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Encyclopedia > Troy (film)
Troy

Troy Theatrical Poster
Directed by Wolfgang Petersen
Produced by Wolfgang Petersen
Diana Rathbun
Colin Wilson
Plan B
Written by David Benioff
Starring Brad Pitt
Eric Bana
Orlando Bloom
Brian Cox
Sean Bean
Peter O'Toole
Diane Kruger
Music by James Horner
Cinematography Roger Pratt
Editing by Peter Honess
Distributed by Warner Bros.
Release date(s) May 14, 2004
Running time 162 Min
Theatrical
196 Min
Director's Cut
Language English
Budget $180 million USD
Official website
IMDb profile

Troy is a movie released on May 14, 2004 concerning the Trojan War. It is loosely based on Homer's Iliad, but includes material from Virgil's Aeneid and other sources, and sometimes diverges from myth. The film has the following cast of actors prominent at the time of its release: Brad Pitt as Achilles, Eric Bana as Hector, Orlando Bloom as Paris, Diane Kruger as Helen, Brian Cox as Agamemnon, Sean Bean as Odysseus, Rose Byrne as Briseis, Garrett Hedlund as Patroclus, Peter O'Toole as Priam, Brendan Gleeson as Menelaus, and Tyler Mane as Ajax. Troy was directed by Wolfgang Petersen and written by David Benioff. It received an Oscar nomination for its costume design. Download high resolution version (550x819, 362 KB)Troy (movie) poster, taken from the movies official website. ... Wolfgang Petersen Wolfgang Petersen (born March 14, 1941 in Emden, Lower Saxony, Germany) is a German film director. ... Wolfgang Petersen Wolfgang Petersen (born March 14, 1941 in Emden, Lower Saxony, Germany) is a German film director. ... For other uses, see Colin Wilson (disambiguation). ... Plan B Entertainment is a film production company founded by Brad Grey, Brad Pitt and Jennifer Aniston. ... David Benioff (born circa 1970 in New York City) is an American writer. ... William Bradley Brad Pitt (born December 18, 1963) is an Academy award-nominated American actor, film producer, and social activist. ... Eric Bana (born Eric Banadinovich on August 9, 1968) is an Australian film and television actor. ... Orlando Jonathan Blanchard Bloom[1] (born 13 January 1977) is an English actor. ... This article is about the actor. ... Shaun Mark Bean (born 17 April 1959) is an English film and stage actor. ... Peter Seamus OToole (born August 2, 1932, uncertain but presumed correct date[1]) is an eight-time Academy Award-nominated Irish actor. ... Diane Kruger (born July 15, 1976), is a German actress and former fashion model. ... James Roy Horner (born August 14, 1953) is an American composer of orchestral and film music. ... Roger Pratt is a well-respected British cinematographer. ... Peter Honess is an ACE-certified film editor. ... “WB” redirects here. ... is the 134th day of the year (135th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... A directors cut is a specially edited version of a film, and less often TV series, music video, commercials or video games, that is supposed to represent the directors own approved edit. ... The English language is a West Germanic language that originates in England. ... USD redirects here. ... This article is about motion pictures. ... is the 134th day of the year (135th in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2004 (MMIV) was a leap year starting on Thursday of the Gregorian calendar. ... The fall of Troy, by Johann Georg Trautmann (1713–1769). ... This article is about the Greek poet Homer and the works attributed to him. ... title page of the Rihel edition of ca. ... For other uses, see Virgil (disambiguation). ... Aeneas flees burning Troy, Federico Barocci, 1598 Galleria Borghese, Rome The Aeneid (IPA English pronunciation: ; in Latin Aeneis, pronounced — the title is Greek in form: genitive case Aeneidos) is a Latin epic written by Virgil in the 1st century BC (between 29 and 19 BC) that tells the legendary story... William Bradley Brad Pitt (born December 18, 1963) is an Academy award-nominated American actor, film producer, and social activist. ... For other uses, see Achilles (disambiguation). ... Eric Bana (born Eric Banadinovich on August 9, 1968) is an Australian film and television actor. ... For other uses, see Hector (disambiguation). ... Orlando Jonathan Blanchard Bloom[1] (born 13 January 1977) is an English actor. ... See List of King Priams children Statue of Paris in the British Museum This article is about the prince of Troy. ... Diane Kruger (born July 15, 1976), is a German actress and former fashion model. ... Helen of Troy redirects here. ... This article is about the actor. ... This article is about a character in Greek mythology. ... Shaun Mark Bean (born 17 April 1959) is an English film and stage actor. ... For other uses, see Odysseus (disambiguation). ... Rose Judith Esther Byrne (born July 24, 1979) is an Australian actress. ... In Greek mythology, Brisēis (Greek Βρισηίς) was a Trojan widow (from Lyrnessus) who was abducted during the Trojan War by Achilles upon the death of her three brothers and husband, King Mynes of Lyrnessus, in the fight. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... A cup depicting Achilles bandaging Patroklos arm, by the Sosias Painter. ... Peter Seamus OToole (born August 2, 1932, uncertain but presumed correct date[1]) is an eight-time Academy Award-nominated Irish actor. ... King Priam killed by Neoptolemus, son of Achilles, detail of an Attic red-figure amphora In Greek mythology, Priam (Greek Πρίαμος, Priamos) was the king of Troy during the Trojan War, and youngest son of Laomedon. ... Gleeson as Professor Mad-Eye Moody in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. ... Menelaus regains Helen, detail of an Attic red-figure crater, ca. ... Tyler Mane (born 23 October 1966) is a Canadian actor and former professional wrestler who worked for World Championship Wrestling as Big Sky and Nitro. ... // Ajax may refer to: Ajax the Great as a well known hero from the Trojan war and son of Telamon Ajax the Lesser son of the king of Locris, and another hero in the Trojan war Ajax (missionary), Arian missionary who converted the pagan Suevi c. ... Wolfgang Petersen Wolfgang Petersen (born March 14, 1941 in Emden, Lower Saxony, Germany) is a German film director. ... David Benioff (born circa 1970 in New York City) is an American writer. ... Although he never won an Oscar for any of his movie performances, the comedian Bob Hope received two honorary Oscars for his contributions to cinema. ...

Contents

Plot

Agamemnon of Mycenae and his army are in Thessaly, Greece, looking to expand his military might and empire. His army prepares to engage in combat against a host of soldiers under the Thessalonian king, Triopas. Rather than suffer great losses, Triopas agrees to Agamemnon's proposal to settle the matter in the traditional way - through a decisive match between the heroes of the opposing armies. Achilles, summoned by Agamemnon, arrives, after being woken by a messenger boy, and kills the greatest and most accomplished warrior of Thessaly, Boagrius. Accepting defeat, Triopas presents Achilles with a scepter as a token for his king, which Achilles refuses, saying "He's not my king." This article is about a character in Greek mythology. ... A clay tablet with writing in Linear B from Mycenae. ... Map showing Thessaly periphery in Greece Thessaly (Θεσσαλια; modern Greek Thessalía; see also List of traditional Greek place names) is one of the 13 peripheries of Greece, and is further sub-divided into 4 prefectures. ... In Greek mythology, Triopas was one of the Heliadae, sons of Helios and Rhodus. ... For other uses, see Achilles (disambiguation). ... A sceptre or scepter is an ornamental staff held by a ruling monarch, a prominent item of kingly regalia. ...


In Sparta, Prince Hector and his young brother Paris negotiate an end to the war between the outlying kingdom of Troy and Sparta. On the last day of a week long peace festival, Paris smuggles his love Helen back to Troy with him. Menelaus, Helen's husband, vows revenge on Paris. Meanwhile, Agamemnon, brother of Menelaus, who had for years harbored plans for conquering Troy, decides to use his brother's situation as an excuse to invade. He is advised by his general, Nestor, to call upon Achilles to fight for the Greeks in order to ensure they can rally enough troops to the cause, knowing that with Troy under his control, Agamemnon would have complete control over the Aegean. For modern day Sparta, see Sparti (municipality). ... For other uses, see Hector (disambiguation). ... See List of King Priams children Statue of Paris in the British Museum This article is about the prince of Troy. ... For other uses of Troy or Ilion, see Troy (disambiguation) and Ilion (disambiguation). ... Helen of Troy redirects here. ... Menelaus regains Helen, detail of an Attic red-figure crater, ca. ... In Greek mythology, Nestor of Gerênia (Greek: Νέστωρ) was the son of Neleus and Chloris, and the King of Pylos. ... Look up Aegean Sea in Wiktionary, the free dictionary. ...


When they arrive in Troy, Hector and Paris, along with Helen, are warmly welcomed and received by their father, King Priam, who says nothing of his younger son's betrayal. Shortly afterwards, Hector urges their father to put Helen on a ship back to Sparta, in order to avoid a colossal war between Troy and Agamemnon, who now controls all of Greece. Priam refuses, choosing to put his faith in his high priests and their interpretation of how Apollo would react, as well as his conviction that Paris is truly in love with Helen. King Priam killed by Neoptolemus, son of Achilles, detail of an Attic red-figure amphora In Greek mythology, Priam (Greek Πρίαμος, Priamos) was the king of Troy during the Trojan War, and youngest son of Laomedon. ... For other uses, see Apollo (disambiguation). ...


Agamemnon and the Greeks amass the largest naval force ever known to man - 1000 ships each containing 50 men - and set sail for Troy. Agamemnon sends Odysseus to convince Achilles to join, but he refuses as he utterly despises Agamemnon and only fights for personal glory, not the power of others. Odysseus hints that the warriors who would fight in this war shall receive immortality in history, but he still refuses. Later, Thetis, Achilles' mother, tells Achilles of the prophecy she had learned of even before he was born, which foretold that if Achilles does not go to the war, he will find peace, love and a family of his own, but he will eventually be forgotten as time passed. But if he chooses to go to Troy, his name would become immortal, at the cost of his life. Achilles, unable to resist such fame and glory, heads for Troy. For other uses, see Odysseus (disambiguation). ... This article is about the Greek sea nymph. ...

The Trojan Horse prop from the film, preserved on the seafront at Çanakkale, Turkey

The Greeks land at Troy and are able to take control of the beach on the first day of the war. Achilles and the Myrmidons are able to defeat many Trojans but also desecrate the Trojan temple of Apollo and kill the unarmed priests that reside there. Briseis, a member of the Trojan royal family who has chosen to dedicate her life to service to the gods, is captured and taken as a prize by Achilles. However, he treats her with kindness, which makes her initially leery. In the course of the battle, Achilles and Hector meet but do not fight, and Hector is allowed to leave. Image File history File links Download high resolution version (932x1411, 346 KB) Please see the file description page for further information. ... Image File history File links Download high resolution version (932x1411, 346 KB) Please see the file description page for further information. ... For the Çanakkale meteorite of 1964, see Meteorite falls. ... The Myrmidons (or Myrmidones Μυρμιδόνες) were an ancient nation of Greek mythology. ... In Greek mythology, Brisēis (Greek Βρισηίς) was a Trojan widow (from Lyrnessus) who was abducted during the Trojan War by Achilles upon the death of her three brothers and husband, King Mynes of Lyrnessus, in the fight. ...


After the battle, Achilles is annoyed that, though he and his Myrmidons spearheaded the battle, the other kings who serve Agamemnon pay him tribute in honor of Agamemnon's great victory. Offended by Achilles' disrespectful and disobedient attitude, Agamemnon takes Briseis from him. Only Briseis' contemptuous pleas stop Achilles from slaughtering Agamemnon and his men, and Agamemnon taunts him for listening to a mere slave girl. Achilles leaves in a rage, but promises Agamemnon he will see him dead before his own life ends.


When the Greek army marches upon Troy, Achilles refuses to fight or allow the Myrmidons to fight until Agamemnon regrets belittling him. Instead, Achilles and his Myrmidons watch the events from a distance, Achilles pacing back and forth in anger at Agamemnon's mistakes. With the Trojan army beneath the walls of Troy and the Greek army surrounding it, Paris, feeling guilt for having brought the threat of war upon Troy, challenges Menelaus to a duel to settle things. Menelaus agrees, knowing he is the better warrior, but Agamemnon decides he will attack afterwards anyway. Paris, severely outmatched, is easily defeated. Terrified of dying, he crawls back to Hector's feet. Menelaus approaches and moves to finish Paris, but Hector steps in to protect his brother and kills Menelaus. A shocked and distraught Agamemnon orders his army to charge the Trojans.


During the battle, Ajax leads the fight and is unstoppable while he causes mayhem with a great hammer of war. Hector, recognizing the threat, faces Ajax and they fight. At first Ajax almost kills Hector, who can only shelter behind his shield as it is smashed to pieces. Hector only just manages to overpower and kill Ajax despite being almost throttled to death by him. The increasingly energized Trojans press their attack against the uncoordinated Greeks. The Greeks move too close to the walls and Trojan archers rain arrows down on them, killing Greek soldiers by the hundreds. Without Ajax or Achilles and his Myrmidons, and with the Trojan archers upon the walls of Troy free to shower arrows upon the Greeks, the battle quickly turns against the Greeks. With command of the battle lost, Agamemnon grudgingly bows to Odysseus's pleas to withdraw, and the Greeks retreat to the beach. Ajax or Aias (Greek: ) was a mythological Greek hero, the son of Telamon and Periboea and disciple of Salamis. ...


Briseis is given to some men by the king after their poor performance in battle as a "morale booster". Before she is branded and raped, Achilles arrives in the nick of time to save her, attacking her assailants and carrying her back to his tent. Later that night, as Achilles sleeps, Briseis contemplates killing him and kneels beside him to press a knife to his throat. He wakes but only challenges her to do it and says that dying now isn't so different than dying fifty years from now, causing her to hesitate at his calmness in the face of death. The next evening, the two lie in bed and Achilles tells her he is sailing in the morning, having been convinced that perhaps the life of an infamous warrior is not all for him. She is slightly skeptical and asks him if he could really leave it all behind, inducing him to ask if she could bring herself to leave Troy.


A debate takes place within the Trojan palace. The priests say that the gods are on their side and they should attack the Greeks while they are weak. Hector points out that the Myrmidons did not fight and that the Greeks are dispirited. If they attack, it might be the thing to roust and unify the Greeks. He argues for leaving them alone and perhaps they will leave on their own accord. Priam disregards this and goes with the assurances of his priests, and a reluctant Hector leads them.


The Trojans attack the Greek camp at dawn. As the Greeks appear to be on the verge of defeat, Achilles' appears and the Myrmidons join the battle. He brings courage to the Greeks, and eventually fights man-to-man against Hector, until his throat is cut: this energizes the Trojans and dismays the Greeks, until Hector pulls Achilles' helmet off and finds it is Patroclus, Achilles' cousin. Grieved at having slain a boy so young, Hector gives him a killing blow out of mercy. Odysseus informs Hector of the boy's identity and they agree to cease hostilities for the day. Achilles, who had slept through the battle, is informed by the Myrmidons of the incident; they had also mistaken Patroclus for Achilles. Consumed by grief and rage, Achilles beats Eudorus and walks toward the beach. A distraught Achilles leads the ceremony, complete with funeral pyre, while a grinning Agamemnon tells Odysseus "That boy just saved this war." A cup depicting Achilles bandaging Patroklos arm, by the Sosias Painter. ... Funeral Pyre was the The Jams thirteenth single released on 6th June 1981. ...


The next day, Achilles approaches the gates of Troy and demands Hector come out and face him. Hector stops the city's archers from opening fire and goes down to face Achilles. Hector requests a pact that the loser be given proper funeral rites by the winner. Achilles denies him, saying that "There are no pacts between lions and men". The two fight 'in a God-like manner', bravely and arduously. Hector, though he is a great warrior in his own right, is no match for the enraged Achilles, who kills him. Achilles then ties Hector's body to the back of his chariot and drags it along the dirt. That night, King Priam, aided by the dark, goes to the Greek army's camp to get Hector's body back. After an emotional and mortifying talk given to him by Priam, Achilles breaks down into tears near Hector's slain body. He lets Priam take Hector's body back, promising him that no Greek will attack them on the way back. Achilles lets Priam take Briseis back as well. He assures Priam that the Greeks will honor Prince Hector's death, and that no Greek will attack Troy for 12 days. This temporary ceasefire angers Agamemnon who sees it as golden opportunity to attack Troy while they are leaderless.


During the 12 days that Troy mourns Hector's death, the Greeks plan to enter the city using a hollowed-out wooden horse, devised by Odysseus. The Greeks leave the horse just outside the city gates, then withdraw to the beach hiding in the remains of their camp in the ships. Paris warns Priam about the horse and says they should burn it to the ground, but Priam neglects his warning, blinded by the priests' talk of the horse being a "peace offering by the Greeks" in order to appease the Sun-God Apollo for the desecration of his temple by Achilles earlier. Assuming victory, the Trojans take the horse into the city and celebrate. A Trojan scout sees the Greeks still at the bay but gets killed by an archer. The Trojans celebrate their victory and the whole of Troy is in drunken stupor when several Greeks, hidden inside the horse, launch a surprise attack and open the gates of Troy to allow the Greek army inside the city walls. Paris refuses to leave and hands the sword of Troy to Aeneas, quoting his father by telling Aeneas that "So long the sword of Troy remains in the hands of a Trojan, our people have a future". Priam yells to the Greeks who break statues in the temple and says "Have you no honor?" but before he can act he is killed by Agamemnon. For other uses, see Apollo (disambiguation). ... Aeneas flees burning Troy, Federico Barocci, 1598. ...


Achilles frantically searches for Briseis, who is at the shrine of Apollo being threatened by Agamemnon. She kills him with a concealed knife, and is saved by Achilles from being stabbed to death by Agamemnon's guards when Achilles arrives. Paris manages to find Achilles and shoots an arrow that goes straight through Achilles' heel. Crippled, he is then hit in the chest by several more arrows, but is able to remove them, though the wounds are fatal. Achilles tells Briseis, "You gave me peace in a lifetime of war," and urges her to leave the city with Paris. After watching them leave, he collapses with one arrow remaining in his heel, just as the Greek soldiers find him.


After a last disorganized and futile attempt by surviving Trojan soldiers to repel the invaders, the battle ends and the Greeks storm the inner palace only to find that Achilles has died just a few moments earlier. They perform the funeral rituals for him the next morning. Odysseus delivers the final words, "If they ever tell my story, let them say that I walked with giants. Men rise and fall like the winter wheat, but these names will never die. Let them say that I lived in the time of Hector, tamer of horses. Let them say I lived in the time of Achilles...."


Finance and Reaction

When the film was completed, total production costs were approximately $180,000,000. This makes Troy one of the most expensive films made in modern cinema. Not adjusted for inflation, it is number 13 on the all time list of most expensive films and number 16 when adjusted for inflation. . ...


Troy screenings have earned $133 million (US$133,378,256) in the United States.[1] Having cost $180 million to make,[1] the film was a disappointment in the US. Many critics anticipated that it would flop as Troy barely missed the $50 million mark on its opening US weekend and wrote off the film. Troy was among the several historical epics released in 2004 that disappointed, such as Alexander, The Alamo and King Arthur, although it fared better than those films. Alexander is a 2004 epic film, based on the life of Alexander the Great. ... The Alamo film poster The Alamo is a 2004 movie, a second major studio film about the legendary Battle of the Alamo during the Texas Revolution, that was shot and scheduled for release initially in December 2003 and then rescheduled for release in April 2004. ... King Arthur is a 2004 epic film directed by Antoine Fuqua and written by David Franzoni. ...


However, Troy did extremely well at the international box office financial success, making more than 73%[1] of its revenues outside of the U.S. Eventually Troy made over US$497 million dollars worldwide,[1] placing it in the #52 spot[1] of top box office hits of all time. This places the film 18 spots above Gladiator (#70) and approximately 20 spots above 300 (#72)[2] in the all-time worldwide box office. This article is about the 2000 film. ... 300 is a 2007 film adaptation of the graphic novel 300 by Frank Miller, and is a fictionalized retelling of the Battle of Thermopylae. ...


Troy met mixed reactions by reviewers. Rotten Tomatoes gave it a Tomatometer rating of 55% from a base of 214 reviews while Yahoo! Movies gave it a critic rating of "B-" (although that was based on 15 Critical Reviews). Roger Ebert, who disliked what he saw as an unfaithful adaptation of the Iliad, gave it two stars out of four[3] Ebert claimed that Troy "sidesteps the existence of the Greek gods, turns its heroes into action movie clichés and demonstrates that we're getting tired of computer-generated armies." David Denby of The New Yorker, however, liked it[4]: "[It's] harsh, serious, and both exhilarating and tragic, the right tonal combination for Homer." This article or section does not cite any references or sources. ... This article or section should be merged with Yahoo! Yahoo! Movies provides information on current movie theater releases, including showtimes, critical reviews and general popular opinion. ... Roger Joseph Ebert (born June 18, 1942) is a Pulitzer Prize-winning American film critic. ... David Denby is an American film critic who writes for The New Yorker. ... For other uses, see New Yorker. ...


Box office totals

  • Budget - $180,000,000[1]
  • Marketing cost - $50,000,000
  • Opening Weekend Gross (Domestic) - $46,865,412
  • Total Domestic Grosses - $133,378,256
  • Total Overseas Grosses - $364,031,596[1]
  • Total Worldwide Grosses - $497,378,256

Cast

British Museum displays costumes from the film.
Actor Role
Brad Pitt Achilles
Eric Bana Hector
Orlando Bloom Paris
Diane Kruger Helen
Peter O'Toole King Priam
Sean Bean Odysseus
Brian Cox Agamemnon
Brendan Gleeson Menelaus
Ken Bones Hippasus
Saffron Burrows Andromache
Rose Byrne Briseis
Julie Christie Thetis
James Cosmo Glaucus
Frankie Fitzgerald Aeneas
Julian Glover Triopas
Garrett Hedlund Patroclus
Tyler Mane Ajax
Vincent Regan Eudorus
John Shrapnel Nestor
Nigel Terry Telephus
Adoni Maropis Philoctetes
Nathan Jones Boagrius
Shero Rauf Trojan Archer (stunt actor)
Ben Crompton Body double

Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1386x1000, 679 KB)This image can be viewed with or without glasses. ... Image File history File linksMetadata Download high resolution version (1386x1000, 679 KB)This image can be viewed with or without glasses. ... London museum | name = British Museum | image = British Museum from NE 2. ... Image File history File links 3d_glasses_red_cyan. ... William Bradley Brad Pitt (born December 18, 1963) is an Academy award-nominated American actor, film producer, and social activist. ... For other uses, see Achilles (disambiguation). ... Eric Bana (born Eric Banadinovich on August 9, 1968) is an Australian film and television actor. ... For other uses, see Hector (disambiguation). ... Orlando Jonathan Blanchard Bloom[1] (born 13 January 1977) is an English actor. ... See List of King Priams children Statue of Paris in the British Museum This article is about the prince of Troy. ... Diane Kruger (born July 15, 1976), is a German actress and former fashion model. ... Helen of Troy redirects here. ... Peter Seamus OToole (born August 2, 1932, uncertain but presumed correct date[1]) is an eight-time Academy Award-nominated Irish actor. ... King Priam killed by Neoptolemus, son of Achilles, detail of an Attic red-figure amphora In Greek mythology, Priam (Greek Πρίαμος, Priamos) was the king of Troy during the Trojan War, and youngest son of Laomedon. ... Shaun Mark Bean (born 17 April 1959) is an English film and stage actor. ... For other uses, see Odysseus (disambiguation). ... This article is about the actor. ... This article is about a character in Greek mythology. ... Gleeson as Professor Mad-Eye Moody in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. ... Menelaus regains Helen, detail of an Attic red-figure crater, ca. ... Hippasus of Metapontum, born circa 500 B.C. in Magna Graecia, was a Greek philosopher. ... Saffron Dominique Burrows (born October 22, 1972 or January 1, 1973[1]) is an English actress. ... Andromache grieves the loss of Hector In Greek mythology, Andromache was the wife of Hector and daughter of Eetion, sister to Podes. ... Rose Judith Esther Byrne (born July 24, 1979) is an Australian actress. ... In Greek mythology, Brisēis (Greek Βρισηίς) was a Trojan widow (from Lyrnessus) who was abducted during the Trojan War by Achilles upon the death of her three brothers and husband, King Mynes of Lyrnessus, in the fight. ... Julie Frances Christie (born 14 April 1941) is an Academy Award-, Golden Globe-, BAFTA Award-, and Screen Actors Guild Award-winning British actress. ... This article is about the Greek sea nymph. ... James Cosmo (born 1948 in Clydebank, Scotland) is a tough guy actor, with numerous credits in film and television. ... In Greek mythology, Glaucus (shiny, bright or bluish-green) was the name of several different figures, including one God. ... Frankie Fitzgerald (born 1985) is a British actor who played Ashley Cotton in EastEnders. ... Aeneas flees burning Troy, Federico Barocci, 1598. ... Julian Wyatt Glover (born March 27, 1935) is an English actor. ... In Greek mythology, Triopas was one of the Heliadae, sons of Helios and Rhodus. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ... A cup depicting Achilles bandaging Patroklos arm, by the Sosias Painter. ... Tyler Mane (born 23 October 1966) is a Canadian actor and former professional wrestler who worked for World Championship Wrestling as Big Sky and Nitro. ... Aias (Greek: ), or Ajax, king of Salamis, a legendary hero of ancient Greece. ... Vincent Regan (born on May 16, 1965) is a British film and television actor. ... John Shrapnel (born 1942 in Birmingham, England) is an English actor. ... In Greek mythology, Nestor of Gerênia (Greek: Νέστωρ) was the son of Neleus and Chloris, and the King of Pylos. ... Nigel Terry as King Arthur in Excalibur Nigel Terry (born August 15, 1945 in Bristol, England) is a British stage and film actor probably best known by movie audiences for his portayal of King Arthur in John Boormans Excalibur. ... A Greek mythological figure, Telephus referred to two different people. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... In Greek mythology, Philoctetes (also Philoktêtês or Philocthetes, Φιλοκτήτης) was the son of King Poeas of Meliboea in Thessaly. ... Nathan Darren Jones (born August 21, 1970 in Gold Coast, Queensland) is an Australian professional wrestler, mixed martial artist and actor. ... Shero Rauf is an Iraqi actor and stuntman. ... Ben Crompton is one of the stars of BBC2 sketch show Man Stroke Woman. ... Body Double is a 1984 film by directed Brian De Palma. ...

Music

Composer Gabriel Yared originally worked on the score for Troy for over a year, having been hired by the director, Wolfgang Petersen. Gabriel Yared (Arabic: جبرائيل يارد) (born 7 October 1949) is a Lebanese composer, best known for his work in French and American cinema. ...


Yared wrote and recorded his score and Tanja Tzarovska provided vocals on various portions of the music, as she later would on composer James Horner's version of the soundtrack. However, after having screened the movie with an early incomplete version of the score, the reactions at test screenings were against it and in less than a day Yared was off the project without being given a chance to fix or change his music, while Warner Bros was already looking for a replacement.[5] According to Yared, his score was removed due to a complaint by the screening audience that the score was too "old-fashioned". Tanja Tzarovska, also known as Tanya Carovska, is a Macedonian singer. ...


The replacement score was written by composer James Horner in about four weeks. He utilized Tanja Tzarovska's vocals, traditional Eastern Mediterranean music and brass instruments. Drums are conspicuous in the most dramatic scenes; most notably, in the duel between Achilles and Hector. James Roy Horner (born August 14, 1953) is an American composer of orchestral and film music. ...


Horner also collaborated with Grammy-nominated American singer/songwriter, Josh Groban and lyricist Cynthia Weil to write an original song for the film's end credits. The product of this collaboration, "Remember" was performed by Groban with additional vocals by Tzarovska. The song is available from the movie's original soundtrack. Joshua Winslow Groban (born February 27, 1981) is a Grammy-nominated American singer-songwriter. ... Cynthia Weil (born October 18, 1937 in New York City) is a prominent American songwriter. ...


Around the time of the film's release in theaters, Gabriel Yared briefly made portions of his rejected score available on his personal website which was later removed by the request of Warner Brothers. Bootleg versions exist on the Internet. Yared's score has since gained much of attention from the fans of movie music. Several petitions were made in request to release Yared's score on either a limited edition CD, or as a bonus feature or secondary audio track on the film's DVD. Those requests however, have been denied by Warner Bros.


Filming

Major sets for the city of Troy were built in the Mediterranean island of Malta at Fort Ricasoli from April to June 2003. Other important scenes were shot in Mellieħa, a small town in the north of Malta, and on the small island of Comino. The outer walls of Troy were built and filmed in Cabo San Lucas, Mexico.[6] The Mediterranean Sea is an intercontinental sea positioned between Europe to the north, Africa to the south and Asia to the east, covering an approximate area of 2. ... Mellieħa [me-lee-ha] (also called Il-Mellieħa) is a large village (pop. ... Comino (Maltese: Kemmuna) is an island of the Maltese archipelago between the islands of Malta and Gozo in the Mediterranean Sea, measuring 3. ... Cabo San Lucas is a small city at the southern tip of the Lower California Penninsula at 22. ...


Director's cut

Troy: Director's Cut was screened at the 57th Berlin International Film Festival on February 17, 2007, and received a limited theatrical release in Germany in April 2007.[7] Warner Home Video reportedly spent more than $1 million for the Director's Cut, which includes "at least 1,000 new cuts" or almost 30-minute extra footage (Running Time: 196 minutes). The DVD was released on September 18, 2007 in the USA. The score of the film was changed dramatically, with many of the female vocals being cut. Various shots were recut and extended. For instance, the love scene between Helen and Paris was reframed to include more nudity of Diane Kruger. The sex scene between Achilles and Briseis is also extended. Only one scene was removed: the scene where Helen tends to the wound of Paris is taken out. The battle scenes were also extended, showing much more of Ajax's bloody rampage on the Trojans during the initial attack by the Greek Army. Perhaps most significantly was the sacking of Troy, barely present in the theatrical cut, but shown fully here. Characters were given more time to develop, specifically Priam and Odysseus, the latter being given a humorous introduction scene. Lastly, bookend scenes were added: the beginning being a soldier's dog finding its dead master, and the end including a sequence where the few surviving Trojans escape to Mount Ida. In one of the commentary sequences one of the film editors said that when it came to deciding whether to follow The Iliad, or do what was best for the movie they always decided with what was best for the movie. The Berlin International Film Festival, also called the Berlinale, is one of the most important film festivals in Europe and the world. ... is the 48th day of the year in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... According to a 2000 study by ABN AMRO, only about 26% of Hollywood movie studios worldwide income came from box office ticket sales; 46% came from VHS and DVD sales to consumers; and 28% came from television (broadcast, cable, and pay-per-view). ... This article or section does not cite its references or sources. ... A directors cut is a specially edited version of a film, and less often TV series, music video, commercials or video games, that is supposed to represent the directors own approved edit. ... In film and video, footage is the raw, unedited material as it has been recorded by the camera, which usually must be edited to create a motion picture, video clip, television show or similar completed work. ... is the 261st day of the year (262nd in leap years) in the Gregorian calendar. ... Year 2007 (MMVII) was a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar in the 21st century. ... Nude redirects here. ... King Priam killed by Neoptolemus, son of Achilles, detail of an Attic red-figure amphora In Greek mythology, Priam (Greek Πρίαμος, Priamos) was the king of Troy during the Trojan War, and youngest son of Laomedon. ... For other uses, see Odysseus (disambiguation). ... Two sacred mountains are called Mount Ida in Greek mythology, equally named Mount of the Goddess. ... The Iliad is, with The Odyssey, one of the two major Greek epic poems traditionally attributed to Homer, a blind Ionian poet. ...


Awards (wins and nominations)

2005 ASCAP Film and Television Music Awards The American Society of Composers, Authors, and Publishers (ASCAP) is an organization known as a collecting society that protects intellectual property, ensuring that music which is broadcast, commercially recorded, or otherwise used for profit, pays a fee to compensate the creators of that music. ...

2005 Academy Awards (Oscars) James Roy Horner (born August 14, 1953) is an American composer of orchestral and film music. ... Academy Award The Academy Awards, popularly known as the Oscars, are the most prominent and most watched film awards ceremony in the world. ...

2005 Japanese Academy Prize This Academy Award was first given for movies made in 1948 when separate awards were given for black-and-white and color movies. ... The Japanese Academy Awards have been held since 1977 to reward excellence in Japanese film. ...

  • Nominated - Best Foreign Film

2005 MTV Movie Awards The MTV Movie Awards is a film awards show presented annually on MTV (Music Television). ...

2005 Motion Picture Sound Editors (Golden Reel Award) William Bradley Brad Pitt (born December 18, 1963) is an Academy award-nominated American actor, film producer, and social activist. ... Eric Bana (born Eric Banadinovich on August 9, 1968) is an Australian film and television actor. ... William Bradley Brad Pitt (born December 18, 1963) is an Academy award-nominated American actor, film producer, and social activist. ... Founded in 1953, Motion Picture Sound Editors (M.P.S.E.) is an honorary society of motion picture sound editors. ...

  • Nominated - Best Sound Editing in Foreign Features — Wylie Stateman, Martin Cantwell, James Boyle, Harry Barnes, Paul Conway, Alex Joseph, Matthew Grime, Steve Schwalbe, Howard Halsall, Sue Lenny, Simon Price, Nigel Stone

2005 Teen Choice Awards The Teen Choice Awards is an awards show presented annually by FOX (United States) and Global TV (Canada). ...

  • Won - Choice Movie Actor - Drama/Action Adventure — Brad Pitt
  • Nominated - Choice Breakout Movie Star - Male — Garrett Hedlund
  • Nominated - Choice Movie - Drama/Action Adventure
  • Nominated - Choice Movie Fight/Action Sequence

William Bradley Brad Pitt (born December 18, 1963) is an Academy award-nominated American actor, film producer, and social activist. ... This article or section does not adequately cite its references or sources. ...

Additional information

  • The Trojan horse prop that was used on the set of the film now stands in Canakkale, Turkey, near the remains of the ancient city of Troy. The horse was a gift offered presumably because of the close proximity of the UNESCO Heritage site. (Location in GeoHacks)
  • Ironically, Brad Pitt tore his Achilles tendon when he jumped off his ship during filming.
  • Brad Pitt's physical transformation for the role took place under the watchful eye of Gregory Joujon-Roche and his team of fitness experts at Holistic Fitness in Los Angeles.

This is about vertebrate anatomy. ... This article does not cite any references or sources. ... Gleeson as Professor Mad-Eye Moody in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. ... This article is about the actor. ... James Cosmo (born 1948 in Clydebank, Scotland) is a tough guy actor, with numerous credits in film and television. ... For the moshing term Braveheart, see Wall of death (moshing). ...

See also

The epic film is a film genre typically featuring expensive production values, an emotionally moving music soundtrack, and dramatic themes. ... This is a list of movies based on poems. ...

References

  1. ^ a b c d e f g "Troy" (film data), Box Office Mojo, 2006, BoxOfficeMojo.com, webpage: BOMojo-Troy.
  2. ^ "Gladiator" (film data), Box Office Mojo, 2001/2006, BoxOfficeMojo.com, webpage: BOMojo-Gladiator.
  3. ^ http://rogerebert.suntimes.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20040514/REVIEWS/405140304/1023
  4. ^ http://www.newyorker.com/arts/reviews/film/troy_petersen
  5. ^ "The Score of Troy - A Mystery Unveiled: by Gabriel Yared
  6. ^ http://maltamoviemap.visitmalta.com/index.pl/films_troy
  7. ^ http://www.warnerbros.de/movies/troy/

Further reading

  • Petersen, Daniel (2006). Troja: Embedded im Troianischen Krieg (Troy: Embedded in the Trojan War). HörGut! Verlag. ISBN 3-93823-099-1.
  • Winkler, Martin M. (2006). Troy: From Homer's Iliad to Hollywood Epic. Blackwell Publishing. ISBN 1-40513-183-7.

External links

Wikiquote has a collection of quotations related to:
Preceded by
Van Helsing
Box office number-one films of 2004 (USA)
May 16, 2004
Succeeded by
Shrek 2

  Results from FactBites:
 
Troy (2004) - Ninth Symphony Films Review (975 words)
Troy's claim to fame though is not so much its male characters, as it is about "the face that launched a thousand ships" and the relationship "difficulties" endured by anyone who's ever been in a relationship.
Troy is a film that benefits from a talented group of actors being able to rein in a film sometimes at war with itself as to what type of epic its filmmakers intended it to be.
Troy is epic filmmaking at its best and while on the long side, it is a massively entertaining adventure.
Troy (729 words)
For an historian, the new film "Troy" presents a dilemma.
His "Troy" is a very human story, with those basic themes from which history and myth derive their power-love, hate, revenge, redemption.
Troy was rich, and the Mycenaeans wanted to plunder her wealth and control her strategic trade location at the crossroads of Europe and Asia.
  More results at FactBites »

 
 

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