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Encyclopedia > Tuam
Tuam
Tuaim
Coat of arms of Tuam
Location
WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates:
53.5167° N 8.85° W
Irish Grid Reference
M436521
Statistics
Province: Connacht
County: County Galway
Elevation: 50 m
Population (2002)
 - Town:
 - Rural:
 
3,104 
2,843

Tuam (Irish: Tuaim) is a small town in County Galway in the Republic of Ireland. The name is pronounced choom (IPA: [tʃuəm]). It is situated west of the midlands of Ireland, and north of Galway city. Image File history File links Tuam_coat. ... Bullet for locations in Ireland, displays location and not area. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... The Global Positioning System (GPS) is currently the only fully functional Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS). ... The Irish national grid reference system is a system of geographic grid references commonly used in Ireland. ... During late Gaelic and early historic times Ireland was divided into provinces to replace the earlier system of the tuatha. ... Connaught redirects here. ... For much of its history, the island of Ireland was divided into 32 counties (Irish language contae or condae, pronounced IPA: ). Two historical counties, County Desmond and County Coleraine, no longer exist. ... Statistics Province: Connacht County Town: Galway Code: G (GY proposed) Area: 6,148 km² Population (2006) 231,035 (including Galway City); 159,052 (without Galway City) Website: www. ... Basic Definition In geography, the elevation of a geographic location is its height above mean sea level (or some other fixed point). ... Statistics Province: Connacht County Town: Galway Code: G (GY proposed) Area: 6,148 km² Population (2006) 231,035 (including Galway City); 159,052 (without Galway City) Website: www. ... Not to be confused with the NATO phonetic alphabet, which has also informally been called the “International Phonetic Alphabet”. For information on how to read IPA transcriptions of English words, see IPA chart for English. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 53. ...

Contents

History

The record of human settlement in Tuam dates back to the Bronze Age when the area was used as a burial ground and the name Tuam comes from the Latin term tumulus (burial mound). In the 19th century, a Bronze Age burial urn was discovered in the area. An early glass photograph of it, which would be used in what was described as "The Magic Lantern," an early form of a slide projector, is still in existence. The Bronze Age is a period in a civilizations development when the most advanced metalworking has developed the techniques of smelting copper from natural outcroppings and alloys it to cast bronze. ... Latin is an ancient Indo-European language originally spoken in Latium, the region immediately surrounding Rome. ... A tumulus (plural tumuli or tumuluses, from the Latin word for mound or small hill) is a mound of earth and stones raised over a grave or graves. ... Maya funerary urn For the computing term, see Uniform Resource Name. ... [carousel slide projector, the most common form of projector] A slide projector is an opto-mechanical device to view photographic slides. ...


The history of Tuam as a settlement dates from the early 6th century. Legend states that a monk called Jarlath, who was a member of a religious community at Cloonfush some four miles west of Tuam and adjacent to the religious settlement at Kilbannon. Saint Jarlath (c. ...


Jarlath's life became uncertain as he wished to travel. Eventually, Jarlath's abbot St. Benignus of Kilbannon told him to "Go, and where ever your chariot wheel breaks, there shall be the site of your new monastery and the place of your resurrection". Jarlath's wheel broke at Tuam and he established a monastery there. As was typical with early settlements in Ireland, religious sites became established first and towns grew around them. Likewise, Tuam grew up around the monastery as a town and kept the broken chariot wheel as its heraldic symbol. Heraldry in its most general sense encompasses all matters relating to the duties and responsibilities of officers of arms. ...


In the mid 11th century, Tuam grew in prominence when the O'Connor Kings of East Connacht established their headquarters in the town. Eventually, the O'Connors defeated the O'Flaherty chieftains of West Connacht and became Kings of all Connacht. The OConor Don (Irish: Ó Conchubhair Donn) is the hereditary chieftain of the traditional royal family of Connacht, one of the premier Irish Royal Families a lineage which is descended from the Kings of Connacht. ... Connaught redirects here. ... OFlaherty is a major Irish clan, originally called the Muintir Murchada, of which the name Ua Flaithbertaig became the name of its ruling dynasty. ... The Kings of Connacht were rulers of the cóiced (variously translated as portion, fifth, province) of Connacht, which lies west of the River Shannon, Ireland. ...


In 1111, Turlough O'Connor became High King of Ireland by force of arms and this brought Tuam its most prominent status as the centre of the seat of power in the 12th century. Turlough O'Connor, High King of Ireland from 1111-1156, was a great patron of the Irish Church and it was due to his patronage that Tuam became the home of some masterpieces of 12th century Celtic art. Tairrdelbach mac Ruaidri Ua Conchobair (1088-1156), whose name is often anglicised to Turlough O Connor, was King of Connacht and became the first High King of Ireland from west of the Shannon in centuries. ... This does not cite its references or sources. ...


Following the destruction of the first Cathedral in 1184, Rory O'Connor left Tuam and retired to the abbey at Cong where he entrusted the Church valuables from the Cathedral at Tuam into the care of the abbot. This left Tuam as a small, unimportant backwater and it wasn't until the early 17th century that it began to grow in importance again. Ruaidri Ua Conchobair (d. ...


In July 1920, the town hall and other properties were burned down by armed Royal Irish Constabulary men, after two had been killed in an ambush by the Irish Republican Army near the town the day before. The Royal Irish Constabulary (RIC) was one of Irelands two police forces in the early twentieth century, alongside the Dublin Metropolitan Police. ... The Seán Hogan Flying column during the War of Independence. ...


In 2003, Tuam councillor Martin Ward became Ireland's first Irish Traveller mayor. Irish Travellers (sometimes known as tinkers because they worked repairing tin ware) are a nomadic or itinerant people of Irish origin living in Ireland, Great Britain and the United States. ... A mayor (from the Latin māior, meaning larger, greater) is the modern title of the highest ranking municipal officer. ...


Tuam was recently shown on RTE with Des Bishop's program "Joy In The Hood"when he was doing a comedy workshop with the local Travellers


Transport

Tuam is served by the N17 road (Galway to Sligo) and the N83 road (to Ballyhaunis) as well as R332 and R347. The N17 is one of the major roads that connects Galway City with major towns in north west County Galway and Mayo. ... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 54. ... Ballyhaunis (Béal Átha hAmhnais in Irish) is a town in County Mayo, Ireland. ...


The town is located on the now disused railway line from Limerick to Sligo. There is a campaign (West-on-track) to have the line reopened as a Western Railway Corridor.A bypass is also planned. 1906 Viceregal Commission rail map of Ireland Irelands extensive rail network was largely dismantled during the 20th Century Map of Irish rail network between 1925 and 1930 This article is part of the history of rail transport by country series The history of rail transport in Ireland began only... WGS-84 (GPS) Coordinates: 52. ... Map of the West of Ireland, showing the Western Rail Corridor and ex-GSWR line south of Limerick in green, other ex-MGWR lines are in red. ...


Education

Tuam is the location of several educational institutions, including St. Patrick's College (formerly the Christian Brothers School) and St. Jarlath's College, although an amalgamation between these two schools is now planned. St. ...


Religion

Tuam has two cathedrals; St. Mary's Cathedral (Church of Ireland) and the Cathedral of the Assumption (Roman Catholic), seat of the Archdiocese of Tuam. Church of Ireland The Church of Ireland (Irish: Eaglais na hÉireann) is an autonomous province of the Anglican Communion, operating seamlessly across the border between the Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland. ... The Roman Catholic Church or Catholic Church (see terminology below) is the Christian Church in full communion with the Bishop of Rome, currently Pope Benedict XVI. It traces its origins to the original Christian community founded by Jesus Christ and led by the Twelve Apostles, in particular Saint Peter. ... The Archdiocese of Tuam is a Roman Catholic diocese in Ireland. ...


Sport

The town has a strong Gaelic Athletic Association tradition: St. Jarlath's College Tuam has won the Hogan Cup (National Championship for secondary schools) a record 12 times since the Games began in 1946. Tuam Stars, the local Gaelic Football team, are one of Galways best Football teams in history. From the period 1953-1960, Tuam Stars were the dominant force in the Galway County Championship winning 7 titles in a row, with players such as Seán Purcell and Frank Stockwell playing at the time. There are also two local soccer teams. Dynamo Blues, founded in 1978 and Tuam Celtic, founded in 1974. A stylised Celtic cross serves as the traditional logo of the GAA. The Gaelic Athletic Association (GAA) (Irish: Cumann Lúthchleas Gael) is an organisation which is mostly focussed on promoting Gaelic Games - traditional Irish sports, such as hurling, camogie, Gaelic football, handball, and rounders. ... St. ... The Hogan Cup is the cup presented to the winners of the Gaelic Football championship for secondary schools in Ireland. ... Seán Purcell (1929 - August 27, 2005), nicknamed The Master, was a famous Gaelic footballer for County Galway. ...


Tuam people

The Saw Doctors are a folk-rock band from Tuam, County Galway in the west of Ireland. ... The N17 is one of the major roads that connects Galway City with major towns in north west County Galway and Mayo. ... A directional road sign in the Republic of Ireland on an other road (not a national road) at Portlaoise, County Laois, including patches for national roads and advance warning of bridge height restrictions. ... Richard William Dick Dowling (1838 – 1867) was the victorious commander at the battle of Sabine Pass in the American Civil War and is considered Houston, Texass first prominent citizen and hero. ... This article needs to be cleaned up to conform to a higher standard of quality. ... John MacHale (1791-1881), Irish divine, was born on the 6th of March 1791 at Tubbernavine, near Lahardane, Mayo. ... Seán Purcell (1929 - August 27, 2005), nicknamed The Master, was a famous Gaelic footballer for County Galway. ... Tom Murphy (born 1935) is an Irish dramatist who has worked closely with the Abbey Theatre. ... John Lydon John Joseph Lydon (born January 31, 1956), also known as Johnny Rotten (a nickname derived from the state of his teeth) was the iconoclastic lead singer of the Sex Pistols and Public Image Ltd (PiL) and an Irish individualist anarchist. ... Finian McGrath is an Irish Independent politician. ... Paddy McHugh (born 1953) is an Irish Independent politician. ... Blaze X (1979-1981) were a Powerpop/punk band from Tuam, Co. ...

Twinning

The following places are twinned with Tuam: For the 1997 film, see Twin Town Sign denoting twin towns of Neckarsulm, Germany Town twinning is a concept whereby towns or cities in geographically and politically distinct areas are paired with the goal of fostering human contact and cultural links. ...

Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... Straubing is an independent city in Niederbayern. ...

Trivia

  • The people of Tuam claim it is the smallest city in the world based on the presence of a cathedral, one of the original definitions of what constitutes a city. However, despite Tuam's two cathedrals, it is officially a town. Moreover, the city of St. David's in Wales has a smaller population and is officially a city.

The city of Chicago, as seen from the sky A city is an urban area that is differentiated from a town, village, or hamlet by size, population density, importance, or legal status. ... A cathedral is a religious building for worship, specifically of a denomination with an episcopal hierarchy, such as the Roman Catholic, Anglican and some Lutheran churches, which serves as a bishops seat, and thus as the central church of a diocese. ... Ronda, Spain Main street in Bastrop, Texas, a small town A town is a community of people ranging from a few hundred to several thousands, although it may be applied loosely even to huge metropolitan areas. ... St Davids ( Welsh: Tŷddewi) is the smallest city in the United Kingdom, with a population of under 2,000 people. ...

See also

The Archdiocese of Tuam is a Roman Catholic diocese in Ireland. ... Newspaper, founded in 1837, serving mainly the north County Galway region in the west of Ireland. ... This is a link page for cities and towns in the Republic of Ireland, including larger villages, and villages and townlands of note, as well as towns, townships or urban centres in Dublin. ...

External links

  • Tuam – Old Cathedral City
  • Tuam's Traveller Mayor
  • The Tuam Guide
  • www.tuam.pl -> Polsko-Angielski portal dla 'Ciumowiczan - //The Polish-English portal for Tuam society//

  Results from FactBites:
 
CATHOLIC ENCYCLOPEDIA: Tuam (3011 words)
Tuam still retaining eight parishes to the east of the lake.
Tuam, founded in 1189 by King Crovedearg, was one of the largest and the wealthiest in the West of Ireland.
Tuam under the presidency of the Roman cardinal.
Tuam - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (449 words)
Tuam (Tuaim in Irish) is a small town in County Galway in the Republic of Ireland.
It is situated west of the midlands of Ireland, and north of Galway city.
Tuam is the location of several educational institutions, including St. Patrick's College (formerly the Christian Brothers School) and St Jarlath's College, although an amalgamation between these two schools is now planned.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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