FACTOID # 10: The total number of state executions in 2005 was 60: 19 in Texas and 41 elsewhere. The racial split was 19 Black and 41 White.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Tuileries Palace
Tuileries Palace before 1871 - View from the Louvre courtyard
Tuileries Palace before 1871 - View from the Louvre courtyard

The Tuileries Palace stood in Paris, France, on the right bank of the River Seine until 1871, when it was destroyed. Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ...   City flag City coat of arms Motto: Fluctuat nec mergitur (Latin: Tossed by the waves, she does not sink) Coordinates Time Zone CET (GMT +1) Administration Country France Région ÃŽle-de-France Département Paris (75) Subdivisions 20 arrondissements Mayor Bertrand Delanoë  (PS) (since 2001) City Statistics Land area... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The Seine (pronounced in French) is a major river of north-western France, and one of its commercial waterways. ... 1871 (MDCCCLXXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ...

Contents

History of the Tuileries

After the death of Henry II of France in 1559, his widow Catherine de' Medicis (1519-1589) planned a new palace. She began the building of the palace of Tuileries in 1564, using architect Philibert de l'Orme. The name derives from the tile kilns or tuileries which previously occupied the site. The palace was formed by a range of long, narrow buildings with high roofs that enclosed one major and two minor courtyards. The building was greatly enlarged in the 1600s, so that the southeast corner of the Tuileries joined the Louvre. Henry II (French: Henri II) (March 31, 1519 – July 10, 1559), a member of the Valois Dynasty, was King of France from March 31, 1547, until his death. ... Events January 15 - Elizabeth I of England is crowned in Westminster Abbey. ... The Coat of Arms of Catherine de Medici Queen consort of France and countess of Auvergne Catherine de Medici (April 13, 1519, Florence – January 5, 1589, Blois), born in Italy as Caterina Maria Romola di Lorenzo de Medici, and later lived in France under the name Catherine de Médicis... Events March 4 - Hernán Cortés lands in Mexico. ... Events Rebellion of the Catholic League against King Henry III of France, in revenge for his murder of Duke Henry of Guise. ... Events March 27 — Naples bans kissing in public under the penalty of death June 22 — Fort Caroline, the first French attempt at colonizing the New World September 10 — The Battle of Kawanakajima Ottoman Turks invade Malta Modern pencil becomes common in England Conquistadors crossed the Pacific Spanish founded a colony... Philibert de lOrme (c. ... The Louvre Museum (Musée du Louvre) in Paris, France, is the largest museum in the world. ...


Louis XIV resided at the Tuileries Palace while Versailles was under construction. His garden designer André Le Notre laid out parterres for the Tuileries in 1664, but when the king left, the building was virtually abandoned; it was used only as a theater, and its gardens became a fashionable resort of Parisians. During the French Revolution, Louis XVI and his family were forced to return from Versailles to the Tuileries under house arrest, starting in October 1789. They tried to escape on the evening of June 20, 1791, but were captured at Varennes and were returned to the Tuileries. The Tuileries were later stormed on August 10, 1792 by the Paris mob, who overwhelmed and massacred the Swiss Guards; the royal family fled through the gardens and took refuge with the Legislative Assembly. Louis XIV (Louis-Dieudonné) (September 5, 1638 – September 1, 1715) ruled as King of France and of Navarre from May 14, 1643 until his death just prior to his seventy-seventh birthday. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... Painting of André Le Nôtre by Carlo Maratti André Le Nôtre (March 12, 1613 - September 15, 1700) was a landscape architect and the gardener of king Louis XIV of France from 1645 to 1700. ... A parterre is a formal garden construction on a level surface consisting of planting beds, edged in stone or tightly clipped hedging and gravel paths arranged to form a pleasing pattern. ... The French Revolution (1789–1799) was a pivotal period in the history of French, European and Western civilization. ... Louis XVI of France Louis XVI (23 August 1754 – 21 January 1793) was King of France and Navarre from 1774 until 1791, and then King of the French from 1791 to 1792. ... 1789 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... June 20 is the 171st day of the year (172nd in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 194 days remaining. ... 1791 (MDCCXCI) was a common year starting on Saturday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 11-day-slower Julian calendar). ... The Flight to Varennes (June 20-21, 1791) was a significant episode in the French Revolution during which the French royal family, faced with a decrease in royal authority, attempted unsuccessfully to escape abroad disguised as a Russian aristocratic family. ... On August 10, 1792, during the French Revolution, a mob – with the backing of a new municipal government of Paris that came to be known as the insurrectionary Paris Commune – besieged the Tuileries palace. ... 1792 was a leap year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... MOB as an initialism may refer to: Management and Organizational Behavior Mail-order bride Man overboard Marching Owl Band Mobile Regional Airport Montreux-Oberland Bernois, Swiss railway Movable Object Block, used in computer graphics Mob The Mob Money Over Bitches Category: ... Papal Swiss Guards in traditional uniforms Swiss Guards are Swiss mercenary soldiers who served as bodyguards, ceremonial guards and palace guards at foreign European courts from the late 15th century until the present day (in the form of the Papal Swiss Guard). ...

Tuileries Palace before 1871 - View from the Tuileries Gardens
Tuileries Palace before 1871 - View from the Tuileries Gardens

On November 9, 1789, the National Constituent Assembly, formerly the Estates-General of 1789, moved its deliberations from the tennis court at Versailles to the Tuileries, following the removal of the court to Paris. The Tuileries' covered riding ring, the Salle du Manège, home to the royal equestrian academy, provided the largest indoor space in the city, and accommodated the Constituent Assembly, its successor the National Convention and in 1795 Council of 500 of the Directoire, until the body moved to the Palais-Bourbon in 1798. In 1799, the Jacobin Club du Manège had its headquarters there. Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... November 9 is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian Calendar, with 52 days remaining. ... 1789 was a common year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... The National Constituent Assembly (French: Assemblée nationale constituante) was formed from the National Assembly on July 9, 1789, during the first stages of the French Revolution. ... The Estates-General (or States-General) of 1789 (French: Les États-Généraux de 1789) was the first meeting since 1614 of the French Estates-General, a general assembly consisting of representatives from all but the poorest segment of the French citizenry. ... This article is about a legislative body and constitutional convention during the French Revolution. ... The Council of Five Hundred (Conseil des Cinq-Cent), or simply the Five Hundred was the lower house of the Directory (Directoire), the legislature of France from August 22, 1795 until November 9, 1799, roughly the second half of the period generally referred to as the French Revolution. ... The grand Roman portico added to the Palais Bourbon in 1806-08, Poyet, architect The Palais Bourbon, a palace located on the Place de la Concorde, Paris, is the seat of the French National Assembly, the lower legislative chamber of the French government. ... It has been suggested that Jacobin/Sandbox be merged into this article or section. ...


When Napoleon came into power he made Tuileries the official residence of the first consul and then the imperial palace. In 1808 Napoleon began constructing the northern gallery which also connected to the Louvre, enclosing a vast place. Napoleon I Bonaparte, Emperor of the French, King of Italy, Mediator of the Swiss Confederation and Protector of the Confederation of the Rhine (15 August 1769 – 5 May 1821) was a general of the French Revolution, the ruler of France as First Consul (Premier Consul) of the French Republic from...


As Napoleon's chief residence Tuileries Palace was redecorated in the Neoclassical Empire style by Percier and Fontaine and some of the best known architects, designers, and furniture makers of the day. One of the artists, Pierre Paul Prud'hon's (1758-1823) most splendid commissions was to design the apartments of the new Empress, Marie-Louise. For the bridal suite of the Empress Marie-Louise he designed all the furniture and interior decorations in a Greek Revival style. Neoclassicism (sometimes rendered as Neo-Classicism or Neo-classicism) is the name given to quite distinct movements in the decorative and visual arts, literature, theatre, music, and architecture. ... Empire is an early 19th century style of architecture and furniture design that and originates from Napoleons rule of France. ... Charles Percier (Paris, August 22, 1764 - Paris, September 5, 1838) was a neoclassical French architect, interior decorator and designer, who worked in such close partnership with Pierre-François-Léonard Fontaine, originally his friend from student days, from 1794 onwards, that it is fruitless to disentangle artistic responsibilities in... Pierre François Léonard Fontaine (1762–1853) was a neoclassical French architect, interior decorator and designer, who worked in such close partnership with Pierre François Léonard Fontaine, originally his friend from student days, from 1794 onwards, that it is fruitless to disentangle artistic responsibilities in their work. ... Pierre Paul Prudhon (1758 - 1823) was a French Romantic painter. ... Marie Louise (December 12, 1791 _ December 17, 1847) was the second wife of Napoleon Bonaparte and Empress of The French. ...

View from the Louvre courtyard showing the joining of the Louvre (foreground) and the Tuileries Palace (background), now a large empty space. - Pei's pyramid now stands in the foreground, instead of the grove of trees.
View from the Louvre courtyard showing the joining of the Louvre (foreground) and the Tuileries Palace (background), now a large empty space. - Pei's pyramid now stands in the foreground, instead of the grove of trees.

In 1809, Jacob-Desmalter, principal supplier of furniture to the Emperor, began work on a jewel cabinet designed for the Empress Joséphine's great bedroom in the Tuileries (and soon to be used by Marie-Louise). This impressive piece of furniture designed by the architect Charles Percier was embellished with several gilt-bronze ornaments: the central panel depicts the "Birth of the Queen of the Earth to whom Cupids and Goddesses hasten with their Offerings" by the bronzier Pierre-Philippe Thomire, after a bas-relief by Chaudet. Jacob-Desmalter completed the "great jewelry box" in 1812, with two smaller items of furniture in the same style but using indigenous woods. Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The Louvre Pyramid, Paris Ieoh Ming Pei (Chinese: 貝聿銘; Pinyin: Bèi Yùmíng; b. ... François-Honoré-Georges Jacob-Desmalter (1770 – 1841) oversaw one of the most successful and influential furniture workshops in Paris, from 1796 to 1825. ... Joséphine de Beauharnais, Empress of the French Joséphine de Beauharnais (June 23, 1763 – May 29, 1814) was the first wife of Napoléon Bonaparte and became Empress of the French. ... Chaudets Cupid in the Louvre. ...


The Tuileries Palace served as the royal residence after the Bourbon Restoration. In the "July Revolution" of 1830, the palace was attacked for a third time by Parisians and occupied. Louis Philippe took up permanent residence there until 1848 when it was again invaded, on February 24, 1848. The Swiss Guards stationed at the palace, aware of what happened in 1792 to their predecessors, abandoned the palace. Following the ousting of Napoleon I of France in 1814, the Allies restored the Bourbon Dynasty to the French throne. ... Liberty Leading the People by Eugène Delacroix commemorates the July Revolution The French Revolution of 1830, also known as the July Revolution, was a revolt by the middle class against Bourbon King Charles X which forced him out of office and replaced him with the Orléanist King Louis...

State rooms of the Tuileries Palace before 1871 - Hall of Peace
State rooms of the Tuileries Palace before 1871 - Hall of Peace

The Palace of the Tuileries served again as the official residence of the executive branch of government after the coup d'état by Napoléon III in 1852; when President Louis-Napoléon Bonaparte became Emperor Napoléon III he moved from his presidential office at the Élysée Palace to the Tuileries Palace, ushering in the Second Empire. During the Second Empire, the Tuileries Palace was extensively refurbished and redecorated after the looting and damages that occurred during the Revolution of 1848. Some imposing state rooms were designed and richly decorated, serving as the center stage of the ceremonies and pageantry of the Second Empire, such as on the occasion of Queen Victoria's state visit to the Tuileries in 1855. The Second Empire also completed the northern wing of the Louvre along the rue de Rivoli, linking the Tuileries Palace with the rest of the Louvre, and thus finally achieving the huge complex of the Louvre-Tuileries, whose master plan had been envisioned three centuries earlier. Image File history File links Tuileries7. ... Image File history File links Tuileries7. ... Charles Louis Napoléon Bonaparte (April 20, 1808, Paris, France - January 9, 1873, Chislehurst, Kent, England) was a President of France, and later, Emperor of the French. ... 1852 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... The entrance to the Élysée Palace. ... The neutrality of this article is disputed. ... // Observations of liberals As 1848 began, liberals in France awaited the death of King Louis Philippe, expecting a new revolution after his death. ... Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria; 24 May 1819 – 22 January 1901) was the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland from 20 June 1837, and the first Empress of India from 1 January 1877, until her death in 1901. ... 1855 was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... Rue de Rivoli is one of the most famous streets of Paris, a commercial street whose shops include the most fashionable names in the world. ...


The prominent roof-lines of the palace and especially its squared central dome were influential prototypes in the Second Empire style adopted for hotels and commercial buildings as well as residences even in the United Kingdom and North America. The canonical example of Second Empire style is the Opéra Garnier, in which Neo-Baroque meets Neo-Renaissance. ...


End of the Tuileries

The final completion of the long planned Louvre-Tuileries complex was not to last long. On May 23, 1871, during the suppression of the Paris Commune, twelve men under the orders of a Commune extremist, Dardelle, set the Tuileries on fire at 7 pm, using petroleum, liquid tar, and turpentine. The fire lasted for 48 hours and entirely consumed the palace. It was only on May 25 that the Paris fire brigades and the 26th battalion of the Africa Chasseurs managed to put out the fire. Other portions of the Louvre were also set on fire by Commune extremists and entirely destroyed. The museum itself was only miraculously saved. May 23 is the 143rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (144th in leap years). ... 1871 (MDCCCLXXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar). ... Le Père Duchesne looking at the statue of Napoleon I on top of the Vendome column: Eh ben ! bougre de canaille, on va donc te foutre en bas comme ta crapule de neveu !… (Here! savage rascal, we will put you down just like your crook of a nephew!…) The... Pumpjack pumping an oil well near Sarnia, Ontario Ignacy Łukasiewicz - inventor of the refining of kerosene from crude oil. ... Tar is a viscous black liquid derived from the destructive distillation of organic matter. ... For the band, click Turpentine (band). ... May 25 is the 145th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (146th in leap years). ... A Chasseur (a French term for hunter) is the designation given to certain regiments ofFrench light infantry (Chasseurs-à-Pied) or light cavalry (Chasseurs-à-Cheval) troops, trained for rapid action. ... The Louvre Museum (Musée du Louvre) in Paris, France, is the largest museum in the world. ...

Burnt stone shell of the Tuileries Palace after the 1871 fire and before the destruction of 1883 - View from the Louvre courtyard
Burnt stone shell of the Tuileries Palace after the 1871 fire and before the destruction of 1883 - View from the Louvre courtyard

The ruins of the Tuileries stood on the site for eleven years. Although the roofs and the inside of the palace had been utterly destroyed by the fire, the stone shell of the palace remained intact, and restoration was possible. Other monuments of Paris also set on fire by Commune extremists, such as the Paris City Hall, were rebuilt in the 1870s. After much hesitation, the Third Republic eventually decided not to restore the ruins of the Tuileries, which had become a symbol of the former royal and imperial regimes. On the other hand, the portions of the Louvre that had also been destroyed by fire were rebuilt in their original style by the French government. Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Image File history File links File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... The Hôtel de Ville houses the office of the Mayor of Paris. ... The French Third Republic, (in French, La Troisième République, sometimes written as La IIIe République) (1870/75-10 July 1940) was the governing body of France between the Second French Empire and the Vichy Regime. ...


In 1882 the French National Assembly voted for the demolition of the ruins, which were sold to a private entrepreneur for the sum of 33,300 gold francs (approximately US$130,000 in 2005), despite the protests of Baron Haussmann and other members of French artistic and architectural circles, who opposed what they thought was a crime against French arts and history. The demolition was started in February 1883 and completed on September 30, 1883; bits of stones and marbles from the palace were sold by the private entrepreneur as souvenirs. 1882 (MDCCCLXXXII) was a common year starting on Sunday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Tuesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar. ... Georges-Eugène, Baron Haussmann (March 27, 1809 – January 11, 1891) was a French civic planner whose name is associated with the rebuilding of Paris. ... 1883 (MDCCCLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... September 30 is the 273rd day of the year (274th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1883 (MDCCCLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ...


Tuileries Garden and the Axe Historique

"Afternoon at the Tuileries Park" by Adolph von Menzel
"Afternoon at the Tuileries Park" by Adolph von Menzel

When the large empty space between the northern and southern wings of the Louvre now familiar to modern visitors was revealed in 1883, for the first time the Louvre courtyard opened into an unbroken Axe historique. The Tuileries Garden (French Jardin des Tuileries) is surrounded by the Louvre (to the east), the Seine (to the south), the Place de la Concorde (to the west) and the Rue de Rivoli (to the north). Farther to the north lies the Place Vendôme. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2048x1408, 462 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Tuileries Palace ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (2048x1408, 462 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Tuileries Palace ... Adolph Friedrich Erdmann von Menzel ( 8 December 1815 - 9 February 1905) was a German artist noted for drawings, engravings, and paintings. ... 1883 (MDCCCLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... The Axe historique (historical axis) is a line of monuments, buildings and thoroughfares that runs out from the centre of Paris, France, to the west. ... The Place de la Concorde seen from the Pont de la Concorde; in front, the Obelisk, behind, the Rue Royale and the Church of the Madeleine; on the left, the Hôtel de Crillon. ... Rue de Rivoli is one of the most famous streets of Paris, a commercial street whose shops include the most fashionable names in the world. ... Communards pose with the statue from the toppled Vendôme column, 1871 Place Vendôme is a square in the 1st arrondissement of Paris located to the north of the Tuileries Gardens and east of the Église de la Madeleine. ...


The Tuileries Garden covers about 63 acres (25 hectares) and still closely follows a design laid out by landscape architect Andre Le Notre in 1664. His spacious formal garden plan drew out the perspective from the reflecting pools one to the other in an unbroken vista along a central axis from the west façade, which has been extended as the Axe historique. A landscape architect is a person, generally speaking, with an education, whether academic or practical, in landscape architecture and whose professional work conforms to the practice of the same name. ... Painting of André Le Nôtre by Carlo Maratti André Le Nôtre (March 12, 1613 - September 15, 1700) was a landscape architect and the gardener of king Louis XIV of France from 1645 to 1700. ... Events March 12 - New Jersey becomes a colony of England. ... The Axe historique (historical axis) is a line of monuments, buildings and thoroughfares that runs out from the centre of Paris, France, to the west. ...


The Galerie nationale du Jeu de Paume is a museum of contemporary art located in the north-west corner of the gardens. The Galerie nationale du Jeu de Paume is a museum of contemporary art in the north-west corner of the Tuileries Gardens in Paris. ...

Map of the Louvre and the Tuileries Gardens
Map of the Louvre and the Tuileries Gardens

Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1000x763, 123 KB) A version of fr:Image:Plan louvre1. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1000x763, 123 KB) A version of fr:Image:Plan louvre1. ...

Rebuilding the Tuileries?

Since 2003, in France, a committee has been proposing to rebuild the Tuileries Palace. This effort is similar to the proposal of reconstruction of the Berliner Stadtschloss (Berlin City Palace). There are several reasons for rebuilding the Palace of the Tuileries. Ever since the destruction of 1883, the famous perspective of the Champs-Élysées, which ended on the majestic facade of the Tuileries Palace, now ends in the Arc du Carrousel, formerly centered on the Tuileries but now occupying a large empty space. The Louvre with its pyramid on the one hand and the axis of the Place de la Concorde-Champs-Élysées-Arc de Triomphe on the other hand are not aligned on the same axis. The Arc du Carrousel fortuitously stands near the intersection of the two axes. The Palace of the Tuileries, which was located at the junction of these two diverging axes, helped to disguise this bending of the axes. Famous architects [citation needed] argue that the rebuilding of the Tuileries would allow the re-establishment of the harmony of these two different axes. The Tuileries Gardens would also recover their purpose, which was to be a palace garden. 2003 (MMIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Berlin City Palace (German: Berliner Stadtschloss) was a palace in central Berlin, on Schlossplatz, next to Alexanderplatz. ... 1883 (MDCCCLXXXIII) was a common year starting on Monday (see link for calendar). ... The Champs-Élysées (pronounced  , literally the Elysian fields) is a broad avenue in Paris. ... The Arc de Triomphe du Carrousel is a triumphal arch in Paris, France. ... The Place de la Concorde seen from the Pont de la Concorde; in front, the Obelisk, behind, the Rue Royale and the Church of the Madeleine; on the left, the Hôtel de Crillon. ... Arc de Triomphe by night The Arc de Triomphe is a monument in Paris that stands in the centre of the Place de lÉtoile, at the western end of the Champs-Élysées. ...

Le Nôtre's central axis of the Tuileries' parterres in a late 17th-century engraving
Le Nôtre's central axis of the Tuileries' parterres in a late 17th-century engraving

Also, it is emphasized that the Louvre Museum needs to extend its groundplan to properly display all its collections, and if the Tuileries Palace is rebuilt, the Louvre Museum could expand into the rebuilt palace. It is also proposed to rebuild the state apartments of the Second Empire as they stood in 1871. All the plans of the palace and many photographs are still stored in French archives, which would make it easy to rebuild the palace and its rooms exactly as they stood in 1871. Furthermore, all the furniture and paintings from the palace survived the 1871 fire, because they had been removed from the palace in 1870 at the start of the Franco-Prussian War, and stored in secure locations. Today, these furniture and paintings are still deposited in storehouses and not on public display due to the lack of space in the Louvre Museum. It is argued that recreating the state apartments of the Tuileries Palace would allow display these treasures of Second Empire style which are currently hidden away from the public. Tuileries Palace File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Tuileries Palace File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ... Painting of André Le Nôtre by Carlo Maratti André Le Nôtre (March 12, 1613 - September 15, 1700) was a landscape architect and the gardener of King Louis XIV of France from 1645 to 1700. ... A parterre is a formal garden construction on a level surface consisting of planting beds, edged in stone or tightly clipped hedging and gravel paths arranged to form a pleasing pattern. ... Combatants Second French Empire North German Confederation allied with south German states (later German Empire) Commanders Napoleon III Helmuth von Moltke Strength 500,000[citation needed] 550,000[citation needed] Casualties 150,000 dead or wounded 284,000 captured 350,000 civilian [citation needed] 100,000 dead or wounded 200...


A rebuilding of the Palace of the Tuileries is estimated to cost 300 million euros (US$ 365 million). It would be financed by public subscription, and the work would be undertaken by a private foundation, with the French government spending no money in the project. Since 2003, the idea has gained momentum in French media, but it remains to be seen whether such a rebuilding will ever happen. It would be the largest construction project undertaken in the centre of Paris since the early 20th century. [citation needed]


See also

  • Salle du Manège

Before the French Revolution, the Salle du Manège (Hall of Manège) at Tuileries Palace in Paris was home to the royal equestrian academy. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:

  Results from FactBites:
 
The Tuileries Palace (469 words)
The palace was formed by a series of long, narrow buildings with high roofs that created one major and two minor courtyards.
The great Louis XIV resided at the Tuileries Palace while Versailles was under construction.
This impressive piece of furniture which was designed by the architect Charles Percier is embellished with several bronze ornaments: the central panel depicts the "Birth of the Queen of the Earth to whom Cupids and Goddesses hasten with their Offerings" by Pierre-Philippe Thomire, after a sculpture by Chaudet.
Tuileries Palace (227 words)
Tuileries became the meeting place of the National Convention, the group of 371 deputies that were to create a new constitution for the country.
The name of the palace was actually changed from Tuileries Palace to le Palais National, thus showing how quickly this building became home to the new national government.
The Tuileries was also well known for its gardens which were a major gathering place for artists and musicians, as well as about every other Parisian.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m