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Encyclopedia > Trumpet
Trumpet
Classification
Playing range
Written range:
Related instruments

Flugelhorn, Cornet, Bugle,
Natural trumpet, Bass trumpet, Post horn, Roman tuba, Bucina, Shofar, Conch, Lur, Didgeridoo, Piccolo trumpet Trumpeter may refer to: A musician who plays the trumpet. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high-resolution version (1299x431, 127 KB) Roy Benson Bb school trumpet, gold colored. ... A musical instrument is a device constructed or modified for the purpose of making music. ... A wind instrument is a musical instrument that contains some type of resonator (usually a tube), in which a column of air is set into vibration by the player blowing into (or over) a mouthpiece set at the end of the resonator. ... Image of a trumpet, foreground, a piccolo trumpet behind, and a flugelhorn in background. ... An aerophone is any musical instrument which produces sound primarily by causing a body of air to vibrate, without the use of strings or membranes, and without the vibration of the instrument itself adding considerably to the sound. ... In music, the range of a musical instrument is the distance from the lowest to the highest pitch it can play. ... Image File history File links Range_trumpet. ... A musical instrument is a device constructed or modified for the purpose of making music. ... A standard 3-valved Bb flugelhorn. ... Bâ™­ cornet The cornet is a brass instrument very similar to the trumpet, distinguished by its conical bore, compact shape, and mellower tone quality. ... Military bugle in Bâ™­ Bugler redirects here. ... Natural Trumpet refers to the valveless brass instrument that is able to play the tones of the harmonic series. ... Bass trumpet in C with rotary valves The bass trumpet is a type of low trumpet which was first developed during the 1820s in Germany. ... The Post horn (also posthorn or post-horn) is a valveless brass instrument used to signal the arrival or departure of a mounted courier or mail coach. ... Roman tuba The Roman tuba is an ancient musical instrument, different from the modern tuba. ... Cornicen on Trajans column. ... A shofar made from the horn of a kudu, in the Yemenite Jewish style. ... Species Strombus gigas Strombus luhuanus Strombus pugilis Strombus tricornis Strombus canarium Strombus dolomena Strombus gibberulus Strombus conomurex Strombus lentigo Strombus doxander Strombus urceus Strombus fragilis Strombus gallus Strombus dentatus Strombus marginatus Strombus raninus Strombus buvonius A conch (pronounced in the U.S.A. as konk or conch, IPA: or ) [1... See Lurs for other uses Lur is a name given to two distinct types of wind musical instrument. ... A didgeridoo. ... Piccolo trumpet in B-flat, with swappable leadpipes to tune the instrument to B-flat (shorter) or A (longer) The smallest of the trumpet family is the piccolo trumpet (picc or pixie in trumpeter slang). ...

The trumpet is a musical instrument with the highest register in the brass family,[1] and produces a "bright" sound.[2] Trumpets are among the oldest musical instruments,[3] dating back to at least 1500 BC. They are constructed of brass tubing bent twice into a compact rectangle, and are played by blowing air through closed lips, producing a "buzzing" sound which starts a standing wave vibration in the air column inside the trumpet. A musical instrument is a device constructed or modified for the purpose of making music. ... In music, a register is the relative height or range of a note, set of pitches or pitch classes, melody, part, instrument or group of instruments. ... Image of a trumpet, foreground, a piccolo trumpet behind, and a flugelhorn in background. ... Brazen redirects here. ... Vibration and standing waves in a string, The fundamental and the first 6 overtones A standing wave, also known as a stationary wave, is a wave that remains in a constant position. ...


There are several types of trumpet; the most common being a transposing instrument pitched in B flat. Older trumpets did not have valves; however, modern trumpets have either three piston valves or three rotary valves, each of which increases the length of tubing when engaged, thereby lowering the pitch. A transposing instrument is a musical instrument whose music is written at a pitch different from concert pitch. ... Piston valve in a brass instrument A piston valve is a device used to control the motion of a fluid along a tube or pipe by means of the linear motion of a piston within a chamber or cylinder. ...


The trumpet is used in most forms of music, including classical music and jazz; some notable trumpet players in the latter field include Louis Armstrong, Miles Davis, Dizzy Gillespie, Clifford Brown, Lee Morgan, Freddie Hubbard, Chet Baker, and Maynard Ferguson. This article is about Western art music from 1000 AD to the present. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... Louis[1] Armstrong[2] (4 August 1901[3] – July 6, 1971), nicknamed Satchmo[4] and Pops, was an American jazz musician. ... Miles Dewey Davis III (May 26, 1926 – September 28, 1991) was an American jazz musician, widely considered to be one of the most influential of the 20th century. ... For the Australian cricketer nicknamed Dizzy, see Jason Gillespie. ... Clifford Brown (October 30, 1930 – June 26, 1956) was an influential and highly rated American jazz trumpeter. ... Lee Morgan Lee Morgan (born July 10, 1938 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania-died February 19, 1972 in New York City) was a hard bop trumpeter. ... Frederick Dewayne Hubbard (born April 7, 1938 in Indianapolis, Indiana) is an American jazz trumpeter. ... Chesney Henry Chet Baker Jr. ... Walter Maynard Ferguson (May 4, 1928 – August 23, 2006) was a Canadian jazz trumpet player and bandleader. ...

Contents

History

Moche Trumpet. 300 AD Larco Museum Collection Lima, Peru.
Moche Trumpet. 300 AD Larco Museum Collection Lima, Peru.
Main article: History of primitive and non-Western trumpets

The oldest trumpets date back to 1500 BC and earlier. The bronze and silver trumpets from Tutankhamun's grave in Egypt, bronze lurs from Scandinavia, and metal trumpets from China date back to this period.[4] Trumpets from the Oxus civilization (3rd millennium BC) of Central Asia have decorated swellings in the middle, yet are made out of one sheet of metal, which is considered a technical wonder.[5] The Moche people of ancient Peru depicted trumpets in their art going back to 300 AD [6] The earliest trumpets were signaling instruments used for military or religious purposes, rather than music in the modern sense;[7] and the modern bugle continues this signaling tradition. Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... Image File history File links No higher resolution available. ... The Larco Museum (Spanish: ) is located in the Pueblo Libre District in Lima, Peru. ... An ancient Greek salpinx, from the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston, Massachusetts The chromatic trumpet of Western tradition is a fairly recent invention, but primitive trumpets of one form or another have been in existence for millennia; some of the predecessors of the modern instrument are now known to... King Tut redirects here. ... See Lurs for other uses Lur is a name given to two distinct types of wind musical instrument. ... The Amu Darya (Darya means river) rises in the Pamirs and flows mainly north-west through the Hindu Kush, Uzbekistan to join the Aral Sea in a large delta. ... The Moche civilization (alternately, the Mochica culture, Early Chimu, Pre-Chimu, Proto-Chimu, etc. ... Military bugle in Bâ™­ Bugler redirects here. ...

Reproduction Baroque trumpet by Michael Laird
Reproduction Baroque trumpet by Michael Laird

In medieval times, trumpet playing was a guarded craft, its instruction occurring only within highly selective guilds. The trumpet players were often among the most heavily guarded members of a troop, as they were relied upon to relay instructions to other sections of the army. Improvements to instrument design and metal making in the late Middle Ages and Renaissance led to an increased usefulness of the trumpet as a musical instrument. The development of the upper, "clarino" register, by specialist trumpeters, would lend itself well to the Baroque era, also known as the "Golden Age of the natural trumpet." The melody-dominated homophony of the classical and romantic periods relegated the trumpet to a secondary role by most major composers. The trumpet was slow to adopt the modern valves (invented around the mid 1830s), and its cousin, the cornet would take the spotlight as solo instrument for the next hundred years. Crooks and shanks (removable tubing of various lengths) as opposed to keys or valves were standard, notably in France, into the first part of the 20th century. Image File history File links Baroque_repro_trumpet. ... Image File history File links Baroque_repro_trumpet. ... The Middle Ages formed the middle period in a traditional schematic division of European history into three ages: the classical civilization of Antiquity, the Middle Ages, and modern times. ... A guild is an association of craftspeople in a particular trade. ... For the TV show, see F Troop. ... For other uses, see Army (disambiguation). ... Clarion (from the Latin word, clarus clear, penetrating, loud, shrill) is a type of trumpet used by cavalries as a signal during war. ... For other uses, see Baroque (disambiguation). ... Natural Trumpet refers to the valveless brass instrument that is able to play the tones of the harmonic series. ... Homophony is a musical term that describes the texture of two or more instruments or parts moving together and using the same rhythm. ... The Classical period in Western music occurred from about 1750 to 1830, despite considerable overlap at both ends with preceding and following periods, as is true for all musical eras. ... The expression romantic music and the homophone phrase Romantic music have two essentially different meanings. ... Bâ™­ cornet The cornet is a brass instrument very similar to the trumpet, distinguished by its conical bore, compact shape, and mellower tone quality. ...


Construction

Trumpet valve bypass
Trumpet valve bypass

The trumpet is constructed of brass tubing bent twice into a compact rectangle.[8] The trumpet and trombone share a roughly cylindrical bore which results in a bright, loud sound. The bore is actually a complex series of tapers, smaller at the mouthpiece receiver and larger just before the flare of the bell begins; careful design of these tapers is critical to the intonation of the instrument. By comparison, the cornet and flugelhorn have conical bores and produce a more mellow tone. Brazen redirects here. ... The trombone is a musical instrument in the brass family. ... A right circular cylinder An elliptic cylinder In mathematics, a cylinder is a quadric surface, with the following equation in Cartesian coordinates: This equation is for an elliptic cylinder, a generalization of the ordinary, circular cylinder (a = b). ... In music, there are two common meanings for tuning: Tuning practice, the act of tuning an instrument or voice. ... Bâ™­ cornet The cornet is a brass instrument very similar to the trumpet, distinguished by its conical bore, compact shape, and mellower tone quality. ... A standard 3-valved Bb flugelhorn. ...


As with all brass instruments, sound is produced by blowing air through closed lips, producing a "buzzing" sound into the mouthpiece and starting a standing wave vibration in the air column inside the trumpet. The player can select the pitch from a range of overtones or harmonics by changing the lip aperture and tension (known as the embouchure). Modern trumpets also have three piston valves, each of which increases the length of tubing when engaged, thereby lowering the pitch. The first valve lowers the instrument's pitch by a whole step (2 semitones), the second valve by a half step (1 semitone), and the third valve by one-and-a-half steps (3 semitones). When a fourth valve is present, as with some piccolo trumpets, it lowers the pitch a perfect fourth (5 semitones). Used singly and in combination these valves make the instrument fully chromatic, i.e., able to play all twelve pitches of Western music. The sound is projected outward by the bell. Trumpet mouthpiece from the side On brass instruments the mouthpiece is the part of the instrument which is placed upon the players lips. ... Vibration and standing waves in a string, The fundamental and the first 6 overtones A standing wave, also known as a stationary wave, is a wave that remains in a constant position. ... Pitch is the perceived fundamental frequency of a sound. ... Approximate harmonic overtones on a string An overtone is a natural resonance or vibration frequency of a system. ... In acoustics and telecommunication, the harmonic of a wave is a component frequency of the signal that is an integral multiple of the fundamental frequency. ... The embouchure is the use of facial muscles and the shaping of the lips to the mouthpiece of a wind instrument. ... Piston valve in a brass instrument A piston valve is a device used to control the motion of a fluid along a tube or pipe by means of the linear motion of a piston within a chamber or cylinder. ... A semitone (also known in the USA as a half step) is a musical interval. ... Piccolo trumpet in B-flat, with swappable leadpipes to tune the instrument to B-flat (shorter) or A (longer) The smallest of the trumpet family is the piccolo trumpet (picc or pixie in trumpeter slang). ... The perfect fourth or diatessaron, abbreviated P4, is one of two musical intervals that span four diatonic scale degrees; the other being the augmented fourth, which is one semitone larger. ... The chromatic scale is a scale with twelve pitches, each a semitone or half step apart. ... Western music is the genres of music originating in the Western world (Europe and its former colonies) including Western classical music, American Jazz, Country and Western, pop music and rock and roll. ...


The trumpet's harmonic series is closely matched to the musical scale, but there are some notes in the series which are a compromise and thus slightly off key; these are known as wolf tones. Some trumpets have a slide mechanism built in to compensate. A wolf tone, or simply a wolf, is a noise that is produced when a note played on a stringed instrument matches the natural resonating frequency of the instrument, producing a tone that is loud and harsh, and basically unwelcomed by most musicians. ...


The mouthpiece has a circular rim which provides a comfortable environment for the lips' vibration. Directly behind the rim is the cup, which channels the air into a much smaller opening (the back bore or shank) which tapers out slightly to match the diameter of the trumpet's lead pipe. The dimensions of these parts of the mouthpiece affect the timbre or quality of sound, the ease of playability, and player comfort. Generally, the wider and deeper the cup, the darker the sound and timbre. In music, timbre, or sometimes timber, (from Fr. ...


Types of trumpets

The most common type is the B-flat trumpet, but C, D, E-flat, E, F, G and A trumpets are also available. The most common use of the C trumpet is in American orchestral playing, where it is used alongside the B-flat trumpet. Its slightly smaller size gives it a brighter, more lively sound. Because music written for early trumpets required the use of a different trumpet for each key — they did not have valves and therefore were not chromatic — and also because a player may choose to play a particular passage on a different trumpet from the one indicated on the written music, orchestra trumpet players are generally adept at transposing music at sight, sometimes playing music written for the B-flat trumpet on the C trumpet, and vice versa. For other uses, see Orchestra (disambiguation). ...

Piccolo trumpet in B-flat, with swappable leadpipes to tune the instrument to B-flat (shorter) or A (longer)

Each trumpet's range extends from the written F sharp immediately below Middle C up to about three octaves higher. Standard repertoire rarely calls for notes beyond this range, and the fingering tables of most method books peak at the C (high C) two octaves above middle C. Several trumpeters have achieved fame for their proficiency in the extreme high register, among them Lew Soloff, Andrea Tofanelli, Bill Chase, Roger Ingram, Maynard Ferguson, Wayne Bergeron, Anthony Gorruso, Dizzy Gillespie, Jon Faddis, Cat Anderson, James Morrison, Doc Severinsen and Arturo Sandoval. It is also possible to produce pedal tones below the low F sharp, although this technique is more often encountered as a sound-production exercise than as a written trumpet part. Image File history File links Picc-trumpet-large-01. ... Image File history File links Picc-trumpet-large-01. ... In Western music, the expression middle C refers to the note C or Do located exactly between the two staves of the grand staff, quoted as C4 in note-octave notation (also known as scientific pitch notation). ... For the numerical computation software, see GNU Octave. ... Wikipedia does not have an article with this exact name. ... Soprano C, sometimes called High C, is the C two octaves above Middle C It is named because it is considered the highest usable note of the soprano, particularly for choral singers (although some can go higher; Mozarts Der Hölle Rache, the Queen of the Night aria from... Lew Soloff (born February 20, 1944 in New York City) is a jazz trumpeter,composer and actor. ... Bill Chase (born William Edward Chiaiese) (October 20, 1934 - August 9, 1974) was an American trumpet player and leader of a jazz-rock fusion band that bore his name. ... Walter Maynard Ferguson (May 4, 1928 – August 23, 2006) was a Canadian jazz trumpet player and bandleader. ... Wayne Bergeons interest in music began in the 7th grade when he discovered his natural ability on the trumpet. ... For the Australian cricketer nicknamed Dizzy, see Jason Gillespie. ... Jon Faddis, born on July 24, 1953 in Oakland, California, is an American jazz trumpet player. ... William Alonzo Cat Anderson (September 12, 1916 - April 29, 1981) was a jazz trumpet player. ... James Morrison AM (born 11 November 1962 in Boorowa, New South Wales) is an Australian jazz musician who plays numerous instruments, but is best known for his trumpet playing. ... Doc Severinsen during The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carsons 18th Anniversary Special in 1980 Carl Hilding Doc Severinsen (born July 7, 1927 in Arlington, Oregon) is an American pop and jazz trumpeter, best known for leading the NBC Orchestra in the Johnny Carson era. ... Arturo Sandoval (born November 6, 1949) is a jazz trumpeter and pianist. ... Pedal tones are special notes in the harmonic series of cylindrical-bore brass instruments. ...



The smallest trumpets are referred to as piccolo trumpets. The most common of these are built to play in both B flat and A, with separate leadpipes for each key. The tubing in the B-flat piccolo trumpet is one-half the length of that in a standard B-flat trumpet. Piccolo trumpets in G, F and even C are also manufactured, but are rarer. Many players use a smaller mouthpiece on the piccolo trumpet, which requires a different sound production technique from the B-flat trumpet and can limit endurance. Almost all piccolo trumpets have four valves instead of the usual three — the fourth valve lowers the pitch, usually by a fourth, to facilitate the playing of lower notes. Maurice André, Håkan Hardenberger, and Wynton Marsalis are some well-known piccolo trumpet players. Piccolo trumpet in B-flat, with swappable leadpipes to tune the instrument to B-flat (shorter) or A (longer) The smallest of the trumpet family is the piccolo trumpet (picc or pixie in trumpeter slang). ... Maurice André (born May 21, 1933) is a French trumpeter, active in the classical music field. ... HÃ¥kan Hardenberger (born 1961, Malmö) is a Swedish trumpeter. ... Wynton Learson Marsalis (b. ...

trumpet in C with rotary valves
trumpet in C with rotary valves

Trumpets pitched in the key of G are also called sopranos, or soprano bugles, after their adaptation from military bugles. Traditionally used in drum and bugle corps, sopranos have featured both rotary valves and piston valves. trumpet in c, made by bernhard willenberg (www. ... trumpet in c, made by bernhard willenberg (www. ... Military bugle in Bâ™­ Bugler redirects here. ... Drum and bugle corps is a name used to describe two forms of marching units. ... See also rotary feeder airflow of rotary valve in two positions A rotary valve is a type of valve in which the rotation of a passage or passages in a transverse plug regulates the flow of liquid or gas through the attached pipes. ... Piston valve in a brass instrument A piston valve is a device used to control the motion of a fluid along a tube or pipe by means of the linear motion of a piston within a chamber or cylinder. ...


The bass trumpet is usually played by a trombone player, being at the same pitch. Bass trumpet is played with a trombone or euphonium mouthpiece, and music for it is written in treble clef. Bass trumpet in C with rotary valves The bass trumpet is a type of low trumpet which was first developed during the 1820s in Germany. ... The trombone is a musical instrument in the brass family. ... The euphonium is a conical-bore, baritone-voiced brass instrument. ... A clef (French for key) is a symbol used in musical notation that assigns notes to lines and spaces on the musical staff. ...


The modern slide trumpet is a B-flat trumpet that has a slide instead of valves. It is similar to a soprano trombone. The first slide trumpets emerged during the Renaissance, predating the modern trombone, and are the first attempts to increase chromaticism on the instrument. Slide trumpets were the first trumpets allowed in the Christian church.[9] There are many different types of trombones. ... The chromatic scale is a scale with twelve pitches, each a semitone or half step apart. ...


The historical slide trumpet was probably first developed in the late fourteenth century for use in alta capella wind bands. Deriving from early straight trumpets, the Renaissance slide trumpet was essentially a natural trumpet with a sliding leadpipe. This single slide was rather awkward, as the entire corpus of the instrument moved, and the range of the slide was probably no more than a major third. Originals were probably pitched in D, to fit with shawms in D and G, probably at a typical pitch standard near A=466. As no instruments from this period are known to survive, the details - and even the existence - of a Renaissance slide trumpet is a matter of some conjecture, and there continues to be some debate among scholars.[10] Alta capella were town wind bands found throughout continental Europe during the 15th and 16th centuries, which typically consisted of shawms and slide trumpets or sackbuts. ... The shawm was a Renaissance musical instrument of the woodwind family, made in Europe from the late 13th century until the 17th century. ...


Some slide trumpet designs saw use in England in the eighteenth century.[11]


The pocket trumpet is a compact B-flat trumpet. The bell is usually smaller than a standard trumpet and the tubing is more tightly wound to reduce the instrument size without reducing the total tube length. Its design is not standardized, and the quality of various models varies greatly. It can have a tone quality and projection unique in the trumpet world: a warm sound and a voice-like articulation. Unfortunately, since many pocket trumpet models suffer from poor design as well as cheap and sloppy manufacturing, the intonation, tone color and dynamic range of such instruments are severely hindered. Professional-standard instruments are, however, available. While they are not a substitute for the full-sized instrument, they can be useful in certain contexts. Pocket trumpet in D-flat, with 5 standard size bell and medium-large bore The pocket trumpet is a compact size Bb trumpet, with the same playing range as the regular trumpet. ...


There are also rotary-valve, or German, trumpets, as well as alto and Baroque trumpets. See also rotary feeder airflow of rotary valve in two positions A rotary valve is a type of valve in which the rotation of a passage or passages in a transverse plug regulates the flow of liquid or gas through the attached pipes. ... Egger copy of a natural trumpet by Johann Leonhard EHE II, Nuremberg 1746. ...


The trumpet is often confused with its close relative, the cornet, which has a more conical tubing shape compared to the trumpet's more cylindrical tube. This, along with additional bends in the cornet's tubing, gives the cornet a slightly mellower tone, but the instruments are otherwise nearly identical. They have the same length of tubing and, therefore, the same pitch, so music written for cornet and trumpet is interchangeable. Another relative, the flugelhorn, has tubing that is even more conical than that of the cornet, and an even richer tone. It is sometimes augmented with a fourth valve to improve the intonation of some lower notes. Bâ™­ cornet The cornet is a brass instrument very similar to the trumpet, distinguished by its conical bore, compact shape, and mellower tone quality. ... This article is about the geometric object, for other uses see Cone. ... A right circular cylinder An elliptic cylinder In mathematics, a cylinder is a quadric surface, with the following equation in Cartesian coordinates: This equation is for an elliptic cylinder, a generalization of the ordinary, circular cylinder (a = b). ... A standard 3-valved Bb flugelhorn. ...


Playing

Main article: Embouchure

The embouchure is the use of facial muscles and the shaping of the lips to the mouthpiece of a wind instrument. ...

Fingering

On any trumpet, cornet, or flugelhorn, pressing the valves indicated by the numbers below will produce the written notes shown - "OPEN" means all valves up, "1" means first valve, "1-2" means first and second valve simultaneously and so on. The concert pitch which sounds depends on the transposition of the instrument. Engaging the fourth valve, if present, drops any of these pitches by a perfect fourth as well. Within each overtone series, the different pitches are attained by changing the embouchure, or lip position and "firmness". Standard fingerings above high C are the same as for the notes an octave below (C sharp is 1-2, D is 1, etc.) The embouchure is the use of facial muscles and the shaping of the lips to the mouthpiece of a wind instrument. ...

A step = a tone; a half step = a semitone
A step = a tone; a half step = a semitone

The volume of sound of the trumpet tone is controlled by the air pressure applied by the player. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1085x317, 10 KB) Summary The musical overtone series that a trumpet (and other three-valve brass instruments) can produce with each valve combination. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (1085x317, 10 KB) Summary The musical overtone series that a trumpet (and other three-valve brass instruments) can produce with each valve combination. ... In music, a whole tone scale (set form 6-35, 02468t) is a scale in which each note is separated from its neighbors by the interval of a whole step. ... A semitone (also known in the USA as a half step) is a musical interval. ...


Note that the fundamental of each overtone series does not exist - the series begins with the first overtone. Notes in parentheses are the sixth overtone, representing a pitch with a frequency of seven times that of the fundamental; while this pitch is close to the note shown, it is slightly flat relative to equal temperament, and use of those fingerings is generally avoided. Vibration and standing waves in a string, The fundamental and the first 6 overtones The fundamental tone, often referred to simply as the fundamental and abbreviated fo, is the lowest frequency in a harmonic series. ... Approximate harmonic overtones on a string An overtone is a natural resonance or vibration frequency of a system. ... An equal temperament is a musical temperament — that is, a system of tuning intended to approximate some form of just intonation — in which an interval, usually the octave, is divided into a series of equal steps (equal frequency ratios). ...


The fingering schema arises from the length of each valve's tubing (longer lengths of tubing produces a lower pitch). Valve "1" increases the tubing length enough to lower the pitch by one whole step, valve "2" by one half step, and valve "3" by one and a half steps. This scheme and the nature of the overtone series create the possibility of alternate fingerings for certain notes. For example, third-space "C" can be produced with no valves engaged (standard fingering) or with valves 2-3. Also, any note produced with 1-2 as its standard fingering can also be produced with valve 3 - each drops the pitch by 1-1/2 steps. Alternate fingerings may be used to improve facility in certain passages. Extending the third valve slide when using the fingerings 1-3 or 1-2-3 further lowers the pitch slightly to improve intonation.


Instruction and method books

One trumpet method publication of long-standing popularity is Jean-Baptiste Arban's Complete Conservatory Method for Trumpet (Cornet).[12] Other well-known method books include "Technical Studies" by Herbert L. Clarke,[13] "Grand Method" Louis Saint-Jacome, and methods by Claude Gordon and Charles Colin.[14] Vassily Brandt's Orchestral Etudes and Last Etudes[15] is used in many college and conservatory trumpet studios, containing drills on permutations of standard orchestral trumpet repertoire, transpositions, and other advanced material. A common method book for beginners is the "Walter Beeler Method", and there have been several instruction books written by virtuoso Allen Vizzutti. The Breeze Eazy method is sometimes used to teach younger students, as it includes general musical information. Jean-Baptiste Arban Joseph Jean Baptist Laurent Arban (28 February 1825 - 9 April 1889) was a cornetist, conductor, pedagogue and the first famed virtuoso of the cornet à piston or valved cornet. ... The Arban Method (La grande méthode complète de cornet à piston et de saxhorn par Arban) is a complete pedagogical method for students of trumpet, cornet, and other valved brass instruments. ... Allen Vizzutti is an American virtuoso trumpeter, composer and music educator. ...


Players

Main article: List of trumpeters
Dizzy Gillespie in 1988, a notable jazz trumpeter
Dizzy Gillespie in 1988, a notable jazz trumpeter

The trumpet is used in many forms of music, though the most recognised players have been in the jazz field. Louis Armstrong, for example, was well known for his virtuosity with the trumpet. Armstrong's improvisations on his Hot Five and Hot Seven records were daring and sophisticated while also often subtle and melodic. Miles Davis is widely considered one of the most influential musicians of the 20th century. His trumpet playing was distinctive, with a vocal, clear tone that has been imitated by many. The phrasing and sense of space in his solos have been models for generations of jazz musicians.[16] Dizzy Gillespie was a trumpet virtuoso and gifted improviser, building on the virtuoso style of Roy Eldridge but adding layers of harmonic complexity previously unknown in jazz. In addition to his instrumental skills, Dizzy had an enormous impact on virtually every subsequent trumpeter, both by the example of his playing and as a mentor to younger musicians. Maynard Ferguson came to prominence playing in Stan Kenton's orchestra, before forming his own band in 1957. He was noted for being able to play accurately in a remarkably high register.[17]. While he was not the first trumpeter to play in the extreme upper register, he had a unique ability to play high notes with full, rich tone, power, and musicality. While regarded by some as showboating, Ferguson's tone, phrasing and vibrato was instantly recognizable and has been influential on and imitated by generations of amateur and professional trumpet players. A direct connection to Ferguson's style of playing continues in the work of the trumpeters who played with him, notably Wayne Bergeron. Although some had believed that Ferguson was endowed with exceptional facial musculature, he often shared in interviews that his command of the upper registers was based mostly on breath control,[18] something he had discovered as a youngster in Montreal. This article lists notable musicians who have played the trumpet, cornet or flugelhorn. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... Louis[1] Armstrong[2] (4 August 1901[3] – July 6, 1971), nicknamed Satchmo[4] and Pops, was an American jazz musician. ... The Hot Five was Louis Armstrongs first jazz recording band led under his own name. ... Louis Amstrong and his Hot Seven was a jazz group organized to make a series of recordings for Okeh Records. ... Miles Dewey Davis III (May 26, 1926 – September 28, 1991) was an American jazz musician, widely considered to be one of the most influential of the 20th century. ... For the Australian cricketer nicknamed Dizzy, see Jason Gillespie. ... For other uses, see Virtuoso (disambiguation). ... Improvisation is the practice of acting and reacting, of making and creating, in the moment and in response to the stimulus of ones immediate environment. ... Roy David Eldridge (January 30, 1911 – February 6, 1989) was a jazz trumpet player in the Swing era. ... Harmony is the use and study of pitch simultaneity, and therefore chords, actual or implied, in music. ... Walter Maynard Ferguson (May 4, 1928 – August 23, 2006) was a Canadian jazz trumpet player and bandleader. ... Stanley Newcomb Kenton (December 15, 1911 – August 25, 1979) led a highly innovative, influential, and often controversial American jazz orchestra. ... In music, a register is the relative height or range of a note, set of pitches or pitch classes, melody, part, instrument or group of instruments. ... Wayne Bergeons interest in music began in the 7th grade when he discovered his natural ability on the trumpet. ...


Among the other great modern jazz trumpet players are Clifford Brown, Jon Faddis, Harry James, Wynton Marsalis, Freddie Hubbard, Lee Morgan, Chet Baker, James Morrison, Arturo Sandoval, and Doc Severinsen. Clifford Brown (October 30, 1930 – June 26, 1956) was an influential and highly rated American jazz trumpeter. ... Jon Faddis, born on July 24, 1953 in Oakland, California, is an American jazz trumpet player. ... Harry Haag James (March 15, 1916 – July 5, 1983) was a popular United States musician and band leader, and a well-known trumpet virtuoso. ... Wynton Learson Marsalis (b. ... Frederick Dewayne Hubbard (born April 7, 1938 in Indianapolis, Indiana) is an American jazz trumpeter. ... Lee Morgan Lee Morgan (born July 10, 1938 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania-died February 19, 1972 in New York City) was a hard bop trumpeter. ... Chesney Henry Chet Baker Jr. ... James Morrison AM (born 11 November 1962 in Boorowa, New South Wales) is an Australian jazz musician who plays numerous instruments, but is best known for his trumpet playing. ... Arturo Sandoval (born November 6, 1949) is a jazz trumpeter and pianist. ... Doc Severinsen during The Tonight Show Starring Johnny Carsons 18th Anniversary Special in 1980 Carl Hilding Doc Severinsen (born July 7, 1927 in Arlington, Oregon) is an American pop and jazz trumpeter, best known for leading the NBC Orchestra in the Johnny Carson era. ...


Notable classical trumpeters include Maurice André, Roger Voisin, William Vacchiano, Adolph "Bud" Herseth, Charles Schlueter, Malcolm McNab, Allen Vizzutti, Sergei Nakariakov, Maurice Murphy, and Philip Smith. Maurice André (born May 21, 1933) is a French trumpeter, active in the classical music field. ... Roger Voisin Roger Louis Voisin (born 26 June 1918) is a French-born American classical trumpeter. ... William Vacchiano (1912 – 2005) was a legendary trumpeter and trumpet instructor. ... Adolph Herseth - Wikipedia /**/ @import /skins/monobook/IE50Fixes. ... Charles Schlueter album cover Charles Schlueter, born in Du Quoin, Illinois[1], is the retiring principal trumpeter of the Boston Symphony Orchestra. ... Malcolm Boyd McNab is a trumpeter and player of other brass instruments, and a Los Angeles-based session musician who has performed on nearly 2000 movie and television soundtracks. ... Allen Vizzutti is an American virtuoso trumpeter, composer and music educator. ... Sergei Nakariakov playing Carnival of Venice Born in Gorky in 1977, Sergei Nakariakov is a Russian trumpeter whose musicality is being recognized by the world. ... British musician, and Principal Trumpet of the London Symphony Orchestra since 1977, Maurice Murphy is hailed across the world as one of the greatest classical trumpeters in history. ... Philip Smith is an eminent American classical trumpet player. ...


A musician who plays the trumpet is called a trumpet player or trumpeter. For the popular-music magazine, see Musician (magazine). ...


Musical pieces

The trumpet is used in a wide range of musical styles including classical, jazz, rock, blues, pop, ska, polka and funk. This article is about Western art music from 1000 AD to the present. ... For other uses, see Jazz (disambiguation). ... This article is about the genre. ... Blues music redirects here. ... For the music genre, see Pop music. ... This article is about the genre. ... Street musicians in Prague playing a polka Polka is a fast, lively Central European dance, and also a genre of dance music. ... For other uses, including related musical genres, see Funk (disambiguation). ...


Solos

The chromatic trumpet was first made in the late 1700s, but there were several solos written for the natural trumpet that are now played on piccolo trumpet. Natural Trumpet refers to the valveless brass instrument that is able to play the tones of the harmonic series. ...


See also

This article lists notable musicians who have played the trumpet, cornet or flugelhorn. ... Muting a trumpet is a popular way to change the tone of the instrument. ... Piccolo trumpet in B-flat, with swappable leadpipes to tune the instrument to B-flat (shorter) or A (longer) The smallest of the trumpet family is the piccolo trumpet (picc or pixie in trumpeter slang). ...

References

Notes

  1. ^ http://www.musicatschool.co.uk/year_7/Instruments_sheets/brass.PDF
  2. ^ The Bright Sound of Brass Instruments. www.articlesbase.com. Retrieved on 2008-05-03.
  3. ^ History of the Trumpet. www.petrouska.com. Retrieved on 2008-05-03.
  4. ^ Edward Tarr, The Trumpet (Portland, Oregon: Amadeus Press, 1988), 20-30.
  5. ^ "Trumpet with a swelling decorated with a human head," Musée du Louvre, [1]
  6. ^ Berrin, Katherine & Larco Museum. The Spirit of Ancient Peru:Treasures from the Museo Arqueológico Rafael Larco Herrera. New York: Thames and Hudson, 1997.
  7. ^ Chicago Symphony Orchestra - Glossary - Brass instruments. www.cso.org. Retrieved on 2008-05-03.
  8. ^ Trumpet, Brass Instrument. www.dsokids.com. Retrieved on 2008-05-03.
  9. ^ Tarr
  10. ^ IngentaConnect More about Renaissance slide trumpets: fact or fiction?. www.ingentaconnect.com. Retrieved on 2008-05-03.
  11. ^ JSTOR: Notes, Second Series, Vol. 54, No. 2, (1997 ), pp. 484-485. www.jstor.org. Retrieved on 2008-05-03.
  12. ^ Arban, Jean-Baptiste (1894, 1936, 1982). Arban's Complete Conservatory Method for TRUMPET. Carl Fischer, Inc. ISBN 0-8258-0385-3.
  13. ^ Herbert L. Clarke (1984). Technical Studies for the Cornet,C. Carl Fischer, Inc. ISBN 0-8258-0158-3.
  14. ^ Colin, Charles. Advanced Lip Flexibilities.
  15. ^ Vassily Brandt Orchestral Etudes and Last Etudes. ISBN 0-7692-9779-X
  16. ^ Miles Davis, Trumpeter, Dies; Jazz Genius, 65, Defined Cool. www.nytimes.com. Retrieved on 2008-05-03.
  17. ^ Ferguson, Maynard. Encyclopedia of Music in Canada. The Canadian Encyclopedia. Retrieved on 2008-01-02.
  18. ^ Zan Stewart (September 1985). Maynard's Changes. Down Beat. Retrieved on 2007-07-20. “There's nothing superstrong about my lip, but there is about my range and stamina. That comes from [...] my breathing.”

2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... The Larco Museum (Spanish: ) is located in the Pueblo Libre District in Lima, Peru. ... Thames & Hudson (also Thames and Hudson and sometimes T&H for brevity) are a publisher, especially of art and illustrated books, founded in 1949 by Walter and Eva Neurath. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Jean-Baptiste Arban Joseph Jean Baptist Laurent Arban (28 February 1825 - 9 April 1889) was a cornetist, conductor, pedagogue and the first famed virtuoso of the cornet à piston or valved cornet. ... The Arban Method (La grande méthode complète de cornet à piston et de saxhorn par Arban) is a complete pedagogical method for students of trumpet, cornet, and other valved brass instruments. ... Herbert L. Clarke Herbert Lincoln Clarke (September 12, 1867–January 30, 1945) was a noted cornet player, bandmaster, and composer. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 123rd day of the year (124th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... 2008 (MMVIII) is the current year, a leap year that started on Tuesday of the Anno Domini (or common era), in accordance with the Gregorian calendar. ... is the 2nd day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Down Beat is an American magazine devoted to jazz. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... is the 201st day of the year (202nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ...

Bibliography

  • Don L. Smithers, The Music and History of the Baroque Trumpet Before 1721, Syracuse University Press, 1973, ISBN 0815621574
  • Philip Bate, The Trumpet and Trombone: An Outline of Their History, Development, and Construction, Ernest Benn, 1978, ISBN 0393021297
  • Roger Sherman, Trumpeter's Handbook: A Comprehensive Guide to Playing and Teaching the Trumpet, Accura Music, 1979, ISBN 0918194024
  • Stan Skardinski, You Can't Be Timid With a Trumpet: Notes from the Orchestra, Lothrop, Lee & Shepard Books, 1980, ISBN 0688419631
  • Robert Barclay, The Art of the Trumpet-Maker: The Materials, Tools and Techniques of the Seventeenth and Eighteenth Centuries in Nuremberg , Oxford University Press, 1992, ISBN 0198162235
  • James Arthur Brownlow, The Last Trumpet: A History of the English Slide Trumpet, Pendragon Press, 1996, ISBN 0945193815
  • Frank Gabriel Campos, Trumpet Technique, Oxford University Press, 2005, ISBN 0195166922

External links

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International Trumpet Guild Home Page (0 words)
was founded in 1974 to promote communications among trumpet players around the world and to improve the artistic level of performance, teaching, and literature associated with the trumpet.
Links to trumpet related websites, materials, repertoire, and pedagogy provide quick access to nearly any facet of trumpet and trumpet related information.
The International Trumpet Guild is in the process of transitioning membership processing and accounting practices in order to improve service to its members.
Trumpet (472 words)
The modern trumpet has three valves and a bore that is partly cylindrical, partly conical.
Another relative of the trumpet is the flugelhorn, sometimes dubbed the "valved bugle".
The length to add for the three valve intervals is calculated by using the fact that the frequency of an air column is inversely proportional to length.
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