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In music, tuning is the process of producing or preparing to produce a certain pitch in relation to another, usually at the unison but often at some other interval. When one is out of tune, too high or too low, one is sharp or flat, respectively. Usually tuning is done only for the fundamental of a pitch. Tuning at the unison obviously requires the ability to match pitch, and tuning at other intervals requires relative pitch. Wikibooks Wikiversity has more about this subject: School of Music Look up Music on Wiktionary, the free dictionary Wikisource, as part of the 1911 Encyclopedia Wikiproject, has original text related to this article: Music MusicNovatory: the science of music encyclopedia The Virginia Tech Multimedia Music Distionary, with definitions, pronunciations, examples... In music, pitch is the perception of the frequency of a note. ... UNISON logo UNISON is the largest trade union in the United Kingdom, with over 1. ... Jump to: navigation, search In music theory, an interval is the relationship between two notes or pitches, the lower and higher members of the interval. ... Jump to: navigation, search This article is about the musical notation. ... Alternate uses: Flat (disambiguation) Figure 1. ... The fundamental tone often referred to simply as the fundamental, is the lowest frequency in a harmonic series. ... Jump to: navigation, search The term relative pitch may denote: the distance of a musical note from a set point of reference, e. ...


Different methods of sound production require different methods of adjustment: Adjustment (from late Latin ad-juxtare, derived from juxta, near, but early confounded with a supposed derivation from Justus, right), regulating, adapting or settling; in commercial law, the settlement of a loss incurred at sea on insured goods. ...

Tuning may be done by aurally testing of the two pitches in question and adjusting the incorrect one until it sounds the same as (or in the correct relation to) the desired pitch. Sometimes a tuning fork or electronic tuning device may be used as a reference pitch, though often a piano is used. An orchestra tunes to an A provided by the principal oboist. Ear training is what musicians do to improve their ability to identify, relatively, chords, intervals, rhythms, and other elements of music. ... Jump to: navigation, search The acoustic archtop guitar, used in Jazz music, features steel strings The guitar is a stringed musical instrument. ... Machine Head is the third Mark-II Deep Purple album. ... Jump to: navigation, search Violin The violin is a stringed musical instrument that has four strings tuned a perfect fifth apart. ... In physics, tension is a force on a body directed to produce strain (extension); it can be considered to be negative compression. ... Jump to: navigation, search A wind instrument is a musical instrument that contains some type of resonator (usually a tube), in which a column of air is set into vibration by the player blowing into (or over) a mouthpiece set at the end of the resonator. ... Jump to: navigation, search A brass instrument is a musical instrument whose tone is produced by vibration of the lips as the player blows into a tubular resonator. ... Look up pipe in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... Jump to: navigation, search The bells of St Savas A bell is a simple sound-making device. ... A fundamental is something that cannot be built out of more basic things, which other things are built upon. ... In acoustics and telecommunication, the harmonic of a wave is a component frequency of the signal that is an integer multiple of the fundamental frequency. ... A tuning fork is a simple metal two-pronged fork with the tines formed from a U-shaped bar of elastic material (usually steel). ... Jump to: navigation, search Modern Oboe The oboe is a musical instrument of the woodwind double reed family. ...


Interference beats (or dissonance) may be used to objectively check tuning at the unison or other simple intervals. Since the speed or frequency of the "beats" is the difference between the two pitches when they are brought close enough for beating to occur, speed will increase as tonal distance increases, and speed will decrease as distance does, until beating is nonexistent at the exact unison. This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ...


Harmonics may be used to check the tuning of strings which are not tuned to the unison. For example, lightly fingering the node found half way down the highest string of a cello produces the same pitch as lightly fingering the node 1/3 of the way down the second highest string. In acoustics and telecommunication, the harmonic of a wave is a component frequency of the signal that is an integer multiple of the fundamental frequency. ... A standing wave. ...


There are various systems for establishing which relations between pitches are in tune; see musical tuning for an index of intonation systems. The strings of a guitar are normally tuned to fourths (excepting the G and B strings in standard tuning), as are the strings of the bass guitar and double bass. Violin, viola, and cello strings are tuned to fifths. However, the tunings of these instruments may be adjusted, as in scordatura. This page is about musical systems of tuning, for the musical process of tuning see tuning. ... Intonation is the variation of tone used when speaking. ... Jump to: navigation, search The acoustic archtop guitar, used in Jazz music, features steel strings The guitar is a stringed musical instrument. ... In music, see: Perfect fourth Augmented fourth or tritone The subdominant, and the chord built on the subdominant, is often simply called the fourth as it is the fourth scale degree. ... Jump to: navigation, search A Fender Jazz Bass Bass Guitar refers to an electric or acoustic stringed instrument with a similar appearance to the guitar, but with a larger body, commonly 4 strings, longer scale neck and tuned an octave lower in pitch than a guitar. ... Side and front views of a modern double bass with a French bow. ... Jump to: navigation, search Violin The violin is a stringed musical instrument that has four strings tuned a perfect fifth apart. ... Jump to: navigation, search The viola, properly called alto viola is a stringed musical instrument which serves as the middle voice of the violin family, between the upper lines played by the lighter violin (soprano register) and the lower lines played by the heavier cello (bass) and double bass. ... Jump to: navigation, search A cropped image to show the relative size of a cello to a human (Uncropped Version) The violoncello, or as it is more commonly to refered to as the cello or cello (pronounced Cheh-loh), is a stringed instrument and a member of the violin family. ... Jump to: navigation, search Fifth means one part out of five (1/5, 0. ... A scordatura (Italian) is an alternate tuning used for the open strings of a string instrument. ...


External links


  Results from FactBites:
 
EUROPA - Education and Training - Tuning Educational Stuctures in Europe (1650 words)
The Tuning project addresses several of the Bologna action lines and notably the adoption of a system of easily readable and comparable degrees, the adoption of a system based on two cycles and the establishment of a system of credits.
Tuning phase II The second phase of the Tuning project (2003-2004) is based on the outcomes of the first phase (2000-2002).
A more general ambition of the Tuning project is to be a platform for the exchange of experience and knowledge between countries, higher education institutions and staff with regard to the implementation of the Bologna process at European level.
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