FACTOID # 13: New York has America's lowest percentage of residents who are veterans.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Tuck School of Business
Tuck School of Business

Established: January 19, 1900[1]
Type: Private business school
Endowment: $191.4 million (as of 2005)[2]
Dean: Paul Danos
Faculty: 46[3]
Students: 490[4]
Location: Hanover, New Hampshire, United States
Website: tuck.edu

The Amos Tuck School of Business Administration is the graduate business school of Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire, United States of America. Founded in 1900, Tuck is the oldest graduate school of business in the world, and was the first institution to offer master's degrees in business administration.[5][6][7][8] It is one of six Ivy League business schools, and it consistently ranks in the top ten of national business school rankings.[9] The date of establishment or date of founding of an institution is the date on which that institution chooses to claim as its starting point. ... is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Äž: For the film, see: 1900 (film). ... For the film of this title, see Private School (film). ... A business school is a university-level institution that confers degrees in Business Administration. ... A financial endowment is a transfer of money or property donated to an institution, with the stipulation that it be invested, and the principal remain intact. ... In an educational setting, a dean is a person with significant authority . ... A faculty is a division within a university. ... For other uses, see Student (disambiguation). ... Hanover is a town located on the Connecticut River in Grafton County, New Hampshire, United States. ... For other uses, see New Hampshire (disambiguation). ... A website (alternatively, web site or Web site) is a collection of Web pages, images, videos or other digital assets that is hosted on one or more web servers, usually accessible via the Internet. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... A business school is a university-level institution that confers degrees in Business Administration. ... Dartmouth College is a private, coeducational university located in Hanover, New Hampshire, USA. Incorporated as Trustees of Dartmouth College,[6][7] it is a member of the Ivy League and one of the nine colonial colleges founded before the American Revolution. ... Hanover is a town located on the Connecticut River in Grafton County, New Hampshire, United States. ... A masters degree is a postgraduate academic degree awarded after the completion of an academic program of one to six years in duration. ... This article is about business administration. ... Of the eight universities belonging to the Ivy League in the United States, six have business schools. ...


Tuck grants only one degree, the Master of Business Administration, alongside shorter programs for executives and recent college graduates, although there are opportunities for dual degrees with other institutions. The school places a heavy emphasis on its tight-knit and residential character, and has a student population that hovers near 500 students and a full-time faculty of 46.[10] Tuck claims over 8,400 living alumni in a variety of fields, and currently enjoys the highest rate of alumni donation of any business school in the United States. MBA redirects here. ... An alumn (with a silent n), alum, alumnus, or alumna is a former student of a college, university, or school. ...

Contents

History

Amos Tuck, the namesake of the Tuck School
Amos Tuck, the namesake of the Tuck School

At the turn of the 20th century, Dartmouth College president William Jewett Tucker decided to explore the possibility of establishing a school of business to educate the growing number of Dartmouth alumni entering the commercial world.[11] Turning to his former roommate from his undergraduate years at Dartmouth, Tucker enlisted the support of Edward Tuck, who had since become a wealthy banker and philanthropist.[12] Tuck donated $300,000 in the form of preferred stock shares in a Minnesota railroad company as the capital to found the school. It was named the Amos Tuck School of Administration and Finance, after Edward Tuck's father and Dartmouth alumnus Amos Tuck.[12] Image File history File links Amos_tuck. ... Image File history File links Amos_tuck. ... Portrait of Amos Tuck Amos Tuck (1810-1879) was a political figure in New Hampshire, credited by some New Hampshire sources as a founder of the Republican Party. ... The Rev. ... Edward Tuck (August 24, 1842 - April 30, 1938) was an American banker and philanthropist. ... Preferred stock, also called preferred shares or preference shares, is typically a higher ranking stock than voting shares, and its terms are negotiated between the corporation and the investor. ... Portrait of Amos Tuck Amos Tuck (1810-1879) was a political figure in New Hampshire, credited by some New Hampshire sources as a founder of the Republican Party. ...


The new school's tuition fee cost $100 for the few students who enrolled in the first year; graduates of the two-year program received a Master of Commercial Science degree (MCS).[12][1] The curriculum involved both traditional liberal arts fields as well as economic and finance education.[11] Undergraduate professors taught most of the first-year courses, while outside guest instructors and businesspeople educated students in their second years.[11][12] As the nation's first graduate school of business, the Tuck School's emphasis on a broad education in general management was adopted by many other emerging business schools, and was dubbed the "Tuck Pattern".[11][12] In the history of education, the seven liberal arts comprise two groups of studies, the trivium and the quadrivium. ...


In the late 1920s, Dartmouth president Ernest Martin Hopkins sought to unify the Tuck School by establishing a central campus, uniting the school's academic and residential facilities. Edward Tuck, then an aged man living in France, donated an additional $570,000 for the effort.[12] Using primarily his funds, four new buildings were constructed in 1929 on the west side of Dartmouth's campus.[13][12] Ernest Martin Hopkins served as the 11th President of Dartmouth College, 1916-1945. ...


In 1942, the school's name changed to the Amos Tuck School of Business Administration, and in 1953, the degree program changed to the modern Master of Business Administration (MBA). Until the late 1950s and early 1960s, the Tuck School catered primarily to Dartmouth students, accepting undergraduates during their third year.[12] Under Dean Karl Hill, Tuck shifted its focus to soliciting a national student body. The resulting expansion in the late 1960s saw additional growth of the campus with the construction of a new dormitory and the Murdough Center, which contains the Feldberg Business and Engineering Library. Under Deans Richard West (1976–1983) and Colin Blaydon (1983–1990), the school's curriculum and faculty expanded extensively, and applications increased by one-third.[12] Since the late 1980s, Tuck has continued to expand in student body and faculty size, and has seen the establishment of two new campus buildings as well as several research centers and nondegree business programs.[1] MBA redirects here. ...


Campus

See also: List of Dartmouth College buildings#Tuck School of Business
The forthcoming Tuck Living and Learning Complex (LLC), expected to be completed in December 2008
The forthcoming Tuck Living and Learning Complex (LLC), expected to be completed in December 2008

The Tuck School is located on the campus of Dartmouth College, which is situated in the rural, Upper Connecticut River Valley, New England town of Hanover, New Hampshire. The campus of the Tuck School sits in a complex on the west side of Dartmouth's campus, near the Connecticut River.[14]( 43°42′19″N, -72°17′38″E) Shortly after being founded in 1900, Tuck was housed in a single building facing the Green at the center of the campus;[15] in 1930, the institution moved into Stell, Chase, Tuck, and Woodbury Halls in its present location along the Tuck Mall.[16][17][13][18] Today, these original structures serve as four of Tuck's six academic and administrative buildings.[14] A view of the northeast corner of campus from the tower of Baker Memorial Library. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (2,816 × 2,112 pixels, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (2,816 × 2,112 pixels, file size: 2. ... Dartmouth College is a private, coeducational university located in Hanover, New Hampshire, USA. Incorporated as Trustees of Dartmouth College,[6][7] it is a member of the Ivy League and one of the nine colonial colleges founded before the American Revolution. ... Upper Valley is the name for the region lying along the upper Connecticut River valley, following the border between New Hampshire and Vermont. ... This article is about the region in the United States of America. ... Hanover is a town located on the Connecticut River in Grafton County, New Hampshire, United States. ... The Connecticut River as seen from the French King Bridge in western Massachusetts. ... , View of the Green from the north, from the tower of Baker Memorial Library. ...


Tuck emphasizes its residential character, describing residential life as "a foundation of the Tuck culture" and crediting it as "a reason that Tuck alumni are among the most loyal of all the business school [sic] in the world."[19][14] Tuck's isolated location has been described as an "image problem" for attracting successful applicants and faculty to its rural campus,[20] although some students cite the school's relatively insular character as a positive trait for fostering intimacy and friendship.[21]


Tuck has two residential facilities: Buchanan Hall (constructed 1968) and Whittemore Hall (constructed 2000). A new building called the Tuck Living and Learning Complex, currently under construction, will house 85 additional students as well as classrooms and study space. At a total cost of $27.2 million, the Tuck LLC is expected to be ready for occupancy in December 2008.[22] The Tuck School shares the Murdough Center (containing the Feldberg Business and Engineering Library) with the adjacent Thayer School of Engineering.[23] The Tuck campus is serviced by Byrne Hall, a dining facility operated by Dartmouth Dining Services.[24] The Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth College is one of the oldest professional schools of engineering in the USA. Founded in 1867 after a donation by General Sylvanus Thayer, the School comprises both the Undergraduate Department of Engineering Sciences at Dartmouth and a graduate professional school in engineering. ...


Academics

Tuck Hall, the Tuck School's main administrative building
Tuck Hall, the Tuck School's main administrative building[25]

The Tuck School offers only a single degree: the two-year, full-time Master of Business Administration (MBA). Students may specialize within the MBA in fields such as finance or marketing, but a specialization is not required for graduation.[26] First-year MBA students at Tuck undertake a 32-week core curriculum in general management and a specialized First Year Project.[27][28][3] During their second year, students take 12 elective courses and design their own focused field of study.[29][30] Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 573 pixelsFull resolution (1664 × 1191 pixel, file size: 1. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Size of this preview: 800 × 573 pixelsFull resolution (1664 × 1191 pixel, file size: 1. ... MBA redirects here. ...


The school stresses a collaborative and teamwork-based approach to learning, which it touts as one of its assets for "building the interpersonal skills required for business leadership."[19] However, this emphasis on cooperative group learning has been criticized as too "touchy-feely" for students entering the competitive business world, and the emphasis on consensus-building as detrimental to students' ability to make quick, independent decisions.[20] The school's academic programs have also been criticized for not offering their students a broader international perspective, though the school has sought to remedy this by offering globally-oriented courses, programs, and research.[20][31][32]

Whittemore Hall, completed in 2000, is a living complex housing 60 first-year students.
Whittemore Hall, completed in 2000, is a living complex housing 60 first-year students.[33]

Students seeking other degrees can engage in one of seven dual-degree or joint-degree programs offered in conjunction with other academic institutions. Dual degrees include an MBA/Master of Arts in Law and Diplomacy from The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University, an MBA/Master of Public Affairs from the John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University, an MBA/Master of Studies in Environmental Law from the Vermont Law School, and an MBA/Master of Arts from the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies at Johns Hopkins University. Joint degrees include a Doctor of Medicine/MBA from Dartmouth Medical School, a Master of Public Health/MBA from the Dartmouth's Center for the Evaluative Clinical Sciences, and a Master of Engineering Management/MBA from Dartmouth's Thayer School of Engineering.[34] The school also offers a variety of second-year exchange programs at other institutions such as the Handelshochschule Leipzig in Germany, the HEC School of Management in Paris, IESE Business School in Barcelona, and the London Business School.[35] Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (2,816 × 2,112 pixels, file size: 2. ... Image File history File links Metadata Size of this preview: 800 × 600 pixelsFull resolution‎ (2,816 × 2,112 pixels, file size: 2. ... The Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, also called simply The Fletcher School, is the oldest exclusively graduate school of international relations in the United States, as well as the second oldest. ... Tufts redirects here. ... The Master of Public Affairs (M.P.Aff. ... The John F. Kennedy School of Government at Harvard University (colloquially known as the Kennedy School, Harvard Kennedy School and HKS[1]) is a public policy and public administration school, and one of Harvards graduate and professional schools. ... Harvard redirects here. ... Oakes Hall, Vermont Law School Vermont Law School is a private law school located in South Royalton, Vermont (a village of Royalton, Vermont). ... A Master of Arts is a postgraduate academic masters degree awarded by universities in North America and the United Kingdom (excluding the ancient universities of Scotland and Oxbridge. ... The Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS), based in Washington, D.C., is a graduate school devoted to the study of international affairs, economics, diplomacy, and policy research and education. ... The Johns Hopkins University, founded in 1876, is a private institution of higher learning located in Baltimore, Maryland, United States. ... Doctor of Medicine (M.D. or MD, from the Latin Medicinae Doctor meaning Teacher of Medicine,) is an academic degree for medical doctors. ... Dartmouth Medical School is the medical school of Dartmouth College, in Hanover, New Hampshire. ... The Master of Public Health (MPH) is a professional masters degree awarded for studies in areas related to public health. ... The Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth College is one of the oldest professional schools of engineering in the USA. Founded in 1867 after a donation by General Sylvanus Thayer, the School comprises both the Undergraduate Department of Engineering Sciences at Dartmouth and a graduate professional school in engineering. ... École des Hautes Études Commerciales de Paris For other schools named Hautes Études Commerciales, see Hautes Études Commerciales. ... IESE Business School of the University of Navarra: A top business school, according to Financial Times and the Economist Intelligence Unit. ... Affiliations: University of London Website: http://www. ...


In addition to the MBA program, the school also offers an array of executive education and other non-degree programs, such as the Tuck Business Bridge Program for current and recent university undergraduates, and the Leadership Education and Development (LEAD) program for high school students.[10]


Organization and research

Like the undergraduate portion of Dartmouth College, the Tuck School operates on a quarter system.[36] As part of the larger institution, the Tuck School is ultimately administered by Dartmouth's President and Board of Trustees. The school is directly managed by a Dean (currently Paul Danos) who is advised by a Board of Overseers that was established in 1951.[37] An academic term is a division of an academic year, the time during which a school, college or university holds classes. ... Daniel Webster arguing Trustees of Dartmouth College v. ...

The Feldberg Business and Engineering Library
The Feldberg Business and Engineering Library

Since the Tuck School offers only one degree, it does not contain formal academic departments as do other institutions. Instead, faculty are generally grouped in one or more of seven "academic areas": accounting, finance and economics, marketing, operations management and management science, strategy and management, international business, and management communication.[38] Tuck is also home to five research centers which organize research in different fields of business administration. The centers are meant to promote faculty research, establish liaisons between the Tuck School and the corporate world, and sponsor programs for Tuck as a whole; MBA students are occasionally invited to participate as fellows and research associates.[39] The five research centers are the William F. Achtmeyer Center for Global Leadership, the Center for Corporate Governance, the Center for International Business, the Center for Private Equity and Entrepreneurship, and the Glassmeyer/McNamee Center for Digital Strategies.[39] It has been suggested that Accounting scholarship be merged into this article or section. ... The field of finance refers to the concepts of time, money and risk and how they are interelated. ... Face-to-face trading interactions on the New York Stock Exchange trading floor. ... Next big thing redirects here. ... Operations management is an area of business that is concerned with the production of goods and services, and involves the responsibility of ensuring that business operations are efficient and effective. ... Management science, or MS, is the discipline of using mathematics, and other analytical methods, to help make better business decisions. ... This article or section may contain external links added only to promote a website, product, or service – otherwise known as spam. ...


Admissions and rankings

In 2007, the Tuck School was ranked first among MBA programs nationally by The Wall Street Journal[40] and Forbes,[41] fourth internationally by The Economist Intelligence Unit,[42] seventh by U.S. News & World Report (2008),[43] eighth by the Financial Times (2008),[44] and eleventh (in 2006) by BusinessWeek.[9] Tuck claims that it places second when these six rankings are averaged.[45] The Wall Street Journal (WSJ) is an international daily newspaper published by Dow Jones & Company in New York City, New York, USA, with Asian and European editions, and a worldwide daily circulation of more than 2 million as of 2006, with 931,000 paying online subscribers. ... For other uses, see Forbes (disambiguation). ... The Economist is an English-language weekly news and international affairs publication owned by The Economist Newspaper Ltd and edited in London. ... This entity, also known as EIU is part of The Economist Group. ... U.S. News & World Report is a weekly newsmagazine. ... The Financial Times (FT) is a British international business newspaper. ... BusinessWeek is a business magazine published by McGraw-Hill. ...

Students studying in Stell Hall
Students studying in Stell Hall

Applicants to the Tuck School are evaluated based on undergraduate academic performance, Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) standardized test scores, essays, recommendations, written applications, and interviews, if applicable.[46][3] 2,276 applicants applied for approximately 240 slots in the class of 2009. The average GMAT score of applicants was 710, and the average undergraduate grade point average (GPA) of American applicants was 3.4.[47] The Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT, pronounced G-mat) is a standardized test for measuring aptitude to succeed academically in graduate business studies. ... A grade in education can mean either a teachers evaluation of a students work or a students level of educational progress, usually one grade per year (often denoted by an ordinal number, such as the 3rd Grade or the 12th Grade). This article is about evaluation of...


People

Student profile

Tuck students, known as "Tuckies", typically number about 480 students, with international students making up about 30% of the student body.[20][19][4] The school has relatively low percentages of women (32%) and minorities (15%), which has been criticized as a weakness by students who desire more diversity in the school.[4][48][21] Tuck has tried to address these shortcomings by offering additional scholarships to minority applicants and by promoting such programs as the annual Tuck Diversity Conference and participation in the Forté Foundation for women in business.[20][49][50] “Minority” redirects here. ...


Like many other business schools, Tuck encourages its students to have post-undergraduate work experience before applying to the MBA program.[51][52] The average incoming student has five years of full-time work experience, and the average student age is 28, ranging from 25 to 32 years.[4][48]


Alumni

See also: List of Dartmouth College alumni

Tuck claims the highest percentage of alumni donors of any business school in the world.[53] It is the only business school in BusinessWeek's study of American business schools to have at least 50% of its alumni contribute to their alma mater's annual funds, with 66% making donations.[53] The most popular career industries for graduates are management consulting (40%) and finance/accounting (37%), with graduates' annual base salaries averaging $100,000.[54] Daniel Webster class of 1801, arguing Dartmouth College v. ... BusinessWeek is a business magazine published by McGraw-Hill. ... Management consultant redirects here. ...

Christopher A. Sinclair '73, former CEO of PepsiCo and current chairman and CEO of Cambridge Solutions Ltd.
Christopher A. Sinclair '73, former CEO of PepsiCo and current chairman and CEO of Cambridge Solutions Ltd.

Alumni of Tuck's MBA program who are prominent in business include entrepreneur Jim Butterworth,[55] former Bristol-Myers Squibb CEO Peter R. Dolan '80,[56] Digital Angel CEO Kevin McGrath '77,[57] and former PepsiCo CEO Christopher A. Sinclair '73.[58] In education, David T. McLaughlin '55 served as the president of Dartmouth College,[59] and Robert Witt '65 as the president of the University of Alabama.[60] Alumni in other fields include screenwriter and director Kamran Pasha '00,[61] U.S. Representative Herman T. Schneebeli '31,[62] and former XFL football player Kyle Schroeder '07.[63] Alumni of Tuck's Executive Training program include The New York Times Company president and CEO Janet L. Robinson '96[64] and graphic designer David R. Brown.[65] Public domain photograph Upton Sinclair This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Public domain photograph Upton Sinclair This image has been released into the public domain by the copyright holder, its copyright has expired, or it is ineligible for copyright. ... Christopher A. Sinclair (b. ... PepsiCo, Incorporated (NYSE: PEP) is the largest global American beverage and snack company. ... This article needs additional references or sources for verification. ... Bristol-Myers Squibb (NYSE: BMY), colloquially referred to as BMS, is a pharmaceutical corporation, formed by a 1989 merger between pharmaceutical companies Bristol-Myers Company, founded in 1887 by William McLaren Bristol and John Ripley Myers in Clinton, NY (both were graduates of Hamilton College), and Squibb Corporation. ... Peter R. Dolan (Born 1956) is a former chief executive officer of Bristol-Myers Squibb. ... Digital Angel (AMEX:DOC) is an American company that produces animal identification and tracking systems using RFID. It also tracks aircraft. ... Kevin McGrath is President and CEO of Digital Angel Corporation. ... PepsiCo, Incorporated (NYSE: PEP) is the largest global American beverage and snack company. ... Christopher A. Sinclair (b. ... David T. McLaughlin (March 16, 1932–August 25, 2004) was the 14th President of Dartmouth College, 1981–1987. ... Dr. Robert E. Witt is president of the University of Alabama as of March 1, 2003. ... The University of Alabama (also known as Alabama, UA or colloquially as Bama) is a public coeducational university located in Tuscaloosa, Alabama, USA. Founded in 1831, UA is the flagship school of the University of Alabama System. ... Please wikify (format) this article or section as suggested in the Guide to layout and the Manual of Style. ... Herman Theodore Schneebeli (July 7, 1907 – May 6, 1982) was a Republican member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Pennsylvania. ... For the aircraft, see XFL Airabonita The XFL was a professional American football league that played for one season in 2001. ... Kyle Schroeder (January 18, 1978 –) was a XFL defensive tackle for the Birmingham Thunderbolts. ... The New York Times Company (NYSE: NYT) is an American media company best known as the publisher of its namesake, The New York Times. ... Janet L. Robinson[1] became president and chief executive officer of The New York Times Company on December 27, 2004. ...


Faculty

Main article: List of Dartmouth College faculty#Tuck School of Business

As of the 2007–2008 school year, the Tuck School employs 46 full-time faculty members and currently maintains a student-faculty ratio of 9:1.[3][48] Among Tuck's notable professors and instructors are Professor of Economics Andrew Bernard, Professor of Marketing Kevin Lane Keller, Professor of Finance Kenneth French, Professor of International Economics Matthew J. Slaughter, Professor of International Business Vijay Govindarajan, Professor of Strategic Management Richard D'Aveni, and Professor of Operations Management M. Eric Johnson.[66] Former faculty include industrial efficiency pioneer Frederick Winslow Taylor,[67] marketing professor Brian Wansink,[68] and Michael Jensen, who taught as a visiting scholar.[69] Eleazar Wheelock, the founder and first president of the College. ... Wikipedia does not yet have an article with this exact name. ... Kevin Lane Keller is the E. B. Osborn Professor of Marketing at the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth College. ... Kenneth R. French (born March 10, 1954) is the Carl E. and Catherine M. Heidt Professor of Finance at the Tuck School of Business, Dartmouth College. ... Matthew J. Slaughter was nominated by President Bush on September 22, 2005 to serve as a Member of the Council of Economic Advisers. ... Vijay Govindarajan, known as VG, is the Earl C. Daum 1924 Professor of International Business at the Tuck School of Business and founding director of Tucks Center for Global Leadership. ... -1... Brian Wansink Brian Wansink (born 1960, Sioux City, Iowa) is an American professor of marketing and nutritional science. ... Michael C. Jensen joined the faculty of the Harvard Business School in 1985. ...


See also

The following is a partial list of business schools in the United States. ... Of the eight universities belonging to the Ivy League in the United States, six have business schools. ...

References

  1. ^ a b c About Tuck: Tuck History Timeline. Tuck School of Business. Retrieved on 2007-11-08.
  2. ^ Dartmouth College: Tuck School of Business. Full-Time MBA Profile. BusinessWeek (2005). Retrieved on 2007-11-06.
  3. ^ a b c d About Tuck - Quick Facts. Tuck School of Business. Retrieved on 2007-11-06.
  4. ^ a b c d Snapshots: Students: Dartmouth College. MBA Center. CareerJournal.com: The Wall Street Journal Executive Career Site. Retrieved on 2007-11-07.
  5. ^ Alsop, Ron (2001-04-09). And the Winner Is... Dartmouth's Tuck School. CareerJournal.com: The Wall Street Journal Executive Career Site. Retrieved on 2007-11-09.
  6. ^ Webster, Jr., Frederick (January/February 2001). Make That Third. Stanford Alumni Magazine. Retrieved on 2007-11-09.
  7. ^ Meacham, Scott. Business Education History. Dartmo.com: The Buildings of Dartmouth College. Retrieved on 2007-11-09.
  8. ^ Business Schools. CollegeSurfing.com. Retrieved on 2007-11-09.
  9. ^ a b MBA Program Rankings. Tuck School of Business. Retrieved on 2007-11-06.
  10. ^ a b About Tuck. Tuck School of Business. Retrieved on 2007-11-09.
  11. ^ a b c d Hill, Karl A. (December 1961). The Amos Tuck School of Business Administration: Its Origin and Present Program. Journal of Higher Education. Retrieved on 2007-11-08.
  12. ^ a b c d e f g h i About Tuck: Our History. Tuck School of Business. Retrieved on 2007-11-08.
  13. ^ a b Tuck Hall (II). Dartmo.: The Buildings of Dartmouth College. Retrieved on 2007-10-02.
  14. ^ a b c Our Campus. Tuck School of Business. Retrieved on 2007-11-06.
  15. ^ McNutt Hall. Dartmo.: The Buildings of Dartmouth College. Retrieved on 2007-11-06.
  16. ^ Chase House. Dartmo.: The Buildings of Dartmouth College. Retrieved on 2007-10-02.
  17. ^ Stell Hall. Dartmo.: The Buildings of Dartmouth College. Retrieved on 2007-10-02.
  18. ^ Woodbury House. Dartmo.: The Buildings of Dartmouth College. Retrieved on 2007-10-02.
  19. ^ a b c About Tuck: Our Strategy. Tuck School of Business. Retrieved on 2007-11-08.
  20. ^ a b c d e Alsop, Ronald. "Dartmouth's Tuck School Keeps Challengers at Bay", CareerJournal.com: The Wall Street Journal Executive Career Site. Retrieved on 2007-11-08. 
  21. ^ a b What Tuck Students Say About... Student Life and Environment. The Princeton Review. Retrieved on 2007-11-10.
  22. ^ Tuck School Living and Learning Complex. Office of Planning, Design and Construction. Retrieved on 2007-10-03.
  23. ^ About Tuck - Murdough Center. Tuck School of Business. Retrieved on 2007-11-06.
  24. ^ Dining Locations - Byrne Hall. Dartmouth Dining Services. Retrieved on 2007-11-06.
  25. ^ About Tuck - Tuck Hall. Tuck School of Business. Retrieved on 2007-10-10.
  26. ^ The Tuck MBA - Academic FAQs. Tuck School of Business. Retrieved on 2007-11-06.
  27. ^ The Tuck MBA - Academics. Tuck School of Business. Retrieved on 2007-11-06.
  28. ^ First-Year Courses. Tuck School of Business. Retrieved on 2007-11-06.
  29. ^ What Tuck Students Say About... Academics. The Princeton Review. Retrieved on 2007-11-10.
  30. ^ Special Interests. Tuck School of Business. Retrieved on 2007-11-06.
  31. ^ Dartmouth College (Tuck). CareerJournal.com: The Wall Street Journal Executive Career Site (2005). Retrieved on 2007-11-11.
  32. ^ The Tuck MBA: Global View. Tuck School of Business. Retrieved on 2007-11-11.
  33. ^ Life at Tuck - Housing. Tuck School of Business. Retrieved on 2007-01-19.
  34. ^ Joint & Dual Degrees. Tuck School of Business. Retrieved on 2007-11-06.
  35. ^ Exchange Programs. Tuck School of Business. Retrieved on 2007-11-06.
  36. ^ Academic Calendar. Tuck School of Business. Retrieved on 2007-11-06.
  37. ^ Board of Overseers. Tuck School of Business. Retrieved on 2007-11-06.
  38. ^ Academic Areas. Tuck School of Business. Retrieved on 2007-11-06.
  39. ^ a b Research Centers. Tuck School of Business. Retrieved on 2007-11-06.
  40. ^ National Ranking. MBA Center. CareerJournal.com: The Wall Street Journal Executive Career Site. Retrieved on 2007-11-06.
  41. ^ Best Business Schools. Forbes. Retrieved on 2007-11-06.
  42. ^ 2007 Rankings. The Economist Intelligence Unit. Retrieved on 2007-11-06.
  43. ^ Bergengruen, Vera. "Tuck remains no. 7 in U.S. News graduate rankings", The Dartmouth, 2008-04-01. Retrieved on 2008-04-01. 
  44. ^ Financial Times 2008 American MBA Rankings. Financial Times. Retrieved on 2008-02-01.
  45. ^ "Tuck #8 among U.S. schools in FT ranking of MBA programs", Tuck School of Business, 2008-01-28. Retrieved on 2008-02-01. 
  46. ^ Evaluation Criteria. Tuck School of Business. Retrieved on 2007-11-06.
  47. ^ Tuck School of Business. Forbes. Retrieved on 2007-11-07.
  48. ^ a b c Dartmouth College: Tuck School of Business. Which MBA. Economist Intelligence Unit. Retrieved on 2007-11-07.
  49. ^ Life at Tuck: Diversity. Tuck School of Business. Retrieved on 2007-11-11.
  50. ^ Life at Tuck: Women. Tuck School of Business. Retrieved on 2007-11-11.
  51. ^ Work Experience. mba.com. Retrieved on 2007-11-08.
  52. ^ Tuck Admissions: FAQs. Tuck School of Business. Retrieved on 2007-11-08.
  53. ^ a b "World record: two of every three Tuck alumni give back", Tuck School News, 2007-07-05. Retrieved on 2007-07-09. 
  54. ^ Snapshots: Hiring: Dartmouth College. MBA Center. CareerJournal.com: The Wall Street Journal Executive Career Site. Retrieved on 2007-11-07.
  55. ^ Seoul Train: Director Bios. PBS. Retrieved on 2007-08-22.
  56. ^ Peter R. Dolan T'80. Tuck Alumni Profiles. Retrieved on 2006-12-10.
  57. ^ Kevin N McGrath. Forbes. Retrieved on 2007-11-06.
  58. ^ Research and Education Association (1996). Rea's Authoritative Guide to the Top 100 Business Schools. ISBN 0878917470. 
  59. ^ Adams, Roland; Laurel Stavis. "In Memoriam: David T. McLaughlin, President Emeritus of Dartmouth College (1932-2004)", Dartmouth News, 2004-08-26. Retrieved on 2006-12-10. 
  60. ^ Academic Vita of Dr. Robert E. Witt. The Office of the President at the University of Alabama. Retrieved on 2006-12-10.
  61. ^ Moderator Bio. NetSAP. Retrieved on 2007-08-22.
  62. ^ Herman T. Schneebeli. Biographical Directory of the United States Congress. Retrieved on 2007-08-22.
  63. ^ Entrepreneurship Club Members. Tuck School of Business. Retrieved on 2007-11-06.
  64. ^ Janet L. Robinson. New York Times Company. Retrieved on 2007-08-22.
  65. ^ "Descanso Gardens Appoints New Executive Director", Pasadena Living. Retrieved on 2007-08-22. 
  66. ^ Faculty Directory. Tuck School of Business. Retrieved on 2007-11-06.
  67. ^ Richard A. D'Aveni On Changing the Conversation: Tuck and the Field of Strategy. Tuck School of Business. Retrieved on 2007-11-22.
  68. ^ About Us: Food and Brand Lab. Cornell University Food and Brand Lab. Retrieved on 2007-11-09.
  69. ^ Biography of Professor Michael Jensen. European Corporate Governance Institute. Retrieved on 2007-08-22.

Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... BusinessWeek is a business magazine published by McGraw-Hill. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article is about the year. ... is the 99th day of the year (100th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 275th day of the year (276th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 275th day of the year (276th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 275th day of the year (276th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 275th day of the year (276th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Princeton Review (TPR) is a for-profit American educational preparation company. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 314th day of the year (315th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 276th day of the year (277th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 283rd day of the year (284th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Princeton Review (TPR) is a for-profit American educational preparation company. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 314th day of the year (315th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 19th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 91st day of the year (92nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 28th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Common Era (or Anno Domini), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 32nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Forbes (disambiguation). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... This entity, also known as EIU is part of The Economist Group. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 315th day of the year (316th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 312th day of the year (313th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 186th day of the year (187th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 190th day of the year (191st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 311th day of the year (312th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 234th day of the year (235th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 238th day of the year (239th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 344th day of the year (345th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 234th day of the year (235th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 234th day of the year (235th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 234th day of the year (235th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 234th day of the year (235th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 310th day of the year (311th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 326th day of the year (327th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 313th day of the year (314th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 234th day of the year (235th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

Wikimedia Commons has media related to:
Tuck School of Business
  • Tuck School of Business
  • Radio Tuck - Tuck podcast series highlighting digital strategies in business
  • Tuck School of Business is at coordinates 43°42′20″N 72°17′38″W / 43.705639, -72.293901 (Tuck School of Business)Coordinates: 43°42′20″N 72°17′38″W / 43.705639, -72.293901 (Tuck School of Business)
Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ... Dartmouth College is a private, coeducational university located in Hanover, New Hampshire, USA. Incorporated as Trustees of Dartmouth College,[6][7] it is a member of the Ivy League and one of the nine colonial colleges founded before the American Revolution. ... Dartmouth College is a private, coeducational university located in Hanover, New Hampshire, USA. Incorporated as Trustees of Dartmouth College,[6][7] it is a member of the Ivy League and one of the nine colonial colleges founded before the American Revolution. ... Dartmouth Medical School is the medical school of Dartmouth College, in Hanover, New Hampshire. ... The Thayer School of Engineering at Dartmouth College is one of the oldest professional schools of engineering in the USA. Founded in 1867 after a donation by General Sylvanus Thayer, the School comprises both the Undergraduate Department of Engineering Sciences at Dartmouth and a graduate professional school in engineering. ... The tone or style of this article or section may not be appropriate for Wikipedia. ... For other uses, see Ivy League (disambiguation). ... Alumni Gymnasium Dartmouth College Alumni Gymnasium, located in Hanover, New Hampshire in the U.S., is the center of Dartmouth Colleges athletic life and hosts venues for many of Dartmouths 34 varsity sports. ... // About the Club Hanover Country Club is a college-owned, semi-private golf course open to the public. ... Leede Arena is a 2,100-seat multi-purpose arena in Hanover, New Hampshire and was built in 1986. ... For other Memorial Fields see Memorial Field Memorial Field is a football stadium located in Hanover, New Hampshire, USA. It is the home of Dartmouth Colleges Big Green football and outdoor track teams. ... The Dartmouth Skiway is located about twenty minutes north of Dartmouth College in Lyme, New Hampshire. ... Thompson Arena is a 5,000-seat multi-purpose arena in Hanover, New Hampshire. ... Dartmouth-Rules Football From the early 1800s to around 1890, students at Dartmouth College played an indigenous soccer-like game called Old Division Foot Ball. ... Dartmouth College is a private, coeducational university located in Hanover, New Hampshire, USA. Incorporated as Trustees of Dartmouth College,[6][7] it is a member of the Ivy League and one of the nine colonial colleges founded before the American Revolution. ... A view of the northeast corner of campus from the tower of Baker Memorial Library. ... Fisher Ames Baker Memorial Library is the main library at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire. ... Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center is a teaching hospital and medical network headquartered in Lebanon, New Hampshire. ... , View of the Green from the north, from the tower of Baker Memorial Library. ... The Hood Museum of Art is North Americas oldest museum in continuous operation. ... Hopkins Center for the Arts at Dartmouth College is located at 2 East Wheelock Street in Hanover, New Hampshire. ... Αlpha Chi Αlpha, 2005. ... Αlpha Chi Αlpha, 2005. ... Αlpha Chi Αlpha, 2005. ... Αlpha Chi Αlpha, 2005. ... Αlpha Chi Αlpha, 2005. ... Αlpha Chi Αlpha, 2005. ... Αlpha Chi Αlpha, 2005. ... Αlpha Chi Αlpha, 2005. ... ΑΧΑ, view from front of renovated house. ... Αlpha Chi Αlpha, 2005. ... Αlpha Chi Αlpha, 2005. ... The quality of this article or section may be compromised by peacock terms. You can help Wikipedia by removing peacock terms. ... Αlpha Chi Αlpha, 2005. ... Αlpha Chi Αlpha, 2005. ... Αlpha Chi Αlpha, 2005. ... Αlpha Chi Αlpha, 2005. ... Αlpha Chi Αlpha, 2005. ... Αlpha Chi Αlpha, 2005. ... Tri-Kap, view from front lawn looking west. ... Αlpha Chi Αlpha, 2005. ... Αlpha Chi Αlpha, 2005. ... This article lacks information on the importance of the subject matter. ... Αlpha Chi Αlpha, 2005. ... Αlpha Chi Αlpha, 2005. ... Αlpha Chi Αlpha, 2005. ... Αlpha Chi Αlpha, 2005. ... The Tabard, a coeducational fraternity at Dartmouth College, was founded in 1857 as a local fraternity named Phi Zeta Mu. ... Phi Tau is a coeducational fraternity at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire, USA. Phi Tau is also a commonly used abbreviation for Phi Kappa Tau, a (completely separate) national fraternity found on many college campuses throughout the United States. ... Chi Gamma Epsilon is a fraternity at Dartmouth College. ... Chi Heorot was founded in 1897 as a local fraternity named Alpha Alpha Omega, and in 1902 was granted a charter as the Chi chapter of Chi Phi. ... Αlpha Chi Αlpha, 2005. ... This page contains detailed information on a number of student groups at Dartmouth College. ... Casque and Gauntlet (also known as C&G) is one of eight senior societies at Dartmouth College. ... The Dragon Society or Society of Dragons is a secret society of senior men at Dartmouth College. ... This page contains detailed information on a number of student groups at Dartmouth College. ... This page contains detailed information on a number of student groups at Dartmouth College. ... The Sphinx is distinguished as the oldest of eight senior societies at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire. ... Dartmouth College is a private, coeducational university located in Hanover, New Hampshire, USA. Incorporated as Trustees of Dartmouth College,[6][7] it is a member of the Ivy League and one of the nine colonial colleges founded before the American Revolution. ... The 2006 AI@50 logo AI@50, which is formally known as the Dartmouth Artificial Intelligence Conference: The Next Fifty Years (July 13-15, 2006), commemorated the 50th anniversary of the Dartmouth Conference which effectively inaugurated the history of artificial intelligence. ... Holding The charter granted by the British crown to the trustees of Dartmouth College, in New-Hampshire, in the year 1769, is a contract within the meaning of that clause of the constitution of the United States, (art. ... The Dartmouth Summer Research Conference on Artificial Intelligence was the name of a conference now considered the seminal event for artificial intelligence as a field. ... The Dartmouth Murders were the double homicide of married victims Half Zantop (born April 24, 1938) and Susanne Zantop (born Susanne Korsukwitz on August 12, 1945), Dartmouth College professors originally from Germany, who were killed at their home in Etna, New Hampshire on January 27, 2001. ... This article or section should include material from Dartmouth College Mens Varsity Swim Team. ... Culver Hall in Hanover, NH was the first building of NHC. New Hampshire College of Agriculture and the Mechanic Arts (NHC) was founded and incoporated in 1866, as a land grant college in Hanover in connection with Dartmouth College. ... Seal of Dartmouth College The Seal of Dartmouth College refers to the official insignia of Dartmouth College, an Ivy League university located in Hanover, New Hampshire, United States. ... Daniel Webster arguing Trustees of Dartmouth College v. ... Daniel Webster class of 1801, arguing Dartmouth College v. ... Eleazar Wheelock, the founder and first president of the College. ... Dartmouth College is a private, coeducational university located in Hanover, New Hampshire, USA. Incorporated as Trustees of Dartmouth College,[6][7] it is a member of the Ivy League and one of the nine colonial colleges founded before the American Revolution. ... BlitzMail is an e-mail system used at Dartmouth College. ... Keggy the Keg is an unofficial mascot of Dartmouth College, created in the fall of 2003. ... Dartmouth pong is a drinking game played at Dartmouth College that is loosely based on ping pong. ... This article concerns the traditions of Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire. ... This page contains detailed information on a number of student groups at Dartmouth College. ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... The Dartmouth Outing Club (DOC) is the oldest and largest collegiate outing club in the United States. ... The Dartmouth (informally known as The D) is Americas oldest college newspaper, published independently at Dartmouth College (although its offices are located on campus). ... The Dartmouth Jack OLantern (sometimes spelled Jack-O-Lantern) was founded at Dartmouth College in 1908. ... The Dartmouth Review is a conservative, independent, bi-weekly newspaper at Dartmouth College in Hanover, New Hampshire (U.S.). It was founded in 1980 by disenchanted staffers—including Gregory Fossedal, Gordon Haff, and Keeney Jones—from the colleges daily newspaper, The Dartmouth. ... Dartmouth Broadcasting began in 1920s with the ambitions of a few Dartmouth College students that decided to give a new technology called radio a try. ... The Dartmouth Forensics Union (IPA: ) is the policy debate team of Dartmouth College. ... The Dartmouth College Marching Band (abbr. ... Columbia Business School (also known as CBS) is the business school of Columbia University in New York, New York. ... The S.C. Johnson Graduate School of Management, also referred as the Johnson School, is located at Cornell University. ... Harvard Business School, officially named the Harvard Business School: George F. Baker Foundation, and also known as HBS, is one of the graduate schools of Harvard University. ... The Wharton School Wharton School is the business school of University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. ... The Yale School of Management (also known as Yale SOM) is the graduate business school of Yale University and is located on Hillhouse Avenue in New Haven, Connecticut, USA. Yale SOM offers M.B.A. and Ph. ...

  Results from FactBites:
 
Tuck Admissions (152 words)
Tuck is an extraordinary place to prepare for a successful career in business management.
A Tuck MBA will benefit your career and your future.
The decision to attend business school—and which business school to attend—is important.
Business school - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (926 words)
In North America a business school is often understood to be a university graduate school which offers a Master of Business Administration or equivalent degree.
The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania was the first undergraduate business school.
It claims to be the first business school to have a Nobel laureate on its faculty: George Stigler won the prize after retiring from the school in 1981.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m