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Encyclopedia > Tudor style architecture
Kings College Chapel outside view
Kings College Chapel outside view

The Tudor style in English architecture is the final development of medieval architecture during the Tudor period (1485–1603) and even beyond, for conservative college patrons. It followed the Perpendicular style and, although superseded by the English Renaissance in domestic building of any pretensions to fashion, the Tudor style still retained its hold on English taste, portions of the additions to the various colleges of Oxford and Cambridge being still carried out in the Tudor style which overlaps with the first stirrings of the Gothic Revival. Download high resolution version (1016x719, 188 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (1016x719, 188 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The architecture of the United Kingdom has a long and diverse history from beyond Stonehenge to the designs of Norman Foster and the present day. ... This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... Winchester Cathedral Sherborne Abbey The Perpendicular Gothic period (or simply Perpendicular) is the third historical division of English Gothic architecture, and is so-called because it is characterised by an emphasis on vertical lines; it is also known as the Rectilinear style, or Late Gothic. ... Oxford is a city and local government district in Oxfordshire, England, with a population of 134,248 (2001 census). ... Geography Status City (1951) Region East of England Admin. ... Victoria Tower at the Palace of Westminster, London: Gothic details provided by A.W.N. Pugin The Gothic revival was a European architectural movement with origins in mid-18th century England. ...


The four-centred arch, now known as the Tudor arch, was a defining feature; some of the most remarkable oriel windows belong to this period; the mouldings are more spread out and the foliage becomes more naturalistic. Nevertheless, "Tudor style" is an awkward style-designation, with its implied suggestions of continuity through the period of the Tudor dynasty and the misleading impression that there was a style break at the accession of Stuart James I in 1603. In the domestic architecture one would find the walls made of wattle and daub. Tudor arch Windows - Kings College Chapel in Cambridge, England Tudor arch, a low, wide arch, was a common architectural element in the Tudor period in England. ... Oriel windows are a form of bay window commonly found in Gothic revival architecture, which jut out from the main wall of the building but do not reach to the ground. ... The Tudor dynasty or House of Tudor (Welsh: ) was a series of five monarchs who ruled England and Ireland from 1485 until 1603. ... James Stuart (19 June 1566 – 27 March 1625) was King of Scots as James VI, and King of England and King of Ireland as James I. He ruled in Scotland as James VI from 24 July 1567, when he was only one year old. ...


In church architecture the principal examples are:

In domestic building: Henry VII (January 28, 1457 – April 21, 1509), King of England, Lord of Ireland (August 22, 1485 – April 21, 1509), was the founder and first patriarch of the Tudor dynasty. ... Westminster is a district within the City of Westminster in London. ... Year 1503 (MDIII) was a common year starting on Sunday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... Kings College Chapel (partially obscured by the Gibbs Building), seen from The Backs Fan vaulting diagram Kings College Chapel is the chapel to Kings College of the University of Cambridge, and is one of the finest examples of late English Gothic or Perpendicular -style. ... Geography Status City (1951) Region East of England Admin. ... Members of the public outside St Georges Chapel at Windsor Castle, waiting to watch the Garter Procession St Georges Chapel is the place of worship at Windsor Castle in England. ... Windsor castle, a thousand-year-old fortress transformed into a royal palace. ... Oxford is a city and local government district in Oxfordshire, England, with a population of 134,248 (2001 census). ...

In the 19th century a free mix of these late Gothic elements and Elizabethan were combined for hotels and railway stations, in revival styles known as Jacobethan and Tudorbethan. Eltham Palace Eltham Palace is a large house in Eltham, London, United Kingdom (Map Ref: TQ424740 , ), currently owned by English Heritage and open to the public. ... The Kent coat of arms For other uses, see Kent (disambiguation). ... Gatehouse of Oxburgh Hall, seen from courtyard Oxburgh Hall is a stately home in Oxborough, Norfolk, England, belonging the the National Trust. ... Norfolk (IPA: //) is a low-lying county in East Anglia in the east of southern England. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Gloucestershire (pronounced ; GLOSS-ter-sher) is a county in South West England. ... Kings College, Aberdeen was founded in 1495 by Bishop William Elphinstone. ... Layer Marney Tower, nr. ... Essex is a county in the East of England. ... East Barsham Manor is an important work of Tudor architecture, originally built in 1520. ... Norfolk (IPA: //) is a low-lying county in East Anglia in the east of southern England. ... For other places with the same name, see Coventry (disambiguation). ... Compton Wynyates, Warwickshire, circa 1925 Compton Wynyates is a country house in Warwickshire, England. ... Hampton Court Palace with the Union Flag flying Hampton Court Palace is a former royal palace in the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames, south west London, England, United Kingdom. ... Montacute House, the west front. ... Wollaton Hall in the late 18th century. ... Nottinghamshire (abbreviated Notts) is an English county in the East Midlands, which borders South Yorkshire, Lincolnshire, Leicestershire and Derbyshire. ... The Old Market Hall is an Elizabethan building situated in the town centre of Shrewsbury, Shropshire. ... , Shrewsbury (pronounced either or [1]) is the county town of Shropshire, West Midlands, England. ... Anthony Salvins Harlaxton Manor, 1837 – 1855, defines the Jacobethan taste. ... The Tudorbethan Revival which manifested itself in domestic architecture in the United Kingdom in the20th century, and was also of influence in some other countries. ...


Tudor style buildings have six distinctive features -

  • Decorative half-timbering
  • Steeply pitched roof
  • Prominent cross gables
  • Tall, narrow windows Window Examples
  • Small window panes
  • Large chimneys, often topped with decorative chimney pots

Braubach (Germany) Timber framing is the modern term for the traditional half-timbered construction in which timber provides a visible skeletal frame that supports the whole building. ... The House of the Seven Gables, Salem, Massachusetts, showing four gables in this view. ... Look up Chimney in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...

As a modern term

As a modern residential style, what is usually referred to as Tudor (or sometimes Mock Tudor) is more akin to the rustic Tudorbethan architecture. Ascott House, Buckinghamshire. ...

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References

  • This article incorporates text from the Encyclopædia Britannica Eleventh Edition, a publication now in the public domain.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Tudor Furniture, English Tudor Style Furniture (507 words)
The tudor period in English history begins with the ascent to the throne of King Henry VII in 1485, this event signifying the end of the Middle Ages in Britain and supposedly the historic beginning of the English Renaissance.
Tudor interiors, in contrast to the lack of grace and quantity in furniture, were often beautifully decorated with tapestries, embroidery, carpets, and fabrics.
To summarise, the early tudor period in England before the Elizabethan age was, in matters of furniture and interior design, mostly part of the gothic tradition only changed somewhat by incipient continental ideas flowing across the channel in very small waves and by new wood crafting knowledge.
Tudor Style architecture - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (196 words)
The Tudor Style in English architecture is the final development of medieval architecture during the Tudor period (1485–1603) and even beyond, for conservative college patrons.
Nevertheless, "Tudor style" is an awkward style-designation, with its implied suggestions of continuity through the period of the Tudor dynasty and the misleading impression that there was a style break at the accession of Stuart James I in 1603.
In the 19th century a free mix of these late Gothic elements and Elizabethan were combined for hotels and railway stations, in revival styles known as Jacobethan and Tudorbethan.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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