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Encyclopedia > Tudor dynasty
Tudor
England
Country: Kingdom of England, Kingdom of Ireland, Kingdom of France
Parent house: Lancaster and York
Titles: Duke of Richmond, Honour of Richmond
Founder: Henry Tudor and Elizabeth Plantagenet
Final ruler: Elizabeth I of England
Current head: House Extinct
Founding year: 1485
Dissolution: 1603
Ethnicity: Welsh, English
Cadet branches: N/A

The Tudor dynasty or House of Tudor (Welsh: Tewdwr) was an English royal dynasty that lasted 118 years, beginning in 1485. It was founded by Henry Tudor, who, of his patrilineage, was a grandson of the mere Welsh courtier Owen Tudor—but who, after years of engaging and surviving the horrific political battles of England's civil Wars of the Roses, triumphed, and acceded to the English throne as Henry VII. Motto Dieu et mon droit(French) God and my right Territory of the Kingdom of England Capital Winchester; London from 11th century Language(s) Old English (de facto, until 1066) Anglo-Norman language (de jure, 1066 - 15th century) English (de facto, gradually replaced French from late 13th century) Government Monarchy... This article is about the Irish kingdom existing from 1541 to 1800. ... Louis XIV as the sun For other uses of the term, see Ancien Régime. ... The House of Lancaster is a dynasty of English kings. ... The House of York was a branch of the English royal House of Plantagenet, three of whom became English kings in the late 15th century. ... Henry Fitzroy, 1st Duke of Richmond and Somerset (June 15, 1519 – June 18, 1536) was the son of Henry VIII and his teenaged mistress, Elizabeth Blount, the only bastard that Henry acknowledged. ... The Honour of Richmond was an honour created by Alain Le Roux, son of Eudes, Count of Penthièvre, grandson of Geoffrey I, Duke of Brittany. ... The Tudor Rose: a combination of the Red Rose of Lancaster and the White Rose of York Henry VII (January 28, 1457 – April 21, 1509), King of England, Lord of Ireland (August 22, 1485 – April 21, 1509), born Henry Tudor, was the first monarch of the Tudor dynasty. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Elizabeth I redirects here. ... Tudor usually relates to the Tudor period in English history, which refers to the period of time between 1485 and 1603 when the Tudor dynasty held the English throne. ... Welsh redirects here, and this article describes the Welsh language. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... The Tudor Rose: a combination of the Red Rose of Lancaster and the White Rose of York Henry VII (January 28, 1457 – April 21, 1509), King of England, Lord of Ireland (August 22, 1485 – April 21, 1509), born Henry Tudor, was the first monarch of the Tudor dynasty. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Lancaster York For other uses, see Wars of the Roses (disambiguation). ...


Of his matrilineage, Henry descended (via an illegitimate son) from John of Gaunt, first Duke of Lancaster and a son of King Edward III of England—through his mother Lady Margaret Beaufort; and he descended on a separate line from Edward I through his great-grandmother, Margaret Holland—who married John Beaufort, that illegitimate son of John of Gaunt. John of Gaunt John of Gaunt John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster (March 6, 1340 – February 3, 1399) was the third surviving son of King Edward III of England and Philippa of Hainault. ... There were several Dukes of Lancaster in the 14th and early 15th Centuries. ... This article is about the King of England. ... Margaret Beaufort, Mother of Henry VII, at prayer, by an anonymous artist, about 1500 Margaret Beaufort (May 31, 1443 – June 29, 1509) was the daughter of John Beaufort, 1st Duke of Somerset, granddaughter of John Beaufort, 1st Earl of Somerset and great-granddaughter of John of Gaunt and his mistress... Edward I (17 June 1239 – 7 July 1307), popularly known as Longshanks[1], also as Edward the Lawgiver or the English Justinian because of his legal reforms, and as Hammer of the Scots,[2] achieved fame as the monarch who conquered Wales and tried to do the same to Scotland. ... Margaret Holland (1385 - 30 Dec 1429) was the daughter of Thomas Holland, 2nd Earl of Kent, who was the son of Joan the Fair Maid of Kent, (wife of Edward the Black Prince and mother of Richard II of England) and grandson of Edward I of England. ... John Beaufort, 1st Earl of Somerset (c. ... John of Gaunt, 1st Duke of Lancaster (June 24, 1340 - February 3, 1399), the third surviving son of King Edward III of England, gained his name because he was born at Ghent in 1340. ...


Himself of the house of Lancaster, Henry allied himself early on with the Lancastrian King Henry VI; later, after the Yorkist Edward IV's return to the throne in 1471—and through the political influence of his remarried mother, Lady Margaret—he was permitted to pledge allegiance to Edward. Finally, emerging victorious over Yorkist Richard III at the Battle of Bosworth Field, Henry gained the throne himself in 1485 and moved to end the Wars of the Roses. The House of Lancaster is a dynasty of English kings. ... This article is about the English king. ... The House of York was a dynasty of English kings. ... The text below is generated by a template, which has been proposed for deletion. ... The House of York was a branch of the English royal House of Plantagenet, three of whom became English kings in the late 15th century. ...


He united the two fractious royal houses by marrying Elizabeth of York; and thereafter he implemented critical reforms that consolidated and modernised the national government. This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ...


Henry Tudor was succeeded by his second son, who became Henry VIII, the famous king who married six wives, and who established the Church of England, then broke off its fealty to the Roman Catholic Church. Henry VIII redirects here. ... The Church of England is the officially established Christian church[3] in England, the Mother Church of the worldwide Anglican Communion and the oldest among the communions thirty-eight independent national churches. ...


Henry VIII was succeeded by his devoutly Protestant son, Edward VI, who attempted to cement the establishment of Protestantism by introducing and requiring the Book of Common Prayer. His half-sister and successor, the equally devout Catholic Mary I, attempted to reverse Edward's reforms, and burned hundreds of Protestants at the stake for heresy. Mary's efforts, however, were overtaken in turn by her half-sister Elizabeth I, who re-introduced Protestantism during her long forty-five-year reign between 1558 and 1603. Edward Tudor redirects here. ... For the novel, see A Book of Common Prayer. ... Mary I (18 February 1516 – 17 November 1558), also known as Mary Tudor, was Queen of England and Queen of Ireland from 6 July 1553 (de facto) or 19 July 1553 (de jure) until her death on 17 November 1558. ... For other uses, see Heresy (disambiguation). ... Elizabeth I redirects here. ...


None of Henry VIII's children had any children of their own. After Elizabeth I's death in 1603, the crown passed to Henry VII's great-grandson, James VI of Scotland, who became James I of England. The Tudor dynasty was succeeded by the House of Stuart. James VI and I (19 June 1566 – 27 March 1625) was King of Scots as James VI, and King of England and King of Ireland as James I. He ruled in Scotland as James VI from 24 July 1567, when he was only one year old, succeeding his mother Mary... The Coat of Arms of King James I, the first British monarch of the House of Stuart The House of Stuart or Stewart was a royal house of the Kingdom of Scotland, later also of the Kingdom of England, and finally of the Kingdom of Great Britain. ...

English Royalty
House of Tudor
Henry VII
   Arthur, Prince of Wales
   Margaret, Queen of Scots
   Henry VIII
   Elizabeth Tudor
   Mary, Queen of France
   Edmund, Duke of Somerset
Henry VIII
   Henry, Duke of Cornwall
   Mary I
   Elizabeth I
   Edward VI
Edward VI
Mary I
Elizabeth I

Contents

This article is about the monarchy of the United Kingdom, one of sixteen that share a common monarch; for information about this constitutional relationship, see Commonwealth realm; for information on the reigning monarch, see Elizabeth II. For information about other Commonwealth realm monarchies, as well as other relevant articles, see... The Tudor Rose: a combination of the Red Rose of Lancaster and the White Rose of York Henry VII (January 28, 1457 – April 21, 1509), King of England, Lord of Ireland (August 22, 1485 – April 21, 1509), born Henry Tudor, was the first monarch of the Tudor dynasty. ... Arthur Tudor (19 September/20 September 1486–2 April 1502) was the first son of King Henry VII of England and Elizabeth of York, and therefore, heir to the throne of England and Wales. ... Margaret Tudor Margaret Tudor (29 November 1489 – October 1541) was the eldest of the two surviving daughters of Henry VII of England and Elizabeth of York, and the elder sister of Henry VIII. In 1503 she married James IV, king of Scotland, thus becoming the mother of James V and... Henry VIII redirects here. ... Elizabeth Tudor (July 2, 1492 – September 14, 1495) was the second daughter and fourth child of Henry VII of England and Elizabeth of York. ... A sketch of Mary during her brief period as Queen of France Mary Tudor (March 18, 1496 – June 25, 1533) was the younger sister of Henry VIII of England and queen consort of France due to her marriage to Louis XII. Mary was the fifth child of Henry VII of... Edmund Tudor, Duke of Somerset (February 21, 1499 – June 19, 1500). ... Henry VIII redirects here. ... Henry, Duke of Cornwall was the name of two sons of King Henry VIII of England and his first wife, Catherine of Aragon. ... Mary I (18 February 1516 – 17 November 1558), also known as Mary Tudor, was Queen of England and Queen of Ireland from 6 July 1553 (de facto) or 19 July 1553 (de jure) until her death on 17 November 1558. ... Elizabeth I redirects here. ... Edward Tudor redirects here. ... Edward Tudor redirects here. ... Mary I (18 February 1516 – 17 November 1558), also known as Mary Tudor, was Queen of England and Queen of Ireland from 6 July 1553 (de facto) or 19 July 1553 (de jure) until her death on 17 November 1558. ... Elizabeth I redirects here. ...

Break with Roman Catholicism

Thomas Cromwell, 1st Earl of Essex, Henry VIII's chief minister responsible for the Dissolution of the Monasteries
Thomas Cromwell, 1st Earl of Essex, Henry VIII's chief minister responsible for the Dissolution of the Monasteries

Cromwell's actions changed the course of English history, and ensured the Tudor dynasty's mark on the national religion. In order to allow Henry to divorce his wife, he broke from the Roman Catholic church, and declared the king Supreme Head of the Church of England. Therefore, the Church of England had been established, with Henry VIII at its head, and his newly appointed Archbishop of Canterbury, Thomas Cranmer, declared Henry's marriage to Catherine annulled. This allowed Henry to marry the lady Anne Boleyn, the daughter of a minor diplomat Sir Thomas Boleyn. Anne was expected to produce a son–at the time, knowledge of genetics was largely unknown, and women were blamed if they did not produce a son. Despite this, Anne was confident; she became pregnant in 1533, but the child, born in September that year, was a girl, whom Anne named Elizabeth. Henry was disappointed, but was confident that Anne could still produce a son; Anne became pregnant again, but the child, Henry, died a few hours after birth in 1534. A further miscarriage in 1535 was too much for Henry to bear, and Thomas Cromwell stepped in again, claiming that Anne had taken lovers during her marriage to Henry, and she was tried for high treason, witchcraft and incest; these charges were most likely fabricated, but she was found guilty, and executed in 1536. Image File history File links Porträt von Thomas Cromwell als Earl von Essex, gemalt von Holbein. ... Image File history File links Porträt von Thomas Cromwell als Earl von Essex, gemalt von Holbein. ... Thomas Cromwell, 1st Earl of Essex (c. ... For other uses of the term dissolution see Dissolution. ... Catholic Church redirects here. ... Henry VIII was the founder of the Church of England yet did not hold the title of Supreme Governor. ... The Church of England is the officially established Christian church[3] in England, the Mother Church of the worldwide Anglican Communion and the oldest among the communions thirty-eight independent national churches. ... The Archbishop of Canterbury is the spiritual leader and senior clergyman of the Church of England, recognized by convention as the head of the worldwide Anglican Communion. ... Thomas Cranmer (July 2, 1489 – March 21, 1556) was the Archbishop of Canterbury during the reigns of the English kings Henry VIII and Edward VI. He is credited with writing and compiling the first two Books of Common Prayer which established the basic structure of Anglican liturgy for centuries and... Annulment is a legal procedure for declaring a marriage null and void. ... Anne Boleyn, 1st Marquess of Pembroke[1] (1501/1507–19 May 1536) was a Queen Consort of England, the second wife of King Henry VIII and the mother of Queen Elizabeth I. Henrys marriage to Anne, and her subsequent execution, made her a key player in the political and... Thomas Boleyn, 1st Earl of Wiltshire and 1st Earl of Ormonde (about 1477 - 12 March 1538/9), was a Tudor diplomat and politician and the father of Anne Boleyn, the second Queen of King Henry VIII. was born and buried at the family home, Hever Castle. ... Elizabeth I redirects here. ... Henry Tudor was born in 1534 to Henry VIII of England and his second wife, Anne Boleyn. ... Thomas Cromwell, 1st Earl of Essex (c. ... {{main|Treason}} High treason, broadly defined, is an action which is grossly disloyal to ones country or sovereign. ... Witch redirects here. ... Incest is defined as sexual relations between closely related persons (often within the immediate family) such that it is either illegal or socially taboo. ...


Mary I: A troubled queen's reign

Mary I of England, who returned England to the Roman Catholic Church

The early reign of Queen Mary I was successful. The politicians formerly loyal to Lady Jane Grey flocked to support Mary, and she pardoned most of those who would have kept her off the throne. Lady Jane herself was locked in the Tower of London in relative comfort, and allowed to walk outside (within the Tower walls) with relative freedom. However, when Jane's father Henry Grey, the first Duke of Suffolk, attempted to depose Mary and put Jane back on the throne, Mary executed both the Dukes of Suffolk and Northumberland. After some hesitation, she sent Lady Jane to the scaffold on February 12, 1554, to avoid any further attempts to re-instate her to the throne. The Tudor dynasty's hold on the throne of England was once again secure. Image File history File links Mary1England. ... Image File history File links Mary1England. ... Mary I (18 February 1516 – 17 November 1558), also known as Mary Tudor, was Queen of England and Queen of Ireland from 6 July 1553 (de facto) or 19 July 1553 (de jure) until her death on 17 November 1558. ... Mary I (18 February 1516 – 17 November 1558), also known as Mary Tudor, was Queen of England and Queen of Ireland from 6 July 1553 (de facto) or 19 July 1553 (de jure) until her death on 17 November 1558. ... Lady Jane Grey, formally Jane of England (1537 — 12 February 1554), a grand-niece of Henry VIII of England, reigned as uncrowned Queen regnant of the Kingdom of England for nine days[1] in July 1553. ... For other uses, see Tower of London (disambiguation) Her Majestys Royal Palace and Fortress, more commonly known as the Tower of London (and historically as The Tower), is a historic monument in central London, on the north bank of the River Thames. ... Henry Grey, 1st duke of Suffolk, 3rd marquess of Dorset and baron Ferrers of Groby, Harrington, Bonville and Astley (c. ... The title of Earl of Suffolk has been created several times in the Peerage of England, most recently in 1603 for Thomas Howard, 1st Baron Howard of Walden. ... John Dudley John Dudley (1501 – August 22/23, 1553) was a Tudor nobleman and politician, executed for high treason by Queen Mary I of England. ... is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 5 - Great fire in Eindhoven, Netherlands. ...


However, Mary soon announced that she was intending to marry the Spanish prince Philip, son of her mother's nephew Charles V, Holy Roman Emperor. The prospect of a marriage alliance with Spain proved unpopular with the English people, who were worried that Spain would use England as a satellite, involving England in wars without the popular support of the people. Popular discontent grew; a Protestant courtier, Thomas Wyatt the younger led a rebellion against Mary, with the aim of deposing and replacing her with her half-sister Elizabeth. The plot was discovered, and Wyatt's supporters were hunted down and killed. Wyatt himself was tortured, in the hope that he would give evidence that Elizabeth was involved so that Mary could have her executed for treason. Wyatt never implicated Elizabeth, and he was beheaded. Elizabeth spent her time between different prisons, including the Tower of London. Philip II (Spanish: ; Portuguese: ) (May 21, 1527 – September 13, 1598) was King of Spain from 1556 until 1598, King of Naples from 1554 until 1598, king consort of England (as husband of Mary I) from 1554 to 1558, Lord of the Seventeen Provinces (holding various titles for the individual territories... For the Carlist claimant King Carlos V, see Infante Carlos, Count of Molina. ... Thomas Wyatt the younger (1521-11 April 1554) was a rebel leader during the reign of Queen Mary I of England. ... Wyatts Rebellion (1554) is a popular rising named for Thomas Wyatt the younger (son of Sir Thomas Wyatt). ... Elizabeth I redirects here. ... Beheading. ... For other uses, see Tower of London (disambiguation) Her Majestys Royal Palace and Fortress, more commonly known as the Tower of London (and historically as The Tower), is a historic monument in central London, on the north bank of the River Thames. ...

Protestants Hugh Latimer and Nicholas Ridley being burned at the stake during Mary's reign
Protestants Hugh Latimer and Nicholas Ridley being burned at the stake during Mary's reign

Mary married Philip at Winchester Cathedral, on July 25, 1554. Philip found her unattractive, and only spent a minimal amount of time with her. Despite Mary believing she was pregnant numerous times during her five-year reign, she never reproduced. Devastated that she rarely saw her husband, and anxious that she was not bearing an heir to Catholic England, Mary took her revenge on Protestants by burning many of them at the stake between 1555 and 1558. Mary aimed to eradicate Protestant heresy, but her actions, even for Catholic conservatives, were seen as brutal and extreme; she became deeply unpopular with her people, and they hoped for her death so that Elizabeth could succeed her. Mary's dream of a resurrected Catholic Tudor dynasty was finished, and her popularity further declined when she lost the last English area on French soil, Calais, to Francis, Duke of Guise on January 7, 1558. Mary died, bitter and lonely, on November 17, 1558. Elizabeth Tudor was now Elizabeth I of England. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1280x1024, 384 KB) Summary http://dlib. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1280x1024, 384 KB) Summary http://dlib. ... Hugh Latimer (d. ... There are two Nicholas Ridleys: Nicholas Ridley (martyr) Nicholas Ridley (politician) This is a disambiguation page — a navigational aid which lists other pages that might otherwise share the same title. ... Winchester Cathedral as seen from the Cathedral Close View along the nave of Winchester Cathedral to the west door A plan published in 1911 View of Winchester Cathedral Winchester Cathedral at Winchester in Hampshire is one of the largest cathedrals in England, said to be the second longest, and with... is the 206th day of the year (207th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 5 - Great fire in Eindhoven, Netherlands. ... For other uses, see Heresy (disambiguation). ... Calais (Kales in Dutch) is a town in northern France, located at 50°57N 1°52E. It is in the département of Pas-de-Calais, of which it is a sous-préfecture. ... Francis, Duke of Guise Francis II, Prince of Joinville, Duke of Guise, Duke of Aumale (February 17, 1519 – February 24, 1563), called Balafré (the scarred), was a French soldier and politician. ... is the 7th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... January 7 - French troops led by Francis, Duke of Guise take Calais, the last continental possession of the Kingdom of England July 13 - Battle of Gravelines: In France, Spanish forces led by Count Lamoral of Egmont defeat the French forces of Marshal Paul des Thermes at Gravelines. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... January 7 - French troops led by Francis, Duke of Guise take Calais, the last continental possession of the Kingdom of England July 13 - Battle of Gravelines: In France, Spanish forces led by Count Lamoral of Egmont defeat the French forces of Marshal Paul des Thermes at Gravelines. ... Elizabeth I redirects here. ...


The Age of Intrigues and Plots: Elizabeth I

Elizabeth I, who was staying at Hatfield House at the time of her accession, rode to London to the cheers of both the ruling class and the common people. She chose as her chief minister Sir William Cecil, a Protestant, and former secretary to Lord Protector the Duke of Somerset and then to the Duke of Northumberland. Under Mary, he had been spared, and often visited Elizabeth, ostensibly to review her accounts and expenditure. Elizabeth also appointed her personal favourite, the son of the Duke of Northumberland Lord Robert Dudley, her Master of the Horse, giving him constant personal access to the queen. Download high resolution version (529x700, 80 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Download high resolution version (529x700, 80 KB) Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Elizabeth I redirects here. ... British coronations are held in Westminster Abbey. ... is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... January 15 - Elizabeth I of England is crowned in Westminster Abbey. ... The great hall Hatfield House is a country house set in a large park, the Great Park, on the eastern side of the town of Hatfield, Hertfordshire, England. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... William Cecil, 1st Baron Burghley William Cecil, 1st Baron Burghley (13 September 1520 – 4 August 1598), was an English politician, the chief advisor of Queen Elizabeth I for most of her reign (17 November 1558–24 March 1603), and Lord High Treasurer from 1572. ... Edward Seymour Edward Seymour, 1st Duke of Somerset (c. ... John Dudley John Dudley (1501 – August 22/23, 1553) was a Tudor nobleman and politician, executed for high treason by Queen Mary I of England. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... The Master of the Horse was (and in some cases, is) a historical position of varying importance in several European nations. ...


Imposing the Church of England

Elizabeth was a moderate Protestant; she was the daughter of Anne Boleyn, who played a key role in the English Reformation in the 1520s. At her coronation in January 1559, many of the bishops–Catholic, appointed by Mary, who had expelled many of the Protestant clergymen when she became queen in 1553–refused to perform the service in English. Eventually, the relatively minor Bishop of Carlisle, Owen Oglethorpe, performed the ceremony; but when Oglethorpe attempted to perform traditional Catholic parts of the Coronation, Elizabeth got up and left. Following the Coronation, two important Acts were passed through parliament: the Act of Uniformity and the Act of Supremacy, establishing the Protestant Church of England and creating Elizabeth Supreme Governor of the Church of England (Supreme Head, the title used by her father and brother, was seen as inappropriate for a woman ruler). These acts, known collectively as the Elizabethan Religious Settlement, made it compulsory to attend church services every Sunday; and imposed an oath on clergymen and statesmen to recognise the Church of England, the independence of the Church of England from the Catholic Church, and the authority of Elizabeth as Supreme Governor. Elizabeth made it clear that if they refused the oath the first time, they would have a second opportunity, after which, if the oath was not sworn, the offender would be deprived of their offices and estates. Protestantism is a general grouping of denominations within Christianity. ... Anne Boleyn, 1st Marquess of Pembroke[1] (1501/1507–19 May 1536) was a Queen Consort of England, the second wife of King Henry VIII and the mother of Queen Elizabeth I. Henrys marriage to Anne, and her subsequent execution, made her a key player in the political and... This box:      King Henry VIII of England. ... British coronations are held in Westminster Abbey. ... Arms of the Bishop of Carlisle The Bishop of Carlisle heads the Anglican Diocese of Carlisle in the Province of York, in England. ... The Act of Uniformity 1559 set the order of prayer to be used in the English Book of Common Prayer. ... The Act of Supremacy 1559 (1 Eliz, c. ... The Church of England is the officially established Christian church[3] in England, the Mother Church of the worldwide Anglican Communion and the oldest among the communions thirty-eight independent national churches. ... Henry VIII was the founder of the Church of England yet did not hold the title of Supreme Governor. ... The Elizabethan Religious Settlement was Elizabeth I’s response to the religious divisions created over the reigns of Henry VIII, Edward VI and Mary I. This response, described as The Revolution of 1559,[1] was set out in two Acts of the Parliament of England. ... The Church of England is the officially established Christian church[3] in England, the Mother Church of the worldwide Anglican Communion and the oldest among the communions thirty-eight independent national churches. ... The name Catholic Church can mean a visible organization that refers to itself as Catholic, or the invisible Christian Church, viz. ...


Pressure to marry

Mary, Queen of Scots, who conspired with English nobles to take the English throne for herself

The popularity of Elizabeth was extremely high, but her Privy Council, her Parliament and her subjects thought that the unmarried queen should take a husband; it was generally accepted that, once a queen regnant was married, the husband would relieve the woman of the burdens of head of state. Also, without an heir, the Tudor dynasty would end; the risk of civil war between rival claimants was a possibility if Elizabeth died childless. The first and most ardent suitor was Mary I's widower Philip II of Spain. However, numerous other suitors from nearly all European nations sent ambassadors to the English court to put forward their suit. Risk of death came dangerously close in 1564 when Elizabeth caught smallpox; when she was most at risk, she named Robert Dudley as Lord Protector in the event of her death. After her recovery, she appointed Dudley to the Privy Council and created him Earl of Leicester, in the hope that he would marry Mary, Queen of Scots. Mary rejected him, and instead married Henry Stuart, Lord Darnley, a descendant of Henry VII, giving Mary a stronger claim to the English throne. Although many Catholics were loyal to Elizabeth, many also believed that, because Elizabeth was declared illegitimate after her parents' marriage was annulled, Mary was the strongest legitimate claimant. Despite this, Elizabeth would not name Mary her heir; as she had experienced during the reign of her predecessor Mary I, the opposition could flock around the heir if they were disheartened with Elizabeth's rule. Image File history File links Mary-queen-of-scots_full. ... Image File history File links Mary-queen-of-scots_full. ... Mary, Queen of Scots redirects here. ... A privy council is a body that advises the head of state of a nation, typically in a monarchy. ... This may refer to the: British Houses of Parliament. ... Cleopatra is one of the most well-known queens regnant A queen regnant (plural queens regnant) is a woman monarch possessing and exercising all of the monarchal powers of a king, in contrast with a queen consort, who is the wife of a reigning king, and in and of her... For the comedy film of the same name, see Head of State (film). ... This article is about the definition of the specific type of war. ... Philip II (Spanish: ; Portuguese: ) (May 21, 1527 – September 13, 1598) was King of Spain from 1556 until 1598, King of Naples from 1554 until 1598, king consort of England (as husband of Mary I) from 1554 to 1558, Lord of the Seventeen Provinces (holding various titles for the individual territories... Smallpox (also known by the Latin names Variola or Variola vera) is a contagious disease unique to humans. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... A privy council is a body that advises the head of state of a nation, typically in a monarchy. ... The Earl of Leicester was created in the 12th century as a title in the Peerage of England (title now extinct), and is currently a title in the Peerage of the United Kingdom, created in 1837. ... Mary, Queen of Scots redirects here. ... Henry Stuart, Duke of Albany (7 December 1545 – 9 or 10 February 1567), commonly known as Lord Darnley, king consort of Scotland, was the first cousin and second husband of Mary, Queen of Scots, and the father of her son King James VI, who also succeded Elizabeth I of England. ... The Tudor Rose: a combination of the Red Rose of Lancaster and the White Rose of York Henry VII (January 28, 1457 – April 21, 1509), King of England, Lord of Ireland (August 22, 1485 – April 21, 1509), born Henry Tudor, was the first monarch of the Tudor dynasty. ... Annulment is a legal procedure for declaring a marriage null and void. ...

Pope St. Pius V, who issued the Papal bull excommunicating Elizabeth and relieving her subjects of their allegiance to her
Pope St. Pius V, who issued the Papal bull excommunicating Elizabeth and relieving her subjects of their allegiance to her

Numerous threats to the Tudor dynasty occurred during Elizabeth's reign. In 1569, a group of Earls led by Charles Neville, the sixth Earl of Westmorland, and Thomas Percy, the seventh Earl of Northumberland attempted to depose Elizabeth and replace her with Mary, Queen of Scots. In 1571, the Protestant-turned-Catholic Thomas Howard, the fourth Duke of Norfolk, had plans to marry Mary, Queen of Scots and then replace Elizabeth with Mary. The plot, masterminded by Roberto di Ridolfi, was discovered and Norfolk was beheaded. The next major uprising was in 1601, when Robert Devereux, the second Earl of Essex, attempted to raise the city of London against Elizabeth's government. The city of London proved unwilling to rebel; Essex and most of his co-rebels were executed. Threats also came from abroad. In 1570, Pope Pius V issued a Papal bull, Regnans in Excelsis, excommunicating Elizabeth, and releasing her subjects from their allegiance to her. Elizabeth came under pressure from Parliament to execute Mary, Queen of Scots to prevent any further attempts to replace her; though faced with several official requests, she vacillated over the decision to execute an anointed queen. Finally, she was persuaded of Mary's (treasonous) complicity in the plotting against her, and she signed the death warrant in 1586. Mary was executed at Fotheringay Castle on February 8, 1587, to the outrage of Catholic Europe. Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1576x2119, 309 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Pope Pius V Pio of Pietrelcina ... Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (1576x2119, 309 KB) File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Pope Pius V Pio of Pietrelcina ... Pope St. ... Papal bull of Pope Urban VIII, 1637, sealed with a leaden bulla. ... Charles Neville was born 1543 and died 1601. ... The title of Earl of Westmorland has been created several times in the Peerage of England. ... Blessed Thomas Percy, 7th Earl of Northumberland (1528 - 22 August 1572) was the nephew of Henry Percy, 6th Earl of Northumberland, Anne Boleyns lover before King Henry VIII. He was granted the title of Earl of Northumberland in 1557. ... The title of Earl of Northumberland was created several times in the Peerages of England and Great Britain. ... Mary, Queen of Scots redirects here. ... Thomas Howard, 4th Duke of Norfolk Thomas Howard, 4th Duke of Norfolk (March 10, 1536 — 1572) and 1st Earl of Southampton, was entrusted by Queen Elizabeth I of England with public office despite his family history and his prior support for the Catholic cause, although he claimed to be a... Thomas Howard, 3rd Duke of Norfolk holding the baton of the Earl Marshal. ... The Ridolfi plot was meant to put Mary Stewart on the throne of England. ... Roberto di Ridolfi or Ridolfo (1531-1612) was an Italian conspirator, who belonged to a famous family of Florence, where he was born on the 18th of November 1531. ... Beheading. ... Robert Devereux, 2nd Earl of Essex Robert Devereux, 2nd Earl of Essex (10 November 1566 – 25 February 1601), favourite of Queen Elizabeth I of England, is the best-known of the many holders of the title Earl of Essex. ... Earl of Essex is a title that has been held by several families and individuals, of which the best-known and most closely associated with the title was Robert Devereux, 2nd Earl of Essex (1566 - 1601). ... Pope St. ... Papal bull of Pope Urban VIII, 1637, sealed with a leaden bulla. ... The Pope and the Queen Regnans in Excelsis was a papal bull issued on February 25, 1570 by Pope Pius V declaring Elizabeth I to be a heretic and releasing all her subjects from any allegiance. ... Allegiance is a duty of fidelity said to be owed by a subject or a citizen to his state or sovereign. ... The Parliament of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland is the supreme legislative institution in the United Kingdom and British overseas territories (it alone has parliamentary sovereignty). ... Death Warrant is a 1990 action movie starring Jean-Claude Van Damme. ... Fotheringhay is a village in Northamptonshire, England. ... is the 39th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1587 was a common year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Sunday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ...


Last hopes of a Tudor heir

The Spanish Armada: Catholic Spain's attempt to depose Elizabeth and take control of England
The Spanish Armada: Catholic Spain's attempt to depose Elizabeth and take control of England

Despite the uncertainty of Elizabeth's–and therefore the Tudor dynasty's–hold on England, Elizabeth never married. The closest she came to marriage was between 1579 and 1581, when she was courted by Francis, Duke of Anjou, the son of Henry II of France and Catherine de' Medici. Despite Elizabeth's government constantly begging her to marry in the early years of her reign, it now was persuading Elizabeth not to marry the French prince; his mother, Catherine de' Medici, was suspected of ordering the St Bartholomew's Day massacre of six thousand French Protestant Hugenots in 1572. Elizabeth bowed to public discontent against the marriage, learning from the mistake her sister made when she married Philip II of Spain, and sent the Duke of Anjou away. Elizabeth knew that the continuation of the Tudor dynasty was now impossible; she was forty-eight in 1581, and too old to bear children. Image File history File linksMetadata Loutherbourg-Spanish_Armada. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Loutherbourg-Spanish_Armada. ... Belligerents England Dutch Republic Spain Portugal Commanders Elizabeth I of England Charles Howard Francis Drake Philip II of Spain Duke of Medina Sidonia Strength 34 warships 163 armed merchant vessels 30 Dutch flyboats 22 galleons 108 armed merchant vessels Casualties and losses 50–100 dead[1] ~400 wounded 6,000... Hercule François, Duke of Anjou and Alençon, (March 18, 1555 – June 19, 1584) was the youngest son of Henry II of France and Catherine de Medici. ... Henry II (French: Henri II) (March 31, 1519 – July 10, 1559), a member of the Valois Dynasty, was King of France from March 31, 1547, until his death. ... Catherine de Medici (April 13, 1519 – January 5, 1589) was born in Florence, Italy, as Caterina Maria Romola di Lorenzo de Medici. ... Catherine de Medici (April 13, 1519 – January 5, 1589) was born in Florence, Italy, as Caterina Maria Romola di Lorenzo de Medici. ... The St. ... In the 16th and 17th centuries, the name of Huguenots came to apply to members of the Protestant Reformed Church of France. ... Philip II (Spanish: ; Portuguese: ) (May 21, 1527 – September 13, 1598) was King of Spain from 1556 until 1598, King of Naples from 1554 until 1598, king consort of England (as husband of Mary I) from 1554 to 1558, Lord of the Seventeen Provinces (holding various titles for the individual territories...


By far the most dangerous threat to the Tudor dynasty during Elizabeth's reign was the Spanish Armada of 1588. Launched by Elizabeth's old suitor Philip II of Spain, and commanded by Alonso de Guzmán El Bueno, the seventh Duke of Medina Sidonia, the Spanish had 22 galleons and 108 armed merchant ships; however, the English and the Dutch Republic outnumbered them. The Spanish lost as a result of bad weather on the English Channel and poor planning and supplies, and the skills of Sir Francis Drake and Charles Howard, the second Baron Howard of Effingham (later first Earl of Nottingham). Belligerents England Dutch Republic Spain Portugal Commanders Elizabeth I of England Charles Howard Francis Drake Philip II of Spain Duke of Medina Sidonia Strength 34 warships 163 armed merchant vessels 30 Dutch flyboats 22 galleons 108 armed merchant vessels Casualties and losses 50–100 dead[1] ~400 wounded 6,000... Philip II (Spanish: ; Portuguese: ) (May 21, 1527 – September 13, 1598) was King of Spain from 1556 until 1598, King of Naples from 1554 until 1598, king consort of England (as husband of Mary I) from 1554 to 1558, Lord of the Seventeen Provinces (holding various titles for the individual territories... Don Alonso Pérez de Guzmán el Bueno, 7th Duke of Medina Sidonia (es: Don Alonso Pérez de Guzmán el Bueno, séptimo duque de Medina Sidonia) (September 10, 1550 - 1615) was the commander-in-chief of the Spanish Armada. ... Dukes of Medina Sidonia (1445) Juan Alfonso de Guzman El Bueno, 1st Duke of Medina Sidonia (1410-1468) Enrique de Guzman El Bueno, 2nd Duke of Medina Sidonia (d. ... Map of Dutch Republic by Joannes Janssonius United Netherlands redirects here. ... For the Thoroughbred racehorse of the same name, see English Channel (horse). ... This article is about the Elizabethan naval commander. ... Charles Howard, 1st Earl of Nottingham (1536-December 14, 1624) was a British statesman and admiral. ... The title of Earl of Effingham has been created twice in British history, both times for holders of the Barony of Howard of Effingham. ... Earl of Nottingham is a title in the peerage of England, created in 1681 for Heneage Finch, who had served as Lord Chancellor. ...


While Elizabeth declined physically with age, her running of the country continued to benefit her people. In response to famine across England due to bad harvests in the 1590s, Elizabeth introduced the poor law, allowing peasants that were too ill to work a certain amount of money from the state. All the money Elizabeth had borrowed from Parliament in twelve of the thirteen parliamentary sessions was paid back; by the time of her death, Elizabeth not only had no debts, but was in credit. Elizabeth died childless at Richmond Palace on March 24, 1603. She never named a successor. However, her chief minister Sir Robert Cecil had corresponded with the Protestant Stuart son of Mary, Queen of Scots, James VI of Scotland, and James's succession to the English throne was unopposed. The Tudor dynasty had ended and the Stuart House became the English royal house. This article deals chiefly with the English Poor Laws covering England and Wales. ... A royal residence 1327-1649, on The Green, Richmond-upon-Thames, Surrey. ... is the 83rd day of the year (84th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1603 (MDCIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... Robert Cecil, 1st Earl of Salisbury (June 1, 1563 -May 24, 1612), son of William Cecil, 1st Baron Burghley and half-brother of Thomas Cecil, 1st Earl of Exeter, statesman, spymaster and minister to Elizabeth I of England and James I of England. ... The Coat of Arms of King James I, the first British monarch of the House of Stuart The House of Stuart or Stewart was a royal house of the Kingdom of Scotland, later also of the Kingdom of England, and finally of the Kingdom of Great Britain. ... James VI and I (19 June 1566 – 27 March 1625) was King of Scots as James VI, and King of England and King of Ireland as James I. He ruled in Scotland as James VI from 24 July 1567, when he was only one year old, succeeding his mother Mary...


Tudor monarchs of England

The six Tudor monarchs were:

Image Name Claim to the throne Birth date Accession date Death date Spouse(s)
Henry VII Right of conquest January 28, 1457 August 22, 1485 (crowned October 30, 1485) April 21, 1509 Elizabeth of York
Henry VIII Son of Henry VII June 28, 1491 April 21, 1509 (crowned June 24, 1509) January 28, 1547 (I) Catherine of Aragon, (II) Anne Boleyn, (III) Jane Seymour, (IV) Anne of Cleves, (V) Catherine Howard, (VI) Catherine Parr
Edward VI Son of Henry VIII by Jane Seymour October 12, 1537 January 28, 1547 (crowned February 20, 1547) July 6, 1553
Jane Granddaughter of Henry VII's daughter Mary Brandon (née Tudor), Duchess of Suffolk 1537 July 10, 1553 February 12, 1554 Lord Guildford Dudley
Mary I Daughter of Henry VIII by Catherine of Aragon February 18, 1516 July 19, 1553 (crowned October 1, 1553) November 18, 1558 Philip II of Spain
Elizabeth I Daughter of Henry VIII by Anne Boleyn September 7, 1533 November 17, 1558 (crowned January 15, 1559) March 24, 1603

To the Tudor period belongs the elevation of the English-ruled state in Ireland from a Lordship to a Kingdom (1541). Image File history File links Download high-resolution version (450x648, 126 KB) Summary Licensing File links The following pages on the English Wikipedia link to this file (pages on other projects are not listed): Henry VII of England ... The Tudor Rose: a combination of the Red Rose of Lancaster and the White Rose of York Henry VII (January 28, 1457 – April 21, 1509), King of England, Lord of Ireland (August 22, 1485 – April 21, 1509), born Henry Tudor, was the first monarch of the Tudor dynasty. ... The right of conquest is the purported right of a conqueror to territory taken by force of arms. ... is the 28th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events University of Freiburg founded. ... is the 234th day of the year (235th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1485 was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar). ... is the 303rd day of the year (304th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1485 was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar). ... is the 111th day of the year (112th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1509 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... Image File history File links Henry-VIII-kingofengland_1491-1547. ... Henry VIII redirects here. ... is the 179th day of the year (180th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events December 6 - King Charles VIII marries Anne de Bretagne, thus incorporating Brittany into the kingdom of France. ... is the 111th day of the year (112th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1509 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 175th day of the year (176th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 1509 was a common year starting on Friday (see link for calendar) of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 28th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1547 was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... Catherine of Aragon (16 December 1485 – 7 January 1536) (Castilian Infanta Catalina de Aragón y Castilla), was the Queen of England as the first wife of Henry VIII of England. ... Anne Boleyn, 1st Marquess of Pembroke[1] (1501/1507–19 May 1536) was a Queen Consort of England, the second wife of King Henry VIII and the mother of Queen Elizabeth I. Henrys marriage to Anne, and her subsequent execution, made her a key player in the political and... For the actress, see Jane Seymour (actress). ... Anne of Cleves (22 September 1515 – 16 July 1557) was the fourth wife of Henry VIII of England from 6 January 1540 to 9 July 1540. ... Cathrine Howard (between 1520 and 1525 – 13 February 1542), also called Katherine Howard[1] was the fifth wife of Henry VIII of England (1540-1542), and sometimes known by his reference to her as the rose without a thorn. Her birth date and place of birth is unknown, (occasionally cited... Catherine Parr or Jane Grey Catherine Parr (c. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 444 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1024 × 1383 pixel, file size: 344 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) Faithful reproductions of two-dimensional original works cannot attract copyright in the U.S. according to the rule in Bridgeman Art Library v. ... Edward Tudor redirects here. ... For the actress, see Jane Seymour (actress). ... is the 285th day of the year (286th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 6 - Alessandro de Medici assassinated August 25 - The Honourable Artillery Company, the oldest surviving regiment in the British Army, and the second most senior, was formed. ... is the 28th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1547 was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... is the 51st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1547 was a common year starting on Saturday (link will display the full calendar) of the Julian calendar. ... is the 187th day of the year (188th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events June 26 - Christs Hospital in London gets a Royal Charter July 6 - Edward VI of England dies July 10 - Lady Jane Grey is proclaimed Queen of England - for the next nine days July 18 - Lord Mayor of London proclaims Queen Mary as the rightful Queen - Lady Jane Grey... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 461 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1450 × 1887 pixel, file size: 412 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) The Steatham Portrait of Lady Jane Grey This image is in the public domain because its copyright has expired in the United States and those... Lady Jane Grey, formally Jane of England (1537 — 12 February 1554), a grand-niece of Henry VIII of England, reigned as uncrowned Queen regnant of the Kingdom of England for nine days[1] in July 1553. ... A sketch of Mary during her brief period as Queen of France Mary Tudor (March 18, 1496 – June 25, 1533) was the younger sister of Henry VIII of England and queen consort of France due to her marriage to Louis XII. Mary was the fifth child of Henry VII of... is the 191st day of the year (192nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events June 26 - Christs Hospital in London gets a Royal Charter July 6 - Edward VI of England dies July 10 - Lady Jane Grey is proclaimed Queen of England - for the next nine days July 18 - Lord Mayor of London proclaims Queen Mary as the rightful Queen - Lady Jane Grey... is the 43rd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 5 - Great fire in Eindhoven, Netherlands. ... Lord Guildford Dudley (1536 - 12 February 1554) was a son of John Dudley, Duke of Northumberland, and Jane Guildford; and the younger brother of Robert Dudley, the future earl of Leicester. ... Image File history File links Mary1England. ... Mary I (18 February 1516 – 17 November 1558), also known as Mary Tudor, was Queen of England and Queen of Ireland from 6 July 1553 (de facto) or 19 July 1553 (de jure) until her death on 17 November 1558. ... Henry VIII (28 June 1491 – 28 January 1547) was King of England and Lord of Ireland (later King of Ireland) from 22 April 1509 until his death. ... Catherine of Aragon (16 December 1485 – 7 January 1536) (Castilian Infanta Catalina de Aragón y Castilla), was the Queen of England as the first wife of Henry VIII of England. ... is the 49th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events March - With the death of Ferdinand II of Aragon, his grandson Charles of Ghent becomes King of Spain as Carlos I. July - Selim I of the Ottoman Empire declares war on the Mameluks and invades Syria. ... is the 200th day of the year (201st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events June 26 - Christs Hospital in London gets a Royal Charter July 6 - Edward VI of England dies July 10 - Lady Jane Grey is proclaimed Queen of England - for the next nine days July 18 - Lord Mayor of London proclaims Queen Mary as the rightful Queen - Lady Jane Grey... is the 274th day of the year (275th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... // Events June 26 - Christs Hospital in London gets a Royal Charter July 6 - Edward VI of England dies July 10 - Lady Jane Grey is proclaimed Queen of England - for the next nine days July 18 - Lord Mayor of London proclaims Queen Mary as the rightful Queen - Lady Jane Grey... is the 322nd day of the year (323rd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... January 7 - French troops led by Francis, Duke of Guise take Calais, the last continental possession of the Kingdom of England July 13 - Battle of Gravelines: In France, Spanish forces led by Count Lamoral of Egmont defeat the French forces of Marshal Paul des Thermes at Gravelines. ... Philip II (Spanish: ; Portuguese: ) (May 21, 1527 – September 13, 1598) was King of Spain from 1556 until 1598, King of Naples from 1554 until 1598, king consort of England (as husband of Mary I) from 1554 to 1558, Lord of the Seventeen Provinces (holding various titles for the individual territories... Image File history File links Elizabeth1England. ... Elizabeth I redirects here. ... Anne Boleyn, 1st Marquess of Pembroke[1] (1501/1507–19 May 1536) was a Queen Consort of England, the second wife of King Henry VIII and the mother of Queen Elizabeth I. Henrys marriage to Anne, and her subsequent execution, made her a key player in the political and... is the 250th day of the year (251st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Events January 25 - King Henry VIII of England marries Anne Boleyn, his second Queen consort. ... 17 November is also the name of a Marxist group in Greece, coinciding with the anniversary of the Athens Polytechnic uprising. ... January 7 - French troops led by Francis, Duke of Guise take Calais, the last continental possession of the Kingdom of England July 13 - Battle of Gravelines: In France, Spanish forces led by Count Lamoral of Egmont defeat the French forces of Marshal Paul des Thermes at Gravelines. ... is the 15th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... January 15 - Elizabeth I of England is crowned in Westminster Abbey. ... is the 83rd day of the year (84th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 1603 (MDCIII) was a common year starting on Wednesday (link will display the full calendar) of the Gregorian calendar (or a common year starting on Saturday of the 10-day slower Julian calendar). ... Coat of arms1 Capital Dublin Language(s) Norman French, Irish, Welsh, English Government Monarchy Lord of Ireland  - 1171-1189 Henry II  - 1509-1541 Henry VIII Lord Lieutenant  - 1528-1529 Piers Butler  - 1540–1548 Anthony St Leger Legislature Parliament of Ireland  - Upper house Irish House of Lords  - Lower house Irish House... This article is about the Irish kingdom existing from 1541 to 1800. ...


Tudor Family Tree

[1] This is a list of British monarchs, that is, the monarchs on the thrones of some of the various kingdoms that have existed on, or incorporated, the island of Great Britain, namely: England (united with Wales from 1536) up to 1707; Scotland up to 1707; The Kingdom of Great Britain... Download high resolution version (1112x1270, 58 KB)Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ...


Patrilineal descent

Patrilineal descent, descent from father to son, is the principle behind membership in royal houses, as it can be traced back through the generations—which means that the historically accurate royal house of the Tudor monarchs was the House of Tudor. [2] Patrilineality is a system in which one belongs to ones fathers lineage; it generally involves the inheritance of property, names or titles through the male line as well. ... A Royal House or Dynasty is a sort of family name used by royalty. ... The Tudor dynasty or House of Tudor (Welsh Twdwr) is a series of five monarchs of Welsh origin who ruled England from 1485 until 1603. ...


The dates are of birth and death, not of ruling years.

  1. Marchudd ap Cynan, c. 846
  2. Kerwit, Lord of Brnffenigl
  3. Senylt, Lord of Brnffenigl
  4. Nathen of Brnffenigl
  5. Edryt ap Nathen, Prince in Wales
  6. Idnerth ap Edryd
  7. Gwgon of Brnffenigl
  8. Iorwerth of Brnffenigl
  9. Kendrig of Brnffenigl
  10. Ednyfed Fychan, d. 1246
  11. Goronwy, Lord of Tres-gastell, d. 1268
  12. Tudur Hen, Lord of Pemmynydd, d. 1311
  13. Goronwy ap Tudur, d. 1331
  14. Tudur Fychan, Lord of Pemmynydd, d. 1367
  15. Maredudd ap Tudur, d. 1406
  16. Owen Tudor, 1400–1461
  17. Edmund Tudor, 1st Earl of Richmond, 1430–1456
  18. Henry VII of England, 1457–1509
  19. Henry VIII of England, 1491–1547
  20. Edward VI of England, 1537–1553; Mary I of England, 1516–1558 and Elizabeth I of England, 1533–1603

Ednyfed Fychan (died 1246), full name Ednyfed Fychan ap Cynwrig, was seneschal to the Kingdom of Gwynedd in northern Wales, serving Llywelyn the Great and his son Dafydd ap Llywelyn. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Edmund Tudor, 1st Earl of Richmond (~1430-November 1, 1456) was the father of King Henry VII of England. ... The Tudor Rose: a combination of the Red Rose of Lancaster and the White Rose of York Henry VII (January 28, 1457 – April 21, 1509), King of England, Lord of Ireland (August 22, 1485 – April 21, 1509), born Henry Tudor, was the first monarch of the Tudor dynasty. ... Henry VIII redirects here. ... Edward Tudor redirects here. ... Mary I (18 February 1516 – 17 November 1558), also known as Mary Tudor, was Queen of England and Queen of Ireland from 6 July 1553 (de facto) or 19 July 1553 (de jure) until her death on 17 November 1558. ... Elizabeth I redirects here. ...

See also

Lancaster York For other uses, see Wars of the Roses (disambiguation). ... The Tudor style, a term applied to the Perpendicular style, was originally that of the English architecture and decorative arts produced under the Tudor dynasty that ruled England from 1485 to 1603, characterized as an amalgam of Late Gothic style formalized by more concern for regularity and symmetry, with round... When Henry Tudor took the crown of England from Richard III in battle, he brought about the end of the Wars of the Roses between the House of Lancaster (Red Rose) and the House of York (White Rose). ... The 12th century Keep is 100 feet high The Castle walls and towers seen from the Keep Richmond Castle in North Yorkshire, England, stands in a breathtaking position above the River Swale and close to the centre of the town of Richmond. ... Richmond is a suburb and the principal settlement of the London Borough of Richmond upon Thames in south west London, England. ... The Tudor re-conquest of Ireland took place under the English Tudor dynasty during the 16th century. ... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ...

Notes

  1. ^ Jones and Underwood Margaret Beaufort accessed 27 Aug 2007
  2. ^ Descent from before Ednyfed is from [1] and may be really unreliable.

References

  • Guy, John (ed). The Tudor Monarchy. St Martin’s Press, 1997.
  • Jones, Michael K. and Malcolm G. Underwood, "Beaufort, Margaret , countess of Richmond and Derby (1443–1509)", Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004. Accessed 27 August 2007.
  • Thomas, R. S. "Tudor, Edmund, first earl of Richmond (c.1430–1456)", Oxford Dictionary of National Biography, Oxford University Press, 2004. Accessed 27 August 2007.
  • Turton, Godfrey. The Dragon’s Breed: The Story of the Tudors from Earliest Times to 1603. Peter Davies, 1970.

is the 239th day of the year (240th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 239th day of the year (240th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ...

External links

House of Tudor
Preceded by
House of York
Ruling House of the Kingdom of England
1485–1603
Succeeded by
House of Stuart
“PDF” redirects here. ... A kibibyte (a contraction of kilo binary byte) is a unit of information or computer storage, commonly abbreviated KiB (never kiB). 1 kibibyte = 210 bytes = 1,024 bytes The kibibyte is closely related to the kilobyte, which can be used either as a synonym for kibibyte or to refer to... A Royal House or Dynasty is a sort of family name used by royalty. ... The House of York was a branch of the English royal House of Plantagenet, three of whom became English kings in the late 15th century. ... // For other uses, see Dynasty (disambiguation). ... Motto Dieu et mon droit(French) God and my right Territory of the Kingdom of England Capital Winchester; London from 11th century Language(s) Old English (de facto, until 1066) Anglo-Norman language (de jure, 1066 - 15th century) English (de facto, gradually replaced French from late 13th century) Government Monarchy... The Coat of Arms of King James I, the first British monarch of the House of Stuart The House of Stuart or Stewart was a royal house of the Kingdom of Scotland, later also of the Kingdom of England, and finally of the Kingdom of Great Britain. ... A Royal House or Dynasty is a sort of family name used by royalty. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ... Angevin (IPA: ) is the name applied to the residents of Anjou, a former province of the Kingdom of France, as well as to the residents of Angers. ... The House of BalÅ¡ić was a Serbian medieval dynasty that ruled Zeta. ... The Kastrioti dynasty (Serbian: Kastriotic, Castriotich) originally hailed from the Mati region, situated in North Albania. ... Wied was a County of Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany, located on the Wied River where it meets the Rhine. ... The Zogu dynasty was founded by Zogu Pasha who migrated to Mati, Albania in the late 15th century and was then appointed Governor of Mati by the Ottoman Sultan with the position of Governor then becoming hereditary among the Zogu clan. ... Flag of the Habsburg Monarchy; also used as the flag of the Austrian Empire until the Ausgleich of 1867. ... Flag of the Habsburg Monarchy; also used as the flag of the Austrian Empire until the Ausgleich of 1867. ... The royal palace in Brussels Successive Belgian kings are 1831-1865: Leopold I 1865-1909: Leopold II 1909-1934: Albert I 1934-1951: Leopold III 1944-1950: Charles, reigned as Prince Regent 1951-1993: Baudouin I Since 1993: Albert II None of these were King of Belgium: their title is... Saxe-Coburg-Gotha or Saxe-Coburg and Gotha (German: Sachsen-Coburg und Gotha) was once the name given to the two German duchies of Saxe-Coburg and Saxe-Gotha in Germany, in the present states of Bavaria and Thuringia, which were in personal union between 1826 and 1918. ... For the various rulers of the kingdoms within England prior to its formal unification, during the Heptarchy, see Bretwalda. ... The House of Wessex refers to the family that ruled a kingdom in southwest England known as Wessex. ... The Norman dynasty is a series of four monarchs, who ruled England from the time of the Norman Conquest in 1066, until 1154. ... The House of Plantagenet (IPA: ), also called the House of Anjou, or Angevin dynasty was originally a noble family from France, which ruled the County of Anjou. ... The House of Lancaster is a dynasty of English kings. ... The House of York was a branch of the English royal House of Plantagenet, three of whom became English kings in the late 15th century. ... The Royal Coat of Arms of Scotland, as used before 1603 The monarch of Scotland was the head of state of the Kingdom of Scotland. ... The House of Alpin is a dynasty of Scottish kings that ruled Scotland from 843 to 1058. ... The so-called House of Dunkeld is a historiographical and genealogical construct to illustrate the clear succession of Scottish kings from 1034 to 1040 and from 1058 to 1290. ... The House of Balliol was a Scottish royal family in the 13th and 14th centuries. ... The House of Bruce was a Scottish Royal House in the 14th century. ... The Coat of Arms of King James I, the first British monarch of the House of Stuart The House of Stuart or Stewart was a royal house of the Kingdom of Scotland, later also of the Kingdom of England, and finally of the Kingdom of Great Britain. ... This is a list of British monarchs, that is, the monarchs on the thrones of some of the various kingdoms that have existed on, or incorporated, the island of Great Britain, namely: England (united with Wales from 1536) up to 1707; Scotland up to 1707; The Kingdom of Great Britain... The Coat of Arms of King James I, the first British monarch of the House of Stuart The House of Stuart or Stewart was a royal house of the Kingdom of Scotland, later also of the Kingdom of England, and finally of the Kingdom of Great Britain. ... The House of Hanover (the Hanoverians) is a German royal dynasty which has ruled the Duchy of Braunschweig-Lüneburg, the Kingdom of Hanover and the Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ... Saxe-Coburg-Gotha or Saxe-Coburg and Gotha (German: Sachsen-Coburg und Gotha) was once the name given to the two German duchies of Saxe-Coburg and Saxe-Gotha in Germany, in the present states of Bavaria and Thuringia, which were in personal union between 1826 and 1918. ... The House of Windsor is the current Royal House of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland and each of the other Commonwealth Realms. ... The Dulo Clan or the House of Dulo was the name of the ruling dynasty of the early Bulgars. ... The Asen dynasty ruled the Second Bulgarian Empire between 1187 and 1280. ... Shishman may refer to: Ivan Shishman of Bulgaria Shishman Street Category: ... Battenberg was the title created for the wife of Prince Alexander of Hesse, Countess Julia von Hauke. ... Capitals Coburg and Gotha Head of State Duke of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha Saxe-Coburg and Gotha or Saxe-Coburg-Gotha (German: Sachsen-Coburg und Gotha) served as the name of the two German duchies of Saxe-Coburg and Saxe-Gotha in Germany, in the present-day states of Bavaria... This is a list of Danish monarchs, that is, the Kings and ruling Queen of Denmark, including Regents of the Kalmar Union. ... The House of Oldenburg is a North German noble family and one of Europes most influential Royal Houses. ... Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg (in Danish: Slesvig-Holsten-Sønderborg-Lyksborg (or Glücksborg), from Glücksburg in northernmost Germany, is a line of the House of Oldenburg that is descended from King King Christian III of Denmark, to which the royal houses of Denmark, Norway, and the exiled... For other uses, see Merovingian (disambiguation). ... The following list of Frankish Kings is one of several Wikipedia lists of incumbents. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with House of Capet. ... The Valois Dynasty succeeded the Capetian Dynasty as rulers of France from 1328-1589. ... Also see:  Early Modern France The House of Bourbon is an important European royal house, a branch of the Capetian dynasty. ... Philippe I, Duc dOrléans, the founder of the House of Orléans Philip II dOrléans - the Regent of France for the young Louis XV. Louis dOrléans, Duke of Orléans, the 3d Duke Louis Philippe I called le Gros or the Fat Philippe Égalit... The original arms of the Buonapartes Bonaparte is a French family name that is of Italian origin. ... House of Bjelbo, also known as House of Bjälbo (Bjälboätten in Swedish) or House of Folkung (Folkungaätten in Swedish), was an Ostrogothian Swedish family that provided for several medieval Swedish bishops, jarls and kings. ... The Grand Ducal House of Mecklenburg, the more common name for the House of Nikloting, was a North German dynasty that ruled until 1918. ... The House of Oldenburg is a North German noble family and one of Europes most influential Royal Houses. ... The Vasa Coat of Arms The House of Vasa was the Royal House of Sweden (1523-1654) and of Poland (1587-1668). ... The House of Pfalz-Zweibrücken was the Royal House of Sweden from 1654 to 1720. ... Hesse-Kassel (Hessen-Kassel) was a German principality that came into existence when the Landgraviate of Hesse was divided in 1568 upon the death of Landgrave Philip of Hesse and his eldest son Wilhelm IV inherited the northern portion and established his capital in Kassel. ... The House of Holstein-Gottorp, a cadet branch of the Oldenburg dynasty, ruled Sweden from 1751 until 1818, and Norway from 1814 to 1818. ... The House of Romanov or Romanese (Рома́нов, pronounced ) was the second and last imperial dynasty of Russia, which ruled the country for five generations from 1613 to 1761. ... The following list of Frankish Kings is one of several Wikipedia lists of incumbents. ... The Conradines or Conradiner were a dynasty of Franconian counts and dukes of the 8th to 11th Century, named after Konrad the Elder and his son Conrad I (or Konrad), Duke of Franconia, King of Germany. ... The Luitpolding was a medieval dynasty which ruled Bavaria from some time in the late ninth century off and on until 985. ... Salian family tree The Salian dynasty was a dynasty in the High Middle Ages of four German Kings (1024-1125), also known as the Frankish dynasty after the familys origin and role as dukes of Franconia. ... The Hohenstaufen were a dynasty of Kings of Germany, many of whom were also crowned Holy Roman Emperor and Dukes of Swabia. ... The possessions of the Guelfs in the days of Henry the Lion The House of Welf (or House of Guelph) is a European dynasty that has included many German and British monarchs from the 11th century until the 20th century. ... Flag of the Habsburg Monarchy; also used as the flag of the Austrian Empire until the Ausgleich of 1867. ... The House of Hanover (the Hanoverians) is a German royal dynasty which has ruled the Duchy of Braunschweig-Lüneburg, the Kingdom of Hanover and the Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland. ... Capitals Coburg and Gotha Head of State Duke of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha Saxe-Coburg and Gotha or Saxe-Coburg-Gotha (German: Sachsen-Coburg und Gotha) served as the name of the two German duchies of Saxe-Coburg and Saxe-Gotha in Germany, in the present-day states of Bavaria... The royal House of Nassau is one of the most prominent dynasties in Europe. ... The House of Luxembourg was a medieval Holy Roman Empire noble family. ... The Wittelsbach family is an European royal family and a German dynasty from Bavaria. ... The House of Schwarzburg is the oldest noble family of Thuringia. ... Brunswick-Lüneburg was an historical state within the Holy Roman Empire. ... Hohenzollern redirects here. ... The House of Oldenburg is a North German noble family and one of Europes most influential Royal Houses. ... Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg (in Danish: Slesvig-Holsten-Sønderborg-Lyksborg (or Glücksborg), from Glücksburg in northernmost Germany, is a line of the House of Oldenburg that is descended from King King Christian III of Denmark, to which the royal houses of Denmark, Norway, and the exiled... The House of Orange-Nassau (in Dutch Oranje-Nassau), is a family that has played a central role in the political life of the Netherlands since William I of Orange (also known as William the Silent and Father of the Fatherland) organised the Dutch revolt against Spanish rule, which after... Flag of Nassau-Weilburg Nassau-Weilburg were a state in the current Germany which had existed from 1344 to 1816. ... The Grand Ducal House of Mecklenburg, the more common name for the House of Nikloting, was a North German dynasty that ruled until 1918. ... The House of Oldenburg is a North German noble family and one of Europes most influential Royal Houses. ... The Vasa Coat of Arms The House of Vasa was the Royal House of Sweden (1523-1654) and of Poland (1587-1668). ... The House of Pfalz-Zweibrücken was the Royal House of Sweden from 1654 to 1720. ... Hesse-Kassel (Hessen-Kassel) was a German principality that came into existence when the Landgraviate of Hesse was divided in 1568 upon the death of Landgrave Philip of Hesse and his eldest son Wilhelm IV inherited the northern portion and established his capital in Kassel. ... The House of Holstein-Gottorp, a cadet branch of the Oldenburg dynasty, ruled Sweden from 1751 until 1818, and Norway from 1814 to 1818. ... The House of Romanov or Romanese (Рома́нов, pronounced ) was the second and last imperial dynasty of Russia, which ruled the country for five generations from 1613 to 1761. ... The Wittelsbach family is an European royal family and a German dynasty from Bavaria. ... Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg (in Danish: Slesvig-Holsten-Sønderborg-Lyksborg (or Glücksborg), from Glücksburg in northernmost Germany, is a line of the House of Oldenburg that is descended from King King Christian III of Denmark, to which the royal houses of Denmark, Norway, and the exiled... The Arpads or Árpáds (Hungarian: Árpádok, Slovak: Arpádovci, Croatian: Arpadovići) was a dynasty ruling in historic Hungary from the late 9th century to 1301 (with some interruptions, e. ... Original coat of arms of the Capetian House of Anjou. ... Flag of the Habsburg Monarchy; also used as the flag of the Austrian Empire until the Ausgleich of 1867. ... Flag of the Habsburg Monarchy; also used as the flag of the Austrian Empire until the Ausgleich of 1867. ... The House of Orange-Nassau (in Dutch Oranje-Nassau), is a family that has played a central role in the political life of the Netherlands since William I of Orange (also known as William the Silent and Father of the Fatherland) organised the Dutch revolt against Spanish rule, which after... To meet Wikipedias quality standards, this article or section may require cleanup. ... The House of Oldenburg is a North German noble family and one of Europes most influential Royal Houses. ... The House of Bernadotte, the current Royal House of the Kingdom of Sweden, has reigned since 1818. ... Schleswig-Holstein-Sonderburg-Glücksburg (in Danish: Slesvig-Holsten-Sønderborg-Lyksborg (or Glücksborg), from Glücksburg in northernmost Germany, is a line of the House of Oldenburg that is descended from King King Christian III of Denmark, to which the royal houses of Denmark, Norway, and the exiled... For Tolkiens fictional character, see Estë To know more about the city, see Este The House of Este is a European princely dynasty. ... The House of Savoy or in Italian, La Casa di Savoia, or simply Casa Savoia, (or Savoie, French) is a dynasty of nobles who traditionally had their domain in Savoy, a region that includes present-day Piemonte, other parts of Northern Italy, and a smaller region in France. ... The Colonna family was a powerful noble family in medieval and renaissance Rome, supplying one pope and many other leaders, and fighting with their rivals the Orsini family for influence. ... For the board game, see Medici (board game). ... Borghese is the surname of a family of Italian noble and papal background, originating in Siena where they came to prominence in the 13th century holding official offices under the commune. ... Sforza was a ruling family of Renaissance Italy, based in Milan. ... Montefeltro is the name of an historical Italian family who ruled Urbino. ... The Orsini family was a powerful noble family in medieval and renaissance Rome, supplying three popes and many other leaders, and fighting with their rivals, the Colonna family, for influence. ... Visconti was a noble family that ruled Milan during the Middle Ages and Early Renaissance period. ... The Gonzaga family ruled Mantua in Northern Italy from 1328 to 1708. ... The Farnese family was an influential family in Renaissance Italy. ... Della Rovere is a noble historical family of Italy. ... Coat of arms, Santa Maria Novella The Acciaioli, Acciaiuoli, or Acciajuoli was an important family of Florence. ... Grimaldi usually refers to House of Grimaldi, the rulers of Monaco. ... The Pamphili (often with the final long i orthography, Pamphilj) are one of the Papal families deeply entrenched in Roman politics of the 16th and 17th centuries. ... The House of Malatesta was an Italian family which ruled over Rimini from 1295 until 1500. ... Vassallo-Paleologo is a family that stemmed from Milian during the Crusades and eventually settled at the Byzantine court. ... Template:Julio-Claudian Dynasty The Julio-Claudian Dynasty refers to the first five Roman Emperors: Augustus, Tiberius, Caligula, Claudius, and Nero. ... The princes Torlonia are a Roman family, with origins in a huge fortune gained during the 18th and 19th century by the administration of the finances of the Vatican. ... The original arms of the Buonapartes Bonaparte is a French family name that is of Italian origin. ... The House of Orange-Nassau (in Dutch Oranje-Nassau), is a family that has played a central role in the political life of the Netherlands since William I of Orange (also known as William the Silent and Father of the Fatherland) organised the Dutch revolt against Spanish rule, which after... Flag of Nassau-Weilburg Nassau-Weilburg were a state in the current Germany which had existed from 1344 to 1816. ... Also see:  Early Modern France The House of Bourbon is an important European royal house, a branch of the Capetian dynasty. ... The House of Mindaugas is the first royal family of Grand Duchy of Lithuania. ... Columns of Gediminas, symbol of the Gediminids. ... The title Duke of Urach was created for Friedrich Wilhelm Alexander Ferdinand, Count of Württemberg on March 28, 1857, with the style of HSH. Wilhelm was the son of Duke Wilhelm of Württemberg (1761-1830) and his morganatic wife, Baroness Wilhelmine von Tunderfeldt-Rhodis (1777-1822). ... The Jagiellons were a royal dynasty originating in Lithuania, which reigned in some Central European countries between the 14th and 16th century. ... The Piast dynasty is a line of Kings and dukes that ruled Poland from its beginnings as an independent state up to 1370. ... PÅ™emyslid coat of arms. ... The House of Burgundy (or Afonsine House) was the first dynasty of Kings of Portugal. ... The House of Aviz is a dynasty of kings of Portugal. ... This is a list of Portuguese monarchs dating from the independence of Portugal from the kingdom of León in 1128 under Afonso Henriques, who proclaimed himself King in 1139, to the proclamation of the Portuguese Republic on October 5, 1910, during the reign of Manuel II, the Patriot, or... The Philippine House or House of Habsburg is the third dynasty of Kings of Portugal named after the three Spanish kings who ruled over Portugal from Madrid between 1580 and 1640. ... The Royal House of Braganza (Portuguese: Casa Real de Bragança, pron. ... This is a list of Portuguese monarchs dating from the independence of Portugal from the kingdom of León in 1128 under Afonso Henriques, who proclaimed himself King in 1139, to the proclamation of the Portuguese Republic on October 5, 1910, during the reign of Manuel II, the Patriot, or... Hohenzollern-Sigmaringen is the cadet branch of the senior Swabian branch of the Hohenzollern dynasty, less known however than the Franconian branch which became Burgraves of Nuremberg and later ruled Brandenburg, Prussia and ultimately Germany in the centuries to 1918. ... Coat of arms of Serbia This is a list of Serbian monarchs. ... The House of Vlastimirović was named after Knez Vlastimir who was the great great grandson of the Unknown Archont who led the Serbs to the Balkans from White Serbia (modern day Poland, Slovakia and Ukraine) during the reign of Byzantine emperor Heraclius somewhere between 610 - 641. ... The House of Vojislav was a medieval dynasty that inherited the claims over Duklja of the old ruling House of Saint Vladimir and the Serbian House of Vlastimir dynasty. ... The House of Nemanjić, fresco from Visoki Dečani monastery The House of Nemanjić (Serbian: Немањићи; Anglicised: Nemanyid) was a medieval Serbian ruling dynasty. ... The House of Mrnjavčević was a Serbian dynasty ruling from Prilep in the region of Macedonia from 1366 to 1395, having ceded from the crumbling Serbian Empire after Stefan DuÅ¡ans death. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... This article or section is in need of attention from an expert on the subject. ... The House of Crnojević was a medieval dynasty that ruled the Kingdom of Zeta. ... The House of BalÅ¡ić was a Serbian medieval dynasty that ruled Zeta. ... The House of Obrenović (or Obrenovići/Обреновићи) ruled Serbia from 1815 to 1842, and again from 1858 to 1903. ... The House of KaraÄ‘orÄ‘ević (Serbian: Карађорђевићи; English: House of Karageorgevich) was a Serbian ruling dynasty descended from KaraÄ‘orÄ‘e (George Petrović). The family had a long blood feud with the Obrenović dynasty. ...

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