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Encyclopedia > Tudor period
Allegory of the Tudor dynasty (detail), attributed to Lucas de Heere, c.1572: left to right, Philip II of Spain, Mary, Henry VIII, Edward VI, Elizabeth.
Allegory of the Tudor dynasty (detail), attributed to Lucas de Heere, c.1572: left to right, Philip II of Spain, Mary, Henry VIII, Edward VI, Elizabeth.

The Tudor period usually refers to the period between 1485 and 1603, specifically in relation to the history of England. This coincides with the rule of the Tudor dynasty in England. Usually the term is used more broadly to include Elizabeth's reign as well (15581603), although this is often treated separately as the Elizabethan era. Image File history File links Broom_icon. ... henry viii, edward vi, mary i & husband, elizabeth i The two-dimensional work of art depicted in this image is in the public domain in the United States and in those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years. ... henry viii, edward vi, mary i & husband, elizabeth i The two-dimensional work of art depicted in this image is in the public domain in the United States and in those countries with a copyright term of life of the author plus 100 years. ... Look up Circa on Wiktionary, the free dictionary The Latin word circa, literally meaning about, is often used to describe various dates (often birth and death dates) that are uncertain. ... Philip II (Spanish: ; Portuguese: ) (May 21, 1527 – September 13, 1598) was King of Spain from 1556 until 1598, King of Naples and Sicily from 1554 until 1598, king consort of England (as husband of Mary I) from 1554 to 1558, Lord of the Seventeen Provinces (holding various titles for the... Mary I (18 February 1516 – 17 November 1558), also known as Mary Tudor, was Queen of England and Queen of Ireland from 6 July 1553 (de facto) or 19 July 1553 (de jure) until her death on 17 November 1558. ... “Henry VIII” redirects here. ... Edward VI (12 October 1537 – 6 July 1553) became King of England, King of France (in practice only the town and surrounding district of Calais) and Edward I of Ireland on 28 January 1547, and crowned on 20 February, at just nine years of age. ... This article is about Elizabeth I of England. ... Year 1485 was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar). ... Year 1603 (MDCIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... England is the largest and most populous of the constituent countries of the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see Tudor (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... January 7 - French troops led by Francis, Duke of Guise take Calais, the last continental possession of the Kingdom of England July 13 - Battle of Gravelines: In France, Spanish forces led by Count Lamoral of Egmont defeat the French forces of Marshal Paul des Thermes at Gravelines. ... Year 1603 (MDCIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... Elizabethan redirects here. ...

Contents

Health

The Tudor municipalities were comparatively small and overcrowded. The cobbled streets were narrow, dirty due to open sewers running alongside and carrying the filth to the nearest river. Rats and flies thrived, spreading diseases such as typhus and the plague. Few of the inhabitants lived to be older than 40, and children often died before they were five.[citations needed] A municipality is an administrative entity composed of a clearly defined territory and its population and commonly referring to a city, town, or village, or a small grouping of them. ... A cobblestone-covered street Cobblestones are stones used in the pavement of early streets. ... A sewer is an artificial conduit or system of conduits used to remove sewage (human liquid waste) and to provide drainage. ... For other uses, see River (disambiguation). ... This is an article about wild rats; for pet rats, see Fancy rat Species 50 species; see text *Several subfamilies of Muroids include animals called rats. ... For other uses, see Fly (disambiguation) and Flies (disambiguation). ... This article is about the medical term. ... For the unrelated disease caused by Salmonella typhi, see Typhoid fever. ... The bubonic plague or bubonic fever is the best-known variant of the deadly infectious disease caused by the enterobacteria Yersinia pestis (Pasteurella pestis). ... For other uses, see Child (disambiguation). ...


Homes and food

The very rich usually lived in large mansions in the countryside, with up to 150 servants. The mansions had many chimneys for the many fireplaces required to keep the vast rooms warm. These fires were also the only way of cooking food. This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Sign in a rural area in Dalarna, Sweden Qichun, a rural town in Hubei province, China An artists rendering of an aerial view of the Maryland countryside: Jane Frank (Jane Schenthal Frank, 1918-1986), Aerial Series: Ploughed Fields, Maryland, 1974, acrylic and mixed materials on apertured double canvas, 52... It has been suggested that servant (domestic) be merged into this article or section. ... Look up Chimney in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


The food consumed by the very rich in this period consisted largely of venison, and often of blackbirds and larks. However, potatoes had not reached the table to any great extent, because farmers had only just begun growing them, although explorers such as Sir Walter Raleigh had brought them to Britain. Honey was normally used to sweeten food; sugar was only rarely available, but when they did have it, they put it on all their food, including meat. The poor never had sugar or potatoes and seldom ate meat. They would occasionally catch rabbits and fish but most of the time they ate bread and vegetables such as cabbage and turnips.


Education

Poorer children never went to school. Children from better-off families had tutors to teach them reading and French. However, boys were often sent to schools which belonged to the monasteries and there they would learn mainly Latin in classes of up to 60 boys. The school day went from dawn until dusk and the schoolmasters would frequently beat their pupils. Children from royal families had private lessons where they usually were the only pupil.


Pastimes

The rich used to go hunting to kill deer and wild boar for their feasts. They also enjoyed fencing and jousting contests. Most rich people watched bear fighting and the poor played a kind of football where the posts were about a mile apart, they jumped on each other, often breaking their necks and backs. There were some theatres and people enjoyed watching plays, particularly those of the young playwright William Shakespeare, operas were also a favourtie among the richer part of the community, with binoculars they would watch the intensity and romance of opera artists.[citations needed] Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ...


The English Reformation began in this period with the Henrician Reformation. This box:      King Henry VIII of England. ...


Other tudor pasttimes were people eating and dancing and singing.


References

Image File history File links Question_book-3. ...

See also

The Tudor style, a term applied to the Perpendicular style, was originally that of the English architecture and decorative arts produced under the Tudor dynasty that ruled England from 1485 to 1603, characterized as an amalgam of Late Gothic style formalized by more concern for regularity and symmetry, with round... When Henry Tudor took the crown of England from Richard III in battle, he brought about the end of the Wars of the Roses between the House of Lancaster (Red Rose) and the House of York (White Rose). ... Ascott House, Buckinghamshire. ... Early Modern Britain is a term used to define the period in the history of Great Britain roughly corresponding to the 16th, 17th, and 18th centuries. ...

External links

  • Tudor food - learning resources from the British Library

  Results from FactBites:
 
Tudor dynasty - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (460 words)
The Tudor dynasty began with the secret marriage between Owen Tudor, a descendant of Ednyfed Fychan, seneschal of Gwynedd in the time of Llywelyn the Great, and Catherine of Valois; gaining strength in the only Earl of Richmond to become King of England and ending when Elizabeth died childless.
This coincides with the rule of the Tudor dynasty in England, with the exception of Elizabeth I. Occasionally the term is used more broadly to capture Elizabeth's reign as well, though in general 1558 1603 is treated separately as the Elizabethan era.
To the Tudor period belongs the elevation of the English-ruled state in Ireland from a Lordship to a Kingdom (1541).
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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