FACTOID # 2: Puerto Rico has roughly the same gross state product as Montana, Wyoming and North Dakota combined.
 
 Home   Encyclopedia   Statistics   States A-Z   Flags   Maps   FAQ   About 
   
 
WHAT'S NEW
 

SEARCH ALL

FACTS & STATISTICS    Advanced view

Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 

 

(* = Graphable)

 

 


Encyclopedia > Tuatha Dé Danann

This article is about a mythical people of Ireland. See This article is about the ancient people of the Achaeans. ...Achaeans for the homeric Greek Danaans.


The Tuatha Dé Danann ("peoples of the A goddess, a female deity, contrasts with male deities, known as gods. A great many cultures have their own goddesses, sometimes alone, but more often as part of a larger pantheon that includes both of the conventional genders and in some cases even hermaphroditic deities. ...goddess In Irish mythology, Danu or Dana was the mother goddess of the Tuatha Dé Danann (peoples of the goddess Danu). ...Danu") were the fifth group of inhabitants of A true colour image of Ireland, captured by a NASA satellite on January 4, 2003. ...Ireland according to the Lebor Gabála Érenn (The Book of the Taking of Ireland) is the Middle Irish title of a loose collection of poems and prose narratives recounting the mythical origins and history of the Irish race from the creation of the world down to the Middle Ages. ...Lebor Gabála Érenn (Book of Invasions) tradition. They are thought to represent the This article is about deities or gods from a non_monotheistic perspective. ...gods of the Goidelic is one of two major divisions of modern_day Celtic languages (the other being Brythonic). ...Goidelic Irish; their This article is about the religious people known as Christians. ...Christian redactors have reduced them to historical kings and heroes, but this mask slips often enough.


A poem in the Book of Leinster lists many of the Tuatha Dé, but ends "Although [the author] enumerates them, he does not worship them". In Irish mythology Goibniu or Goibhniu was the smith of the Tuatha Dé Danann. ...Goibniu, In Irish mythology, Creidhne (or Credne) was a son of Brigid and Tuireann. ...Creidhne and In Celtic mythology, Luchtaine (or Luchta) was a son of Brigid and Tuireann and a god of craftwork and smithing. ...Luchta are referred to as Trí Dée Dána ("three gods of craftsmanship"), and the The Dagda is an important god of Irish mythology. ...Dagda's name is interpreted in The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times, beginning with the Renaissance. ...medieval texts as "the good god". Even after they are displaced as the rulers of Ireland, characters such as Lug, the Mórrígan, In Irish mythology, Aengus (Áengus, Óengus, Angus) aka Aengus Óg (Aengus the Young), Mac ind Óg (son of the young) or Mac Óg (young son) was a member of the Tuatha Dé Danann and probably a god of love, youth and beauty. ...Aengus and In Irish mythology, Manannan mac Lir was a sea and weather god. ...Manannan appear in stories set centuries later, showing all the signs of immortality. They have many parallels across the The word Celtic can refer to: the European Celtic people, ancient or modern the Celtic languages, spoken by these people and their modern descendents the Celtic (Lusitania), Celts from the Alentejo. ...Celtic world. In Irish mythology, Nuada or Nuadu Airgetlám (Silver Hand) was a king of the Tuatha Dé Danann. ...Nuada is Cognates are words that have a common origin. ...cognate with the Ancient Britain was a period in the human occupation of Great Britain that extended throughout prehistory, ending with the Roman invasion of Britain in AD 43. ...British god Nodens or Nodons was a Celtic deity worshipped in Britain. ...Nodens; Lug or Lugh is an Irish sun god and king of the Tuatha Dé Danann whose name means light or brightness. His epithets include Lámfhada (long hand), for his skill with a spear or sling, and Samildánach (multi_talented, skilled in many arts). He is handsome, perpetually youthful...Lug is a reflex of the pan_ The word Celtic can refer to: the European Celtic people, ancient or modern the Celtic languages, spoken by these people and their modern descendents the Celtic (Lusitania), Celts from the Alentejo. ...Celtic deity Lugus; In Celtic mythology, Tuireann was the father of Creidhne, Luchtaine and Giobhniu by Brigid. ...Tuireann is related to the Gaulish is name given to the now_extinct Celtic language that was spoken in Gaul before the Romans, the Franks and the British Celts invaded. ...Gaulish In Celtic mythology Taranis was a god of thunder worshipped in Gaul and Britain and mentioned, along with Esus and Toutatis, by the Roman poet Lucan in his epic poem Pharsalia. ...Taranis; In Irish mythology, Ogma was the god of scholars, education, writing and eloquence. ...Ogma to Ogmios was a Gaulish deity, sometimes known by the epithet Sun_face, usually depicted as a bald old man with a bow and club who leads an apparently happy band of men with chains attached to their ears and tongues. ...Ogmios; the In Irish mythology, Badb (crow) or in modern spelling Badhbh was a goddess of war who took the form of a crow, thus known as Badb Catha (battle crow). ...Badb to Catubodua.


The Tuatha Dé were descended from Nemed, leader of a previous wave of inhabitants of Ireland. They came from four northern cities, Falias, Gorias, Murias and Finias, where they acquired their occult skills and attributes. They arrived in Ireland, on or about May 1 is the 121st day of the year in the Gregorian calendar (122nd in leap years). ...May 1 (the date of the feastival of This article is about the Gaelic holiday. ...Beltaine), on dark clouds, although later versions rationalise this by saying they burned their ships to prevent retreat, and the "clouds" were the smoke produced.


Led by their king, In Irish mythology, Nuada or Nuadu Airgetlám (Silver Hand) was a king of the Tuatha Dé Danann. ...Nuada, they fought the first First Battle of In Irish mythology, Magh Tuiredh (Mag Tuired, Magh Tuireadh, anglicised as Moytura) is the name of the locations of two battles said to have been waged by the Tuatha Dé Danann. ...Magh Tuiredh ( In Irish mythology, Magh Tuiredh (Mag Tuired, Magh Tuireadh, anglicised as Moytura) is the name of the locations of two battles said to have been waged by the Tuatha Dé Danann. ...Moytura), on the west coast, in which they defeated and displaced the clumsy and ill_armed In Irish mythology and pseudohistory, the Fir Bolg (Fir Bholg, Firbolg, Irish men of Builg) were one of the races that inhabited Ireland before the coming of the Gaels. ...Fir Bolg, who then inhabited Ireland. Nuada lost an arm in the battle. Since he was no longer perfect, he could not continue as king and was replaced by the half_ In Irish mythology, the Fomorians (Irish Fomóire, Fomórach) or Fomors were a semi_divine race who inhabited Ireland in ancient times. ...Fomorian In Irish mythology, Bres, aka Eochaid Bres, Eochu Bres (Eochaid/Eochu the Beautiful), was a king of the Tuatha Dé Danann. ...Bres, who turned out to be a tyrant. The physician In Irish mythology, Dian Cecht was a god of healing. ...Dian Cecht replaced Nuada's arm with a working silver one and he was reinstated as king.


The Tuatha Dé then fought the Second Battle of Magh Tuiredh against the Fomorians. Nuada was killed by the Fomorian king In Irish mythology, was the god of death and King of the Fomorians. ...Balor's poisonous eye, but Balor was killed by Lug or Lugh is an Irish sun god and king of the Tuatha Dé Danann whose name means light or brightness. His epithets include Lámfhada (long hand), for his skill with a spear or sling, and Samildánach (multi_talented, skilled in many arts). He is handsome, perpetually youthful...Lug, who took over as king.


A third battle was fought against a subsequent wave of invaders, the In Irish mythology the Milesians or Sons of Míl Espáine were the final inhabitants of Ireland, representing the Goidelic Celts. ...Milesians, from The Kingdom of Spain or Spain ( Spanish: Reino de España or España; Catalan: Regne dEspanya; Basque: Espainiako Erresuma; Galician: Reino da España) is a country located in the southwest of Europe. ...Spain, descendants of Míl Espáine (who are thought to represent the Goidelic is one of two major divisions of modern-day Celtic languages (the other being Brythonic). ...Goidelic Celts). The Milesians encountered three goddesses of the Tuatha Dé, Ériu, In Irish mythology, Banba, sometimes spelled Banbha, was the patron spirit of Ireland, wife of King MacCuill, and a goddess of war and fertility. ...Banba and In Irish mythology, Fodla, daughter of Ernmas, was one of the patron goddesses of Ireland. ...Fodla, who asked that the island be named after them; Ériu is the origin of the modern name Map of Éire Éire (pronounced AIR uh, in the Irish language, translated as Ireland) is the name given in Article 4 of the 1937 Irish constitution to the 26_county Irish state, created under the 1921 Anglo_Irish Treaty, which was known between 1922 and 1937 as the Irish Free...Éire, and Banba and Fodla are still sometimes used as poetic names for Ireland.


Their three husbands, Mac Cuill, Mac Cecht and Mac Gréine, who were kings of the Tuatha Dé at that time, asked for a truce of three days, during which the Milesians would lie at anchor nine waves' distance from the shore. The Milesians complied, but the Tuatha Dé created a magical storm in an attempt to drive them away. The Milesian poet In Irish mythology, Amergin was a bard and judge. ...Amergin calmed the sea with his verse, before his people landed and defeated the Tuatha Dé at In Irish mythology, Tailtiu was an earth goddess. ...Tailtiu. The Tuatha Dé were led underground into the In Irish mythology, the sídhe (pronounced shee) are a supernatural race, quite distinct from humankind. ...Sidhe mounds by The Dagda is an important god of Irish mythology. ...The Dagda.


The Tuatha Dé Danann fought against the witch In Irish mythology, Carman was a goddess of evil magic. ...Carman and her three sons. They are said to have brought For the torpedo_shaped underwater vehicle ridden by two frogmen, sometimes referred to as a chariot, see Human torpedo. ...chariots and In the Celtic religion, the modern words Druidry or Druidism denote the practices of the ancient druids, the priestly class in ancient Celtic societies through much of Western Europe north of the Alps and in the British Isles. ...druidry to Ireland.



Preceded by:
In Irish mythology and pseudohistory, the Fir Bolg (Fir Bholg, Firbolg, Irish men of Builg) were one of the races that inhabited Ireland before the coming of the Gaels. ...Fir Bolg
Lebor Gabála Érenn (The Book of the Taking of Ireland) is the Middle Irish title of a loose collection of poems and prose narratives recounting the mythical origins and history of the Irish race from the creation of the world down to the Middle Ages. ...Mythical invasions of Ireland
AFM 1897 BC
FFE 1477 BC
Succeeded by:
In Irish mythology the Milesians or Sons of Míl Espáine were the final inhabitants of Ireland, representing the Goidelic Celts. ...Milesians



The Four Treasures of the Tuatha Dé Danann

The Tuatha Dé Danann brought The Tuatha Dé Danann came to Ireland from four cities on four islands in the North; Murias, Falias, Gorias and Finias, bringing with them The Four Treasures, also known as The Hallows of Ireland. ...four magical treasures with them to Ireland:

  • The Dagda is an important god of Irish mythology. ...The Dagda's Cauldron
  • the Spear of Lug or Lugh is an Irish sun god and king of the Tuatha Dé Danann whose name means light or brightness. His epithets include Lámfhada (long hand), for his skill with a spear or sling, and Samildánach (multi_talented, skilled in many arts). He is handsome, perpetually youthful...Lugh
  • the Stone of The Fusil Automatique Leger, or Light Automatic Rifle (LAR). ...Fal
  • the Sword of In Irish mythology, Nuada or Nuadu Airgetlám (Silver Hand) was a king of the Tuatha Dé Danann. ...Nuada

Tuatha Dé Danann High Kings of Ireland

AFM: chronology from the Annals of the Four Masters; FFE: chronology based on reign-lengths given in Seathrún Céitinn's Forus Feasa ar Erinn.

  • In Irish mythology, Bres, aka Eochaid Bres, Eochu Bres (Eochaid/Eochu the Beautiful), was a king of the Tuatha Dé Danann. ...Bres AFM 1897_1890 BC; FFE 1477_1470 BC
  • In Irish mythology, Nuada or Nuadu Airgetlám (Silver Hand) was a king of the Tuatha Dé Danann. ...Nuada AFM 1890_1870 BC; FFE 1470_1447 BC
  • Lug or Lugh is an Irish sun god and king of the Tuatha Dé Danann whose name means light or brightness. His epithets include Lámfhada (long hand), for his skill with a spear or sling, and Samildánach (multi_talented, skilled in many arts). He is handsome, perpetually youthful...Lug AFM 1870_1830 BC; FFE 1447_1407 BC
  • The Dagda is an important god of Irish mythology. ...Eochaid Ollathair AFM 1830_1750 BC; FFE 1407_1337 BC
  • Delbáeth AFM 1750-1740 BC; FFE 1337-1327 BC
  • In Irish mythology, Fiachna of the Tuatha Dé Danann was the son of Delbáeth. ...Fiachna AFM 1740_1730 BC; FFE 1327_1317 BC
  • Mac Cuill, Mac Cecht and Mac Gréine AFM 1730-1700 BC; FFE 1317-1287 BC

Tuatha Dé Danann family tree

The following table is based on the Genealogy is the study and tracing of family pedigrees. ...genealogies given by Seathrún Céitinn and in the Lebor Gabála Érenn (The Book of the Taking of Ireland) is the Middle Irish title of a loose collection of poems and prose narratives recounting the mythical origins and history of the Irish race from the creation of the world down to the Middle Ages. ...Lebor Gabála Érenn, and references in Cath Maige Tuireadh. It is not clear whether the various Elathas and Delbáeths are meant to be different figures of the same name or different traditions regarding the genalogy of the same figure. It is also notable that In Irish mythology, the Fomorians (Irish Fomóire, Fomórach) or Fomors were a semi-divine race who inhabited Ireland in ancient times. ...Fomorians such as Elatha and Balor are closely related to the Tuatha Dé.

 Nemed | Iarbonel Faidh | Beothach | Iobáth | Enna | Tabarn | Tat ____________________________________|__________________________________ | | Allai Indai | __________________________|__________________________ | | | Orda    In Irish mythology Neit was a god of war, and husband of Nemain. ...Nét    In Goidelic mythology, Prince Elatha (or Elathan) of the Fomorians was the father of Bres by Ériu. ...Elatha | --------------------|---------------------------------------------- | | | | | | Etarlám Esar Brec Delbáeth Dot    In Irish mythology, Bres, aka Eochaid Bres, Eochu Bres (Eochaid/Eochu the Beautiful), was a king of the Tuatha Dé Danann. ...Bres | | | | | | | | Eochaid    In Irish mythology, Dian Cecht was a god of healing. ...Dian Cecht Elatha    In Irish mythology, was the god of death and King of the Fomorians. ...Balor | | | | | -----------|----------- -----------------|---------------------- |    In Irish mythology, Nuada or Nuadu Airgetlám (Silver Hand) was a king of the Tuatha Dé Danann. ...Nuada | | | | | | | | | | | (   In Irish mythology, Elcmar (also Ecmar, Elcmhaire) was the husband of Boann. ...Elcmar) Cu Cethen   CJAL is an educational television station in Edmonton, Alberta branded as ACCESS, Albertas provincial educational broadcasting service. ...Cian    In Irish mythology, Miach was the son of Dian Cecht. ...Miach    In Irish mythology, the goddess Airmed was one of the Tuatha de Danaan. ...Airmed   The Dagda is an important god of Irish mythology. ...Dagda Fiacha Delbáeth    In Irish mythology, Ogma was the god of scholars, education, writing and eloquence. ...Ogma Allód    In Irish mythology, Ethniu (Eithne, Ethliu, Ethlinn, and a variety of other spellings _ see below) was the daughter of Balor, king of the Fomorians. ...Ethniu (   In Goidelic mythology, Nechtan was the father of Boann. ...Nechtan) | | | | | (Ler) -----|---- | | -------------|------------ | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | Etarlám    In Irish mythology Nemain (alternative spelling Nemhain) was a goddess of war, possibly another aspect of Morrigan. ...Nemain Bec_Felmas    Lug or Lugh is an Irish sun god and king of the Tuatha Dé Danann whose name means light or brightness. His epithets include Lámfhada (long hand), for his skill with a spear or sling, and Samildánach (multi_talented, skilled in many arts). He is handsome, perpetually youthful...Lug Cermait    In Irish mythology, Aengus (Áengus, Óengus, Angus) aka Aengus Óg (Aengus the Young), Mac ind Óg (son of the young) or Mac Óg (young son) was a member of the Tuatha Dé Danann and probably a god of love, youth and beauty. ...Aengus     In Goidelic mythology, Bodb refers to the god Bodb Dearg. ...Bodb    In Irish mythology Midir (also spelled Midhir) was a god who, as all gods of both sexes had to do after being defeated by the Milesians, lived in the sidh of Bri Leith. ...Midir    In Irish mythology, Brigid or Brighid (exalted one) was the daughter of Dagda (and therefore one of the Tuatha de Danaan) and wife of Bres of the Fomorians. ...Brigid    In Irish mythology, Boann or Boand (white cow) was the goddess of the river Boyne. ...Boann Delbáeth   In Irish mythology, Manannan mac Lir was a sea and weather god. ...Manannan | | | (   In Celtic mythology, Tuireann was the father of Creidhne, Luchtaine and Giobhniu by Brigid. ...Tuireann) | | ---------|--------- ----------------------|---------------------------------- | | | | | | | | | | | | | | Ernmas    In Irish mythology, Abhean was the harper of the Tuatha de Danaan. ...Abean MacCuill MacCecht MacGréine    In Irish mythology, Fiachna of the Tuatha Dé Danann was the son of Delbáeth. ...Fiachna    In Goidelic mythology, and especially Scotland, Brian was a bumbling fool who helped Cailleach rescue Dia Griene. ...Brian Iuchar Iucharba    In Irish mythology, Danu or Dana was the mother goddess of the Tuatha Dé Danann (peoples of the goddess Danu). ...Danu    In Irish mythology Goibniu or Goibhniu was the smith of the Tuatha Dé Danann. ...Goibniu    In Irish mythology, Creidhne (or Credne) was a son of Brigid and Tuireann. ...Credne   In Celtic mythology, Luchtaine (or Luchta) was a son of Brigid and Tuireann and a god of craftwork and smithing. ...Luchta Ollam |------------------ | | | | | Ériu =    In Irish mythology, Badb (crow) or in modern spelling Badhbh was a goddess of war who took the form of a crow, thus known as Badb Catha (battle crow). ...Badb |    In Irish mythology, Aoi Mac Ollamain or Ai is the god of poetry, and is one of the Tuatha De Danaan. ...Aoi    In Irish mythology, Banba, sometimes spelled Banbha, was the patron spirit of Ireland, wife of King MacCuill, and a goddess of war and fertility. ...Banba =     This article is about the goddess in Celtic mythology. ...Macha | Fódla = Mórrígan =    The Australian National University (ANU), is a university located in Canberra, the national capital of Australia. ...Anu 

Other members of the Tuatha Dé Danann include:

  • In Irish mythology, Abarta or Abartach (performer of feats) was one of the Tuatha De Danaan. ...Abarta
  • In Irish mythology, the goddess Beag was one of the Tuatha de Danaan. ...Beag
  • In Irish mythology, Bé Chuille, also known as Becuille and Bé Chuma, was a good witch and a member of the Tuatha de Danaan. ...Bechuille
  • In Irish mythology, the god Brea was one of the Tuatha de Danaan. ...Brea
  • In Irish mythology, Fand was Queen of the Fairies, and wife of Manannan. ...Fand

 
 

COMMENTARY     


Share your thoughts, questions and commentary here
Your name
Your comments

Want to know more?
Search encyclopedia, statistics and forums:

 


Press Releases |  Feeds | Contact
The Wikipedia article included on this page is licensed under the GFDL.
Images may be subject to relevant owners' copyright.
All other elements are (c) copyright NationMaster.com 2003-5. All Rights Reserved.
Usage implies agreement with terms, 1022, m