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Encyclopedia > Trustworthiness

Trustworthiness is a moral value considered to be a virtue. A trustworthy person is someone in whom we can place our trust and rest assured that the trust will not be betrayed. Personification of virtue (Greek ἀρετή) in Celsus Library in Ephesos, Turkey Virtue (Latin virtus; Greek ) is moral excellence of a person. ... For other uses, see Trust. ...


A person can prove his trustworthiness by fulfilling an assigned responsibility - and as an extension of that, to not let down our expectations. The responsibility can be either material, such as delivering a mail package on time, or it can be a non-material such as keeping an important secret to himself.


In order for one to trust another, their worth and integrity must be constantly proven over time. Look up integrity in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


See also

Look up Trustworthiness in
Wiktionary, the free dictionary.

  Results from FactBites:
 
Trustworthy Computing - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (1416 words)
More recently, Microsoft has adopted the term Trustworthy Computing as the title of a company initiative to improve public trust in its own commercial offerings.
In large part, it is intended to address the concerns about the security and reliability of previous Microsoft Windows releases and, in part, to address general concerns about privacy and business practices.
This workshop assessed the challenges involved in developing trustworthy critical computer systems and recommended the use of formal methods as a solution.
TTNet, the Trustworthy Technologists Network (3830 words)
These trustworthy Netizans are willing to risk their own reputations by validating the reputation of the associated trustworthy Netizans.
These trustworthy Netizans who are willing to risk their own reputations by validating the reputation of the associated trustworthy Netizans.
For instance, when the elected leaders of a large, wealthy and prosperous entity take things of value from other than the members of that entity, they damage their reputations for living up to their employment agreements that define the relationship between them and the citizens of that entity that employ them to be their leaders.
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