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Encyclopedia > Truro
Truro
Cornish: Truru


Truro Cathedral from St Mary's Street Truro is the name of several places: Truro, Nova Scotia, Canada Truro, Cornwall, UK Truro, Massachusetts, USA Truro, Iowa, USA City of Truro is the name of a Great Western Railway locomotive, and is claimed to be the first steam locomotive to have exceeded 100mph. ... For the Cornish-English dialect, see West Country dialects. ... Image File history File links Size of this preview: 446 × 599 pixelsFull resolution (529 × 711 pixel, file size: 217 KB, MIME type: image/jpeg) File history Legend: (cur) = this is the current file, (del) = delete this old version, (rev) = revert to this old version. ...


Truro shown within Cornwall
Population 20,920 (2001 Census)
OS grid reference SW825448
 - London 232 miles (373 km) ENE
Parish Truro
District Carrick
Shire county Cornwall
Region South West
Constituent country England
Sovereign state United Kingdom
Post town TRURO
Postcode district TR1-4
Dialling code 01872
Police Devon and Cornwall
Fire Cornwall
Ambulance South Western
European Parliament South West England
UK Parliament Truro and St Austell
Website: http://www.truro.gov.uk
List of places: UKEnglandCornwall

Coordinates: 50°15′36″N 5°03′04″W / 50.26, -5.051 Image File history File links Size of this preview: 758 × 600 pixelsFull resolution (1351 × 1069 pixel, file size: 97 KB, MIME type: image/png) An outline map of Cornwall for use within templates on Wikipedia. ... Image File history File links Red_pog2. ... For other uses, see Cornwall (disambiguation). ... UK Census 2001 logo A nationwide census, commonly known as Census 2001, was conducted in the United Kingdom on Sunday 29 April 2001. ... The British national grid reference system is a system of geographic grid references commonly used in Great Britain, different from using latitude or longitude. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... “Miles” redirects here. ... “km” redirects here. ... A modern compass card. ... A civil parish (usually just parish) in England is a subnational entity forming the lowest unit of local government, lower than districts or counties. ... The districts of England are a level of subnational division of England used for the purposes of local government. ... Carrick is a local government district in Cornwall, United Kingdom. ... Metropolitan and non-metropolitan counties are one of the four levels of English administrative division used for the purposes of local government. ... For other uses, see Cornwall (disambiguation). ... The region, also known as Government Office Region, is currently the highest tier of local government subnational entity of England in the United Kingdom. ... This article is about the region. ... // Constituent country is a phrase used, often by official institutions, in contexts in which a historical, currently non-legally officially recognised country makes up a part of a larger entity or grouping. ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... This list of sovereign states, alphabetically arranged, gives an overview of states around the world with information on the extent of their sovereignty. ... A post town is a required part of all UK postal addresses. ... UK postal codes are known as postcodes. ... The TR postcode area, also known as the Truro postcode area[2], is a group of postal districts around Camborne, Falmouth, Hayle, Helston, Isles of Scilly, Marazion, Newquay, Penryn, Penzance, Perranporth, Redruth, St Agnes, St Columb, St Ives and Truro in Cornwall, England. ... +44 redirects here. ... There are a number of policing agencies in the United Kingdom. ... Devon and Cornwall Constabulary is the Home Office police force responsible for policing the counties of Devon and Cornwall and the unitary authorities of Plymouth, Torbay and the Isles of Scilly. ... A Fire Appliance belonging to the Greater Manchester Fire and Rescue Service The fire service in the United Kingdom has undergone dramatic changes since the beginning of the 21st century, a process that has been propelled by a devolution of central government powers, new legislation and a change to operational... Fire Service Headquarters County Hall Truro Cornwall TR1 3AY cheif officer M A Howell Image:Cornwall fire link-1-.gif ... The South Western Ambulance Service NHS Trust (SWAST) is the authority responsible for providing NHS ambulance services in the counties of Devon, Cornwall, Somerset and Dorset. ... This is a list of Members of the European Parliament for the United Kingdom in the 2004 to 2009 session, ordered by name. ... The constituency (first used 2004) within England; Gibraltar is in the inset. ... The United Kingdom House of Commons is made up of Members of Parliament (MPs). ... Creation 1295 MP Matthew Taylor Party Liberal Democrat Type House of Commons County Cornwall EP constituency South West England Truro and St Austell is a constituency represented in the House of Commons of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. ... List of cities in the United Kingdom List of towns in England Lists of places within counties List of places in Bedfordshire List of places in Berkshire List of places in Buckinghamshire List of places in Cambridgeshire List of places in Cheshire List of places in Cleveland List of places... This is a list of all the towns and villages in the county of Cornwall, United Kingdom. ... Map of Earth showing lines of latitude (horizontally) and longitude (vertically), Eckert VI projection; large version (pdf, 1. ...


Truro (pronounced /ˈtruːrəʊ/; Cornish: Truru) is a city in Cornwall, England, United Kingdom. It is the administrative centre and only city within the county, and the most southerly city in Great Britain. For the Cornish-English dialect, see West Country dialects. ... Cathedral city redirects here. ... For other uses, see Cornwall (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ... The traditional counties as usually portrayed. ...


The city grew to be an important centre of trade thanks firstly to its port, but later because of its role as a stannary town for the mining industry. Today, Truro is the centre for administration, leisure and retail in Cornwall and has a population of 20,920.[1] A stannary town is, historically, the adminstrative centre of a tin-mining district, from where the sale and export of the mined tin was arranged. ...


The city is well-known for its cathedral (completed in 1910), as well as its cobbled streets, open spaces and many examples of Georgian architecture. It is also the location of the Royal Cornwall Museum, the Hall for Cornwall, Cornwall's Courts of Justice and Cornwall County Council. Truro Cathedral is a cathedral in the city of Truro in Cornwall in south-west England. ... A Georgian house in Salisbury For the unrelated architecture of the country Georgia, see Architecture of Georgia (country). ... The Royal Cornwall Museum in the city of Truro in the United Kingdom is the oldest museum in Cornwall and the leading museum of Cornish culture. ... The Hall for Cornwall is a major venue in Cornwall having one large main auditorium which places host to west end musicals, opera, ballet, entertainers and music acts. ... Her Majestys High Court of Justice (usually known more simply as the High Court) is, together with the Crown Court and the Court of Appeal, part of the Supreme Court of Judicature of England and Wales (which under the Constitutional Reform Act 2005, is to be known as the... In the British Isles, a county council is a council that governs a county. ...

Contents

Etymology

The origin of Truro's name is the source of some debate. It is often said to be derived from the Cornish tri-veru meaning "three rivers", but certain reference works such as the Oxford and Cambridge Dictionaries of English Place Names do not accept this theory. At best, the Tru- part could mean "three", but even this is doubtful. The chief expert on Cornish place-names, Oliver Padel, in his book A popular dictionary of Cornish place-names said the `three rivers' meaning is "not possible" [2] For the Cornish-English dialect, see West Country dialects. ...


History

The earliest records and archaeological findings of a permanent settlement in the Truro area originate from Norman times. A castle was built in the 12th century by Richard de Luci, Chief Justice of England in the reign of Henry II, who was granted land in Cornwall for his services to the court, including the area surrounding the confluence of the two rivers. He planted the town in the shadow of the castle and awarded it borough status to further economic activity. (The castle has long since disappeared). Norman conquests in red. ... For other uses, see Castle (disambiguation). ... Richard de Luci was first noted as Sheriff of the County of Essex. ... Henry II of England (called Curtmantle; 25 March 1133 – 6 July 1189) ruled as King of England (1154–1189), Count of Anjou, Duke of Normandy, Duke of Aquitaine, Duke of Gascony, Count of Nantes, Lord of Ireland and, at various times, controlled parts of Wales, Scotland and western France. ...


By the start of the 14th century Truro was an important port, thanks firstly to its inland location away from invaders and its prosperity from the fishing industry, but also to its new role as one of Cornwall's stannary towns for the official assaying and stamping of locally-produced tin and copper in Cornish mines. However, the Black Death soon arrived and with it, a trade recession, resulting in a mass exodus of the population and, as such the town was left in a very neglected state. A stannary town is, historically, the adminstrative centre of a tin-mining district, from where the sale and export of the mined tin was arranged. ... This article is about the metallic chemical element. ... For other uses, see Copper (disambiguation). ... This article concerns the mid fourteenth century pandemic. ... In macroeconomics, a recession is a decline in a countrys real gross domestic product (GDP), or negative real economic growth, for two or more successive quarters of a year. ...


Trade returned to Truro with help from the government and the town was very prosperous during the Tudor period. Self-governance was awarded in 1589 by the granting of a new charter by Elizabeth I, which gave Truro an elected mayor and control over the port of Falmouth. The Tudor dynasty or House of Tudor (Welsh Twdwr) is a series of five monarchs of Welsh origin who ruled England from 1485 until 1603. ... Elizabeth I (7 September 1533 – 24 March 1603 ) was Queen of England and Queen of Ireland from 17 November 1558 until her death. ... Falmouth (Cornish: Aberfal) is a seaport on the River Fal on the south coast of Cornwall, England, UK. It is both a town and a civil parish. ...


During the Civil War in the 17th century, Truro raised a sizable force to fight for the King and a royalist mint was set up in the town. However, defeat to the Parliamentary troops came in 1646 and the mint was moved to Exeter. Further disheartenment came later in the century when Falmouth was awarded its own charter giving it rights to its harbour, starting a long rivalry between the two towns. The dispute was eventually settled in 1709 with control of the River Fal being divided between Truro and Falmouth. For other uses, see English Civil War (disambiguation). ... The city of Exeter is the county town of Devon, in the southwest of England, also known as the West Country. ... The River Fal flows through Cornwall, the United Kingdom, rising near Truro and reaching the English Channel at Falmouth. ...

A historic image of Boscawen Street

Truro prospered greatly during the 18th and 19th centuries. Industry flourished thanks to improved mining methods and higher prices for tin, and the town soon became the place to be for wealthy mine owners. Elegant Georgian and Victorian townhouses were built—such as those seen today on Lemon Street, named after the mining magnate and local MP Sir William Lemon—and Truro became the centre for high society in the county, being mentioned as "the London of Cornwall".[3] Image File history File links Truro_historic. ... Image File history File links Truro_historic. ... Manchester Town Hall is an example of Victorian architecture found in Manchester, UK. The Carson Mansion is an example of a Victorian home in Eureka, California, USA The term Victorian architecture can refer to one of a number of architectural styles predominantly in the Victorian era. ... Leinster House Henrietta Street In the United Kingdom, Ireland and in some other countries, a townhouse was a residence of a peer or member of the aristocracy in the capital or major city. ... A Member of Parliament, or MP, is a representative elected by the voters to a parliament. ...

The Cathedral in 1905, before completion of the spires
The Cathedral in 1905, before completion of the spires

Throughout these prosperous times Truro remained a social centre and many notable people hailed from it. One of the most noteworthy residents was Richard Lander, an explorer who discovered the source of the River Niger in Africa and was awarded the first gold medal of the Royal Geographical Society. Others include Humphry Davy, educated in Truro and inventor of the miner's safety lamp, and Samuel Foote, an actor and playwright from Boscawen Street. Image File history File links Truro_Cathedral_in_1905,_before_completion_of_its_spire. ... Image File history File links Truro_Cathedral_in_1905,_before_completion_of_its_spire. ... Richard Lemon Lander Richard Lemon Lander (February 8, 1804 - February 6, 1834), English explorer of the African continent. ... See also explorations, sea explorers, astronaut, conquistador, travelogue, the History of Science and Technology and Biography. ... The Niger River is the principal river of western Africa, extending over 2500 miles (about 4000 km). ... The Royal Geographical Society is a British learned society founded in 1830 with the name Geographical Society of London for the advancement of geographical science, under the patronage of King William IV. It absorbed the Association for Promoting the Discovery of the Interior Parts of Africa (founded by Sir Joseph... Sir Humphry Davy, 1st Baronet FRS (17 December 1778 – 29 May 1829) was a British chemist and physicist. ... Davy lamp The Davy lamp is a candle containing safety lamp devised in 1815 by Humphry Davy. ... For other people named Samuel Foote, see Samuel Foote (disambiguation) Samuel Foote (January 27, 1720 – October 21, 1777), a Cornish dramatist and actor, was baptized at Truro on January 27, 1720. ...


Truro's importance increased later in the 19th century and it had its own iron smelting works, potteries, and tanneries. The Great Western Railway arrived in Truro in the 1860s with a direct line from London Paddington, and the Bishopric of Truro bill was passed in 1876 which gave the town a bishop, then a cathedral. The next year Queen Victoria granted Truro city status. Pottery on display in Dilli Haat, Delhi, India. ... This article is about making hides into leather. ... The original Bristol Temple Meads station, first terminus of the GWR, is the building to the left of this picture The Great Western Railway (GWR) was a British railway company, linking South West England, the West Country and South Wales with London. ... Paddington station or London Paddington is the name of a major railway station in the Paddington area of London, which is the London terminus for long distance trains to the West of England and South Wales and some West London commuter services. ... Topics in Christianity Movements · Denominations · Other religions Ecumenism · Preaching · Prayer Music · Liturgy · Calendar Symbols · Art · Criticism Important figures Apostle Paul · Church Fathers Constantine · Athanasius · Augustine Anselm · Aquinas · Palamas · Luther Calvin · Wesley Arius · Marcion of Sinope Archbishop of Canterbury · Catholic Pope Coptic Pope · Ecumenical Patriarch Christianity Portal This box:      This article... Victoria Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Ireland, Empress of India Victoria (Alexandrina Victoria) (24 May 1819–22 January 1901) was a Queen of the United Kingdom, reigning from 20 June 1837 until her death. ...


The start of the 20th century saw the decline of the mining industry, however the city remained prosperous as its previous role as a market town shifted to being the administrative and commercial centre of Cornwall, and saw substantial development. Today, Truro continues its role as the retail centre of Cornwall but, like many other cities, faces concerns over the disappearance of many of its renowned speciality shops for national chain stores, the eroding of its identity, and also over how to accommodate future expected growth in the 21st century. Specialty stores are small stores which specialise in a specific range of merchandise and related items. ... Chain stores are a range of retail outlets which share a brand and central management, usually with standardised business methods and practices. ...


Geography

The Truro River and one of the Enterprise Boats fleet transporting passengers to Falmouth
The Truro River and one of the Enterprise Boats fleet transporting passengers to Falmouth

Truro is located in the centre of Cornwall approximately 9 miles (14 km) from the south coast on the confluence of the rivers Kenwyn and Allen, which both combine to become the River Truro, one of a series of creeks, rivers and drowned valleys leading into the River Fal and then onto the large natural harbour of Carrick Roads. The river valleys form a bowl surrounding the city on the north, east and west and open to the Truro River in the south. The fairly steep-sided bowl in which Truro is located, along with high precipitation swelling the rivers and a spring tide in the River Fal, were major factors in the cause of floods seen in 1988 which caused large amounts of damage to the city centre. Since then, flood defences have been constructed around the city, including an emergency dam at New Mill on the River Kenwyn and a tidal barrier on the Truro River, to prevent future problems. Falmouth (Cornish: Aberfal) is a seaport on the River Fal on the south coast of Cornwall, England, UK. It is both a town and a civil parish. ... A kilometer (Commonwealth spelling: kilometre), symbol: km is a unit of length in the metric system equal to 1,000 metres (from the Greek words χίλια (khilia) = thousand and μέτρο (metro) = count/measure). ... Kenwyn civil parish and village in the Carrick district of Cornwall, in the United Kingdom. ... River Allen is a river in the county of Dorset Categories: UK geography stubs | Rivers in Dorset ... The Truro River is a river near to the city of Truro in Cornwall. ... Georges River, in the southern suburbs of Sydney (Australia) is a ria, or drowned river valley. ... The River Fal flows through Cornwall, the United Kingdom, rising near Truro and reaching the English Channel at Falmouth. ... Carrick Roads is located on the southern Cornish coast in the UK, near Falmouth. ... The tide is the regular rising and falling of the oceans surface caused by changes in gravitational forces external to the Earth. ... Flooding near Key West, Florida, United States from Hurricane Wilmas storm surge in October 2005 For other uses, see Flood (disambiguation). ... This article is about structures for water impoundment. ... Tokyo floodgates to protect from typhoon surges. ...


The city is surrounded by a number of protected natural areas such as the historic parklands at Pencalenick, and larger areas of ornamental landscape, such as Trelissick Garden and Tregothnan further down the Truro River. An area south-east of the city, around and including Calenick Creek, has been designated an Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty. Other protected areas include an Area of Great Landscape Value comprising agricultural land and wooded valleys to the north east, and Daubuz Moors, a Local Nature Reserve located alongside the River Allen close to the city centre. Trelissick manor Trelissick Garden is a garden in the ownership of the National Trust and situated in Feock, near Truro, Cornwall, England. ... The Tregothnan Estate, located near Truro in Cornwall, England, is the traditional home of the Boscawen family, and the seat of Lord Falmouth. ... An Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty (AONB) is an area of countryside with significant landscape value in England, Wales or Northern Ireland, that has been specially designated by the Countryside Agency on behalf of the United Kingdom government; the Countryside Council for Wales on behalf of the Welsh Assembly Government... A Local Nature Reserve or LNR is a statutory designation in England made under Section 21 of the National Parks and Access to the Countryside Act 1949 by principal local authorities. ...


Truro has mainly grown and developed around the historic city centre in a nucleated fashion along the slopes of the bowl valley, with an exception being fast linear development along the A390 to the west, towards Threemilestone. As Truro has grown, it—like any other city—has incorporated a number of settlements, turning them into suburbs or unofficial districts. These include Kenwyn and Moresk to the north, Trelander to the east, Newham to the south, and Highertown, Treliske and Gloweth to the west as a result of the far stretching development in that area. The eukaryotic cell nucleus. ... For other uses, see Linear (disambiguation). ... Threemilestone is a small village in the civil parish of Kenwyn, located precisely three miles west of Truro, the only city in Cornwall. ... Kenwyn civil parish and village in the Carrick district of Cornwall, in the United Kingdom. ...


Culture

The west face of the Cathedral
The west face of the Cathedral

Attractions

Truro's most recognisable feature is its gothic-revival Cathedral, rising 76 m (250 ft) above the city at its highest spire.[4] It took 30 years to build, from 1880 to 1910, and was built on the site of the old St. Mary's Church, consecrated over 600 years earlier. Enthusiasts of Georgian architecture are well catered for in the city, with terraces and townhouses along Walsingham Place and Lemon Street often said to be "the finest examples of Georgian architecture west of the city of Bath".[5] Victoria Tower at the Palace of Westminster, London: Gothic details provided by A.W.N. Pugin The Gothic revival was a European architectural movement with origins in mid-18th century England. ... Truro Cathedral is a cathedral in the city of Truro in Cornwall in south-west England. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... A Georgian house in Salisbury For the unrelated architecture of the country Georgia, see Architecture of Georgia (country). ... , Bath is a small city in Somerset, England most famous for its historic baths fed by three hot springs. ...


The main attraction for local residents in the region is the wide variety of shops. Truro has a vast selection of chain stores, speciality shops and markets, which reflect its historic tradition as a market town. The indoor Pannier Market is open year-round with many stalls and small businesses. The city is also popular for its eateries, including cafés and bistros. Additionally, it has emerged as a popular destination for nightlife with many bars, clubs and restaurants opening. Truro is also known for the Hall for Cornwall, a performing arts and entertainment venue. Chain stores are a range of retail outlets which share a brand and central management, usually with standardised business methods and practices. ... Specialty stores are small stores which specialise in a specific range of merchandise and related items. ... Chichicastenango, Guatemala traditional market Market stall in internally displaced persons camp in Kitgum, northern Uganda Mercado dos Lavradores, Funchal (Madeira Islands) A market is a mechanism which allows people to trade, normally governed by the theory of supply and demand. ... The market town is a medieval phenomenon. ... Nightlife is the collective term for any entertainment that is available and more popular from the late evening into the early hours of the morning. ... The Hall for Cornwall is a major venue in Cornwall having one large main auditorium which places host to west end musicals, opera, ballet, entertainers and music acts. ...


The Royal Cornwall Museum is the oldest and premier museum in Cornwall for exhibitions detailing Cornish history and culture, with a wide range of collections such as archaeology, art and geology. Truro is also noted for its parks and open spaces, including Victoria Gardens, Boscawen Park and Daubuz Moors. The Royal Cornwall Museum in the city of Truro in the United Kingdom is the oldest museum in Cornwall and the leading museum of Cornish culture. ... The history of Cornwall begins with the pre-Roman inhabitants, including speakers of a Celtic language that would develop into Brythonic and Cornish. ... Cornwall, in the United Kingdom, though administratively part of England, has many cultural differences from the culture of England. ... For referencing in Wikipedia, see Wikipedia:Citing sources. ... This article is about the philosophical concept of Art. ... This article includes a list of works cited but its sources remain unclear because it lacks in-text citations. ...


Events

Lemon Quay
Lemon Quay

The piazza at Lemon Quay is the centre of most festivities in Truro, which attracts visitors year-round with numerous different events.


In April, Truro prepares to partake in the Britain in Bloom competition, with many floral displays and hanging baskets dotted around the city throughout the summer. A "continental market" also comes to Truro during the season and features food and craft stalls from all over Europe including France, Spain, Italy, Germany, Belgium, the Netherlands and Greece. Britain in Bloom is a horticultural competition in the United Kingdom. ... For other uses, see Europe (disambiguation). ...


The Truro City Carnival takes place every September over a weekend, including various arts and music performances, children's activities, a fireworks display, food and drinks fairs, a circus, and a parade. A half-marathon also takes place in September, with hundreds of participants running from the city centre into the countryside towards Shortlanesend, and returning to finish at Lemon Quay. For other uses, see Fireworks (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Circus (disambiguation). ... Fun runners taking part in the Bristol Half Marathon A half marathon is a road running event of 13. ... Shortlanesend is a village in Cornwall, United Kingdom. ...


Truro celebrates the Christmas season with its Winter Festival, which includes a paper lantern parade known as the City of Lights Procession, Christmas lights throughout the city centre as well a "big switch-on" event, speciality products and crafts fairs, late-night shopping evenings, various events at the Cathedral and a fireworks display on New Year's Eve. A Christmas tree is put up on the Piazza, and another outside the Cathedral at High Cross. One notable Christmas celebration was the Winter Festival of 2006, which, after a badly executed fundraising operation left the city with underwhelming decorations the year before, featured extensive festivities and decoration including an artificial ski slope constructed on Lemon Quay, resulting in a much more successful festival. For other uses, see Christmas (disambiguation). ... Paper Lanterns Paper lanterns come in various shapes and sizes, as well as various methods of construction. ... For other articles with similar names, see New Year (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see Christmas tree (disambiguation). ... Dry ski slopes are an attempt to mimic the attributes of snow using materials that are usable at normal summer temperatures. ...

A Celtic cross near the Cathedral
A Celtic cross near the Cathedral

There was some controversy in February 2007 surrounding an event planned for Truro celebrating the patron saint of England, St George. The Celtic League opposed the plans by the English Democrats party, claiming that Truro is a Cornish rather than an English city.[6] For the band, see Celtic Cross (band). ... The flag of Cornwall (Kernow) The constitutional status of Cornwall, in the southwest of United Kingdom is the subject of ongoing debate. ... For alternate uses, see Saint George (disambiguation) Saint George on horseback rides alongside a wounded dragon being led by a princess, late 19th century engraving. ... The Celtic League can refer to either: A league of professional Rugby Union clubs involving teams from Ireland, Scotland and Wales. ... The English Democrats Party, previously the English National Party, is a political party in England, which seeks the establishment of a new Parliament for England with at least the same powers as those granted to the Scottish Parliament. ... For other uses, see Cornwall (disambiguation). ... For other uses, see England (disambiguation). ...


It has also been announced that Cornwall's first Pride will be held in the city of Truro on Saturday 23rd August. This year's Cornwall Pride will have a theatrical theme. After the parade in the afternoon, there will be an event in Truro itself and then more entertainment in the evening. Chairman of Cornwall Pride, Christian Diamant, said: "At its most basic what Cornwall Pride is celebrating is the fact that Cornwall is a better place because not everyone is white, not everyone is straight and that Cornwall would be a worse place, if we were all the same,"


Sports

Truro was the new home to the National Division One rugby club, the Cornish Pirates, after a move from Penzance; however the team is currently relocated at Camborne while discussions about the construction of a new stadium are being made, currently planned for Threemilestone.[7] The city is also home to Truro City F.C., a football team in the Western Football League Premier Division and was recently gained promotion to Southern Football League Division One South & West, the only Cornish club ever to do so.. The Club achieved national recognition when they won the FA Vase in 2007, beating A.F.C. Totton 3-1 in only the second ever final at the new Wembley Stadium, and becoming the first Cornish side ever to win the FA Vase. Other sporting amenities include a leisure centre, golf course, cricket pitch, and tennis courts. National League One is the second tier of the English rugby union leagues. ... The Cornish Pirates are a professional rugby union team who play in National Division One, and are the premier Cornish rugby club. ... Penzance Harbour and surrounding area as seen from the air Penzance (Cornish: Pensans) is a civil parish and port town in the Penwith district of Cornwall, England, UK. Granted various Royal Charters from 1512 onwards and incorporated in 1614,[2] it has a population of 21,168[1] people and... , Not to be confused with Cambourne in Cambridgeshire. ... This article is about the building type. ... Threemilestone is a small village in the civil parish of Kenwyn, located precisely three miles west of Truro, the only city in Cornwall. ... Truro City F.C. are a football club based in Truro, Cornwall, England, United Kingdom. ... Soccer redirects here. ... It has been suggested that this article or section be merged with Western Football League. ... The Southern Football League Division One South & West is a football division covering southern and western England. ... The Football Association Challenge Vase is an annual football competition for teams playing in the lower regional leagues of England. ... A.F.C. Totton is a football club based in Totton, England. ... For the old stadium, see Wembley Stadium (1923). ... A Leisure Centre in the UK is a site, usually owned and operated by the county council, where people go to keep fit or relax. ... This article is about the game. ... This article is about the sport. ... For other uses, see Tennis (disambiguation). ...


Media

Truro is the centre of Cornwall's local media. The county-wide weekly newspaper—The West Briton—is based in the city and serves the Truro area with its Truro and Mid-Cornwall edition. The city is also home to the broadcasting studios of the county-wide radio station BBC Radio Cornwall, and the studios of the West district of ITV News's regional programme serving the south-west, Westcountry Live. The West Briton is a local weekly newspaper serving different areas of Cornwall, United Kingdom with four separate editions—Truro and Mid-Cornwall, Falmouth and Penryn, Redruth Camborne and Hayle, and Helston and The Lizard. ... BBC Radio Cornwall is the BBC Local Radio service for the English county of Cornwall. ... ITV News is the name of the news broadcasts on British TV network ITV. It has one of the largest television audiences for news in the UK. It is produced by Independent Television News (ITN), and was more commonly known simply as ITN until 1999. ... Westcountry Live is the flagship regional news programme for ITV region Westcountry. ...


Demographics and Economy

Sunday morning on Pydar Street
Sunday morning on Pydar Street

Truro's popularity within Cornwall as the number one destination for retail and leisure, and its role as the administrative centre of the county, is unusual compared to other cities in the country given that it is the fourth most populous settlement in Cornwall.[1] Furthermore, population growth has been slow compared to other Cornish towns and Cornwall as a whole, at 10.5% during the 1971–1998 period.


There are approximately 22,000 jobs available in Truro; major employers in the city include the Royal Cornwall Hospital, Cornwall County Council, Carrick District Council and Truro College. The large number of jobs is a stark difference to the number of economically active people living in the city, at 9,500. This results in a large amount of commuting which is a major factor in the traffic congestion problems that Truro suffers from. Earnings on average are higher than the rest of Cornwall. The Royal Cornwall Hospital (Treliske), is a medium-sized teaching hospital situated in Treliske on the outskirts of Truro, Cornwall. ... Motto: Onan hag oll (Cornish: One and all) Cornwall, England Geography Status Ceremonial and (smaller) Non-metropolitan county Region South West England Area - Total - Admin. ... Truro College is located in Truro, Cornwall, in the South West of England. ... Commuters on the New York City Subway during rush hour Rush hour at Shinjuku Station, Yamanote Line Traffic jam Commuting is the process of travelling between a place of residence and a place of work. ...


Housing prices in Truro are at an all-time high, also being 8% more expensive than the rest of Cornwall. Truro was named in 2006 as the top small city in the United Kingdom for increasing house prices, at 262% since 1996.[8] There is a large demand for new housing in the city, and a call for inner city properties to be converted into flats or houses to encourage city centre living and to alleviate the dependence on cars.


Administration

Truro City Council, a parish council, is situated within City Hall, and is responsible for parks, gardens and planting, mayoral and civic events, support of its overseas twinning, tourist information, and the liaising with Carrick District Council and Cornwall County Council over planning, infrastructure, development and environmental issues, over which the district and county councils administer. The city is divided into four wards - Boscawen, Moresk, Tregolls and Trehaverne, with 24 councillors elected for four-year terms.[9] The current mayor is Pat Young. A civil parish (usually just parish) in England is a subnational entity forming the lowest unit of local government, lower than districts or counties. ... This article is about partnerships between towns distant from each other; see Twin cities for the different concept of physically neighbouring cities. ... A visitor center (or visitor centre) may be: A tourist information center, where visitors to a location can get information on the areas attractions, lodgings, maps, and other items relevant to tourism. ... Motto: Onan hag oll (Cornish: One and all) Cornwall, England Geography Status Ceremonial and (smaller) Non-metropolitan county Region South West England Area - Total - Admin. ... A ward is an electoral district used in local politics, most notably in England, Scotland, and Wales, as well as Australia, Canada, the Republic of Ireland, New Zealand, South Africa and many cities in the United States and the federal district of Washington, DC. Wards are usually named after neighbourhoods... A councillor is a member of a council (such as a city council), particularly in the U.K. and its former colonies. ...


Twinning

Truro is twinned with: This article is about partnerships between towns distant from each other; see Twin cities for the different concept of physically neighbouring cities. ...

Image File history File links Flag_of_Germany. ... Boppard (Latin: Baudobriga) is a town in the Rhein-Hunsrück district, in Rhineland-Palatinate, Germany. ... The Rhenish Palatinate (Rheinpfalz, sometimes Lower Palatinate or Niederpfalz) occupies rather more than a quarter of the German Bundesland (federal state) of Rhineland-Palatinate (Rheinland-Pfalz) and contains the towns of Ludwigshafen, Kaiserslautern, Neustadt an der Weinstrasse, Pirmasens, Landau and Speyer. ... Image File history File links This is a lossless scalable vector image. ... Morlaix is a commune, or municipality, in the département of Finistère in Brittany, North-West France. ... This article is about the historical kingdom, duchy and French province, as well as one of the Celtic nations. ...

Transport

Truro is 6 miles (9 km) from the A30 trunk road, to which it is connected by the A39 leading from Falmouth and Penryn. Wrapping the city's south side is the A390, stretching from Redruth in the west to Liskeard in the east where it connects to the A38, which then goes on to Plymouth and further to Exeter and the M5 motorway. Truro is the most southerly city in the United Kingdom, situated just under 232 miles (373 km) west south-west of Charing Cross, London. “Miles” redirects here. ... “km” redirects here. ... The A30 is an old trunk road (main road) which runs from central London to Lands End, the westernmost point of the mainland of England (though not of mainland Great Britain), and is sometimes called the Great South West Road. ... A63(T) trunk road A trunk road, trunk highway, or strategic road is a major road—usually connecting one or more cities, ports, airports, etc. ... Falmouth (Cornish: Aberfal) is a seaport on the River Fal on the south coast of Cornwall, England, UK. It is both a town and a civil parish. ... Penryn (Cornish: Pennrynn, from Pen-ryn meaning promontory) is a town in Cornwall, England, UK on the Penryn river. ... Map sources for Redruth at grid reference SW700420 Redruth (Cornish: Rysrudh) is a town in the south-west of Cornwall, Britain. ... , Liskeard ( ; IPA — usually stressed on the second syllable) (Cornish: ), is an ancient stannary and market town at the head of the River Looe valley in the ancient hundred of West Wivelshire in southeast Cornwall, England, United Kingdom. ... A38 passing under M50 in Worcestershire The A38 is a major trunk road in England. ... This article is about the city in England. ... The city of Exeter is the county town of Devon, in the southwest of England, also known as the West Country. ... The M5 near J28, Devon This article concerns the M5 motorway in England. ... The Victorian Eleanor Cross at Charing Cross The name Charing Cross, now given to a district of central London in the City of Westminster, comes from the original hamlet of Charing, where King Edward I placed a memorial to his wife, Eleanor of Castile. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ...

Carvedras Viaduct, built in 1859 by Isambard Kingdom Brunel. It was replaced by a stone viaduct in 1904.
Carvedras Viaduct, built in 1859 by Isambard Kingdom Brunel. It was replaced by a stone viaduct in 1904.

Truro railway station is a short walk from the city centre and is part of the Cornish Main Line, giving the city a direct connection to London Paddington. North-east of the station is a 28 metre (92 ft) high stone viaduct offering expansive views over the city, cathedral, and Truro River in the distance. The viaduct—the longest on the line—replaced Isambard Kingdom Brunel's wooden Carvedras Viaduct in 1904. Connecting to the main line at Truro station is the Maritime Line, a branch line which travels south and terminates at Falmouth. The Cornwall Railway viaducts were mostly built on stone piers but with spans of timber fans. ... Isambard Kingdom Brunel, FRS (9 April 1806 – 15 September 1859) (IPA: ), was a British engineer. ... The main entrance to the station Truro Station serves the city of Truro, Cornwall, UK. It is the junction for the Maritime Line to Falmouth. ... The Royal Albert Bridge The Cornish Main Line is a railway line in England, which forms the backbone for rail service in Cornwall, as well as prodiving a direct line to London. ... Paddington station or London Paddington is the name of a major railway station in the Paddington area of London, which is the London terminus for long distance trains to the West of England and South Wales and some West London commuter services. ... This article is about the unit of length. ... A foot (plural: feet or foot;[1] symbol or abbreviation: ft or, sometimes, ′ – a prime) is a unit of length, in a number of different systems, including English units, Imperial units, and United States customary units. ... Torontos Bloor Street Viaduct bridges the Don valley; road traffic uses the upper deck, rail traffic uses the lower deck. ... The Truro River is a river near to the city of Truro in Cornwall. ... Isambard Kingdom Brunel, FRS (9 April 1806 – 15 September 1859) (IPA: ), was a British engineer. ... The Cornwall Railway viaducts were mostly built on stone piers but with spans of timber fans. ... The Maritime Line is a railway line from Truro to Falmouth in Cornwall, UK. The line travels close to the River Fal for some of its length. ... A branch line is a relatively minor railway line which branches off a more important through route. ...


Truro's first railway station was at Highertown, which was opened in 1852 by the West Cornwall Railway and from where trains ran to Reduth and Penzance. The line was extended to the Truro River at Newham in 1855. When the Cornwall Railway connected the line to Plymouth, their trains ran to a new station above the city centre. The West Cornwall Railway then diverted most of its passenger trains to the new station, leaving Newham mainly as a goods station until it closed in 1971. The route from Highertown to Newham is now a cycle path which takes a leisurely loop through the countryside on the south side of the city. Truro is also known as the namesake of the famous steam locomotive, the City of Truro. Was a former Railway Company operating in West Cornwall, UK. The company was formed in 1844 to opererate the existing service between the towns of Hayle and Redruth and the extend the railway line as far as Penzance. ... Penzance Harbour and surrounding area as seen from the air Penzance (Cornish: Pensans) is a civil parish and port town in the Penwith district of Cornwall, England, UK. Granted various Royal Charters from 1512 onwards and incorporated in 1614,[2] it has a population of 21,168[1] people and... The Cornwall Railway was a broad gauge railway (7 feet 0. ... This article or section should include material from Cycle path debate Segregated cycle facilities may consist of a separate road, track, path or lane that is designated for use by cyclists and from which motorised traffic is generally excluded. ... GWR 3700 Class (City) 4-4-0, no. ...


The city and surrounding area is served by extensive bus services offering routes in and out of the city in all directions, starting and terminating at the main bus depot near Lemon Quay. The headquarters of the mid-Cornwall bus operator Truronian are also located there, as are the starting points for many of the First Group services covering a wider area. Coach services including Truronian and National Express also operate from Truro, providing transport to and from larger cities up-country. Autobus redirects here. ... Truronian is a bus service and coaching holiday operator primarily located in mid-Cornwall, United Kingdom. ... First Group PLC (LSE: FGP) is a British transport company operating in the United Kingdom, Ireland and North America, with headquarters in Aberdeen, Scotland. ... For other uses, see Coach. ... National Express coach on route 561 National Express is the brand under which the majority of long distance bus and coach services in the United Kingdom are marketed, and also the company that manages this network and operates some of the services. ...


Newquay Airport is Cornwall's main airport and is located 12 miles (19 km) north of Truro. One of the fastest-growing regional airports in the UK, the services and destinations are constantly expanding. The airport offers regular flights to and from London Gatwick, London Stansted and other cities around the country, the Isles of Scilly and Dusseldorf in Germany, winter services to Geneva in Switzerland and Chambéry in France and summer services to Alicante and Girona in Spain, Zurich in Switzerland and Saint-Brieuc in France. Newquay Cornwall International Airport (IATA: NQY, ICAO: EGDG) is a commercial airport located a few kilometers northeast of Newquay in England. ... A Domestic airport is an airport which handles only domestic flights or flights within the same country. ... Gatwick Airport (IATA Airport Code: LGW, ICAO Airport Code: EGKK) is Londons second airport and the second largest airport in the UK after Heathrow. ... Terminal building, designed by Sir Norman Foster Stansted Airport is a medium-sized passenger airport with a single runway, located in the English county of Essex about thirty miles north of London. ... Scilly redirects here. ... Düsseldorf in Germany The Düsseldorf Coat of Arms Düsseldorf is the capital city of the German federal state of North Rhine-Westphalia. ... For other uses, see Geneva (disambiguation). ... Chambéry is the capital of the department of Savoie, France. ... Location Coordinates : Time zone : CET (GMT +1) - summer : CEST (GMT +2) General information Native name Alacant (Catalan) Spanish name Alicante Postal code 03000 - 03016 Website www. ... This article is about the Spanish city. ... Location within Switzerland   Zürich[?] (German pronunciation IPA: ; usually spelled Zurich in English) is the largest city in Switzerland (population: 366,145 in 2004; population of urban area: 1,091,732) and capital of the canton of Zürich. ... Saint-Brieuc (Breton: Sant-Brieg) is a commune France, situated in Côtes-dArmor and in the Brittany région. ...


Also available is a boat link to Falmouth along the Rivers Truro and Fal, four times daily, tide permitting. The small fleet run by Enterprise Boats and part of the Fal River Links also stops at Malpas, Trelissick, Tolverne and St Mawes. Falmouth (Cornish: Aberfal) is a seaport on the River Fal on the south coast of Cornwall, England, UK. It is both a town and a civil parish. ... The River Fal flows through Cornwall, the United Kingdom, rising near Truro and reaching the English Channel at Falmouth. ... This article is about tides in the Earths oceans. ... Malpas could be Malpas, Newport (historically in Monmouthshire) Malpas, Cheshire This article consisting of geographical locations is a disambiguation page, a list of pages that otherwise might share the same title. ... Trelissick is a village in Cornwall, United Kingdom. ... St. ...


Education

Educational institutions in Truro include:

  • Polwhele House Preparatory School — now educates the choristers from Truro Cathedral School.
  • Truro School — a public school founded in 1880.
  • Truro High School for Girls — a female-only public school, for ages 3–18.
  • Penair School — a state school, co-educational science college, for children aged 11–16.
  • Richard Lander School — a state school, co-educational technology college, for children aged 11–16.
  • St. Michael's Catholic Small School — a small, privately run co-educational school for children aged 3–16.
  • Truro College — A further and higher education college. Part of the Combined Universities in Cornwall.

Preparatory school or prep school may refer to: University-preparatory school, in North America, is a private secondary school designed to prepare a student for higher education. ... Truro School is a mixed independent school in the city of Truro, Cornwall. ... The term public school has three distinct meanings: In the USA and Canada, elementary or secondary school supported and administered by state and local officials. ... State school is an expression used in Australia, New Zealand, and the United Kingdom to distinguish schools provided by the government from privately run schools. ... Truro College is located in Truro, Cornwall, in the South West of England. ... Further education (often abbreviated FE) is post-secondary, post-compulsory education (in addition to that received at secondary school). ... The University of Cambridge is an institute of higher learning. ... The Combined Universities in Cornwall is a centre of higher education located at the site of an abandoned girls convent, in Tremough, Cornwall, England. ...

Development

Lower Lemon Street
Lower Lemon Street

Truro has many proposed development schemes and plans, the majority of which to counter the main problems it faces, notably traffic congestion and lack of housing. Urban planning is concerned with the ordering and design of settlements, from the smallest towns to the worlds largest cities. ... This article needs additional references or sources to facilitate its verification. ... Houses in Fishpool Street, St Albans, England For other meanings of the word house, see House (disambiguation). ...


Major proposals include the construction of a distributor road to carry traffic away from the very busy Threemilestone-Treliske-Highertown corridor, reconnecting at either Green Lane or Morlaix Avenue. This road will also serve the new housing planned for that area.[10] Construction of a Park and Ride scheme began in late 2007 is expected to begin operation in mid-2008.[11] A bypass is a road or highway that avoids (bypasses) a built-up area, town, or village, to let through traffic flow without interference from local traffic, to reduce congestion in the built-up area, and to improve road safety. ... a park-and-ride bus in Oxford Park and ride terminals are public transport stations that allow commuters to drive short distances in their personal automobiles to catch a ride on a bus or railroad system (usually classified as light rail or the heavier commuter rail). ...


Major changes are also proposed for the city centre, such as pedestrianisation of the main shopping streets, beautification of a list of uncharacteristic storefronts built in the 1960s,[10] and improvements to Victoria Square.[12] Also, new retail developments on the current Carrick District Council site and Garras Wharf waterfront site will provide more space for shops, open spaces and public amenities and also turn rather ugly areas of the city into attractive new destinations.[10] Along with the redevelopment of the waterfront, a tidal barrier is planned to dam water into the Truro River which is currently blighted by unsightly mud banks which appear at low tide.[10] Car-free zones (also known as auto-free zones and pedestrianised zones) are areas of a city or town in which automobile traffic is prohibited. ... Note: Not to be confused with beatification Beautification is the process of making visual improvements in a town or city, typically to an urban area. ... Tokyo floodgates to protect from typhoon surges. ... This article is about tides in the ocean. ...


Controversial developments include the construction of a new stadium for Truro City F.C. [13] and the Cornish Pirates, and the relocation of the city's golf course to make way for more housing. A smaller project is the addition of two large sculptures in the Piazza.[14]. This article is about the building type. ... The Cornish Pirates are a professional rugby union team who play in National Division One, and are the premier Cornish rugby club. ... This article is about the sport of golf. ...


Notable residents

Richard Lemon Lander. A monument to him stands at the top of Lemon Street.
Richard Lemon Lander. A monument to him stands at the top of Lemon Street.
See also: Category:People from Truro
  • 18th century
    • Edward Boscawen — an admiral of the Royal Navy. A cobbled street at the centre of Truro and a park are named in his honour.

Richard Lemon Lander Richard Lemon Lander (February 8, 1804 - February 6, 1834), English explorer of the African continent. ... Giles Farnaby was born in 1560 in Truro, Cornwall, England, and died in November of 1640 in London, England. ... Elizabethan redirects here. ... Edward Boscawen (August 10, 1711 - January 10, 1761) was a British (Cornish) admiral. ... This article is about the navy of the United Kingdom. ... Frederic Conquer (1792-1851) was a English philanthropist who had originally made his fortune owning the Wheal Bush mine in the Gwennap mining district south of Truro, Cornwall, United Kingdom. ... A philanthropist is someone who engages in philanthropy; that is, someone who donates his or her time, money, or reputation to a charitable cause. ... This article is about the capital of England and the United Kingdom. ... Joseph Antonio Emidy was born in West Africa in c. ... Photo submitted by Martin Hornby - (Gallaher Cigarette Cards) James Henry Fynn was an English recipient of the Victoria Cross, the highest and most prestigious award for gallantry in the face of the enemy that can be awarded to British and Commonwealth forces. ... For other uses, see Victoria Cross (disambiguation). ... For other people named Samuel Foote, see Samuel Foote (disambiguation) Samuel Foote (January 27, 1720 – October 21, 1777), a Cornish dramatist and actor, was baptized at Truro on January 27, 1720. ... Actors in period costume sharing a joke whilst waiting between takes during location filming. ... A playwright, also known as a dramatist, is a person who writes dramatic literature or drama. ... Richard Lemon Lander Richard Lemon Lander (February 8, 1804 - February 6, 1834), English explorer of the African continent. ... See also explorations, sea explorers, astronaut, conquistador, travelogue, the History of Science and Technology and Biography. ...  Western Africa (UN subregion)  Maghreb[1] West Africa or Western Africa is the westernmost region of the African continent. ... Secondary school is a term used to describe an institution where the final stage of compulsory schooling, known as secondary education, takes place. ... Matthew Etherington (born August 14, 1981 in Truro, Cornwall) is an English football player. ... Soccer redirects here. ... The West Ham United Crest West Ham United F.C are a professional English football club based in East London. ... Henry Louis Gibson (1906 -1992) was born in Truro, Cornwall, and died in Rochester, New York. ... For other uses, see Infrared (disambiguation). ... Breast cancer is cancer of breast tissue. ... Nick Nieland is a British javelin thrower. ... The 2006 Commonwealth Games were held in Melbourne, Australia between March 15 and March 26, 2006. ... Barbara Joyce West Dainton (born May 24, 1911) was born in Bournemouth, Dorset, England and was 10 months and 22 days old when the Titanic sank. ... For other uses, see Titanic (disambiguation). ... Thomas Michael Dunstan Voyce (born 5 January 1981 in Truro) is an English rugby union footballer who plays at wing or fullback for Wasps and England. ... Official website www. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Queen are an English rock band formed in 1970 in London by guitarist Brian May, lead vocalist Freddie Mercury, and drummer Roger Taylor, with bassist John Deacon joining the following year. ... Robert Goddard is a British novelist. ...

See also

The Diocese of Truro forms part of the Province of Canterbury in England. ... Edward Boscawen (August 10, 1711 - January 10, 1761) was a British (Cornish) admiral. ... This is a list of topics related to Cornwall, UK. The Cornwall category contains a more comprehensive selection of Cornish articles. ... Richard Lemon Lander Richard Lemon Lander (February 8, 1804 - February 6, 1834), English explorer of the African continent. ... The Truro River is a river near to the city of Truro in Cornwall. ... Truro Cathedral is a cathedral in the city of Truro in Cornwall in south-west England. ...

References

  1. ^ a b Census 2001 Key Statistics for urban areas in England and Wales (pdf). National Office of Statistics. Retrieved on 2008-01-13.
  2. ^ Oliver Padel A popular dictionary of Cornish place-names, Penzance, A. Hodge, 1988 ISBN 090672015X
  3. ^ History of Truro (htm). Truro Town Site. Retrieved on 2008-01-13.
  4. ^ Building Stastics - Truro Cathedral, Truro (htm). Emporis. Retrieved on 2008-01-13.
  5. ^ Daytripper - Sheer Indulgence in Truro (htm). Truro City Council. Retrieved on 2008-01-13.
  6. ^ Call to boycott St George event (htm). BBC News (2007-02-26). Retrieved on 2008-01-13.
  7. ^ Renewed hope for sports stadium (htm). BBC News (2007-12-21). Retrieved on 2008-01-13.
  8. ^ Homes in smaller cities cost more (htm). BBC News (2006-05-20). Retrieved on 2008-01-13.
  9. ^ Councillors & Wards (htm). Truro City Council. Retrieved on 2008-01-13.
  10. ^ a b c d Truro and Threemilestone Action Plan (htm). Carrick District Council. Retrieved on 2008-01-13.
  11. ^ Park-and-ride construction starts (htm). BBC News (2007-11-22). Retrieved on 2008-01-13.
  12. ^ Changes to city centre discussed (htm). BBC News (2007-10-25). Retrieved on 2008-01-13.
  13. ^ Truro City Football Club (Soccer) see Sports, above
  14. ^ The Lemon Quay Sculptures (htm). Truro City Council. Retrieved on 2008-01-13.

2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 13th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 13th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Emporis is a real estate data company with headquarters in Darmstadt, Germany. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 13th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 13th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article refers to the news department of the British Broadcasting Corporation, for the BBC News Channel see BBC News (TV channel). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 57th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 13th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article refers to the news department of the British Broadcasting Corporation, for the BBC News Channel see BBC News (TV channel). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 355th day of the year (356th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 13th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article refers to the news department of the British Broadcasting Corporation, for the BBC News Channel see BBC News (TV channel). ... Year 2006 (MMVI) was a common year starting on Sunday of the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 140th day of the year (141st in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 13th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 13th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 13th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article refers to the news department of the British Broadcasting Corporation, for the BBC News Channel see BBC News (TV channel). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 326th day of the year (327th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 13th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... This article refers to the news department of the British Broadcasting Corporation, for the BBC News Channel see BBC News (TV channel). ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 298th day of the year (299th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 13th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... For other uses, see Truro (disambiguation). ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance to the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 13th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ...

External links

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  Results from FactBites:
 
Truro Town Site - Cornwall UK (866 words)
Truro derives its name from the Cornish Tri-veru, meaning three rivers, and developed as a tin port between the Truro River and the rivers Kenwyn and Allen.
By the 14th century Truro was an important inland port and one of the five stannary towns in Cornwall.
Truro was called the London of Cornwall and the Assembly Rooms on High Cross, with a theatre as well, were the centre of this high society.
GENUKI: Truro (2056 words)
Truro was also the chief coinage town of the county and much tin raised in the county was shipped from its quays.
Truro was formally granted the status of a city in the early part of the 20th Century.
Truro Union workhouse was actually located in the parish of St Clements for Poor Law administration and parish relief.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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