bank of the Tanaro is known today as Pollenzo, a fraction of Bra in the Province of Cuneo, Piedmont. ... Country Italy Region Piedmont Province Province of Cuneo (CN) Mayor Elevation 301 m Area 18. ... Elabana Falls is in Lamington National Park, part of the Central Eastern Rainforest Reserves World Heritage site in Queensland, Australia. ... UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) is a specialized agency of the United Nations established in 1945. ...


Its gardens include the Orto Botanico dell'Università di Torino, a historic botanical garden. Inside the United States Botanic Garden Washington, D.C. Botanical gardens grow a wide variety of plants primarily categorized and documented for scientific purposes. ...


In the hills overlooking the city is the basilica church of Superga, providing a view of Turin against a backdrop of the snow-capped Alps. The basilica holds the tombs of many of the dukes of Savoy, as well as many of the kings of Sardinia. Superga can be reached by means of the Superga Rack Railway from the suburb of Sassi. The Basilica of Superga is a church in the vicinity of Turin. ... Alp redirects here. ... The Superga Rack Railway (or Sassi-Superga Railway) is a mountain railway line in the city of Turin in Italy. ...


Universities

The University of Turin (Italian Università degli Studi di Torino, UNITO) is a university in the city of Turin in the Piedmont region of north-western Italy. ... The Polytechnic University of Turin (Italian: Politecnico di Torino, POLITO) is an engineering university based in Turin. ...

Business School

  • (ESCP-EAP European School of Management)

The ESCP-EAP European School of Management is a top ranking international business school and one of the most prestigious French Management Grandes Écoles [1], [2]. It is the oldest institution in the world[3] dedicated to business education. ...

Publishing and journalism

After Alexandria, Madrid, New Delhi, Antwerp and Montreal, Turin has been chosen by UNESCO as World Book Capital for the year 2006. The International Book Fair is one of the most important fairs of its kind in Europe. This article is about the city in Egypt. ... This article is about the Spanish capital. ... , This article is about the capital city of India. ... For other uses, see Antwerp (disambiguation). ... Nickname: Motto: Concordia Salus (well-being through harmony) Coordinates: , Country Province Region Montréal Founded 1642 Established 1832 Government  - Mayor Gérald Tremblay Area [1][2][3]  - City 365. ... UNESCO logo UNESCO (United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization) is a specialized agency of the United Nations established in 1945. ... World Book Capital is a title bestowed by UNESCO to a city in recognition of the quality of its programs to promote books and reading and the dedication of all players in the book industry. ...


Turin is home to one of Italy's principal national newspapers, La Stampa, and to the sports daily Tuttosport. La Stampa is one of the best-known and most widely sold Italian daily newspapers, published in Turin and distributed in Italy and in other nations in Europe. ... Tuttosport’s cover of 3 December 2006 celebrates Torino F.C.’s centenary: the club was founded on 3 December 1906 Tuttosport is an Italian national sports newspaper based in Turin which has been published since 30 July 1945. ...


Sport

Rowing

Turin was the city where the FISA (international rowing federation) was born in 1892. ...


Football

The city is famous for two football teams: Juventus F.C. (founded 1897), and Torino F.C. (founded 1906). These squads play in the oldest derby in Italy: the Derby della Mole or Derby of Torino [6]. Soccer redirects here. ... Juventus redirects here. ... Torino Football Club is one of the most popular Italian football clubs, based in Turin. ... In many countries the term local derby, or simply just derby (pronounced der-bee in American English and dar-bee in British English after the English city) means a sporting fixture between two (generally local) rivals, particularly in Association Football. ... Derby della Mole is the Italian name for the Turin derby, played out between the citys two most successful teams, Juventus FC and Torino Calcio. ...


Juventus is the Italy's most successful team, and one of the most prestigious [6] and successful in the world [6]. The torinese side, world's sixth club with the most official international titles [7], was the first team in football history [8] -and only at present- to have won all official international championships and cups for clubs [9] recognized by one of the six regional confederations (UEFA [10] in this case) and by FIFA [8]. This page details football records in Italy. ... Below is a list of clubs with the most international titles won in the world, and in each continent (since a top-3 to top-10) recognized by one of the six continental confederations of international football and the International Federation of Association Football. ... This page indexes the individual year in football (soccer) pages. ... This page indexes the individual year in football (soccer) pages. ... A local gaelic football team. ... This article is about the international association football organization. ... The Union Européenne de Football Association or Union of European Football Associations in English, almost always referred to by the acronym UEFA (pronounced (you-AY-fuh) or (oo-Ay-fuh) or ), is the administrative and controlling body for European football. ... This article is about the international association football organization. ...


In 1949, a plane carrying the whole Torino F.C. team (at that time the most important in Italy and known as the Grande Torino) Superga air disaster hit the back side of the Basilica of Superga, in the Turin hills. Valentino Mazzola (one of the best Italian players of all times), father of Ferruccio and Sandro Mazzola (who were later to become football champions) were among those who perished in the crash. Torino Football Club is one of the most popular Italian football clubs, based in Turin. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Torino F.C.. (Discuss) Grande Torino (The Great Torino) is how the Torino F.C. team of the forties is known in Italy. ... The Superga air disaster happened on Wednesday, May 4, 1949, when a plane carrying almost the entire Grande Torino squad (18 players), plus management, journalists and crew, crashed into the Superga hills near Turin, killing everyone on board. ... The Basilica of Superga is a church in the vicinity of Turin. ... Valentino Mazzola. ... Sandro Mazzola (born November 8, 1942 in Turin, Italy) was a football player. ...


Olympic Games

Turin was the host of the 2006 Winter Olympics. The 2006 Winter Olympics, officially known as the XX Olympic Winter Games, were celebrated in Turin, Italy from February 10, 2006, through February 26, 2006. ...


Other international championships hosted

1934 1934 European Championships in Athletics
1959 I Summer Universiade
1970 VI Summer Universiade
2005 Figure Skating European Championship
2006 37th Chess Olympiad;
World Fencing Championship [11]

Host city for the Winter Olympic Games The 1st European Championships in Athletics were held in Turin, Italy in 1934. ... The 1959 Summer Universiade, also known as the I Summer Universiade, took place in Turin, Italy. ... The 1970 Summer Universiade, also known as the VI Summer Universiade, took place in Turin, Italy. ... The 37th Chess Olympiad took place from 20 May to 6 June 2006 in Turin, (Italy). ... Fencing advertisement for the 1900 Summer Olympic Games This article is about the sport, which is distinguished from stage fencing and academic fencing (mensur). ...

2007 Winter Universiade Games
2008 23rd European Rhythmic Gymnastics (Calisthenics) Championships
2008 11th European and Mediterranean Indoor Archery Championships: Torino 2008
2009 IAAF European Indoor Championships in Athletics
2010 Figure Skating World Championship

[12][13] The 2007 Winter Universiade, the XXIII Winter Universiade, is scheduled to take place in Turin, Italy. ... Rhythmic gymnasts from Greece in the 2000 Sydney Olympics Rhythmic gymnastics is a sport in which single competitors or pairs, trios or even more manipulate one or two apparatuses: Ball, Clubs, Hoop, Ribbon, and Rope. ... Archery is the practice of using a bow to shoot arrows. ...


Other sports

Volleyball

The C.U.S. Torino volleyball team won 4 times the domestic league and, in season 1979/80 the Volleyball European Champion's Cup. It was the first team from western Europe to win this competition. In the 1990s, the team had been dismantled due to economical issues.


Chocolate

Turin is the birth place of solid chocolate. It was in Turin that, at the end of the 18th century, Mr. Doret invented a revolutionary machine that could make solid chocolate (as opposed to drinking chocolate). Turin chocolate firms produce a typical chocolate, called Gianduiotto, named after Gianduja, a local Commedia dell'arte mask; plus many other kinds of chocolate. Every year the town organizes CioccolaTÒ, a two-week chocolate festival run with the main Piedmontese chocolate producers, such as Venchi and others, as well as some big international companies, such as Lindt & Sprüngli. For other uses, see Chocolate (disambiguation). ... The Gianduiotto is a Piedmontese chocolate whose shape is similar to an upturned boat. ... Gianduja is one of the masks of the Italian Commedia dellArte, typically representing the town of Turin (and Piedmont in general). ... Commedia redirects here. ... Official Venchi logo Venchi is an Italian gourmet chocolate manufacturer founded by artisan chocolatier Silvano Venchi. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Lindor. ...


Nearby towns

Turin is surrounded by several smaller cities in the Province of Turin such as Grugliasco, Rivoli, Chivasso, Venaria, Settimo Torinese, Orbassano, Moncalieri, Avigliana, Buttigliera Alta, Gassino Torinese, Nichelino, Collegno, Pino Torinese, Chieri, Ciriè, Ivrea, Pinerolo, Borgaretto and others, that make up one of Italy's primary metropolitan areas. Grugliasco is a comune (municipality) in the Province of Turin in the Italian region Piedmont, located about 9 km west of Turin. ... Rivoli is a town near Turin, Italy. ... Chivasso is a common of 23. ... Country Italy Region Piedmont Province Province of Turin (TO) Mayor Elevation 262 m Area 20. ... Settimo Torinese is a commune in the province of Brescia, in Lombardy. ... Orbassano is a commune in the province Torino, Piedmont, Italy, about 20km from the city of Turin. ... Moncalieri is a town of approximately 56,000 inhabitants (2001) about nine kilometers south of Turin, Italy. ... Avigliana is a town of approximately 10,000 inhabitants located about 25 km from Turin in the Susa valley in Piedmont in northern Italy. ... Buttigliera Alta is a small village of approximately 6800 inhabitants located about 25 km from Turin in the Susa valley in Piemont. ... Gassino Torinese is a small Italian town in the Piedmont near Torino, in north-west Italy. ... Country Italy Region Piedmont Province Province of Turin (TO) Mayor  ? Elevation 229 m Area 20. ... Country Italy Region Piedmont Province Province of Turin (TO) Mayor  ? Elevation m Area 18. ... Country Italy Region Piedmont Province Province of Turin (TO) Mayor Elevation 550 m Area 21. ... Chieri is a town in the Province of Turin, Piedmont (Italy), located about 13 miles SE by rail and 8 miles by road from the town of Turin. ... Ivrea is a small town, with a population of slightly over 20,000 people, located in the Piemonte region of northwestern Italy. ... Pinerolo is a town in Italy, 40 km southwest of Turin on the River Chisone. ...


Notable natives

Giovanni Agnelli. ... Edoardo Agnelli (1892-1935) Italian industrialist and principal family shareholder of Fiat. ... For other uses, see Fiat (disambiguation). ... Juventus redirects here. ... Gianni Agnelli. ... For other uses, see Fiat (disambiguation). ... Juventus redirects here. ... Umberto Agnelli, (November 1, 1934 - 28 May 2004) was the chairman of Italian carmaker Fiat from early 2003 until his death. ... For other uses, see Fiat (disambiguation). ... Juventus redirects here. ... Giuliano Amato (born May 13, 1938) is an Italian politician. ... Avogadro redirects here. ... A magnet levitating above a high-temperature superconductor demonstrates the Meissner effect. ... Alessandro Baricco (b. ... Ferdinando Fred Buscaglione (Turin, 23 November 1921 - Rome, 3 February 1960) was an Italian singer and actor who became very popular in late 1950s. ... Giuseppe MarcAntonio Baretti (1719-1789), Italian critic, was born at Turin. ... Count Camillo Benso di Cavour (Turin, August 10, 1810 - Santena, near Turin, June 6, 1861) was a statesman who was a leading figure in the movement toward Italian unification and the first Prime Minister of the new Kingdom of Italy. ... Italian Unification (Italian: il Risorgimento, or The Resurgence) was the political and social movement that unified different states of the Italian peninsula into the single nation of Italy. ... Roberto Bettega (born December 27, 1950 in Turin) was an Italian footballer and arguably one of the greatest to ever put on the Juventus shirt. ... Norberto Bobbio (October 18, 1909 – January 9, 2004) was an Italian philosopher of law and political sciences and an historian of political thought. ... Giampiero Boniperti (born July 4, 1928) was an Italian football player who played for Juventus between 1946 and 1961. ... Juventus redirects here. ... Gianpiero Combi (November 20, 1902– August 12, 1956) was an Italian football goalkeeper who played for Juventus in the 1930s and won the 1934 World Cup with the Italy national team. ... Qualifying countries The 1934 FIFA World Cup was the second World Cup staged, and was hosted in Italy from May 27 to June 10. ... Arturo Brachetti Arturo Brachetti, born in Turin, Italy on the 13th of October 1957, is an inventive quick-change artist, well-known throughout the world. ... Carla Bruni Tedeschi (born Turin, Italy, 23 December 1967), is an Italian supermodel, songwriter and singer. ... Nicolas Sarkozy at Paris, May 2005. ... Pierre Paul Caffarel (1801 Turin - 1871 Turin), Italian entrepreneur who created the chocolate company of Caffarel. ... Antonio Benedetto Carpano, (1764 Turin -1815 Turin)Italian inventor, famous for having invented the Vermouth and consequently the aperitif. ... A bottle of vermouth Vermouth is a fortified wine flavored with aromatic herbs and spices (aromatized in the trade) using closely-guarded recipes (trade secrets). ... Campari apéritif. ... Leo Chiosso (Turin, 8 August 1920) was an Italian lyricist mostly known for his work with Fred Buscaglione. ... Ferdinando Fred Buscaglione (Turin, 23 November 1921 - Rome, 3 February 1960) was an Italian singer and actor who became very popular in late 1950s. ... Robert Mano Fano (1917- ) is professor emeritus of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. ... Galileo Ferraris (October 30, 1847 - February 7, 1897) was an Italian physicist and electrical engineer, noted mostly for his studies on alternating current. ... Piero Gobetti (1901-1926) was a young journalist, intellectual and radical liberal. ... Joseph-Louis, comte de Lagrange (January 25, 1736 Turin, Kingdom of Sardinia - April 10, 1813 Paris) was an Italian-French mathematician and astronomer who made important contributions to all fields of analysis and number theory and to classical and celestial mechanics as arguably the greatest mathematician of the 18th century. ... Vincenzo Lancia (Fobello 1881- Turin 1937) Italian pilot, engineer and founder of Lancia Vincenzo Lancia was born in the small village of Fobello on August 24th, 1881, close to Turin. ... Lancia (pronounced Lan-cha) is an Italian automobile manufacturer founded in 1906 by Vincenzo Lancia and which became part of the Fiat Group in 1969. ... Advertising for Lavazza, Transport of coffee in Indochina, ca 1900 Luigi Lavazza was an Italian businessman (1859 Murisengo - 1949), creator of the company of coffee Lavazza in 1895 in Turin. ... For other uses, see Coffee (disambiguation). ... Carlo Levi Carlo Levi (29 November 1902 – January 4, 1975) was an Italian-Jewish painter, writer, activist, anti-fascist, and doctor. ... Primo Michele Levi (July 31, 1919 – April 11, 1987) was a Jewish Italian chemist, Holocaust survivor and author of memoirs, short stories, poems, and novels. ... For other uses, see Holocaust (disambiguation) and Shoah (disambiguation). ... Salvador Edward Luria (August 13, 1912 - February 6, 1991) was a naturalized American microbiologist whose pioneering work on phage helped open up molecular biology. ... Alessandro Martini (1812-1905), Italian businessman, founder of the most important company of vermouth in the world, namely Martini or Martini & Rossi in the United States In 1830 he purchased a small company of vine, which was situated very close to Turin. ... For other possible meanings, see Mau Mau (disambiguation). ... Carlo Mollino (May 6, 1905 - August 27, 1973) was an Italian architect and designer. ... Rita Levi-Montalcini (born April 22, 1909) is an Italian neurologist who, together with colleague Stanley Cohen, received the 1986 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for their discovery of growth factors. ... Adriano Olivetti (1901 Turin- 1960 Turin), Italian entrepreneur, the son of the founder of Olivetti, Camillo Olivetti Adriano Olivetti was known worldwide during his lifetime as the Italian manufacturer of Olivetti typewriters, calculators, and computers. ... Carlo Parola (20 September 1921 - 22 March 2000), was an Italian football player and coach, from Turin. ... A bicycle kick, scissors kick, or overhead kick is a move in football, which is made by throwing the body up into the air, making a shearing movement with the legs to get one leg high overhead to reach the ball (in original head height), which gets kicked backward over... Giuseppe Peano Giuseppe Peano (August 27, 1858 – April 20, 1932) was an Italian mathematician and philosopher best known for his contributions to set theory. ... Aurelio Peccei (July 4, 1908 - March 14, 1984) was an Italian scholar and industrialist, best known as the founder and first president of the Club of Rome. ... The Club of Rome is a global think tank that deals with a variety of international political issues. ... Gabry Ponte (Gabriele Ponte, born April 20, 1973) is an Italian DJ best known for his membership in the Italian dance group Eiffel 65. ... Eiffel 65 was an Italian electronic/eurodance/italodance three-piece group, formed in the late 1990s and best known for their international hit Blue (Da Ba Dee). Their other hit singles include Move Your Body and Too Much of Heaven, all of which appeared on their debut album Europop, released... Vittorio Pozzo (born March 2, 1886 in Turin, Piedmont, Italy – Ponderano (Biella) December 21, 1968) was an Italian football (soccer) coach who was most famous for leading the Italian national team to victory in the 1934 and 1938 FIFA World Cup; managed the side that won the 1930 and 1935... First International Italy 6 - 2 France (Milan, Italy; 15 May 1910) Largest win Italy 9 - 0 USA (Brentford, England; 2 August 1948) Worst defeat Hungary 7 - 1 Italy (Budapest, Hungary; 6 April 1924) World Cup Appearances 15 (First in 1934) Best result Winners, 1934, 1938, 1982 European Championship Appearances 6... Qualifying countries The 1934 FIFA World Cup was the second World Cup staged, and was hosted in Italy from May 27 to June 10. ... Qualifying countries The 1938 FIFA World Cup was the third staging of the World Cup, and was held in France from June 4 to June 19. ... Tullio Regge (born July 11, 1931 in Turin) is an Italian physicist. ... Piero Sraffa. ... Subsonica is an Italian Rock band that was formed in 1996. ... Francesco Hayez: Massimo dAzeglio 1860 Massimo Taparelli, marquis dAzeglio (Turin, October 24, 1798 - January 15, 1866), was an Italian statesman, novelist and painter. ... Umberto Tozzi (born March 4, 1952) is an Italian pop singer and composer, born in Turin. ... Gianni Vattimo at the National Gay Pride march, Como, 1999 Gianni Vattimo (born January 4, 1936) is an internationally recognized Italian author and politician. ... King Victor Emmanuel II of Italy. ... For other uses, see Piedmont (disambiguation). ...

Notable residents

List of people associated with the city of Turin, and its environs: (in alphabetical order) Adelaide of Susa (1016-1091) princess Africa Unite musical group Giovanni Agnelli (1866-1945) industrialist Gianni Agnelli (1921-2003) industrialist Umberto Agnelli (1934-2004) industrialist Cesare Aimonetti (1868-1950) mathematician Marisa Allasio (born 1936) actor... Alessandro Del Piero, Cavaliere Ufficiale OMRI[3][4] (born November 9, 1974 in Conegliano) is an Italian World Cup-winning footballer. ... A footballer is a person who plays one of the various games known as football – especially association football, although the term is also used to refer to participants in Australian rules football and Gaelic football. ... Edmondo De Amicis (Oneglia (Imperia), October 21, 1846 - Bordighera, 1908), is a notable Italian childrens writer. ... This article incorporates text from the public domain Catholic Encyclopedia. ... Francesco Faà di Bruno (1825—1888) was an Italian mathematician and priest, born at Alessandria. ... Italo Calvino, on the cover of Lezioni americane: Sei proposte per il prossimo millennio Italo Calvino (October 15, 1923 – September 19, 1985) (pronounced ) was an Italian writer and novelist. ... Gaspare Campari was born in 1828 in the small town of Castelnuovo, the province of Lombardy, before Italy was unified. ... Francesco Cirio, Italian businessman and inventor of canned vegetables and meat (Nizza Monferrato close to Turin 1836-1900). ... Renato Dulbecco (born February 22, 1914) is an Italian-born virologist. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Emil Adolf von Behring was the first person to receive the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, for his work on the treatment of diphtheria. ... Umberto Eco (born January 5, 1932) is an Italian medievalist, semiotician, philosopher and novelist, best known for his novel The Name of the Rose (Il nome della rosa) and his many essays. ... A medievalist is a person who specializes in medieval studies. ... ... A philosopher is a person who thinks deeply regarding people, society, the world, and/or the universe. ... Literary criticism is the study, discussion, evaluation, and interpretation of literature. ... A novel is an extended work of written, narrative, prose fiction, usually in story form; the writer of a novel is a novelist. ... Luigi Einaudi, Cavaliere di Gran Croce decorato di Gran Cordone OMRI[1] (March 24, 1874 - October 30, 1961) was an Italian politician and economist. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A politician is an individual who is a formally recognized and active member of a government, or a person who influences the way a society is governed through an understanding of political power and group dynamics. ... Erasmus redirects here. ... Renaissance humanism (often designated simply as humanism) was a European intellectual movement beginning in Florence in the last decades of the 14th century. ... Theology finds its scholars pursuing the understanding of and providing reasoned discourse of religion, spirituality and God or the gods. ... Guido Fubini (January 19, 1879 - June 6, 1943) was an Italian mathematician, best known for Fubinis theorem. ... Leonhard Euler, considered one of the greatest mathematicians of all time A mathematician is a person whose primary area of study and research is the field of mathematics. ... Natalia Ginzburg née Levi (July 14, 1916, Palermo—October 7, 1991, Rome) was an Italian author whose work explored family relationships, politics, and philosophy. ... A writer is anyone who creates a written work, although the word more usually designates those who write creatively or professionally, or those who have written in many different forms. ... Antonio Gramsci (IPA: ) (January 22, 1891 – April 27, 1937) was an Italian writer, politician and political theorist. ... A writer is anyone who creates a written work, although the word more usually designates those who write creatively or professionally, or those who have written in many different forms. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      A politician is an individual who is a formally recognized and active member of a government, or a person who influences the way a society is governed through an understanding of political power and group dynamics. ... A political theorist is someone who engages in political theory. ... The Fourth Estate The Partito Comunista Italiano (PCI) or Italian Communist Party emerged as Partito Comunista dItalia or Communist Party of Italy from a secession by the Leninist comunisti puri tendency from the Italian Socialist Party (PSI) during that bodys congress on 21 January 1921 at Livorno. ... Primo Michele Levi (July 31, 1919 – April 11, 1987) was a Jewish Italian chemist, Holocaust survivor and author of memoirs, short stories, poems, and novels. ... For other uses, see Holocaust (disambiguation) and Shoah (disambiguation). ... Cesare Lombroso Cesare Lombroso (Verona, November 6, 1835 - Turin, October 19, 1909) was a historical figure in modern criminology, and the founder of the Italian Positivist School of criminology. ... Look up Criminologist in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Cesare Lombroso (1835-1909) and two of his Italian disciples, Enrico Ferri (1856–1929) and Raffaele Garofalo (1851–1934), founded what became known as the Italian school of criminology. ... Claudio Magris, Warsaw (Poland), March 9, 2005. ... Palazzo Madama house of the Senate of the Republic. ... Joseph de Maistre (portrait by Karl Vogel von Vogelstein, 1810) Joseph-Marie, Comte de Maistre (April 1, 1753- February 26, 1821) was a French-speaking Savoyard lawyer, diplomat, writer, and philosopher. ... French (français, langue française) is one of the most important Romance languages, outnumbered in speakers only by Spanish and Portuguese. ... Flag of Savoy This article is about the historical region of Savoy. ... Giulio Natta (February 26, 1903 – May 2, 1979) was an Italian chemist. ... A chemist pours from a round-bottom flask. ... This is a list of Nobel Prize laureates in Chemistry from 1901 to 2006. ... For other uses, see 1963 (disambiguation). ... Friedrich Wilhelm Nietzsche (October 15, 1844 – August 25, 1900) (IPA: ) was a nineteenth-century German philosopher and philologist. ... A philosopher is a person who thinks deeply regarding people, society, the world, and/or the universe. ... Vilfredo Pareto Vilfredo Federico Damaso Pareto [vilfre:do pare:to] (July 15, 1848, Paris – August 19, 1923, Geneva) was a French-Italian sociologist, economist and philosopher. ... Sociology is the study of the social lives of humans, groups and societies. ... Alan Greenspan, former chairman, United States Federal Reserve. ... A philosopher is a person who thinks deeply regarding people, society, the world, and/or the universe. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... A poet (from the ancient Greek ποιητης, poïêtes (artisan) ; ποιέω, poieō) is a person who writes poetry. ... Rousseau redirects here. ... Emilio Salgari. ... A writer is anyone who creates a written work, although the word more usually designates those who write creatively or professionally, or those who have written in many different forms. ... Ascanio Sobrero (1812-1888) was an Italian chemist who discovered nitroglycerin in 1847 while working under Théophile-Jules Pelouze at the University of Torino, who had worked with the explosive material guncotton. ... A chemist pours from a round-bottom flask. ... Germain Sommeiller (1815-1871), Italian ingeener, famous for being the Chief of the design and the Director of the works for the Mont Cenis tunnel or Frejus Tunnel (12 km), the first big tunnel of History He was born in Saint-Jeoire-en Faucigny (Bonneville, Haute Savoie) on 15th February... The Falkirk Wheel in Scotland. ... Gianni Vattimo at the National Gay Pride march, Como, 1999 Gianni Vattimo (born January 4, 1936) is an internationally recognized Italian author and politician. ... Elio Vittorini (July 23, 1908 - February 12, 1966) was an Italian writer and novelist. ...

International relations

Twin cities:

Collaboration accords with: Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Chambéry is the capital of the department of Savoie, France. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... Cologne (German: , IPA: ; local dialect: Kölle ) is Germanys fourth-largest city after Berlin, Hamburg and Munich, and is the largest city both in the German Federal State of North Rhine-Westphalia and within the Rhine-Ruhr Metropolitan Area, one of the major European metropolitan areas with more than... Image File history File links Flag_of_Luxembourg. ... District Luxembourg Canton Esch-sur-Alzette Geography Area Area rank 14. ... Luxembourg - a small country in west Europe Luxembourg (city) - the capital city of the country Luxembourg (district) - a district in the country Luxembourg, province of Belgium Luxemburg, Iowa - a city in the USA Luxemburg, Wisconsin - a village in the USA Luxembourg Garden, Paris, France Luxemburg Township, Minnesota - a township in... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_United_Kingdom. ... For other uses, see Glasgow (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Belgium_(civil). ... Liege or Liège has several meanings: A liege is the person or entity to which one has pledged allegiance. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... For other uses, see Lille (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Netherlands. ... Nickname: Motto: Sterker door strijd (Stronger through Struggle) Location of Rotterdam Coordinates: , Country Province Government  - Mayor Ivo Opstelten  - Aldermen Jeannette Baljeu Hamit Karakus Orhan Kaya Lucas Bolsius Jantine Kriens Dominic Schrijer Roelf de Boer Leonard Geluk Area [1]  - Total 319 km² (123. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Brazil. ... Nickname: Motto: Poder, prosperidade e altruísmo(Portuguese) Power, prosperity and altruism Location in Brazil Country Region State Mato Grosso do Sul Founded 1899 Government  - Mayor Nelson Trad Filho (PMDB) Area  - City 8,110 km²  (3,131. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Argentina. ... Córdoba is a city located near the geographical center of Argentina, in the foothills of the Sierras Chicas mountains on the Suquía River, about 700 km west-northwest from Buenos Aires. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Motto: Speramus Meliora; Resurget Cineribus (We Hope For Better Things; It Shall Rise From the Ashes - this motto was adopted after the disastrous 1805 fire that devastated the city) Nickname: The Motor City and Motown Location in Wayne County, Michigan Founded Incorporated July 24, 1701 1815  County Wayne County Mayor... Image File history File links Flag_of_Guatemala. ... Buildings flanking the Central Park Square in Quetzaltenango Building flanking the Central Park Square in Quetzaltenango Quetzaltenango is the second most populous city of Guatemala, after Guatemala City, and is the capital of Quetzaltenango Department. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... The Salt Lake Temple of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints is Salt Lake Citys top tourist draw. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Palestine. ... Not to be confused with the Spanish name Garza or the Egyptian town of Giza. ... “Palestinian government” redirects here. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Israel. ... Hebrew Arabic حَيْفَا Government City District Haifa Population 266,300 (city) 1,039,000 (metropolitan area) Jurisdiction 63,666 dunams (63. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Japan. ... Nagoya ) is the fourth largest city in Japan. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Peoples_Republic_of_China. ... This article is about a city. ...

Image File history File links Flag_of_Romania. ... County Bacău County Status County capital Mayor Romeo Stavarache, National Liberal Party, since 2004 Area 41 km² Population (2002) 175,500 181,144 - National Institute of statistics, July 1, 2004 Density 5133 inh/km² Geographical coordinates Web site http://www. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_Spain. ... Location Coordinates : Time Zone : CET (GMT +1) - summer: CEST (GMT +2) General information Native name Barcelona (Catalan) Spanish name Barcelona Nickname Ciutat Comtal (City of Counts) Postal code 08001–08080 Area code 34 (Spain) + 93 (Barcelona) Website http://www. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... This article is about the French city. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... For the annual festival, see Cannes Film Festival. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_South_Korea. ... This article is about Gwangju Metropolitan City. ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Peoples_Republic_of_China. ... Harbin on a map of China For other meanings of Harbin, see Harbin (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Peoples_Republic_of_China. ... For other uses, see Shenzhen (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... For other uses, see Vancouver (disambiguation). ... Image File history File links Flag_of_the_Czech_Republic. ... Zlín (during 1948-90 named Gottwaldov) is a city in Zlínský kraj (region), in southeastern Moravia, Czech Republic, on the Drevnice River, at 49. ...

References

The public domain comprises the body of all creative works and other knowledge—writing, artwork, music, science, inventions, and others—in which no person or organization has any proprietary interest. ... Not to be confused with New Catholic Encyclopedia. ...

Footnotes

  1. ^ http://demo.istat.it/bilmens2006/index.html- ISTAT demographics
  2. ^ OECD. Retrieved on 2007-08-31.
  3. ^ The city's history. Turismo e promozione. Città di Torino. Retrieved on 2007-08-31.
  4. ^ Torino Turistica - Servizio Telematico Pubblico - Città di Torino
  5. ^ Weatherbase: Historical Weather for Turin, Italy (English). Weatherbase (2007). Retrieved on 2007-06-23.
  6. ^ a b c Football Derbies: Derby della Mole. footballderbies.com. Retrieved on 08 March 2008..
  7. ^ Only Milan (with 18 titles), Boca Juniors (17) and other three clubs: Independiente, Real Madrid (both with 15) and Al-Ahly (12) have won more official international titles.
  8. ^ a b FIFA Classic Clubs: Juventus FC. FIFA Official Website. Retrieved on 2007-08-31.
  9. ^ European clubs facts: Juventus FC. UEFA Official Website. Retrieved on 2007-10-02.
  10. ^ UEFA club competitions press kit (.PDF archive, page 23). UEFA Official Website. Retrieved on 2006-08-25.
  11. ^ http://www.escrime-torino2006.com/eng/
  12. ^ [1] thecgf.com (English) Retrieved on 2007-10-06
  13. ^ [2] european-athletics.org (English) Retrieved on 2007-10-06
  14. ^ http://www.eresie.it/id337.htm eresie.it (Italian) Retrieved on 2007-10-06
  15. ^ http://cronologia.leonardo.it/mondo41e.htm cronologia.leonardo.it (Italian) Retrieved on 2007-10-06
  16. ^ [3] (Italian) Retrieved on 2007-11-03
  17. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y Turin City Hall - International Affairs (English) Retrieved on 2008-01-26.

Istituto Nazionale di Statistica (ISTAT) is the Italian national statistical institute, roughly corresponding to the United States Census Bureau. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 243rd day of the year (244th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 243rd day of the year (244th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 174th day of the year (175th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... March 8 is the 67th day of the year in the Gregorian Calendar (68th in Leap years). ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... Associazione Calcio Milan, commonly referred to by the abbreviation AC Milan or simply Milan, is an Italian professional football club based in Milan, Lombardy. ... Boca Juniors redirects here. ... Independiente redirects here. ... Real Madrid Club de Fútbol is a Spanish sports club most widely known for its professional football team based in Madrid. ... Al-Ahly (Arabic: النادى الاهلى للرياضة البدنية ) is an Egyptian football club founded and headed by the English gentleman Mitchell Ince in April, 1907 in Cairo, Egypt. ... Below is a list of clubs with the most international titles won in the world, and in each continent (since a top-3 to top-10) recognized by one of the six continental confederations of international football and the International Federation of Association Football. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 243rd day of the year (244th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 275th day of the year (276th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 237th day of the year (238th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 279th day of the year (280th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 279th day of the year (280th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 279th day of the year (280th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 279th day of the year (280th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 26th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

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Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Image File history File links Wikibooks-logo. ... Image File history File links Wikiquote-logo. ... Image File history File links Wikisource-logo. ... Image File history File links Commons-logo. ... Image File history File links WikiNews-Logo. ... Image File history File links Wikiversity-logo-Snorky. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... Arabic redirects here. ... Albanian ( IPA ) is a language spoken by 8 million people, primarily in Albania and Serbia (province of Kosovo-Metohija), but also in other parts of the Balkans with an Albanian population (parts of the Republic of Macedonia, and some parts in Montenegro and Serbia), along the eastern coast of Italy...

Preceded by
Montreal
World Book Capital
2006
Succeeded by
Bogotá


  Results from FactBites:
 
Shroud of Turin Story Guide to the Facts 2007 (4727 words)
The scientific study of the Turin Shroud is like a microcosm of the scientific search for God: it does more to inflame any debate than settle it.” Later in his commentary Ball added, “And yet, the shroud is a remarkable artefact, one of the few religious relics to have a justifiably mythical status.
In 1998, Turin’s scientific adviser, Piero Savarino, suggested, “extraneous substances found on the samples and the presence of extraneous thread (left over from ‘invisible mending’ routinely carried on in the past on parts of the cloth in poor repair)” might have accounted for an error in the carbon 14 dating.
The Sudarium of Oviedo and the Shroud of Turin
CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Turin (1530 words)
The City of Turin is the chief town of a civil province in Piedmont and was formerly the capital of the Duchy of Savoy and of the Kingdom of Sardinia.
In 1638, during the quarrel of the regency, the city was besieged by the French and defended by Prince Thomas of Savoy.
After that, Turin was the centre of all Italian movements for the union of the Peninsula, whether monarchical or republican.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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