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Encyclopedia > Tufts University
Tufts University

Motto: Pax et Lux
(Peace and Light)
Established: 1852
Type: Private
Endowment: $1.5 billion[1]
President: Lawrence S. Bacow
Provost: Jamshed Bharucha
Faculty: 583
Undergraduates: 4,995[2]
Postgraduates: 4,300
Location: Medford/Somerville/Boston, MA, USA
Campus: Urban/Suburban
Colors: Brown      and blue     
Mascot: Jumbo
Affiliations: NESCAC
Website: www.tufts.edu

Tufts University is a private research university in Medford/Somerville, near Boston, Massachusetts. The university is home to the nation's oldest graduate school of international relations, The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy. Tufts is a surname, and may refer to: Charles Tufts James Hayden Tufts James Walker Tufts Patrick Tufts Peter Tufts Richard Tufts Robert Tufts Sonny Tufts Terry Tufts Warren Tufts Tufts University Tuft Tofte (surname) Toft (surname) Tufte (surname) Categories: | ... Image File history File links Tufts_univ_seal_brown_blue. ... For other uses, see Motto (disambiguation). ... The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... 1852 was a leap year starting on Thursday (see link for calendar). ... For the film of this title, see Private School (film). ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... USD redirects here. ... University President is the title of the highest ranking officer within a university, within university systems that prefer that appellation over other variations such as Chancellor or rector. ... Lawrence S. Bacow, an environmental economist, has been president of Tufts University since September 1, 2001. ... Provost is the title of a senior academic administrator at many institutions of higher education in the United States and Canada, the equivalent of Vice-Chancellor at certain UK universites such as UCL, and the head of certain Oxbridge colleges (e. ... Jamshed Bharucha has been Provost and Senior Vice President of Tufts University since August, 2002. ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... In some educational systems, undergraduate education is post-secondary education up to the level of a Bachelors degree. ... Degree ceremony at Cambridge. ... Location in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country United States State Massachusetts County Middlesex County Settled 1630 Incorporated 1630 Government  - Type Mayor-council city  - Mayor Michael J. McGlynn Area  - City  8. ... Location in Middlesex County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Middlesex Settled 1630 Incorporated 1842 Government  - Type Mayor-council city  - Mayor Joseph A. Curtatone Area  - Total 4. ... Boston redirects here. ... This article is about the U.S. state. ... Cities with at least a million inhabitants in 2006 An urban area is an area with an increased density of human-created structures in comparison to the areas surrounding it. ... “Suburbia” redirects here. ... School colors are the colors chosen by a school to represent it on uniforms and other items of identification. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... This article is about the historic elephant named Jumbo. ... The New England Small College Athletic Conference (NESCAC) is an athletic conference consisting of eleven highly selective liberal arts colleges located in New England and New York. ... A website (alternatively, web site or Web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or more web servers, usually accessible via the Internet. ... For the community in Florida, see University, Florida. ... Location in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country United States State Massachusetts County Middlesex County Settled 1630 Incorporated 1630 Government  - Type Mayor-council city  - Mayor Michael J. McGlynn Area  - City  8. ... Location in Middlesex County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Middlesex Settled 1630 Incorporated 1842 Government  - Type Mayor-council city  - Mayor Joseph A. Curtatone Area  - Total 4. ... Boston redirects here. ... The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, also called simply The Fletcher School, is the oldest exclusively graduate school of international relations in the United States, as well as the second oldest. ...


In 1852, Tufts College was founded by Universalists who had for years worked to open a non-sectarian institution of higher learning.[3] Charles Tufts donated the land for the campus on Walnut Hill, the highest point in Medford, saying that he wanted to set a "light on the hill." The name was changed to "Tufts University" in 1954, although the corporate name remains "the Trustees of Tufts College." After over a century as a small New England liberal arts college, the French-American nutritionist Jean Mayer became president of Tufts in the late 1970s and, through a series of rapid acquisitions, transformed the school into an international research university.[4] This article is about Universalism in religion and theology. ... Charles Tufts (1781 - 1876) donated twenty acres (80,000 m²) of land in Medford, Massachusetts for what was to be named Tufts University. ... Walnut Hill, located in Medford, Massachusetts, is the geographical home of Tufts University. ... This article is about the region in the United States of America. ... In the history of education, the seven liberal arts comprise two groups of studies, the trivium and the quadrivium. ... Jean Mayer (February 19, 1920-January 1, 1993) was a renowned French-American nutritionist and the tenth president of Tufts University from 1976 to 1992. ... The 1970s decade refers to the years from 1970 to 1979, also called The Seventies. ...


Tufts is organized into 10 schools,[5] including two undergraduate programs and eight graduate divisions, on four campuses in Massachusetts and on the eastern border of France. The university emphasizes public service in all of its disciplines[6] and is well-known for internationalism and its study abroad programs.[7] This article is about the U.S. state. ... Public services is a term usually used to mean services provided by government to its citizens, either directly (through the public sector) or by financing private provision of services. ... Internationalism is a political movement which advocates a greater economic and political cooperation between nations for the benefit of all. ... Studying abroad is the act of a student pursuing educational opportunities in a foreign country. ...

Contents

History

Walnut Hill as it appeared prior to the construction of Tisch Library and steps, circa 1910. The road to the right no longer exists.
Walnut Hill as it appeared prior to the construction of Tisch Library and steps, circa 1910. The road to the right no longer exists.

Charles Tufts was the donor of the land the university now occupies on the Medford-Somerville line. The twenty-acre plot, given to the Universalist church on the condition that it be used for a college, was valued at $20,000 and located on one of the highest hills in the Boston area, Walnut Hill. In 1852, the Commonwealth of Massachusetts chartered Tufts College. Having been one of the biggest influences in the establishment of the College, Hosea Ballou II became the first president in 1853. Charles Tufts (1781 - 1876) donated twenty acres (80,000 m²) of land in Medford, Massachusetts for what was to be named Tufts University. ... This article is about the unit of measurement. ... The flaming chalice is the universally recognized symbol for Unitarian Universalism. ... Walnut Hill may refer to: Walnut Hill, Illinois Walnut Hill Station Walnut Hill, Tennessee This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Hosea II Ballou (1796 - 1861) was the first president of Tufts University from 1853-1861. ...


P.T. Barnum was one of the earliest benefactors of Tufts College, and the Barnum Museum of Natural History was constructed in 1884 with funds donated by him. On April 14, 1975, fire gutted Barnum Hall; the collection housed in the building was completely lost, including numerous animal specimens, Barnum's desk and bust, and the stuffed hide of Jumbo the elephant. Phineas Taylor Barnum (July 5, 1810 – April 7, 1891), American showman who is best remembered for his entertaining hoaxes and for founding the circus that eventually became Ringling Brothers and Barnum and Bailey Circus. ... is the 104th day of the year (105th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1975 (MCMLXXV) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the historic elephant named Jumbo. ...


On July 15, 1892, the Board of Trustees voted to admit women to Tufts College. is the 196th day of the year (197th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1892 (MDCCCXCII) was a leap year starting on Friday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian Calendar (or a leap year starting on Wednesday of the 12-day slower Julian calendar). ...


The university experienced tremendous growth during the presidency of Jean Mayer (1976–1992).[8] Mayer was, by all accounts, some combination of "charming, witty, duplicitous, ambitious, brilliant, intellectual, opportunistic, generous, vain, slippery, loyal, possessed of an inner standard of excellence, and charismatic".[9] Mayer established Tufts' veterinary, nutrition, and biomedical schools and acquired the Grafton and Talloires campuses, at the same time lifting the university out of its dire financial situation by increasing the size of the endowment by a factor of 15.[8] Jean Mayer (February 19, 1920-January 1, 1993) was a renowned French-American nutritionist and the tenth president of Tufts University from 1976 to 1992. ...


Recent developments

Tufts received a gift of $136 million, the largest in the university's history, on April 9, 2008 upon the dissolution of a charitable trust set up by 1911 alumnus Frank C. Doble. As an unrestricted gift, the donation was invested entirely in the university's endowment.[10][11] The investment will help finance the construction of a lab complex integrating biology and engineering, already in the planning stages, which will bear Doble's name.[12] is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1911 (MCMXI) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 13-day-slower Julian calendar). ...


Tufts is in the midst of a capital campaign, entitled Beyond Boundaries, with the intent of raising $1.2 billion and fully implementing need-blind admission.[13] Previously, the university had received the three largest donations in its history during 2005 and 2006. On 4 November 2005, eBay founder Pierre Omidyar and his wife Pam donated $100 million to Tufts to establish the Omidyar-Tufts Microfinance Fund.[14] On 12 May 2006, Jonathan Tisch gave $40 million to endow the University College of Citizenship and Public Service, which now bears his name.[15] The veterinary school was named in honor of William S. Cummings after a $50 million donation to the school in 2005. On September 4, 2007, it was announced that Steve Tisch had donated $10 million to support a $35 million athletics and fitness facilities expansion planned to begin in late 2008. In addition, the Jaharis Family Foundation donated $15 million to renovate the Sackler Center for Health Communications and build a new campus center for the Boston campus and medical school.[16] Need-blind admission is a U.S. term denoting a college admission policy in which the admitting institution claims not to consider an applicants financial situation when deciding admission. ... is the 308th day of the year (309th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the online auction center. ... Pierre M. Omidyar (born 21 June 1967) is a French-born Iranian-American entrepreneur and philanthropist/economist, and the founder/chairman of the eBay auction site. ... The Omidyar-Tufts Microfinance Fund is a microfinance investment firm established on 4 November 2005. ... is the 132nd day of the year (133rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... Jonathan M. Tisch has been Chairman and CEO of Loews Hotels since 1989, as well as being Co-Chairman of the Board and Member of the Office of the President of Loews Corporation, its parent company. ... The Jonathan M. Tisch College of Citizenship and Public Service, (originally named University College of Citizenship and Public Service, UCCPS) is a college of Tufts University, located in Medford, Massachusetts. ... Steven Steve Tisch is the chairman, executive vice president, and co-owner of the New York Giants, as well as a movie director. ...


In August 2006, Tufts subsidiary TUDC, LLC and development partner Hines Interests LP secured approval to build a 621-foot tower atop Boston's South Station. The complex, designed by César Pelli, was conceived by Jean Mayer in 1991 as a medical research hub. Construction is expected to begin sometime in 2008 and is an example of transit-oriented development.[17][18] South Station Tower is a proposed 621 foot (189 m), 49-story hotel, condominium complex, office space, and parking structure to be built atop Bostons historic South Station. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... muu Cesar Pelli (born October 12, 1926 in San Miguel de Tucumán, Argentina) is a noted Argentine architect known for designing some of the worlds tallest buildings and other major urban landmarks. ... Jean Mayer (February 19, 1920-January 1, 1993) was a renowned French-American nutritionist and the tenth president of Tufts University from 1976 to 1992. ... Aerial view of growth patterns in Arlington County, Virginia. ...


Campuses

Greater Boston

View of Boston from the public area on the Tisch library roof
View of Boston from the public area on the Tisch library roof

Image File history File links Tufts_Library. ... Image File history File links Tufts_Library. ... Location in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country United States State Massachusetts County Middlesex County Settled 1630 Incorporated 1630 Government  - Type Mayor-council city  - Mayor Michael J. McGlynn Area  - City  8. ... Location in Middlesex County in Massachusetts Coordinates: , Country State County Middlesex Settled 1630 Incorporated 1842 Government  - Type Mayor-council city  - Mayor Joseph A. Curtatone Area  - Total 4. ... Walnut Hill, located in Medford, Massachusetts, is the geographical home of Tufts University. ... The School of Arts and Sciences (A&S) is the largest of the eight schools and colleges that comprise Tufts University. ... The School of Engineering is one of the eight schools and colleges that comprise Tufts University . ... The Cabot Intercultural Center of The Fletcher School at Tufts University The Fletcher School (also called The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy) is the oldest graduate school of international relations in the United States. ... The Gerald J. and Dorothy R. Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy (also called the Friedman School) at Tufts University brings together biomedical, clinical, social, and behavioral scientists to conduct research, educational, and community service programs in the field of human nutrition. ... Davis Square, Somerville, Massachusetts Davis Square is a neighborhood of Somerville, Massachusetts, located around the intersection of Holland Street, Dover Street, Elm Street, Highland Avenue, and College Avenue. ... Nickname: City on the Hill, Beantown, The Hub (of the Universe)1, Athens of America, The Cradle of Revolution, Puritan City, Americas Walking City Location in Massachusetts, USA Counties Suffolk County Mayor Thomas M. Menino(D) Area    - City 232. ... The Tufts University School of Medicine is one of the eight schools that comprise Tufts University. ... The Sackler School of Graduate Biomedical Sciences is one of the eight schools that comprise Tufts University. ... Tufts University School of Dental Medicine is a private dental school, and one of seven graduate/professional schools offered by Tufts University. ... The Gerald J. and Dorothy R. Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy (also called the Friedman School) at Tufts University brings together biomedical, clinical, social, and behavioral scientists to conduct research, educational, and community service programs in the field of human nutrition. ... Nickname: City on the Hill, Beantown, The Hub (of the Universe)1, Athens of America, The Cradle of Revolution, Puritan City, Americas Walking City Location in Massachusetts, USA Counties Suffolk County Mayor Thomas M. Menino(D) Area    - City 232. ... The Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, one of the eight colleges and schools that comprise Tufts University, is the only school of veterinary medicine in the New England region of the United States. ...   Grafton is a town in Worcester County, Massachusetts, United States. ... Woodstock is a town located in Windham County, Connecticut. ... This article is about the area of Massachusetts known as Cape Cod. For other uses, see Cape Cod (disambiguation). ...

Satellite facilities

  • Tufts has a satellite campus in Talloires, France at the Tufts European Center, a former Benedictine priory built in the 11th century. The priory was purchased in 1958 by Donald MacJannet and his wife Charlotte and used as a summer camp site for several years before the MacJannets gave the campus to Tufts in 1978. Each year the center hosts a number of summer study programs, and enrolled students live with local families. The site is frequently the host of international conferences and summits.

A satellite campus is the campus of a college or university that is physically detached from the main university or college area. ... Tufts European Center, an 11th century Benedictine priory Talloires is a small town and commune of the Haute-Savoie département, in the Rhône-Alpes région of eastern France. ... A priory is an ecclesiastical circumscription run by a prior. ...

Academic profile

Rankings

Tufts' undergraduate program was ranked #28 overall in U.S. News & World Report's 2008 rankings of national universities,[19] tied for #102 in Shanghai Jiao Tong University's 2007 Academic Ranking of World Universities,[20] and tied for #159 in the Times Higher Education 2007 World University Rankings.[21] The institution is also categorized as a "Doctoral/Research Extensive" institution by the Carnegie Foundation. U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... Shanghai Jiao Tong University (simplified Chinese: ; traditional Chinese: ; pinyin: ; abbreviated Jiao Da (交大) or SJTU), located in Shanghai, is one of the oldest and most influential universities in China. ... // One of the well known rankings, THES - QS publishes an annual report about world rankings. ... The Carnegie Classification of Institutions of Higher Education is a report classifying all accredited degree_granting colleges and United States. ... The Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching is an international centre for research in education based in the United States of America. ...


In the Princeton Review's 2006 Best 361 Colleges, Tufts was named #7 in a list of the 20 schools in the country where students are happiest, and #17 in a list of the 20 schools in the country with the best food. Typically, 96-97% of first year students return for their sophomore year. The Princeton Review (TPR) is a for-profit U.S. company that offers private instruction and tutoring for standardized achievement tests, in particular those offered by the Educational Testing Service (ETS), such as the SAT, GRE, LSAT, GMAT, and MCAT. The company was founded in 1982 and is based in...


Admissions

In the 2008 edition of U.S. News & World Report's National Universities ranking, Tufts tied Cornell University as the 15th most selective university. U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... Cornell redirects here. ...


Tufts accepted 25% of applicants to its undergraduate Class of 2012, a 3% decrease from the previous year's admissions rate.[22] Eighty-three percent of incoming freshmen ranked in the top 10% of their high school class.


In selecting the Class of 2010, Dean of Arts and Sciences Robert Sternberg added experimental criteria to the application process for undergraduates to test "creativity and other non-academic factors." Calling it the "first major university to try such a departure from the norm," Inside Higher Ed also notes that Tufts continues to consider the SAT and other traditional criteria.[23][24] Robert J. Sternberg (8 December 1949-) is the Dean of Arts and Sciences at Tufts University and is the former IBM Professor of Psychology and Education at Yale University. ... Inside Higher Ed is a free daily online publication that covers a variety of college and university issues. ... For other uses, see SAT (disambiguation). ...


Organization

Tufts University comprises eight schools including:[25]

Each school has its own faculty and is lead by a dean appointed by the president and the provost with the consent of the Board of Trustees. In addition, the university is affiliated with the School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston and the New England Conservatory of Music. The School of Arts and Sciences (A&S) is the largest of the eight schools and colleges that comprise Tufts University. ... Year 1898 (MDCCCXCVIII) was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Monday of the 12-day-slower Julian calendar). ... Year 1903 (MCMIII) was a common year starting on Thursday (link will display calendar) of the Gregorian calendar or a common year starting on Wednesday of the 13-day slower Julian calendar. ... The School of Engineering is one of the eight schools and colleges that comprise Tufts University . ... The Cabot Intercultural Center of The Fletcher School at Tufts University The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, also called simply The Fletcher School, is the oldest graduate school of international relations in the United States. ... Tufts University School of Dental Medicine is a private dental school, and one of seven graduate/professional schools offered by Tufts University. ... The Tufts University School of Medicine is one of the eight schools that comprise Tufts University. ... The Sackler School of Graduate Biomedical Sciences is one of the eight schools that comprise Tufts University. ... The Gerald J. and Dorothy R. Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy (also called the Friedman School) at Tufts University brings together biomedical, clinical, social, and behavioral scientists to conduct research, educational, and community service programs in the field of human nutrition. ... The Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, one of the eight colleges and schools that comprise Tufts University, is the only school of veterinary medicine in the New England region of the United States. ... The Jonathan M. Tisch College of Citizenship and Public Service, (originally named University College of Citizenship and Public Service, UCCPS) is a college of Tufts University, located in Medford, Massachusetts. ... In an educational setting, a dean is a person with significant authority . ... For other uses, see President (disambiguation). ... Provost is the title of a senior academic administrator at many institutions of higher education in the United States and Canada, the equivalent of Vice-Chancellor at certain UK universites such as UCL, and the head of certain Oxbridge colleges (e. ... The School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (also known as the Museum School or SMFA) is an undergraduate and graduate college located in Boston, Massachusetts and is dedicated to the visual arts. ... The New England Conservatory of Music (NEC) in Boston, Massachusetts is the oldest independent conservatory in the United States. ...


The School of Arts and Sciences and the School of Engineering are the only schools that award both undergraduate and graduate degrees. The Jackson College for Women, established in 1910 as a coordinate college adjacent to the Tufts campus, was integrated with the College of Liberal Arts in 1980, but is recognized in the formal name of the undergraduate arts and sciences division, the "College of Liberal Arts and Jackson College". Undergraduate women in arts and sciences continued to receive their diplomas from Jackson College until 2002. The School of Arts and Sciences (A&S) is the largest of the eight schools and colleges that comprise Tufts University. ... Also see: 2002 (number). ...


The Fletcher School, the School of Medicine, the Sackler School of Graduate Biomedical Sciences, the School of Dental Medicine, the Gerald J. and Dorothy R. Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, and the Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine are exclusively graduate and professional schools. All of these schools, with the exception of dental medicine, award the Ph.D.


The Jonathan M. Tisch College of Citizenship and Public Service was founded in 2000 "to educate for active citizenship" with the help of a $10 million gift from eBay founder Pierre Omidyar and his wife Pam. In 2006 the school was renamed after a $40 million dollar gift from Jonathan Tisch. It has been called the "most ambitious attempt by any research university to make public service part of its core academic mission."[26] Tisch College does not grant degrees; the college facilitates and supports a wide range of community service and civil engagement programs, research and teaching initiatives across the university. The Jonathan M. Tisch College of Citizenship and Public Service, (originally named University College of Citizenship and Public Service, UCCPS) is a college of Tufts University, located in Medford, Massachusetts. ... This article is about the online auction center. ... Pierre M. Omidyar (born 21 June 1967) is a French-born Iranian-American entrepreneur and philanthropist/economist, and the founder/chairman of the eBay auction site. ... Jonathan M. Tisch has been Chairman and CEO of Loews Hotels since 1989, as well as being Co-Chairman of the Board and Member of the Office of the President of Loews Corporation, its parent company. ...


Under the purview of the School of Arts and Sciences is the Experimental College, a non-degree granting entity created in 1964 as a proving ground for innovative, experimental, and interdisciplinary curricula and courses. By far, the most successful component of the Ex College is EPIIC, a year-long program begun in 1985 to immerse students in a global issue which culminates in an annual symposium of scholars and experts from the field. The Experimental College (also known as the Ex College or Ex-College), is a college of Tufts University, located in Medford, Massachusetts. ... Also Nintendo emulator: 1964 (emulator). ... Interdisciplinary work is that which integrates concepts across different disciplines. ... EPIIC(Education for Public Inquiry and International Citizenship) is a program at Tufts University in the Program of the Institute for Global Leadership. ... This article is about the year. ...


Culture and student life

A fixture on the Medford campus is a replica of a cannon taken from the deck of the USS Constitution, donated to the university by the city of Medford in 1956.[27] Since 1977, it has been used by student groups and individual students who paint advertisements, political statements, birthday greetings, and other messages on the cannon under the cover of night. Painting the cannon is a competitive activity; students must guard their handiwork or risk of having their message painted over by a rival group before dawn.[28] Look up replica in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... For other uses, see Cannon (disambiguation). ... “ Old Ironsides ” redirects here. ... Also: 1977 (album) by Ash. ...

Football players pose with Jumbo in 1935. Jumbo was destroyed by fire in 1975.
Football players pose with Jumbo in 1935. Jumbo was destroyed by fire in 1975.

The Tufts school mascot is Jumbo the elephant, in honor of a major donation from circus owner P.T. Barnum in 1882. While Barnum gave the skeleton of the animal to the American Museum of Natural History, the stuffed remains of Jumbo were put on display in the basement of Barnum Hall until the building burned down in 1974. The alleged ashes of Jumbo currently reside in a peanut butter jar in the athletic director's office. A large plaster-statue elephant, Jumbo II, now sits on the academic quad. Image File history File links Jumbo_w_football_players. ... Image File history File links Jumbo_w_football_players. ... This article is about the historic elephant named Jumbo. ... Millie, once mascot of the City of Brampton, is now the Brampton Arts Councils representative. ... This article is about the historic elephant named Jumbo. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... Phineas Taylor Barnum (July 5, 1810 – April 7, 1891), American showman who is best remembered for his entertaining hoaxes and for founding the circus that eventually became Ringling Brothers and Barnum and Bailey Circus. ... Main Lobby in the Theodore Roosevelt Memorial. ... A mounted snow leopard. ... Peanut butter in a jar. ... For the adhesive medical dressing, see Adhesive bandage. ...


The Tufts Community Union funds a number of student groups, and some 150 are recognized by the university. The Leonard Carmichael Society, an umbrella organization for community and public service projects, is the largest student group at Tufts, comprising a volunteer corps of over 1,000 and a staff of eighty-five.


Traditions

  • The Naked Quad Run takes place just before fall finals, where several hundred students unwind by stripping and running circuit around the Rez Quad. Most students run naked, but some wear costumes such as capes or shrink wrap.
  • A concert known as Spring Fling takes place in the spring semester immediately before final exams on the President's Lawn; acts over the past several years have included the Dropkick Murphys, The Roots, T.I., and Tufts alumni Guster.
  • The night before Spring Fling, the Tuftonia's Day fireworks take place on the Rez Quad.
  • The Tufts Mountain Club famously "pumpkins" the campus on the night before Halloween, placing pumpkins in prominent and increasingly absurd locations such as atop buildings and statues. Although the ritual is over 75 years old, the TMC has never officially taken credit for it.
  • Tufts' Bowen Gate, named for Tufts alum Eugene Bucklin Bowen (A'1876), is a famous romantic location on campus. According to Tufts lore, any couple who kisses under the gate will eventually marry each other.
  • Tufts Cannon was given to Tufts as a gift by the city of Medford and the Medford Historical Society in 1956. It is a replica of a cannon taken from the deck of the USS Constitution. The tradition of painting the cannon began in 1977, when students painted in protest of a controversial honorary degree.[3] Today, traditional etiquette states that anyone can paint the cannon, but rights are accorded to those who "guard" the cannon, usually overnight the evening it is painted.

Tufts University is a private university located in Medford, Massachusetts, a suburb of Boston. ... The Rez Quad behind Olin Hall The Rez Quad is a quadrangle at Tufts University in Medford, Massachusetts. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... DKM redirects here. ... The Roots, a. ... This article is about the musician. ... Guster is an alternative rock band that is known for its live performances, unique sound, humor, and cult following formed by Adam Gardner, Ryan Miller, and Brian Rosenworcelin 1991 while attending Tufts University in Boston. ...

Athletics

Tufts is a member of the Division III National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and the New England Small College Athletic Conference (NESCAC), which includes Amherst, Bates, Bowdoin, Colby, Connecticut College, Hamilton, Middlebury, Trinity, Williams, and Wesleyan. Tufts does not offer athletic scholarships. Men's and women's squash and coed and women's sailing are the only Division I sports at the school. The sailing team won the 2001 Intercollegiate Sailing Association (ICSA) Dinghy National Championship and won more championships in the 1990s than any other team. Men's Squash maintains a top 20 Division I national ranking.[29] NCAA redirects here. ... The New England Small College Athletic Conference (NESCAC) is an athletic conference consisting of eleven highly selective liberal arts colleges located in New England and New York. ... Amherst College is a private liberal arts college in Amherst, Massachusetts, USA. It is the third oldest college in Massachusetts. ... Bates College is a private liberal arts college, founded in 1855 by abolitionists, located in Lewiston, Maine, in the United States. ... Bowdoin College, founded in 1794, is a private liberal arts college located in the coastal New England town of Brunswick, Maine. ... Colby College, founded in 1813, is an elite liberal arts college located on Mayflower Hill in Waterville, Maine. ... , Connecticut College is a coeducational private liberal arts college located in New London, Connecticut. ... For other colleges with the same name, see Hamilton College (disambiguation). ... Middlebury College is a small, private liberal arts college located in the rural town of Middlebury, Vermont, United States. ... Trinity College is a private liberal arts college in Hartford, Connecticut. ... Williams College is a highly selective [1] private liberal arts college located in Williamstown, Massachusetts. ... Wesleyan University is a private liberal arts college founded in 1831 and located in Middletown, Connecticut. ... Look up squash in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ... The Inter-Collegiate Sailing Association (ICSA) is a volunteer organization that serves as the governing authority for all sailing competition at colleges and universities throughout the United States and in some parts of Canada. ... The ICSA National Championship Regatta is held once each year in May and is hosted by a member school of the Intercollegiate Sailing Association. ...


The Tufts football program is one of the oldest in the country. The 1,000th game in team history was played during the 2006 season. Historians point[30] to a Tufts versus Harvard game in 1875 as the first game of College Football between two American colleges using American football rules.[31] Harvard University is a private university in Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA, and a member of the Ivy League. ... This article covers college football played in the United States. ... United States simply as football, is a competitive team sport that is both fast-paced and strategic. ...


In 1943, the Boston Red Sox used the Tufts athletic facilities during spring training due to gasoline rationing limiting the team's travel.[32] Year 1943 (MCMXLIII) was a common year starting on Friday (the link will display full 1943 calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... Major league affiliations American League (1901–present) East Division (1969–present) Current uniform Retired Numbers 1, 4, 8, 9, 27, 42 Name Boston Red Sox (1908–present) Boston Americans (1901-1907) Other nicknames The BoSox, The Olde Towne Team, The Sox Ballpark Fenway Park (1912–present) Huntington Avenue Baseball Grounds... Petrol redirects here. ... Gasoline ration stamps being printed as a result of the 1973 oil crisis Rationing is the controlled distribution of resources and scarce goods or services. ...


Sustainability

Tufts University is a signatory to, and originator of the Talloires Declaration, an international campus sustainability agreement.[33] In 1999, the university pledged to meet or beat Kyoto Protocol targets and reduce its greenhouse gas emissions 7% below 1990 levels by 2012.[34] Because of its efforts in areas like climate change, energy efficiency, local food, and recycling, Tufts received a “B+” grade from the Sustainable Endowments Institute on its 2008 college sustainability report card.[35] The Talloires Declaration is a declaration for sustainability, created for and by presidents of institutions of higher learning. ... The Earth Day flag includes a NASA photo. ... The Kyoto Protocol is a protocol to the international Framework Convention on Climate Change with the objective of reducing greenhouse gases that cause climate change. ... Top: Increasing atmospheric levels as measured in the atmosphere and ice cores. ...


Campus media and publications

  • Tufts Daily, the daily student newspaper and the most prominent source of news for the last two decades; the Daily is notable for its financial independence, receiving no funding from the student activities fee.
  • Tufts Observer, a weekly newsmagazine and the oldest student organization on campus, having been founded in 1895 as the university's first student newspaper.
  • The Primary Source, a journal of conservative thought.
  • Zamboni, a humor and satire magazine.
  • Tufts Traveler, a travel journal founded in 2005.
  • WMFO (91.5 FM Medford) is freeform radio operated by students and community volunteers since 1970; the station broadcasts 365 days a year and operates out of Curtis Hall.
  • TUTV, the campus television station, operated by Tufts students in partnership with the Ex College.
  • JumboCast, a student-run broadcast group that specializes in streaming Tufts events live over the internet via webcast.
  • Hemispheres, since 1976 one of the few undergraduate journals dedicated to international relations in the United States.
  • Public Journal, an alternative literary magazine, founded in 2005, which focuses on publishing found literature.
  • Outbreath, a literary magazine which publishes short stories, poems, one-act plays, and photography.
  • Melisma, a journal of independent music and culture founded in 2004.
  • Tuftscope, an interdisciplinary journal of health, ethics, and policy founded in 2001.

The Tufts Daily, known on campus simply as The Daily, is the student newspaper at Tufts University in Medford, Massachusetts. ... The Tufts Observer, formerly known as the Tufts Weekly, is an undergraduate student newsmagazine published at Tufts University. ... Freeform, or freeform radio, is a radio station programming format in which the disc jockey is given total control over what music to play, regardless of music genre or commercial interests. ... The Experimental College (also known as the Ex College or Ex-College), is a college of Tufts University, located in Medford, Massachusetts. ... JumboCastss main page JumboCast. ...

Notable alumni and staff

Tufts alumni are prominent in government and media, as well as business and academic disciplines. New Mexico Governor and former presidential candidate Bill Richardson, U.S. Senator Daniel Patrick Moynihan, television personality Meredith Vieira, Oscar-winning actor William Hurt, Indian actress Amisha Patel, Pfizer CEO Jeff Kindler, eBay founder Pierre Omidyar, and JPMorgan Chase CEO Jamie Dimon count Tufts as their alma mater. The following is a partial, incomplete list of notable Tufts University alumni. ... This is a list of Governors of the state of New Mexico (est. ... For other persons named William Richardson, see William Richardson (disambiguation). ... Daniel Patrick “Pat” Moynihan (March 16, 1927 – March 26, 2003) was a United States Senator, Ambassador, and eminent sociologist. ... Meredith Vieira (born December 30, 1953) is an Emmy Award-winning American television personality, game show hostess and journalist. ... William Hurt (born March 20, 1950) is an Academy Award-winning American actor. ... Amisha Patel (born June 9, 1977, also known as Ameesha Patel) is a Bollywood actress and model from Maharashtra, India. ... Pfizer Incorporated (NYSE: PFE) is a major pharmaceutical company, which ranks number one in the world in sales[2]. The company is based in New York City. ... Jeff Kindler is the CEO of the Pfizer corporation. ... This article is about the online auction center. ... Pierre M. Omidyar (born 21 June 1967) is a French-born Iranian-American entrepreneur and philanthropist/economist, and the founder/chairman of the eBay auction site. ... -1... James Jamie Dimon (born March 13, 1956) became CEO of JPMorgan Chase & Co. ...


Notable Tufts academics include philosopher Daniel C. Dennett, biologist Barry Trimmer, Nobel Prize recipient Allan M. Cormack (1924 – 1998) and retired Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Martin J. Sherwin. Daniel Clement Dennett (born March 28, 1942) is an American philosopher. ... Allan McLeod Cormack (February 1924 - May 7, 1998) was a South Africa-born American physicist who shared a part of the 1979 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for his work on the computerized axial tomography (CAT) scan. ... Martin J. Sherwin is a Pulitzer Prize-winning American historian. ...


Tufts references in popular culture

Main article: Tufts University in popular culture

Tufts alumni in the media have been known to write characters as students of Tufts or a thinly-veiled substitute, such as the title characters of the TV series Two Guys and a Girl and the lead character of Christopher Golden's Body of Evidence mystery novels. Fictional doctors who cite Tufts School of Medicine as their alma mater include the title character from Crossing Jordan and Dr. Jennifer Melfi from The Sopranos. The Elaine Benes character on the 1990s sitcom Seinfeld mentions she went to Tufts. The following is a partial, incomplete list of notable Tufts University alumni. ... Two Guys and a Girl Two Guys, a Girl and a Pizza Place (retitled Two Guys and a Girl in its third season) was a sitcom created by Kenny Schwartz and Danny Jacobson that ran on ABC for four seasons from 1998-2001. ... Christopher Golden is an American award-winning, bestselling author of such novels as Wildwood Road, The Boys Are Back in Town, The Ferryman, Strangewood, Of Saints and Shadows, and the Body of Evidence series of teen thrillers. ... The Tufts University School of Medicine is one of the eight schools that comprise Tufts University. ... Crossing Jordan is an American television crime/drama series that aired on NBC from September 24, 2001 to May 16, 2007. ... Jennifer Melfi, M.D., played by Lorraine Bracco, is a fictional character on the HBO TV series The Sopranos. ... This article is about the television series. ... Elaine Marie Benes is a fictional character on the American television sitcom Seinfeld (1989–1998), played by Julia Louis-Dreyfus. ... A sitcom or situation comedy is a genre of comedy performance originally devised for radio but today typically found on television. ... For other uses, see Seinfeld (disambiguation). ...


In addition, because of both the school's suburban ambience and proximity to Boston, it has been used as a filming location to represent the generic New England liberal arts college. Footage of the campus has appeared in Sabrina, the Teenage Witch, The Next Karate Kid, and the 1968 film Charly. This article is about the region in the United States of America. ... In the history of education, the seven liberal arts comprise two groups of studies, the trivium and the quadrivium. ... For the comic book series, see Sabrina, the Teenage Witch. ... The Next Karate Kid is a 1994 film starring Hilary Swank and Pat Morita. ... Spoiler warning: Charly (also spelled ChaЯly) is a 1968 film which tells the story of a mentally retarded man, working at a bakery, who becomes a subject of an experiment to increase his mental capacity. ...


References

  1. ^ [www.endowmentinstitute.org/report2008/profile151.pdf College Sustainability Report Card 2008, Tufts University]. Accessed June 15, 2008.
  2. ^ USNews.com: America's Best Colleges 2008: Tufts University: At a glance
  3. ^ Concise Encyclopedia of Tufts History "Tufts University, 1852"
  4. ^ Gittleman, Sol. (November 2004) An Entrepreneurial University: The Transformation Of Tufts, 1976-2002. Tufts University, ISBN 1-58465-416-3.
  5. ^ Bylaws of the Trustees of Tufts College, Article VI, sec. 6.1
  6. ^ Bacow, Lawrence S. "How Universities Can Teach Public Service." The Boston Globe. 15 October 2005.
  7. ^ Kantrowitz, Barbara. "America's Hot 25 Schools." Newsweek Kaplan College Guide.
  8. ^ a b McFadden, Robert D. "Jean Mayer, 72, Nutritionist Who Led Tufts, Dies." The New York Times. January 2, 1993.
  9. ^ Gittleman, Sol. "The Accidental President." Tufts Magazine, Winter 2005.
  10. ^ Russonello, Giovanni. "Tufts receives largest gift in university history." The Tufts Daily, April 9, 2008.
  11. ^ The Harvard Crimson :: News :: Tufts, Lesley Receive Big Gift
  12. ^ New building to integrate biology, engineering - News
  13. ^ [1] Chronicle of Higher Education.
  14. ^ Hopkins, Jim. "Ebay founder takes lead in social entrepreneurship." USA Today, 3 November 2005.
  15. ^ Tisch announces $40 million gift to Tufts University. Boston Globe. 12 May 2006.
  16. ^ E-mail sent from President Bacow to campus students, faculty and staff on September 4, 2007 at 1:18pm EST.
  17. ^ [2]
  18. ^ South Station's mega-makeover - The Boston Globe
  19. ^ America's Best Colleges 2008: National Universities. Retrieved on 2008-04-22.
  20. ^ Top 500 World University (101-202). Retrieved on 2008-04-22.
  21. ^ World University Rankings 2007. Times Higher Education (2007). Retrieved on 2008-04-22.
  22. ^ Tufts receives record number of applicants. Retrieved on 2008-04-04.
  23. ^ Jaschik, Scott (2006). A "Rainbow" Approach to Admissions. Inside Higher Ed, July 6, 2006.
  24. ^ McAnerny, Kelly (2005). From Sternberg, a new take on what makes kids Tufts-worthy. Tufts Daily, November 15, 2005.
  25. ^ Bylaws of the Trustees of Tufts College, Article VI, sec. 6.1
  26. ^ Bombardieri, Marcella. At Tufts, civic engagement stretches across the globe. Boston Globe, 14 March 2004.
  27. ^ The cannon arrives on campus, 1956
  28. ^ Tufts Magazine Winter 2006
  29. ^ Athletics Department - Tufts University
  30. ^ Gridiron gridlock - The Boston Globe
  31. ^ Smith, R.A. "Sports and Freedom: The Rise of Big-Time College Athletics", New York: Oxford University Press, 1988
  32. ^ Boston Red Sox spring training history: from 1901 to 2003. | Sports & Recreation > Sports, Games & Outdoor Recreation from AllBusiness.com
  33. ^ Sustainability @ Tufts. Tufts Climate Initiative. Retrieved on 2008-05-20.
  34. ^ Tufts Climate Initiative. Tufts Climate Initiative. Retrieved on 2008-05-20.
  35. ^ College Sustainability Report Card 2008. Sustainable Endowments Institute. Retrieved on 2008-05-20.

is the 166th day of the year (167th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 288th day of the year (289th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... USA Today is a national American daily newspaper published by the Gannett Company. ... is the 307th day of the year (308th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Boston Globe is the most widely-circulated daily newspaper in Boston, Massachusetts and in the greater New England region. ... is the 132nd day of the year (133rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 112th day of the year (113th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 112th day of the year (113th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 112th day of the year (113th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 94th day of the year (95th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Inside Higher Ed is a free daily online publication that covers a variety of college and university issues. ... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Tufts Daily, known on campus simply as The Daily, is the student newspaper at Tufts University in Medford, Massachusetts. ... is the 319th day of the year (320th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2005 (MMV) was a common year starting on Saturday (link displays full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... The Boston Globe is the most widely-circulated daily newspaper in Boston, Massachusetts and in the greater New England region. ... is the 73rd day of the year (74th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 140th day of the year (141st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 140th day of the year (141st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 140th day of the year (141st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

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Tufts University


Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ... The School of Arts and Sciences (A&S) is the largest of the eight schools and colleges that comprise Tufts University. ... The School of Engineering is one of the eight schools and colleges that comprise Tufts University . ... The Experimental College (also known as the Ex College or Ex-College), is a college of Tufts University, located in Medford, Massachusetts. ... The Jonathan M. Tisch College of Citizenship and Public Service, (originally named University College of Citizenship and Public Service, UCCPS) is a college of Tufts University, located in Medford, Massachusetts. ... The Tufts University School of Medicine is one of the eight schools that comprise Tufts University. ... The Sackler School of Graduate Biomedical Sciences is one of the eight schools that comprise Tufts University. ... The Cummings School of Veterinary Medicine, one of the eight colleges and schools that comprise Tufts University, is the only school of veterinary medicine in the New England region of the United States. ... The Gerald J. and Dorothy R. Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy (also called the Friedman School) at Tufts University brings together biomedical, clinical, social, and behavioral scientists to conduct research, educational, and community service programs in the field of human nutrition. ... The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, also called simply The Fletcher School, is the oldest exclusively graduate school of international relations in the United States, as well as the second oldest. ... Tufts University School of Dental Medicine is a private dental school, and one of seven graduate/professional schools offered by Tufts University. ... The Tufts Daily, known on campus simply as The Daily, is the student newspaper at Tufts University in Medford, Massachusetts. ... The Tufts Observer, formerly known as the Tufts Weekly, is an undergraduate student newsmagazine published at Tufts University. ... JumboCastss main page JumboCast. ... Colleges and universities in metropolitan Boston include: // Berklee College of Music Boston Architectural College Boston Baptist College Boston Conservatory Boston University Emerson College Emmanuel College Massachusetts College of Art Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences New England College of Optometry New England Conservatory of Music New England School of... Babson College, located in Wellesley, Massachusetts (zoned as Babson Park, ZIP code 02457),[1] is a private business school which grants all undergraduates a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration. ... Bay State College is a small private college in Boston, Massachusetts. ... The Benjamin Franklin Institute of Technology (BFIT) in Boston, Massachusetts is one of New Englands oldest colleges of engineering and technologies. ... Bentley College is located at 175 Forest Street in Waltham, Massachusetts, 10 miles west of Boston. ... Berklee College of Music, founded in 1945, is an independent music college in Boston, Massachusetts with many prominent faculty, staff, alumni, and visiting artists. ... The Boston Architectural College (the BAC), formerly known as the Boston Architectural Center, is New Englands largest independent design college, located on beautiful Newbury Street in Bostons historic Back Bay neighborhood. ... Boston Baptist College was founded in 1976 by Dr. A.V. Henderson (he served as the first President), and Dr. John Rawlings (then president of BBFI, Baptist Bible Fellowship International). ... Boston College (BC) is a private university located in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, in the New England region of the United States. ... The Boston Conservatory is an arts conservatory located in the Fenway-Kenmore region of Boston, Massachusetts, United States. ... For the similarly named institution in Chestnut Hill, see Boston College. ... Brandeis University is a private university located in Waltham, Massachusetts, United States. ... Bunker Hill Community College is a two-year college located in Charlestown, Massachusetts, which is a neighborhood of Boston. ... Cambridge College is a university in Cambridge, Massachusetts specializing in adult education. ... Founded in 1879, Curry College is a private, four-year, co-educational[2] liberal arts-based institution located on a wooded 137-acre (0. ... Eastern Nazarene College is a small liberal arts college south of Boston in Quincy, Massachusetts. ... Emerson College was founded in 1880 by Charles Wesley Emerson as a school of oratory, in Boston, Massachusetts. ... Emmanuel College is a four-year Catholic liberal arts college located on The Fenway in Boston, Massachusetts. ... Fisher College is a two-year college located in Boston, Massachusetts. ... Harvard redirects here. ... Hebrew College is transdenominational school of Jewish studies, located in Newton Centre, Massachusetts, near Boston, Massachusetts. ... Hellenic College is a small Orthodox Christian liberal arts college in Brookline, Massachusetts, founded in 1966. ... Lasell College is a private college in the Newton, Massachusetts village of Auburndale. ... Lesley University is a private university with campuses at Boston and Cambridge, in the U.S. state of Massachusetts. ... Massachusetts Bay Community College (more commonly Mass Bay Community College) is a two year institution in Middlesex County, Massachusetts. ... Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences (MCPHS) is an accredited [2] private institution providing traditional and non-traditional programs of study focusing on vocational education of pharmacy and areas of the health sciences. ... “MIT” redirects here. ... Mount Ida College is a baccalaureate, four-year liberal arts college located in Newton, Massachusetts. ... Newbury College Newbury College moved to its current home on Monks Lane, Newbury, in 2002. ... The New England College of Optometry in Boston, Massachusetts, is the oldest college of optometry in the United States. ... The New England Conservatory of Music (NEC) in Boston, Massachusetts is the oldest independent conservatory in the United States. ... The New England Institute of Art is located in the heart of the Boston area, the home to more colleges and universities than any other city in North America. ... The New England School of Law (NESL) is located in Boston, Massachusetts in the theater district. ... “Neu” redirects here. ... The Franklin W. Olin College of Engineering (abbreviated as Olin College) is a private undergraduate engineering college located in Needham, Massachusetts (near Boston), adjacent to the Babson College campus. ... Pine Manor College, or PMC, is a private, womens liberal arts college located in Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts. ... Quincy College is a community college located in Quincy, Massachusetts, with a second campus located in Plymouth, Massachusetts. ... This article is about the college in Massachusetts. ... Roxbury Community College is a two-year community college in Roxbury Crossing, Massachusetts. ... St. ... The School of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston (also known as the Museum School or SMFA) is an undergraduate and graduate college located in Boston, Massachusetts and is dedicated to the visual arts. ... Simmons College is a liberal arts womens college in Boston, Massachusetts. ... Suffolk University is a private university in Boston, Massachusetts, United States, situated on Beacon Hill. ... University of Massachusetts Boston, or UMass Boston, is a university in Boston, Massachusetts in the northeastern United States. ... Urban College of Boston (UCB) is a two-year private college located in downtown Boston, Massachusetts. ... For other uses, see Wellesley College (disambiguation). ... The Wentworth Institute of Technology is a nationally accredited institution located in Boston, Massachusetts. ... Wheelock College is an institution of higher learning located in Boston, Massachusetts. ... The New England Small College Athletic Conference (NESCAC) is an athletic conference consisting of eleven highly selective liberal arts colleges located in New England and New York. ... Amherst College is a private liberal arts college in Amherst, Massachusetts, USA. It is the third oldest college in Massachusetts. ... Bates College is a private liberal arts college, founded in 1855 by abolitionists, located in Lewiston, Maine, in the United States. ... Bowdoin College, founded in 1794, is a private liberal arts college located in the coastal New England town of Brunswick, Maine. ... Colby College, founded in 1813, is an elite liberal arts college located on Mayflower Hill in Waterville, Maine. ... , Connecticut College is a coeducational private liberal arts college located in New London, Connecticut. ... For other colleges with the same name, see Hamilton College (disambiguation). ... Middlebury College is a small, private liberal arts college located in the rural town of Middlebury, Vermont, United States. ... Trinity College is a private liberal arts college in Hartford, Connecticut. ... Wesleyan University is a private liberal arts college founded in 1831 and located in Middletown, Connecticut. ... Williams College is a highly selective [1] private liberal arts college located in Williamstown, Massachusetts. ... // Organization Three women collegiate fencers, Julia Jones and Dorothy Hafner of New York University and Elizabeth Ross of Cornell University, founded the NIWFA in 1929. ... USMA redirects here. ... “City College” redirects here. ... Cornell redirects here. ... Drew University is a small, private university located in Madison, New Jersey. ... Fairleigh Dickinson University is a American private university founded in 1942. ... -1... Haverford College is a private, coeducational liberal arts college located in Haverford, Pennsylvania, a suburb of Philadelphia. ... See also: Hunter College High School Hunter College of The City University of New York (known more commonly as simply Hunter College) is a senior college of the City University of New York (CUNY), located on Manhattans Upper East Side. ... The Johns Hopkins University, founded in 1876, is a private institution of higher learning located in Baltimore, Maryland, United States. ... This article is about Marist College in Poughkeepsie, New York. ... The University of Maryland, College Park (also known as UM, UMD, or UMCP) is a public university located in the city of College Park, in Prince Georges County, Maryland, just outside Washington, D.C., in the United States. ... New Jersey Institute of Technology is a public research university in Newark, New Jersey. ... Queens College is one of the senior colleges of the City University of New York. ... Smith College is a private, independent womens liberal arts college located in Northampton, Massachusetts. ... Stevens Institute of Technology is a technological university located on a 55 acre (223,000 m²) campus in Hoboken, New Jersey, USA, founded in 1870 on the basis of an 1868 bequest from Edwin A. Stevens. ... For the private Christian university in Tennessee, see Tennessee Temple University. ... The University of Virginia (also called U.Va. ... Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, better known as Virginia Tech, is a public land grant polytechnic university in Blacksburg, Virginia, U.S. Although it is a comprehensive university with many departments, the agriculture, engineering, architecture, forestry, and veterinary medicine programs from its historical polytechnic core are still considered to... Yeshiva University is a private Jewish university in New York City whose first component was founded in 1886. ...


  Results from FactBites:
 
Tufts University - definition of Tufts University in Encyclopedia (1450 words)
Tufts University is recognized among the premier universities in the United States.
Approximately 40 percent of all undergraduates attending Tufts pursue course work outside the United States to add a strong international dimension to their field of study, and the university's language studies are both popular and rigorous.
Every year Tufts graduates physicians, diplomats, dentists, veterinarians, entrepreneurs, teachers, engineers, researchers, scientists, and liberal arts professionals who will be leaders in their chosen fields and who believe it is their responsibility to contribute to the advancement of humanity and to the improvement of today's global community and environment.
Tufts University - Columbia Encyclopedia article about Tufts University (165 words)
Tufts University, main campus at Medford, Mass.; coeducational; chartered 1852 by Universalists as a college for men.
The university's medical and dental schools are in Boston, and the veterinary school is in North Grafton.
Tufts opened the first school of nutrition in the United States in 1981; it also operates the U.S. Dept. of Agriculture's Human Nutrition Research Center in Boston.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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