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Encyclopedia > Tulane University

Tulane University

Image File history File linksMetadata Tulane_shield_web. ...

Motto Non Sibi Sed Suis
(Not for one's self, but for one's own)
Established as the Medical College of Louisiana in 1834[1]
as the University of Louisiana in 1847
as Tulane University of Louisiana in 1884
Type Private University
Academic term Semester
Endowment US $1 billion +[2]
President Scott Cowen
Faculty 1,132[1]
Undergraduates 6,533[1]
Postgraduates 4,073[1]
Location New Orleans, LA, USA (29.935344° N 90.122687° WCoordinates: 29.935344° N 90.122687° W)
Campus Urban
Colors Olive Green and Sky Blue           
Nickname Green Wave Tulane T Logo
Athletics NCAA Division I C-USA
Six teams competing in eight varsity sports
Affiliations AAU
Website www2.tulane.edu

Tulane University is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university located in New Orleans, Louisiana. Founded as a public medical college in 1834, the school grew into a full university and was eventually privatized under the endowments of Paul Tulane and Josephine Louise Newcomb in the late 19th century. It is the only American university that has been converted from a public institution to a private institution.[3] A motto (from Italian) is a phrase or a short list of words meant formally to describe the general motivation or intention of an entity, social group, or organization. ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... Year 1834 (MDCCCXXXIV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1847 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1884 (MDCCCLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... A private university is a university that is run without the control of any government entity. ... An academic term is a division of an academic year, the time during which a school, college or university holds classes. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... ISO 4217 Code USD User(s) the United States, the British Indian Ocean Territory,[1] the British Virgin Islands, East Timor, Ecuador, El Salvador, the Marshall Islands, Micronesia, Palau, Panama, Caicos Islands, and the insular areas of the United States Inflation 2. ... Billion may mean: 1,000,000,000 (one thousand million; ), used by most English-speaking countries (American and usual modern British meaning) 1,000,000,000,000 (one million million; ), used by most other countries outside Asia (older British meaning). ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... NOLA redirects here. ... Official language(s) de jure: none de facto: English & French Capital Baton Rouge Largest city New Orleans [1] Area  Ranked 31st  - Total 51,885 sq mi (134,382 km²)  - Width 130 miles (210 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 16  - Latitude 29°N to 33°N  - Longitude 89°W... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ... Crowded Shibuya, Tokyo shopping district An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... Olive is a dulled, darker yellowish-green color typically seen on green olives. ... The term blue may refer to any of a number of similar colours. ... The athletic nickname, or equivalently athletic moniker, of a university or college within the United States of America is the name officially adopted by that institution for at least the members of its athletic teams. ... Tulane University is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university located in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... Division I (or DI) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ... Conference USA, officially abbreviated C-USA, is a college athletic conference whose member institutions are located within the Southern United States. ... The word varsity can refer to several things. ... The Association of American Universities (AAU) is an organization of leading research universities devoted to maintaining a strong system of academic research and education. ... A website (alternatively, Web site or web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos and other digital assets that is hosted on one or several Web server(s), usually accessible via the Internet, cell phone or a LAN. A Web page is a document, typically written in HTML... A private university is a university that is run without the control of any government entity. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Coeducation is the integrated education of males and females at the same school facilities. ... A university is an institution of higher education and of research, which grants academic degrees. ... NOLA redirects here. ... Official language(s) de jure: none de facto: English & French Capital Baton Rouge Largest city New Orleans [1] Area  Ranked 31st  - Total 51,885 sq mi (134,382 km²)  - Width 130 miles (210 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 16  - Latitude 29°N to 33°N  - Longitude 89°W... The Founder Paul Tulane (May 10, 1801 – March 27, 1887), an American philanthropist, was born near Princeton, New Jersey, the son of Louis Tulane, a French immigrant, and Maria Tulane. ... Josephine Louise Newcomb, born Josephine Le Monnier (October 31, 1816–April 7, 1901), was the philanthropist whose donations led to the founding of Newcomb College at Tulane University. ...


Tulane is an American research university. Particularly noted are its programs in architecture[citation needed], international development[citation needed], philosophy[citation needed], political economy[citation needed], Latin American studies (ranked second in the country by the Gourman Report[4]), as well as its graduate schools of law, business and medicine[citation needed]. This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Richardson Memorial hall, Home of the TSA The Tulane School of Architecture or (TSA) is the school of architecture at Tulane University in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... This article is about International Development. ... The philosopher Socrates about to take poison hemlock as ordered by the court. ... The Politics series Politics Portal This box:      Political economy was the original term for the study of production, the acts of buying and selling, and their relationships to laws, customs and government. ... Latin America consists of the countries of South America and some of North America (including Central America and some the islands of the Caribbean) whose inhabitants mostly speak Romance languages, although Native American languages are also spoken. ... The Princeton Review: Gourman Report is a ranking guide for undergraduate programs and professional programs in American and International Universities. ... Lady Justice or Justitia is a personification of the moral force that underlies the legal system (particularly in Western art). ... Wall Street, Manhattan is the location of the New York Stock Exchange and is often used as a symbol for the world of business. ... Medicine is the science and art of maintaining andor restoring human health through the study, diagnosis, and treatment of patients. ...

Contents

History

Founding/early history

The University dates from 1834 as the Medical College of Louisiana.[1] With the addition of a law department, it became The University of Louisiana in 1847,[1] a public university. 1851, saw the establishment of an Academic Department, the forerunner of the College of Arts and Sciences. Two significant scientific innovations were made by faculty at the University at this time.[5] J. Lawrence Smith invented the inverted microscope in 1850,[6] and John L. Riddell invented the first practical microscope to allow binocular viewing through a single objective lens in 1851.[7] Year 1834 (MDCCCXXXIV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... At present, no single institution exists with the specific, official name of the University of Louisiana. ... 1847 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... quagmire:For alternate meanings see state university (disambiguation). ... 1851 (MDCCCLI) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


The University closed for three years during the Civil War; after reopening, it went through a period of financial challenges. Paul Tulane donated extensive real estate within New Orleans for the support of education; this donation led to the establishment of a Tulane Educational Fund (TEF), whose board of administrators sought to support the University of Louisiana instead of establishing a new university. In response, through the influence of former Civil War general Randall Lee Gibson, the Louisiana state legislature transferred control of the University of Louisiana to the administrators of the TEF in 1884.[1] This act created the Tulane University of Louisiana. Combatants United States of America (Union) Confederate States of America (Confederacy) Commanders Abraham Lincoln, Ulysses S. Grant Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee Strength 2,200,000 1,064,000 Casualties 110,000 killed in action, 360,000 total dead, 275,200 wounded 93,000 killed in action, 258,000 total... The Founder Paul Tulane (May 10, 1801 – March 27, 1887), an American philanthropist, was born near Princeton, New Jersey, the son of Louis Tulane, a French immigrant, and Maria Tulane. ... Randall Lee Gibson (September 10, 1832 – December 15, 1892) was a U.S. Senator and a member of the House of Representatives from Louisiana. ... Year 1884 (MDCCCLXXXIV) was a leap year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a leap year starting on Sunday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


In 1885, a Graduate Division started, the predecessor to the Graduate School. One year later, gifts from Josephine Louise Newcomb totaling over $3.6 million led to the establishment of H. Sophie Newcomb Memorial College within Tulane University. Newcomb was the first coordinate college for women in the United States.[8] 1885 (MDCCCLXXXV) is a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... Josephine Louise Newcomb, born Josephine Le Monnier (October 31, 1816–April 7, 1901), was the philanthropist whose donations led to the founding of Newcomb College at Tulane University. ... H. Sophie Newcomb Memorial College, or Newcomb College, was the coordinate womens college of Tulane University located in New Orleans, Louisiana. ...


In 1894 a College of Technology formed, the forerunner to the College of Engineering. In the same year the university moved to its present-day uptown campus on St. Charles Avenue, five miles by streetcar from downtown.[8] 1894 (MDCCCXCIV) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... The St. ...


The 20th century

In 1901, the cornerstone was laid for the F.W. Tilton Library, endowed by the New Orleans businessman and philanthropist Frederick William Tilton (18211890). Year 1901 (MCMI) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday [1] of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... For other uses, see Library (disambiguation). ... A philanthropist is someone who engages in philanthropy; that is, someone who donates his or her time, money, or reputation to a charitable cause. ... Frederick William Tilton (ca. ... Year 1821 (MDCCCXXI) was a common year starting on Monday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ... 1890 (MDCCCXC) was a common year starting on Wednesday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Friday of the Julian calendar). ...


An Architecture Department originated within the College of Technology in 1907. One year later, Schools of Dentistry and Pharmacy appeared, both temporarily: Dentistry ended in 1928, and Pharmacy six years later.[8] Year 1907 (MCMVII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1928 (MCMXXVIII) was a leap year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


In 1914, Tulane established a College of Commerce, the first business school in the South.[8] Year 1914 (MCMXIV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ... A business school is a university-level institution that confers degrees in Business Administration. ... The U.S. Southern states or the South, also known colloquially as Dixie, constitute a distinctive region covering a large portion of the United States, with its own unique heritage, historical perspective, customs, musical styles, and cuisine. ...


1925 saw the formal establishment of the Graduate School. Two years later, the university set up a School of Social Work, the first in the Deep South region.[8] Year 1925 (MCMXXV) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Regional definitions vary from source to source. ...


The house of Tulane's president on St. Charles Avenue was once the mansion of Sam Zemurray who was the head of the United Fruit Company which became infamous for its exploitation of Latin American countries as "banana republics." St. ... Samuel Zemurray (January 18, 1877-November 30, 1961) was a U.S. businessman. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged into Chiquita Brands International. ... For other uses, see Banana republic (disambiguation). ...


University College dates from 1942. The School of Architecture grew out of Engineering in 1950. Year 1942 (MCMXLII) was a common year starting on Thursday (the link will display the full 1942 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1950 (MCML) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine dates from 1967 and is the oldest school of its kind in the country. Also, Tulane's School of Tropical Medicine is the only of its kind in the country. In the Fall of 2006, the School of Public Health began admitting undergraduate students. Year 1967 (MCMLXVII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full calendar) of the 1967 Gregorian calendar. ...


The student-run radio station of the university, WTUL-FM, began broadcasting on campus in 1971. A radio station is an audio (sound) broadcasting service, traditionally broadcast through the air as radio waves (a form of electromagnetic radiation) from a transmitter to an antenna and a thus to a receiving device. ... WTUL is a progressive/alternative FM radio outlet in New Orleans, Louisiana, operating at 91. ... Year 1971 (MCMLXXI) was a common year starting on Friday (link will display full calendar) of the 1971 Gregorian calendar. ...


On April 23, 1975, Gerald R. Ford, Jr., spoke at Tulane University's Fogelman Arena at the invitation of Congressman F. Edward Hebert, the powerful representative of Louisiana’s 1st Congressional District. During the historic speech, Ford announced that the Vietnam War was "finished as far as America is concerned"- one week before the fall of Saigon. Ford drew parallels to the Battle of New Orleans saying that such positive activity could do for America’s morale what the battle did in 1815.[9] is the 113th day of the year (114th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Order: 38th President Vice President: Nelson A. Rockefeller Term of office: August 9, 1974 – January 20, 1977 Preceded by: Richard Nixon Succeeded by: Jimmy Carter Date of birth: July 14, 1913 Place of birth: Omaha, Nebraska First Lady: Betty Ford Political party: Republican Gerald Rudolph Ford, Jr. ... Felix Edward Hébert (October 12, 1901 - December 29, 1979) was a Louisiana politician. ... Ho Chi Minh City (Vietnamese: Thành Chí Minh) is the largest city in Vietnam, located near the delta of the Mekong River. ... Combatants United Kingdom United States Commanders Sir Edward Pakenham† John Lambert Alexander Cochrane Andrew Jackson Strength 8,000 men 3,500-4,000 men Casualties 385 killed 1,186 wounded 484 captured 13 killed 58 wounded 30 captured The Battle of New Orleans, also known as the Battle of Chalmette... April 5-12: Mount Tambora explodes, changing climate. ...


Tulane once had a football stadium on campus that seated over 80,000 people, held three Super Bowls, and was the home of the New Orleans Saints and the Sugar Bowl. When Tulane Stadium was razed after the construction of the Superdome, workers found a mummy couple underneath the bleachers.[10] The football team now plays in the Superdome. The Super Bowl is the championship game of the National Football League, the pinnacle of American football. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... This article is about the American football game. ... Tulane Stadium was an outdoor football stadium located in New Orleans, Louisiana from 1926 to 1980. ... Superdome can stand for: Louisiana Superdome HP Superdome server ... A mummy is a corpse whose skin and dried flesh have been preserved by either intentional or accidental exposure to chemicals, extreme cold, very low humidity, or airlessness. ... Superdome can stand for: Louisiana Superdome HP Superdome server ...


During the 1980s, Tulane made the fateful decision not to place a portion of its endowment into the stock market due to the market's volatile nature at the time. This has led to Tulane having to dip into its endowment on a regular basis.[citation needed] This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


In 1998, the student body of Tulane University voted by referendum to split the Associate Student Body (ASB) Senate into two separate houses, the Undergraduate Student Government (USG) and the Graduate and Professional Student Association (GAPSA). Previous to the split, only one Executive Cabinet was elected and all student government meetings consisted of both undergraduate and graduate students. Now, each house has its own Executive Cabinet and Senate elected by its own students. USG and GAPSA meet separately to issues pertaining to their respective constituencies. However, the Office of the Associated Student Body President remained - the ASB President is a representative of every student on all of Tulane's campuses. This person is still elected by the entire student body of Tulane, both undergraduate and graduate students.


USG and GAPSA come together twice a semester to meet as the ASB Senate, where issues pertaining to the entire Tulane student body are discussed. The meetings of the ASB Senate are presided over by the ASB President.


The Jambalaya, Tulane's yearbook, published annually since 1897, published its last edition (Volume 99) in 1995, due to funding and management problems. In the fall of 2003, the "Jambalaya" was reestablished as a student club, and in the spring of 2004, the centennial edition of the Jambalaya was published. The staff now continues to publish a "Jambalaya" annually. A yearbook, also known as an annual, is a book to record, highlight, and commemorate the past year of a school or a book published annually. ... 1897 (MDCCCXCVII) was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar). ... Year 1995 (MCMXCV) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display full 1995 Gregorian calendar). ...


The 21st century

In 2001 the Tulane Center for Gene Therapy started as the first major center in the U.S. to focus on research using adult stem cells. Year 2001 (MMI) was a common year starting on Monday (link displays the 2001 Gregorian calendar). ... Stem cell division and differentiation. ...


In the July 2004, Tulane received two $30 million donations to its endowment, the largest individual or combined gifts in the university's history. The donations came from Jim Clark, a member of the university's Board and founder of Netscape, and David Filo, a graduate of its School of Engineering and co-founder of Yahoo!. The gifts had particular significance, since Tulane had had one of the lowest endowments ($722 million as of June 2004) among the 62 members of the Association of American Universities. In the months following Hurricane Katrina, restrictions were removed from these gifts to ensure the continued financial health of the university. On July 30, 2007, Tulane made a public announcement that its endowment reached $1 billion. 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: July 2004 in sports Deaths in July • 31 David B. Haight • 29 Francis Crick • 29 Nafisa Joseph • 23 Joe Cahill • 23 Mehmood • 23 Illinois Jacquet • 23 Carlos Paredes... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... Dr. James H. Clark (born 1944) is a prolific entrepreneur and former computer scientist. ... Netscape Communications (formally known as Netscape Communications Corporation and commonly known as Netscape), is an American computer services company, best known for its web browser. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Yahoo! Inc. ... 2004 : January - February - March - April - May - June - July - August - September - October - November - December See also: June 2004 in sports Deaths in June • 28 Anthony Buckeridge • 26 Naomi Shemer • 26 Yash Johar • 22 Bob Bemer • 22 Thomas Gold • 22 Francisco Ortiz Franco • 16 Thanom Kittikachorn • 10 Ray Charles • 5 Ronald Reagan... The Association of American Universities (AAU) is an organization of leading research universities devoted to maintaining a strong system of academic research and education. ... is the 211th day of the year (212th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ...


Effects of Hurricane Katrina

As a result of the storm and its effects on New Orleans, Tulane University was closed for the second time in its history—the first being during the Civil War.


Tulane began to publicly respond to the arrival of Hurricane Katrina on August 27, 2005, with an initial plan to close the university until September 1. The following day, that date was extended to "no earlier than" September 7. University officials led a rare evacuation of nearly 400 students (one report said that the number was closer to 700) to Jackson State University, all of whom remained safe after the hurricane's passage and returned to their homes if they were from outside the gulf coast region. This was the second time Tulane's evacuation plan had been used, the first being in September 2004 during Hurricane Ivan. In other recent hurricanes such as Georges in 1998, Tulane simply used its larger dorms as shelters for students. This article is about the Atlantic hurricane of 2005. ... is the 239th day of the year (240th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jackson State University, often abridged as Jackson State or by its initials JSU is a historically black university located in Jackson, Mississippi founded in 1877. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Lowest pressure 910 mbar (hPa) Damage $19. ... Lowest pressure 937 mbar (hPa; 27. ...


On August 30, the university reported that "physical damage to the area, including Tulane's campuses, was extensive" and conditions in the city were continuing to deteriorate. Power was out, water levels were rising, all city roads were blocked, and the "vast majority of our workforce" had left the parish in response to the mayor's mandatory evacuation order. By September 1 only a core group of public safety and facilities personnel remained on campus. Tulane president Scott Cowen and an "emergency team" relocated to Houston, Texas to coordinate planning for recovery. Tulane reported that security was being maintained on campus and that students' belongings were safe in the unflooded areas of the dormitories. On September 2, President Cowen announced that the University would cancel classes for the fall semester. is the 242nd day of the year (243rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 244th day of the year (245th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... “Houston” redirects here. ...


During the storm, Tulane University Hospital & Clinic lost power and received patients from neighboring hospitals and from the Louisiana Superdome. These patients, along with all hospital staff, staff family members present, and patients were evacuated within five days via helicopters from the top floor of a neighboring parking garage. This rescue effort was organized, directed, and paid for by the hospital's parent company, HCA.[11] On February 14, 2006 it was the first hospital to reopen in downtown New Orleans after the hurricane.[12] Superdome redirects here. ... A multi-storey car park is a building or part thereof which is designed specifically to be for vehicle parking and where there are a number of floors on which parking takes place. ... The Hospital Corporation of America (HCA) NYSE: HCA is the largest private operator of health care facilities in the world. ... is the 45th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...


The American Council on Education and the Association of American Universities urged their member institutions to help displaced students from Tulane and the area's other universities. Dozens of universities made provisions to allow Tulane students (and students from other affected colleges) to enroll as "provisional students" for the fall semester. When the university reopened in the spring, Tulane transferred credits earned by students elsewhere. To further help students graduate on schedule, Tulane offered two academic semesters between January and June 2006. A regular spring term began January 17, with a seven-week "Lagniappe Semester" which ran from May 15 through the end of June. The American Council on Education is a United States organization comprising over 1,800 accredited, degree-granting colleges and universities and higher education-related associations, organizations, and corporations. ... The Association of American Universities (AAU) is an organization of leading research universities devoted to maintaining a strong system of academic research and education. ... Lagniappe means a little something extra. ...


Tulane School of Medicine relocated its students and essential teaching staff to Houston, Texas, and continued its fall semester at Baylor College of Medicine. This was aided in part by the support of Michael DeBakey, pioneering heart surgeon, graduate of Tulane School of Medicine and chancellor emeritus at Baylor College of Medicine. Students taking the basic science medical courses used the facilities at Baylor, while 3rd and 4th year students did clinical rotations in several of the nearby teaching hospitals located in Houston, Galveston, and Temple. Tulane attempted to keep the medical students together, and discouraged transfer, except in the most extenuating of circumstances. Students were able to request transfers, but many medical schools supported Tulane's attempts to retain their student body and thus their school, although some students were successful in their appeals to transfer. The School of Medicine's stay in Texas ('Tulane West' or 'Tulane at Baylor') ended, with the students and faculty returning to New Orleans in July 2006. “Houston” redirects here. ... Baylor College of Medicine (BCM) is ranked among the top Schools of medicine in the United States. ... Michael Ellis DeBakey, M.D. (born September 7, 1908), is a pioneering cardiovascular surgeon and researcher. ...


As a result of the plan dismissing so many tenured faculty without what the American Association of University Professors considered "due cause," Tulane, along with three other New Orleans based universities, was censured [1] by the AAUP [2]. Tulane’s responses purportedly showed that the AAUP's draft report was flawed significantly and contained numerous errors of fact, omission and interpretation. Tulane's administration responded that the final version of the AAUP report acknowledges (mostly in footnotes) some of the corrections Tulane offered, and continued to assert that errors and meritless conclusions remain in the final version (contrary to the AAUP's viewpoint). [3] The American Association of University Professors (AAUP) is an organization of professors and other academics in the United States. ...


2005–06 Renewal Plan

Facing a budget shortfall, the Board of Administrators announced a "Renewal Plan" on December 8, 2005 to reduce its annual operating budget and create a "student-centric" campus. At the end of January 2006, the administration reported an estimated $90 to $125 million shortfall for the 2005–06 year. Tulane laid off about 2,000 part-time employees in September and October 2005, 243 non-teaching personnel in November 2005, 230 faculty members in December 2005, and another 200 employees in January 2006. is the 342nd day of the year (343rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ...


Under the Renewal Plan, Tulane eliminated six undergraduate and graduate programs in the Engineering School: mechanical engineering, civil engineering, electrical engineering, computer engineering, environmental engineering, and computer science, and also a bachelor's degree in exercise science. The university cut twenty-seven of its forty-five doctoral programs and suspended eight NCAA Division I intercollegiate athletic programs. The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ... Division I (or DI) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ...


For spring 2006 the administration reported that "85 percent of all students" returned. By keeping the school smaller, officials said they will not have to lower admission standards.


The university Renewal Plan created a single undergraduate co-ed college in July 2006, discontinuing Tulane's liberal arts and sciences coordinate college system that comprised Tulane College (for men) and the H. Sophie Newcomb Memorial College (for women). On March 16, 2006, the board announced establishment of the H. Sophie Newcomb Memorial College Institute, an umbrella organization for extracurricular programs, "to enhance women's education at the university." H. Sophie Newcomb Memorial College, or Newcomb College, was the coordinate womens college of Tulane University located in New Orleans, Louisiana. ...


Claiming that dissolution of Newcomb College violates conditions on the gifts and will of its founder Josephine Louise Newcomb, Mrs. Newcomb's heirs are suing Tulane to enforce their ancestor's donor's intent. The action, Howard v. Tulane, is now pending in Louisiana District Court.


Critics of the Renewal Plan charge the school administration of using Katrina as the excuse to push an agenda that would otherwise have been difficult to accomplish. [4] In response to cutting several engineering degree programs, students, faculty, and alumni started the Save Tulane Engineering campaign to reinstate the five engineering majors and the separate school. The "American Association of University Professors" expressed concern at the lack of meaningful faculty involvement in crafting the Renewal Plan, as did many students.[13]


On April 4, 2007, Tulane University announced that the School of Science and Engineering will introduce a new major beginning fall 2007, called engineering physics. The major, the first new engineering major added since the School of Engineering closed in the wake of Hurricane Katrina, is designed to meet the criteria of the Engineering Accreditation Commission, and is geared towards preparing students in quantum physics and nanotechnology.[14] Engineering physics (EP) is an academic degree, usually at the level of Bachelor of Science. ...


On May 8, 2007, Tulane announced that more than 1,375 high school seniors had committed to coming to Tulane University as part of the class of 2011. This increase in enrollment, surpassing 882 students from the class of 2010, and a planned 1,200 students for the class of 2011, marks a strong return in enrollment that nears the level prior to Hurricane Katrina. Tulane will welcome 1,500 new students including 128 transfer students in fall 2007. [5]


Campuses

Gibson Hall at dawn

Tulane's uptown campus, established in the 1890s, occupies over 110 acres (0.4 km²), facing St. Charles Avenue directly opposite Audubon Park. The rear of the uptown campus reaches South Claiborne Avenue, and it is divided by Freret Street. The campus architecture consists of several styles, including Richardsonian Romanesque, Elizabethan, Italian Renaissance, Brutalist Modern, and Ultramodern styles. Though there isn't a coherent building design across the entire campus, most buildings make use of similar materials. The front campus buildings use Indiana White Limestone or orange brick for exteriors, while the middle campus buildings are mostly adorned in red St. Joe brick, the staple of Newcomb College buildings. Loyola University is directly adjacent to Tulane, on the downriver side. The uptown campus is known for its many large live oak trees and architecturally historic buildings. Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 441 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (753 × 1024 pixel, file size: 671 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Taken by Tony Vanky (tonyvanky. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 441 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (753 × 1024 pixel, file size: 671 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Taken by Tony Vanky (tonyvanky. ... Uptown is a large area of New Orleans, Louisiana. ... An acre is the name of a unit of area in a number of different systems, including Imperial units and United States customary units. ... A square metre (US spelling: square meter) is by definition the area enclosed by a square with sides each 1 metre long. ... St. ... Audubon Park entrance gates on the St. ... Logo of Loyola University New Orleans Loyola University New Orleans is a private, co-educational Jesuit university in the United States with 5,000 students (3,000 undergraduates). ... Southern live oaks on Skidaway Island, near Savannah, Georgia Live oak is a general term for a number of unrelated oaks in several different sections of the genus Quercus that happen to share the character of evergreen foliage. ...


The front of the Campus, between St. Charles Avenue and Freret Street, is home to most of the schools academic buildings, including the schools of Architecture and Social Work. The centerpiece of the Academic Quad is the first academic building on Tulane's uptown campus, Gibson Hall. The middle of the campus, between Freret and Willow Streets and bisected by McAlister Drive and Newcomb Place, serves as the center of campus activities. The Lavin Bernick Center for University Life (known by students as the UC), Fogelman Arena (home to Tulane's basketball teams), McAlister Auditorium, Howard-Tilton Memorial Library, most of the student residence halls and academic buildings populate the center of campus. The middle campus is also the home of the Newcomb College Campus. The facilities for the Business school line McAlister Drive and Tulane Law School sits adjacent to the Business school. The Newcomb Campus was designed by New York architect James Gamble Rogers, noted for his work with Yale University's campus.[15] The Newcomb campus is home to Tulane's performing and fine arts venues. The back of campus, between Willow Street and South Claiborne, is home to two residence halls, Reily Recreation Center and Turchin Stadium, the home of Green Wave baseball. A tribute to Rogers in a Yale residential college James Gamble Rogers (b. ... “Yale” redirects here. ...


Through Hurricane Katrina, Tulane has continued to build new facilities and renovate old spaces on its campus. The newest residence hall, Lallage Feazel Wall Residential College, was completed in August 2005 and took in its first students when Tulane re-opened in January 2006. Fogelman Arena was completely renovated for basketball in the fall of 2006. The Lavin-Bernick Center for University Life was renovated to be a green, environmentally friendly building and opened for student use in January 2007. Turchin Stadium is undergoing renovation and will reopen for the 2008 baseball season. Tulane also hopes to begin construction on another new residence hall, to be ready for the incoming class of 2008. Turchin Stadium is a baseball stadium in New Orleans, Louisiana. ...

An early 20th century view of Tulane's Gibson Hall. It faces St. Charles Avenue and is the entry landmark to the uptown campus.
An early 20th century view of Tulane's Gibson Hall. It faces St. Charles Avenue and is the entry landmark to the uptown campus.
An early 21st century view from a similar vantage point. Note the major growth of the live oak trees since the previous picture.
An early 21st century view from a similar vantage point. Note the major growth of the live oak trees since the previous picture.

Other facilities owned by Tulane include: Image File history File links Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana, view of Gibson Hall from across St. ... Image File history File links Tulane University, New Orleans, Louisiana, view of Gibson Hall from across St. ... (19th century - 20th century - 21st century - more centuries) Decades: 1900s 1910s 1920s 1930s 1940s 1950s 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s As a means of recording the passage of time, the 20th century was that century which lasted from 1901–2000 in the sense of the Gregorian calendar (1900–1999... Randall Lee Gibson (September 10, 1832 – December 15, 1892) was a U.S. Senator and a member of the House of Representatives from Louisiana. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 529 pixel Image in higher resolution (1280 × 846 pixel, file size: 437 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) A modern-day view of Gibson Hall on Tulane Universitys Uptown Campus in New Orleans across St. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 800 × 529 pixel Image in higher resolution (1280 × 846 pixel, file size: 437 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) A modern-day view of Gibson Hall on Tulane Universitys Uptown Campus in New Orleans across St. ... The 21st century is the present century of the Anno Domini (common) era, in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... Southern live oaks on Skidaway Island, near Savannah, Georgia Live oak is a general term for a number of unrelated oaks in several different sections of the genus Quercus that happen to share the character of evergreen foliage. ...

Felix Edward Hébert (October 12, 1901 - December 29, 1979), more commonly referred to at the time as F. Edward Hebert, was a Louisiana politician. ... , Belle Chasse is a census-designated place (CDP) in Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana, on the West Bank of the Mississippi River. ... Official language(s) de jure: none de facto: English & French Capital Baton Rouge Largest city New Orleans [1] Area  Ranked 31st  - Total 51,885 sq mi (134,382 km²)  - Width 130 miles (210 km)  - Length 379 miles (610 km)  - % water 16  - Latitude 29°N to 33°N  - Longitude 89°W... Computer science, or computing science, is the study of the theoretical foundations of information and computation and their implementation and application in computer systems. ... Biological engineering (also biosystems engineering and bioengineering) is a broad-based engineering discipline that deals with bio-molecular and molecular processes, product design, sustainability and analysis of biological systems. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... The city of Covington is the parish seat of St. ... National Institutes of Health Building 50 at NIH Clinical Center - Building 10 The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is an agency of the United States Department of Health and Human Services and is the primary agency of the United States government responsible for biomedical research. ... The Central Business District is an area of New Orleans, Louisiana. ... Superdome redirects here. ... Canal Street is a major thoroughfare in the city of New Orleans, Louisiana. ... University College can refer to several institutions: in Canada University College, University of Toronto University College of the North, The Pas, Manitoba University College of the Cariboo, Kamloops, British Columbia, merged with British Columbia Open University and renamed Thompson Rivers University Kings University College (Edmonton), Alberta in England University... Biloxi Lighthouse (of 1848) Biloxi () is a city in Harrison County, Mississippi, in the U.S.. The 2000 census recorded the population as 50,644. ... “Houston” redirects here. ... Location of Santiago commune in Greater Santiago Coordinates: , Region Province Foundation February 12, 1541 Government  - Mayor Raúl Alcaíno Lihn Area 1  - City 22. ... Alternate meanings: See Shanghai (disambiguation) Shanghai (Chinese: 上海; pinyin: shàng hǎi; Shanghainese IPA: /zɑ̃ hɛ/) is Chinas largest city and is situated on the banks of the Chang Jiang delta. ... Alternative meaning: Taipei County City nickname: the City of Azaleas Capital District Xinyi Area  - Total  - % water Ranked 16 of 25 271. ... “MBA” redirects here. ...

Academics

Academic divisions

Tulane is organized into ten schools centered around liberal arts, sciences and certain professions:


All undergraduate students are enrolled in the Newcomb-Tulane College. The graduate programs are governed by individual schools. Tulane also offers continuing education courses and associate's degrees through its School of Continuing Studies. Continuing education is an all encompassing term within a broad spectrum of post-secondary learning activities and programs. ...


From 1963-1968, the Tulane Law School dean was Cecil Morgan, the key legislator who had been involved in 1929 in the impeachment of Governor Huey Pierce Long, Jr., and who thereafter was a major Standard Oil Company executive in Louisiana and New York City. He had also been a judge for two years in Shreveport. Year 1963 (MCMLXIII) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1968 (MCMLXVIII) was a leap year starting on Monday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Cecil Morgan, Sr. ... Year 1929 (MCMXXIX) was a common year starting on Tuesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Depiction of the impeachment trial of Andrew Johnson, then President of the United States, in 1868. ... For other uses, see Governor (disambiguation). ... Huey Pierce Long, Jr. ... Standard Oil was an oil refining organization founded by John D. Rockefeller (1839-1937) and partners beginning in 1863. ... New York, New York and NYC redirect here. ... : Port City , River City , Rachet City : The Next Great City of the South United States Louisiana Caddo 117. ...

A view of the downtown Tulane University Health Sciences Center
A view of the downtown Tulane University Health Sciences Center
Academic Division Dean
A.B. Freeman School of Business Angelo S. DeNisi
Newcomb-Tulane College James MacLaren
School of Architecture Scott Bernhard, interim[16]
Law School Lawrence Ponoroff
School of Liberal Arts George L. Bernstein
School of Medicine Benjamin Sachs
School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine Pierre Buekens
School of Science and Engineering Nicholas J. Altiero
School of Social Work Ronald E. Marks
School of Continuing Studies Richard A. Marksbury

Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2448x3264, 1509 KB) Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2448x3264, 1509 KB) Licensing File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Richardson Memorial hall, Home of the TSA The Tulane School of Architecture or (TSA) is the school of architecture at Tulane University in New Orleans, Louisiana. ...

Statistics and rankings

The following statistics reflect some of the changes at Tulane between 1998 and 2006: Year 1998 (MCMXCVIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display full 1998 Gregorian calendar). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ...

  • Undergraduate applications received annually nearly tripled, growing from 7,780 to 21,000.
  • The average SAT scores for incoming students rose from 1278 to 1306.[1]
  • Application acceptances lowered from 79% of applicants to 38%.[17]
  • Funding for research and development nearly doubled, from $68 million to $130 million.
  • The National Institutes of Health funding ranking rose from 96 to 79.[18]

In 2003, Tulane's graduation rate for student-athletes was 79%, ranking 14th among Division I athletic programs. For other uses, see SAT (disambiguation). ... National Institutes of Health Building 50 at NIH Clinical Center - Building 10 The National Institutes of Health (NIH) is an agency of the United States Department of Health and Human Services and is the primary agency of the United States government responsible for biomedical research. ... Year 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Division I (or DI) is the highest level of intercollegiate athletics sanctioned by the National Collegiate Athletic Association in the United States. ...


Tulane is one of North America's top research universities; its status confirmed by it being one of 60 elected members of the Association of American Universities. Tulane also is designated as a Carnegie research university/very high research activity, the highest classification by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching.[19] The Association of American Universities (AAU) is an organization of leading research universities devoted to maintaining a strong system of academic research and education. ... Carnagie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching was founded by Andrew Carnegie in 1905 and chartered in 1906 by an Act of Congress. ...


Tulane's overall undergraduate program was ranked 50th in the nation among "National Universities" by US News & World Report in its 2008 edition. Tulane tied with Syracuse University for the 50th spot.[20] Syracuse University (SU) is a private nonsectarian research university located in Syracuse, New York. ...


In the US News and World Reports Best Grad Schools Guide, published in April 2007, the Tulane School of Law ranked 47th (with a ranking of 5th for its environmental law program), and the A.B. Freeman School of Business ranked No. 45.[21][22]


Dean's Honor Scholarship

The Dean's Honor Scholarship is a merit-based scholarship awarded by Tulane which covers full tuition for the duration of the recipient's undergraduate program. The scholarship is offered to 100 incoming freshmen by the Office of Undergraduate Admission, and is awarded only through a separate application. This scholarship is renewable provided that the recipient maintains a minimum 3.0 GPA at the end of each semester and maintains continuous enrollment in a full-time undergraduate division. Typically, recipients rank in the top 5% of their high school graduating class, have a rigorous course load including honors and Advanced Placement classes, and an outstanding record of extracurricular activities.[23] This article is about scholarship (noun) and scholarship as a form of financial aid. ... The initials GPA can refer, among other things, to Grade Point Average; see Grade (education) Guinness Peat Aviation General Practice Australia, a private, independent medical accreditation society Greyhound Pets of America This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same... For other uses, see High school (disambiguation). ... Advanced Placement (AP) is the term used to describe high school classes that are taught at a college level. ...


Notable recipients include Sean M. Berkowitz, David Filo and Eric R. Palmer. Sean M. Berkowitz (born 1967) is the former director of the Enron Task Force. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ...


List of university presidents

There have been fourteen presidents of Tulane since the establishment of the Tulane Education Fund in 1884.

President Years
William Preston Johnson 1884–1899
William Oscar Rogers 1899–1900 (acting)
Edwin Alderman 1900–1904
Edwin Boone Craighead 1904–1912
Robert Sharp 1912–1913 (acting)
1913–1918
Albert Bledsoe Dinwiddie 1918–1935
Douglas Smith Anderson 1935–1936 (acting)
Robert Leonval Menuet 1936–1937 (acting)
Rufus Carrollton Harris 1937–1960
Maxwell Edward Laphan 1960 (acting)
Herbert Eugene Longenecker 1960–1975
Sheldon Hackney 1975–1980
Eamon Kelly 1980–1981 (acting)
1981–1998
Scott S. Cowen 1998–present

Edwin A. Alderman Edwin Anderson Alderman (born May 15, 1861 in Wilmington, North Carolina; died April 30, 1931 in Charlottesville, Virginia) served as the President of three universities. ... Sheldon Hackney is Boies Professor of United States History and chairman of the Department of History at the University of Pennsylvania. ... For Eamon Kelly (Actor) see Eamon Kelly (Actor) Eamon Michael Kelly is the President Emeritus of Tulane University, having served as its president for seventeen years. ...

Athletics

Main article: Tulane Green Wave

Tulane is a member of Conference USA in athletics and fields NCAA Division I teams in several sports. Tulane University is a private, nonsectarian, coeducational research university located in New Orleans, Louisiana. ... Conference USA, officially abbreviated C-USA, is a college athletic conference whose member institutions are located within the Southern United States. ... The National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA, often pronounced N-C-Double-A or N-C-Two-A ) is a voluntary association of about 1,200 institutions, conferences, organizations and individuals that organizes the athletic programs of many colleges and universities in the United States. ...


Tulane University's football team went 12-0 in 1998 culminating in a 41-27 victory over BYU in the Liberty Bowl. They finished the season ranked No. 5 in the nation, by far their best performance to date. They were led by senior quarterback Shaun King, who in that season set an NCAA record for the highest single-season passing efficiency rating. That record still stands.[24][25] Shaun Earl King (born May 29, 1977 in St. ...


They have been unable to match 1998's success in recent years.


Notable alumni and faculty

A list of notable people affiliated with Tulane University, including graduates, former students, faculty, former faculty and major benefactors. ...

Alma maters

Tulane Alma Mater
We praise thee for thy past, O Alma Mater!
Thy hand hath done its work full faithfully.
The incense of thy spirit has ascended
And filled America from sea to sea!
Olive Green and Blue! we love thee!
Pledge we now our fealty true
Where the trees are ever greenest,
Where the skies are purest blue.
Hear us now, O Tulane, hear us,
As we proudly sing to thee!
Take from us our hearts' devotion,
Thine we are and thine shall be!

Newcomb Alma Mater
Where stars arise in Southern skies
And thy loyal love in laughter lies,
O Newcomb fair, we bring to thee
Our hearts' allegiance, bold and free.
We bring to thee, where e'er shall be
The Star of our ascendancy --
CHORUS
O Alma Mater, Stand we nigh,
Thy daughters lift Thy flag on high!

International profile

The International University in Geneva proposes undergraduate and graduate programs in Business Administration, International Relations and Media and Communication. ... The Financial Times (FT) is an international business newspaper printed on distinctive salmon pink broadsheet paper. ...

Popular culture references

Literature

  • Black Sunday by Thomas Harris is set during a Super Bowl played in Tulane Stadium..
  • A Confederacy of Dunces by Tulane graduate John Kennedy Toole is set in New Orleans and features Ignatius J. Reilly.
  • Love in the Ruins and The Moviegoer by Walker Percy are partially set on Tulane's campus.
  • Earth (novel) by David Brin, features characters from Tulane.
  • The Pelican Brief by John Grisham is set on Tulane's campus and features a Tulane Law student.
  • The story Reb Kringle from Nathan Englander's book For the Relief of Unbearable Urges features an appearance by "the elf on winter break from Tulane."
  • Honest Illusions by Nora Roberts features a character Roxanne Nouvelle who attends Tulane.

This article is about the novel. ... A Confederacy of Dunces is a novel written by John Kennedy Toole, published in 1980, 11 years after the authors suicide. ... The Moviegoer is a 1961 novel by Walker Percy. ... Cover of 1991 Spectra mass market paperback edition. ... The Pelican Brief is a legal/suspense thriller written by John Grisham in 1992. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...

Television

  • St. Elsewhere: Howie Mandel's character, Dr. Wayne Fiscus, attended Tulane Medical School.
  • Frank's Place: Bubba Weisberger (played by Robert Harper) was a graduate of Tulane Law School.
  • Sex and the City: Mr. Big's ex-wife, Natasha, attended Tulane University as an undergraduate student.
  • Gilmore Girls: Rory Gilmore's high school classmate Louise Grant attended Tulane, and Louise's best friend Madeline Lynn also transferred to the school.
  • Grey's Anatomy: Dr. Burke attended Tulane University.
  • CSI: Miami: Calleigh Duquesne attended Tulane University and majored in physics.
  • The Real World: Denver: Colie Edison attended Tulane University.
  • The Real World: New Orleans: The cast often socialized with Tulane students especially at The Boot Bar.
  • In the A&E movie about Senator John McCain, the outside scenes of the Naval Academy were filmed at Tulane.

St. ... Franks Place was a CBS dramedy (comedy-drama hybrid) series which aired for 22 episodes in 1987 and 1988. ... Sex and the City is a popular American cable television program. ... Gilmore Girls was an American television drama/comedy that began on October 5, 2000 and aired its final episode on May 15, 2007. ... Information Nickname(s) Rory, Mary (from Tristan DuGrey), Ace (from Logan Huntzberger) Age 22 Date of birth October 8, 1984 Occupation journalist Family Lorelai Gilmore (mother) Christopher Hayden (father) Georgia GiGi Tinsdale (half-sister) Spouse(s) Logan Huntzberger (Ex-boyfriend) Dean Forester (Ex-boyfriend) Jess Mariano (Ex-boyfriend) Relatives Emily... This article is about the television series. ... CSI: Miami is a spinoff of the popular CBS network series CSI: Crime Scene Investigation. ... Biography is one of A&Es longest-running and most popular programs. ... For McCains grandfather and father, see John S. McCain, Sr. ...

Movies

This article is about the 1976 American film. ... Robert Mario De Niro Jr. ... The Pelican Brief, rated PG-13 in the U.S., is a legal crime thriller based on the novel by the same name written by John Grisham and was adapted into a feature film in 1993, directed by Alan J. Pakula and starring Julia Roberts in the role of young... John Ray Grisham Jr. ... The Pelican Brief is a legal/suspense thriller written by John Grisham in 1992. ... The Brooke Ellison Story is a 2004 TV movie about the life of Brooke Ellison, the first quadriplegic to graduate from Harvard. ... Harvard University (incorporated as The President and Fellows of Harvard College) is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA and a member of the Ivy League. ... Christopher DOlier Reeve[1] (September 25, 1952 – October 10, 2004) was an American actor, director, producer and writer. ... Promotional poster for All the Kings Men All the Kings Men (2006) is an adaptation of the 1946 Pulitzer Prize winning novel by Robert Penn Warren and a remake of the 1949 Academy Award-winning movie, All the Kings Men. As of December 2005, extended post-production... College is a 2008 comedy film written by Dan Callahan and Adam Ellison and directed by Deb Hagan. ...

Computer games

  • Laura Bow Series by Sierra Entertainment (including games The Colonel's Bequest and The Dagger of Amon Ra): Laura Bow, the main character is a Tulane University student.
  • Gabriel Knight: Sins of the Fathers by Sierra Entertainment: Tulane University is one of the game locations.

Laura Bow is an amateur detective and heroine of two adventure games, Laura Bow: The Colonels Bequest (1989) and Laura Bow: The Dagger of Amon Ra (1992), both created by the computer game company Sierra Entertainment (formerly Sierra On-Line). ... The Colonels Bequest is a computer game published by Sierra On-Line in 1989. ... Laura Bow 2: The Dagger of Amon Ra (usually just called The Dagger of Amon Ra) is a computer game published by Sierra On-Line in 1992. ...

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h Tulane University Facts (2006). Retrieved on 2007-04-16.
  2. ^ Report charts highs, lows for Tulane (2007). Retrieved on 2007-07-24.
  3. ^ Gerald R. Ford: Address at a Tulane University convocation (1975). Retrieved on 2007-03-15.
  4. ^ Latin American Studies (2006). Retrieved on 2007-01-24.
  5. ^ Gage SH (1964). "Microscopy in America.". Trans Am Microscopical Soc 83 (4): 54–55. 
  6. ^ Smith JL (1852). "The inverted microscope-a new form of microscope". Am J Sci Arts 14: 233–241. 
  7. ^ Riddell JL (1854). "On the binocular microscope". Quart J Microsc Sci 2: 18–24. 
  8. ^ a b c d e Significant dates in Tulane's History (unknown). Retrieved on 2007-06-07.
  9. ^ Address at a Tulane University Convocation (1975). Retrieved on 2007-01-08.
  10. ^ A Tale of Two Mummies (1999). Retrieved on 2007-03-15.
  11. ^ Carey, Bill (2006). Leave No One Behind: Hurricane Katrina and the Rescue of Tulane Hospital. Nashville, Tennessee: Clearbrook Press, 164. 0-9725680-3-4. 
  12. ^ Tulane's The New Wave
  13. ^ http://www.SaveTulaneEngineering.org/files/AAUPLetterCowen.pdf
  14. ^ http://www2.tulane.edu/article_news_details.cfm?ArticleID=7265
  15. ^ unknown (unknown). Retrieved on 2007-06-21.
  16. ^ http://www2.tulane.edu/tulane_talk/tt_050407.cfm
  17. ^ College Search - Tulane University: Admission (2007). Retrieved on 2007-02-03.
  18. ^ NIH Award Trends-Rankings: All Institutions 2005 (2005). Retrieved on 2007-02-12.
  19. ^ Institutions: Tulane University of Louisiana (2006). Retrieved on 2007-02-13.
  20. ^ America's Best Colleges 2008 (2007). Retrieved on 2007-08-17.
  21. ^ USNews.com Top Law Schools (2007). Retrieved on 2007-06-07.
  22. ^ USNews.com: Top Business Schools (2007). Retrieved on 2007-06-07.
  23. ^ Dean's Honor Scholarship information
  24. ^ Presidential Coalition for Athletics Reform (2003). Retrieved on 2007-04-16.
  25. ^ MU’s Daniel has been model of efficiency (2006). Retrieved on 2007-04-16.
  26. ^ Freeman School @ Tulane - Rankings (2005). Retrieved on 2007-06-07.
  27. ^ http://www2.tulane.edu/article_news_details.cfm?ArticleID=6794
  28. ^ http://www.robinsonfilmcenter.org/news/news_142.html

Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 106th day of the year (107th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 205th day of the year (206th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 74th day of the year (75th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 24th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... June 7 is the 158th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (159th in leap years), with 207 days remaining. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... January 8 is the 8th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 74th day of the year (75th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 172nd day of the year (173rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 34th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... February 12 is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 44th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 229th day of the year (230th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... June 7 is the 158th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (159th in leap years), with 207 days remaining. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... June 7 is the 158th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (159th in leap years), with 207 days remaining. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 106th day of the year (107th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... is the 106th day of the year (107th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) is the current year, a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar and the AD/CE era. ... June 7 is the 158th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (159th in leap years), with 207 days remaining. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:

Tulane's official media Image File history File links Commons-logo. ...

  • The Hullabaloo, official student-run newspaper
  • The New Wave, official daily news
  • WTUL, progressive FM radio station

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Tulane University - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (2337 words)
Tulane is one of North America's top research universities; its status confirmed by it being one of 60 elected members of the Association of American Universities.
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Tulane University was ranked eighth nationally in the 2001 Open Doors report for the proportion of students studying abroad in 1999-2000.
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