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Encyclopedia > Trysail

A small fore-and-aft sail hoisted abaft the foremast and mainmast in a storm to keep a ship's bow to the wind. The mast of a sailing ship is a tall vertical pole which supports the sails. ... The mast of a sailing ship is a tall vertical pole which supports the sails. ...


Links

  • Sailing Under the Storm (http://www.sailnet.com/collections/articles/index.cfm?articleid=davisd0019)

Sails spars and rigging



  Results from FactBites:
 
UK's Encyclopedia of Sails -- Index (265 words)
The storm trysail and storm jib must be made out of strong dacron.
Storm Trysail: A short triangular sail that is attached to back of the mast and is sheeted to the deck.
The ORC states, “It shall be sheeted independently of the boom and shall have neither a headboard nor battens and be of suitable strength for the purpose.” If you ever plan to set a storm trysail, it is best to have a separate track on the mast for the sail.
Excerpt from Maximum Sail Power (3790 words)
These generally consist of a trysail, i.e., a kind of mini-mainsail bent on the mast after the regular main has been lashed to the boom, and a storm jib, a tiny scrap of sail flown either from the forestay or an inner forestay in place of a standard jib.
Virtually all rating rules call for a storm trysail to have a maximum area no larger than the result of the formula: 0.175 x P (mainsail luff) x E (mainsail foot), with a hollowed-out leech and foot, the area will be roughly 25 to 30 percent that of the mainsail.
Once the trysail is attached to the mast, it is hoisted with a short pennant at the tack.
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